SVI Still Supports Net Neutrality!

The FCC has killed Net Neutrality!  In a 3 to 2 vote on December 14, 2017  our five FCC commissioners voted to kill Net Neutrality, at least for now.  There is a silver lining to this dismal information, small Internet Service Providers (ISPs) like SVI, are upholding the  principals and values of Net Neutrality. What does this mean to you?  Well, unlike the  big boys SVI will continue to offer  a free and open internet, we will site.  Big corporations like Comcast, Charter, Verizon, and AT&T will most likely slowly transition to no longer allowing for internet freedom.  Be prepared!  Please support your local ISP and help us keep the internet open, fair and available to all.   

 
Net Neutrality is the idea of having a free and open internet, where  the internet is thought to be  a basic human right.  As a small ISP, SVI strives to uphold the principles of a free  and open net.   The big boys in the industry have won this battle but the war to eliminate a free and open internet has not yet been won.  Many states are in the process of filing claims against the FCC, this could potentially tie up the commission for  a couple years minimizing the rapid manipulation of the internet as we know it today.  Should the war be lost,  companies such as Charter, Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and many others will most likely begin to restrict your browsing capabilities. These companies will have the right to restrict what you see and when you see it, giving them the advantage and potentially  denying you your right to choose what you see and when you see it.  In addition these large ISP’s will potentially  provide larger companies easier access to you while denying smaller entities, due to excessive fees for access to potential customers.  Please understand that all of this is just speculation but if we look at the big boys history you will see a life full of predatory decisions and actions.  It will take some time for the elimination of Net Neutrality to fully take place, with that being said you can expect minor changes over the next year while the Net Neutrality war rages on.