List of Archived Posts

2014 Newsgroup Postings (03/27 - 04/17)

Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry
Obama to Kill Tomahawk, Hellfire Missile Programs
ebooks
IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue wouldrather you f
Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
Economic Network of Organized Crime Revealed
Credit Card Breach at California DMV Provides Yet Another Warning of Cyber Insecurities
Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
The IBM Strategy
Boyd for Business & Innovation Conference
Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
The IBM Strategy
The IBM Strategy
23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek
FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
The IBM Strategy
IBM 8150?
23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
Tandem Memos
Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek
The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Zeus malware found with valid digital certificate
U.S. States Investigating Breach at Experian
The dark side of digital banking
As US card fraud rises, firms increase security spending
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek
Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
The dark side of digital banking
TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Rather nice article on COBOL on Vulture Central
The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
"NSA foils much internet encryption"
NSA and Heartbleed
NSA and Heartbleed
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping
How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping
SEC Goldman Lawyer Says Agency Too Timid on Wall Street Misdeeds
Yes, the SEC was colluding with banks on CDO prosecutions
How widespread is tax evasion? Cost of 'round-tripping,' a method investors use to avoid the tax collector
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
How the Internet wasn't Commercial Dataprocessing
FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
Three Expensive Milliseconds
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Another Golden Anniversary - Dartmouth BASIC
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
How the Internet wasn't Commercial Dataprocessing
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry
Date: 27 Mar 2014
Blog: Facebook
Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry
http://www.amazon.com/Deep-State-Government-Secrecy-Industry-ebook/dp/B00DNL1AXE/

sort of elongated OODA ... loc3135-36:
The model went by the initials FFFEAD, or F3EAD -- find, fix, finish (that is, the getting of the bad guys), exploit, analyze, and disseminate (that is, using the first get to get other bad guys)

... snip ...

Steele's long time mantra, commanders only get 4% of necessary info from traditional intelligence ...loc3457-59:
Officers such as Chris C. had an institutional knowledge of tribes, geography, and environment that had eluded JSOC. Flynn was determined to merge the two systems. "Ninety percent of the intelligence we needed was not in JSOC," he told one observer in 2010.

organizational & faster OODA ... loc3495-97:
Instead of three operations every two weeks, JSOC was able to increase its operations tempo (or "optempo") significantly, sometimes raiding five or six places a night. This completely bewildered insurgents and al-Qaeda sympathizers, who had no idea what was going on.

... snip ...

however, from sharing nothing to sharing everything results in things like manning & snowden ... loc3107-8
Flynn once told one of McChrystal's deputies that his "A-ha" moment came when he saw that the key to actually doing tactical military intelligence right was as simple as making sure that everyone had access to everything.

... snip ...

some cyber dumb and not entirely unrelated:

Army Unit to Intel Center: DCGS Doesn't Work
http://www.dodbuzz.com/2014/03/23/army-unit-to-intel-center-dcgs-doesnt-work/
The Pentagon Spent $2.7 Billion on an Intelligence System That Doesn't Work
http://www.thewire.com/politics/2014/03/pentagon-spent-27-billion-intelligence-system-doesnt-work/359319/
$2.7 Billion Later, the Army's Intelligence-Sharing Computer System Still Doesn't Work
http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2011-07/27-billion-later-army%E2%80%99s-intelligence-sharing-computer-system-still-doesn%E2%80%99t-work
Exclusive: Pentagon Withholds Internal Report About Flawed $2.7 Billion Intel Program
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2014/03/18/exclusive_pentagon_withholds_report_2.7_billion_intel_program

recent "cyber dumb" posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#3 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#47 Stolen F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China's Stealth Fighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#49 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dum

posts mentioning MICC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Obama to Kill Tomahawk, Hellfire Missile Programs

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Obama to Kill Tomahawk, Hellfire Missile Programs
Date: 27 Mar 2014
Blog: Facebook
Obama to Kill Tomahawk, Hellfire Missile Programs; Cornerstone of U.S. Naval power eliminated under Obama budget
http://freebeacon.com/obama-to-kill-tomahawk-hellfire-missile-programs/

how 'bout eliminate everything that isn't f35????

note this mentions that F35 isn't able to carry AIM-9 inside its stealth weapons bay like F22
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/2014/03/wear-raaf-uniform-get-free-pass-to.html
and
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com.au/2013/06/f-35s-air-to-air-ability-limited.html
this has list of armament ... but sort of implies most are outside on the (non-stealth) hardpoints
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Martin_F-35_Lightning_II#Specifications_.28F-35A.29

tomahawk ... replace with F35 carrying missiles and some future supersonic or hypersonic cruise missile
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomahawk_%28missile%29

hellfire 100lb ... there is talk about future drones going with even smaller "precision" missile.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AGM-114_Hellfire
but also: Joint Air-to-Ground Missile
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joint_Air-to-Ground_Missile

if you eliminate other weapons ... then you are left with the F-35 "bomb truck" with its short range needs large aircraft carriers to "forward project"

'Proceedings' carries an article on aircraft carriers that comes close to self-parody
http://ricks.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2014/03/25/proceedings_carries_an_article_on_aircraft_carriers_that_comes_close_to_self_parody

"At What Cost a Carrier?"
http://www.cnas.org/publications/reports/at-what-cost-a-carrier
http://www.cnas.org/files/documents/publications/CNAS%20Carrier_Hendrix_FINAL.pdf

"Report: Costly USN Aircraft Carriers May Be Too Vulnerable To Keep"
http://www.defensenews.com/article/20130312/DEFREG03/303120015/Report-Costly-USN-Aircraft-Carriers-May-Too-Vulnerable-Keep
"After the Aircraft Carrier: 3 Alternatives to the Navy's Vulnerable Flattops"
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2013/03/replacing-aircraft-carriers/

"The Military Wants To Phase Out Tomahawk And Hellfire Missile Programs"
http://www.businessinsider.com/death-of-tomahawk-and-hellfire-missile-program-2014-3

from above:
The most likely replacement for the two missile programs is Lockheed Martin's Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM), which will receive a lion's share of the funding from the Tomahawk program, the Free Beacon reports.

However, the LRASM is not expected to be combat-ready for another 10 years, experts told the Free Beacon. That leaves a massive hole in America's deterrence capabilities should the missile not be ready by the time the Tomahawk supply is exhausted.


... snip ...

another article (& also references freebeacon)
http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2014/03/administration_to_cancel_hellfire_and_tomahawk_missile_programs.html

posts mentioning MICC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

ebooks

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: ebooks
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2014 17:27:03 -0400
JimP. <pongbill127@cableone.net> writes:
I remember reading sf stories a number of years ago where the author had 'books on demand' in a hotel room or at home. After reading, you dumped it into the bin and it was returned to whatever it was before, probably energy, so it could be used again and again.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#94 ebooks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#99 ebooks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#104 ebooks

brewster has been making pitches for several years that his books on demand prints typical 300 page book for less than it costs for a library to reshelve a book ... following from 2002,
http://www.salon.com/2002/10/09/bookmobile/

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#29 Will Apple ever offer a newsreader?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#39 book machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#5 The round wheels industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#9 The round wheels industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#19 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue wouldrather you f

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue wouldrather you f
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 10:40:38 -0400
hancock4 writes:
I just recalled one application where various fonts were used on Selectrics. If they were preparing a document for publication, such as a booklet with charts, often they would use various fonts, including Orator, for captions, title page, etc. (It was still done on a conventional fixed pitch typewriter). The carbon film ribbon of the Selectric made high quality images that were easy to reproduce. Lots of technical documents were typewritten, not formally typeset. Older computer manuals on bitsavers were often typewritten.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#80 IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue would rather you forgot
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#95 IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue would rather you forgot

as i've periodically mentioned some 360/370 principles of operation were done on 1403/3211 printers.

it was one of the first major publications moved to cms script.

the "full" document was the architecture "redbook" (for being distributed on dark red 3-ring binders) ... that contained engineering notes, feature justification, alternatives, implementation notes, etc ... intermixed with the principles of operation subset. command line parameter would either select formating the full redbook or the principles of operation subset.

some recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#72 IBM documentation - anybody know the current tool? (from Mislocated Doc thread)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#20 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#52 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#37 PDP-10 byte instructions, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#40 Reader Comment on SA22-7832-08 (PoPS), should I?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#17 Literate JCL?

cms script start out as re-implementation of ctss runoff at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#545tech

then in 1969, GML was invented at the science center and GML tag processing added to cms script
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

typset and runoff
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TYPSET_and_RUNOFF
typeset and runoff
http://web.mit.edu/saltzer/www/publications/ctss/CC-244.html
ctss
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System

recent reference to somebody looking for precusor to ditto as part of article looking at archaeology/history of html5
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#21 CTSS DITTO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#74 The Mother of All Demos: The 1968 presentation that sparked a tech revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#84 The Mother of All Demos: The 1968 presentation that sparked atech revolutio
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#88 DCF on OS/2
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#2 Royal Pardon For Turing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 20:35:01 -0400
Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.computerweekly.com/feature/Can-the-mainframe-remain-relevant-the-cloud-and-mobile-era

from above:
2012 study from WinterGreen Research demonstrated the savings of an IBM zEnterprise 114 mainframe over a VMware setup using HP ProLiant DL685. WinterGreen Research calculated that a suite of Linux web services applications running on 80 HP blade servers with VMware would cost $127,225 a year, while the same application configuration on the zEnterprise 114 would cost $67,787. The zEnterprise 114 (or z196) server is cost-efficient because it uses less power and fewer software licences, the study said.

... snip ...

Note that the megadatacenters of the large cloud operators have been at the very forefront of "green" in terms of power, cooling, heat, operations, etc. They've also been claiming for at least a decade they build their own systems for 1/3rd the price of brand name systems and typically operate with linux and other software not requiring software licenses. The megadatacenters with hundreds of thousands of systems and millions of processor are typically operated by scores of people (large thousands of systems per person)

Max. configured z196 with 80 processors had list price of $28M and system rating of 50BIPS. IBM financials claim that the IBM mainframe group earns total of $6.25 for every dollar in processor sales ... making typical z196 cost around $175M (or $3.5M/BIPS). IBM had base list price for e5-2600 blade of $1815 with system rating of 400BIPS-600BIPS. Cloud claims of 1/3rd brand name costs come in around $1/BIPS.
April 7, 1964 System/360 Announcement
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PR360.html


I've mentioned before that with the enormous reduction in system costs for cloud megadatacenters ... other costs represent an increasing percentage of TCO ... motivating the significant investment in green and automation.

The Data Center Era
http://www.wired.com/insights/2014/03/data-center-era/

from above:
3. Virtualization. One of the datacenter world's pain points is that servers spend most of their time idle. Only about 15% of processing cycles, on a good day, accomplish work. The virtualization process decreases idle time by combining different applications on the same piece of hardware. The technology was first applied to servers, but it's migrating to storage systems and networking equipment.

... ship ...

Also I've mentioned the similarity between current cloud "on-demand" and early virtual machine cp67 online service "on-demand". One of the issues was automation to reduce offshift costs and leave system available 7x24. Back then systems were rented/leased and charges were based on the system meter that run whenever the processor and/or channels were "busy". There was gimmick for cp67 terminal I/O that would be active to accept incoming characters but allow the channel to be idle when nothing was going on. The processor and all channels had to be idle for at least 400ms before the system meter would actually come to a stop. Note that long after systems had been converted to purchase, MVS still had a system task that would wake up every 400ms (making sure that the system meter never stopped).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

recent posts mentioning cloud megadatacenters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#91 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#35 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#37 Where Does the Cloud Cover the Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#51 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#61 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#74 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#7 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#60 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#50 Mainframe On Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#70 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#33 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#35 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#61 Bet Cloud Computing to Win
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#71 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#23 Scary Sysprogs and educating those 'kids'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#94 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#97 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#4 IBM Plans Big Spending for the Cloud ($1.2B)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#27 IBM sells x86 server business to Levono
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#72 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#22 US Federal Reserve pushes ahead with Faster Payments planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#108 The IBM Strategy

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Economic Network of Organized Crime Revealed

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Economic Network of Organized Crime Revealed
Date: 28 Mar 2014
Blog: Facebook
Economic Network of Organized Crime Revealed; An approach based on network theory reveals the pattern of links between Mafia-controlled firms involved in organized crime and the rest of the economy.
http://www.technologyreview.com/view/525826/economic-network-of-organized-crime-revealed/

I was in presentation nearly 20yrs ago that said somewhat the same thing (about organized crime in the US).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Credit Card Breach at California DMV Provides Yet Another Warning of Cyber Insecurities

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Credit Card Breach at California DMV Provides Yet Another Warning of Cyber Insecurities
Date: 28 Mar 2014
Blog: Facebook
Credit Card Breach at California DMV Provides Yet Another Warning of Cyber Insecurities
http://www.ctovision.com/2014/03/credit-card-breach-california-dmv-provides-yet-another-warning-cyber-insecurities/

After Target, Neiman Marcus breaches, does PCI compliance mean anything?
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9245709/_After_Target_Neiman_Marcus_breaches_does_PCI_compliance_mean_anything_

We were tangentially involved the cal state data breach notification law (first in the nation). We had been brought in to help word smith the cal state electronic signature act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#signature
posts mentioning data breach
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

and many of the participants were heavily involved in privacy issues and had done extensive public surveys and the number #1 issue was identity theft, primarily the form account fraud form involving fraudulent financial transactions as a result of breaches/skimming. The issue was that little or nothing was being done and it was hoped that the publicity from breaches would motivate corrective action (nominally security measures are taken in self-protection, however in the cases of breaches, the institutions weren't at risk, the public was).

In the years since the cal. state breach notification act, there have been numerous federal preemption notification bills (none passed), about evenly divided between those similar to the cal. legislation and those that effectively would eliminate notification. Some of the notification "elimination" acts would reference industry action, like PCI which originated after the cal. legislation.

we've used a couple metaphors about the current paradigm

dual-use ... since information from previous transactions can be used for fraudulent transactions, that information has to be kept totally confidential and never divulged. at the same time the same information is required in dozens of business processes at millions of locations around the world. we've periodically commented that even if the planet was buried under miles of information hiding encryption, it still wouldn't stop leakage

security proportional to risk ... the value of the transaction information to the merchants is the profit on the transactions, which can be a couple dollars (and a couple cents for the transaction processor) ... the value of the information to the crooks is the account balance and/or credit limit ... as a result the crooks can afford to outspend the defenders by a factor of 100 times.

posts mentioning security proportional to risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#.security.proportional.to.risk

... note, long ago and far away, we had been brought in as consultants for a small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server, they had invented this technology they wanted to use called SSL, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce".

somewhat as a result, in the mid-90s we were asked to participate in the x9a10 financial standard working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments, which resulted in the x9.59 transaction standard. We had done detailed, end-to-end, detailed venerability and threat analysis for several different payment types. Note that x9.59 did nothing to address breaches, it just slightly tweaked the existing infrastructure and made information from prior transactions useless to the bad guys for performing fraudulent transactions (didn't eliminate the breaches, just eliminated the risk and motivation for performing breaches). posts mentioning x9.59
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
Date: 29 Mar 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1321537

HGST is the remnants of the old IBM San Jose disk division. As IBM was going into the red ... it was the furthest along of the 13 "baby blues" as ADSTAR ... reorganization in preparation for breaking up the company.

I've periodically commented that a senior disk engineer in the late 80s had got a talk scheduled for the communication group, annual, worldwide, internal conference supposedly on the subject of 3174 performance, but opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was the communication group had stranglehold on the datacenter and was fighting off distributed computing and client/server, attempting to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm and install base. The disk division was seeing the effects of data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to address the opportunity, but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group (which had corporate strategic "ownership" for everything that crossed the datacenter walls)

Last Gasp For Hard Disk Drives; While solid state gains ground, vendors surprise the market with new hard disk drives. Does anyone really need them?
http://www.informationweek.com/infrastructure/storage/last-gasp-for-hard-disk-drives/d/d-id/1127799

old "13 baby blue" article (28Dec1992)
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

we had left, but we got a call if we would work as consultants inventorying all the interdivision MOUs ... lots of things that would have to turn into contracts between independent companies (including things like one division had contract with supplier and another division was making use of that same contract). Before we started, the board brings in Gerstner to reverse the breakup and resurrect the company (however, the disk division still didn't survive long)

going to smaller (2.5in) diameter helps with spinning faster & faster access ... the referenced articles says a 60drive, 36terabyte box delivers 18,000 IOPS ... also mentions that flash/SSD deliver throughput.

i've mentioned before peak (mainframe) z196 I/O benchmark was 2M IOPS using 104 FICON (compared to single FCS announced for e5-2600 claiming over million IOPS) @18k IOPS/box ... would require 111 such boxes for peak z196 I/O benchmark.

following has HDD drive (unit) sales peaked 2010.

Will Flash Memory Spell The End Of The Hard Disk Drive (HDD) Industry?
http://seekingalpha.com/article/1974691-will-flash-memory-spell-the-end-of-the-hard-disk-drive-hdd-industry

has individual drive IOPS https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IOPS

peak individual hard disk 175-210 IOPS

lowend SSD starts at 400 IOPS and goes up to almost 10M IOPS

posts mentioning FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

I had a project HSDT in early to mid-80s, that was doing T1 and faster speed links. Because communication group products only supported up to 56kbits, the communication group generates an analysis for the executive committee that customers wouldn't be interested in T1 support until at least the early 90s. We do a trivial customer survey at the same time and find at least 200 mainframe customers with T1 links (which they were using with non-IBM products). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

the communication group was generating all sorts of internal misinformation and fudging various things ... including spreading internal misinformation that the NSFNET backbone could be done on SNA/VTAM ... somebody collected the email and forwarded to us ... heavily snipped and redacted to protect the guilty:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109

precursor to modern internet/cloud ... was nsfnet backbone, originally to interconnect the nsf supercomputer centers ... then regional networks start connecting to the centers.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

we were working with some of the centers and were originally to get $20M to do the interconnect. then congress cuts the budget and some other things happen, finally NSF releases RFP. Internal politics prevents us from bidding on the RFP. The director of NSF tries to help by writing a letter to the company, but that just aggravates the internal politics (as does comments that what we already have running is at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
posts mentioning nsfnet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

then came the transition to commercial with CIX:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commercial_Internet_eXchange

Communication group initially opposed releasing the original mainframe TCP/IP product. When sufficient force was brought they switched and said that since it "crossed the datacenter walls", it had to be done through the communication group (that had strategic ownership for everything that crossed the datacenter walls). They enormously inflated the price and the throughput was compromised; it got about 44kbytes/sec throughput using nearly full 3090 processor. I did the mainframe TCP/IP enhancements to support RFC1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research between 4341 and Cray, got sustain 4341 channel speed throughput using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly some 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

Other trivial, in the late 80s we came up with 3-tier networking architecture and it was written into response to large, super secure government campus network request. We were then out making 3-tier executive presentations and taking lots of arrows in the back from the communication group and SAA forces. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

Later the communication group subcontracted for TCP/IP protocol support implemented inside VTAM. The subcontractor originally demonstrated TCP/IP support running significantly faster than LU6.2. The communication group told the subcontractor that everybody "knows" that a "proper" TCP/IP implementation runs slower than LU6.2, and they would only be paying for a "proper" implementation.

Other trivia, in the 90s, the RFC Editor, Postel would let me help him do STD1 (IETF Internet standards documents)

More trivia ... interop has been get together for IETF interoperability testing ... I had some equipment at Interop88 (1988) ... but in another vendor's booth (not IBM's) ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#interop88

and on the disk/channel side:

In 1980, STL cons me into doing support for channel extender as part of move of 300 people from the IMS group to offsite bldg (channel attached 3270s with service back to STL datacenter ... they had tried "remote" 3270 and found them totally unacceptable). Part of the support is downloading channel programs to the remote end and running the extension "full-duplex" ... to minimize the significant channel protocol chatter latency. Posts mentioning channel extender
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

The vendor then tries to get my support released, but it is blocked by a group in POK that has been playing with some serial stuff. They are afraid if it is in the market, they would have trouble justifying theirs, however theirs isn't released until decade later, as ESCON with ES/9000 in 1990 (by that time, it is already obsolete).

In 1987, I'm asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they are doing which eventually becomes fibre-channel standard. It is full-duplex and includes downloading I/O program to the remote end to minimize as much as possible protocol chatter latency. Some POK channel engineers then become involved and define an enormously heavyweight protocol on top of FCS that drastically cuts the native I/O throughput). This eventually comes out as FICON.

Peak I/O benchmark for z196 uses 104 FICON to get 2M IOPS ... about the same time a single FCS is announced for e5-2600 claiming over 1M IOPS (native, aka two such FCS would have higher native throughput than 104 FICON).

there was series/1 "zirpel" t1 card that was special fsd/gov bid to replace the aging 2701 T1s (from the 60s). I got harranged that I had to use some as part of HSDT ... but that was about the time ibm bought ROLM ... who then ordered more than a full year manufacturing output of series/1. The head of ROLM datacenter was former IBMer that I knew and managed to do a little horse trading for a few series/1s.

however, none of the mainframe 32x5s boxes had more 56kbits support. to somewhat compensate they did "fat pipes" which would treat multiple parallel 56kbit links as single logical link. for their justification to executive committee they surveyed 2, 3, 4, etc 56kbit "fat pipes" and showed that customers weren't using any above five. what they didn't know (or failed to mention) was telco tariffs for T1 was about the same as five 56kbit links ... so customers just went to full T1 and used some other vendors products (lack of six 56kbit "fat pipes" had to do with T1 being cheaper)

about this time, HSDT was also having some equipment built on the other side of the pacific. Friday before I was to visit, communication group sent out announcement for new online "high speed" discussion group with the following definitions:


low-speed       <9.6kbits
medium-speed    19.2kbits
high-speed      56kbits
very high-speed 1.5mbits

the following monday morning in conference room (on the other side of the pacific) were the following definitions:

low-speed       <20mbits
medium-speed    100mbits
high-speed      200-300mbits
very high-speed >600mbits

the native internal network ran on vm370 and was not sna/vtam. there was some vm370 bottlenecks that prevented it from doing more than couple hundred kbytes/sec sustained ... and I needed a minimum of more than 10 times that. I rewrote big sections of vm370 to remove the bottleneck. By the time I was trying to get the changes incorporated into the internal network backbone nodes ... the communication group was on a misinformation campaign to get the internal network converted to sna/vtam. Part of that was restricting the interal technical steering committee meetings to managers only (no technical people) ... old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#email870302 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#email870306 ..

by that time it would have been much better cost effective, throughput, performance, etc to have converted to tcp/ip. posts mentioning internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

the communication group finally was forced to come up with a SNA/VTAM T1 product before the end of the 80s (3737) ... the problem was that SNA/VTAM couldn't tolerate latency issues for even a short-haul terrestrial T1 ... so the box spoofed VTAM that it was a local CTCA connection, immediately ACK'ing the RU ... and having enormous buffering and recovery to fake out the respective VTAM systems at the two ends. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#email880130 .
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#email880606 .
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#email881005 .

My other problem with the internal network was that it required all corporate links to be encrypted. I really disliked what I had to pay for T1 link encryptors and faster ones were almost impossible to find. I got involved in doing a link encryptor that was targeted to be less than $100 to build and could handle multiple megabytes/sec sustained (software DES in the early 80s to handle full-duplex T1 sustained would require two fulltime dedicated 3081K processors). At first the corporate crypto group claimed it significantly reduced DES crypto strength. It took me 3months to figure out how to explain to them what it was doing ... actually significantly increased DES crypto strength beyond standard DES. It was hollow victory tho, it was when I first realized that there was three kinds of crypto in the world: 1) the kind they don't care about, 2) the kind you can't do, and 3) the kind you can do only for them (aka I was told that I could build as many boards as I wanted to but they all would be shipped to address in maryland ... and I wasn't allowed to use any).

random other trivia: long ago and far away, my wife had been con'ed into going to POK to be in charge of loosely-coupled architecture. While there she came up with peer-coupled shared data architecture ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

However 1) she was under constant pressure to force her to use sna/vtam for loosely-coupled operation and 2) there was very little uptake except for IMS hot-standby (until sysplex and parallel sysplex) ... and she doesn't stay long

Later she does a stint as chief architecture for AMADEUS (euro airline res system built off old eastern System One). She backs x.25 ... and the SNA forces then get her removed ... but it didn't do them any good ... since AMADEUS goes with x.25 anyway.

We then do IBM's HA/CMP product and cluster scaleup ... both scientific/technical with national labs as well as commercial/DBMS ... old post with reference to JAN1992 meeting in Ellison's conference room for DBMS scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
and some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa
however, within a month it is transferred, we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors and it is announced as IBM supercomputer (for technical/scientific *ONLY*, mainframe DB2 are saying if we are allowed to go ahead, we would be at least 5yrs ahead of them). Press item 17Feb1992
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
posts mentioning ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

TCP actually has a different kind of problem ... they implemented "slow-start" that dynamically adjusts the number of outstanding packets in a "window" paradigm (number of outstanding packets in a "window"). At the IETF meeting where this was first presented, I commented that it was possibly because many of the hardware platforms lacked sufficient timer facilities (and outstanding packet window protocol was wrong paradigm to be using for the situation). Same month there was also an ACM SIGCOMM paper showing how slow-start was non-stable in larger heterogeneous bursty network ... aka emerging NSFNET backbone environment (part of the problem was that returning ACKs frequently would bunch up on the return path, which would then immediately open multiple back-to-back packet transmission).

In HSDT we had been doing adaptive rate-based control since early 80s ... but required minimum level of timer support. They have since adopted rate-based in some of the specialized internet protocols ... and are claiming it will be part of the fundamental tcp/ip stack for internet2.

In the late 80s, I was on the XTP advisory board and wrote up rate-based for protocol specification. It is insensitive to whether latency is large multi-hop network or long-haul geo-sync satellite
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/xtprate.html

Since military wanted to use it for warships and fighers with sensors and fire control ... XTP needed to also be able to tolerate enormous amount of damage and still operate.

Note DNS caching isn't a latency issue ... it is a scaling issue ... since host->ip mapping infrequently changes ... DNS allows for caching at all levels (along with being able to specify cache lifetime time-out). With a relatively few root DNS servers and tens of millions of devices constantly making DNS requests ... they would quickly saturate. Trivia, the person that invented DNS in the early 80s, a decade earlier had worked at the IBM cambridge science center as an MIT grad. student. past posts mentioning CSC

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

After we had left IBM (in large part motivatied by the transfer of cluster scaleup and being told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors), one of the things were we were brought in to consult with a small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server; they had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use; the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". Part of what we had to do was map "SSL" technology to payment business processes, vet the technology and also do audit/walk-throughs of several of the new businesses selling "SSL" digital certificates. past posts mentioning SSL domain name certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#sslcert

One of the gotchas was that TCP had been used for long-life (reliable) sessions ... while HTTP was an atomic request/response ... but layered on top of TCP for its relability characteristics. In the mid-90s, this didn't scale ... several webservers were starting to spend 95% of their CPU processing the FINWAIT list (after TCP session is closed, an entry is made in the FINWAIT list to catch any dangling session packets). There was 6-9 month period where vendors came up with revised, scalable processing of enormous TCP FINWAIT lists.

SSL/HTTPS processing then adds quite a bit extra protocol chatter to establish SSL session (in addition to what is required for base HTTP). Note that XTP protocol does reliable operation in a minimum of 3-packet exchange. I once did a HTTPS/SSL specification that did both the equivalent of full HTTPS/SSL exchange and HTTP request/response in just the 3-packet XTP exchange (by piggy-backing SSL information obtained from DNS) ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#catch22
other past posts mentioning XTP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#xtphsp

Old email about review of la guade lab summer of 1985, they had an experimental 3725 cribbed to handle T1 link ... but it saturated at 1.7mbit-1.8mbit (US full-duplex is 3mbit, EU full-duplex is 4mbit)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#email850719
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#16

And old email from somebody in Rochester that was told to come to me about high-speed for their new product (aka follow-on to s/36&s/38 which was going to be as/400)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#email860812
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#15

Possibly because I was doing all this other stuff ... I also got asked to look at a NCP/VTAM implementation that one of the baby bells had done with Series/1. They had real networking out in the Series/1 and then spoofed boundary host VTAMs ... claiming cross-domain operation (aka fiction that the resource was owned by some other vtam host). This is short piece of presentation they made at ibm "common" user group meeting:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#70

I got suckered into doing a plan to turn it out as type-1 IBM product ... but because the communication group was notorious for corporate dirty tricks ... it had to be done with no IBM resources. We went to the largest customer of ibm 37x5 controllers and got him to commit to completely fund the whole effort. The business case was that with the throughput and performance and being able to eliminate all his real 37x5 controllers, he totally recouped his cost in under 12months. This is piece of presentation that I made at the SNA architecture review board meeting in raliegh, the fall of 1986
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#67

Plan included as soon as the Series/1 implementation shipped, it would then all be moved to RIOS (801/risc used for rs/6000). What happened next can only be described as truth is stranger than fiction. It started with enormous amount of FUD that none of the analysis was correct ... but they never actually identified any errors in the analysis. The scenario was real live production environment the telco was running with tens of thousands of terminals. Past post with reference to some of the FUD sequence I was getting out of communication group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#32
from above post, some of my email responses to the FUD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#email870218
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#email870219

Total aside, for awhile the person responsible for APPN (aka AWP164) and I reported to the same executive. I would needle him that he should stop doing what he was working and come work on real networking. Fall 1986, the communication group objected to announcing APPN. Several weeks escalation and the APPN announcement leter was carefully rewritten to not imply any sort of connection between APPN and SNA. --
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The IBM Strategy

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The IBM Strategy
Date: 30 Mar 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
The IBM Strategy
http://www.ibm.com/annualreport/2013/strategy.html

on the "pivot" to the cloud

Attack of the killer clouds and the coming IT storm
http://www.infoworld.com/t/cringely/attack-of-the-killer-clouds-and-the-coming-it-storm-239006

from above:
Death by cloud and virtualization

The specific IT dodo myth tends to revolve around the specter of virtualization combined with the private and public cloud. This multiheaded monster will turn all networks into self-sustaining, self-configuring, self-remediating benevolent SkyNets and, thus, kill the IT pro. When you have instant infrastructure provisioning, policy-based scalability, and a network that runs at the cut-and-paste level, not the crack-the-rack level, who needs IT pros?


... snip ...

I periodically mention the explosion in vm/4341s at large corporations ... ordering hundreds at a time and putting out in departmental areas ... sort of the leading edge of the distributed computing tsunamis. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

The high-end disks for datacenters were 3380s ... the the low-end and mid-range disks were all FBA (3310s & 3370s) ... sort of locking MVS out of the market. Eventually they came out with CKD 3375 (emulated on real FBA 3370, sort of the beginning of the end of real CKD ... which haven't been manufactured for decades). However, the MVS system care and feeding could easily to run to dozen or more people ... so didn't scale very well when talking about putting out hundreds in every departmental area (inside IBM it contributed to shortage of conference rooms .... converted to departmental vm/4341 rooms).

As aside, the MVS software dasd people had told me that even if I provided them with fully integrated and tested FBA support, I still needed a $26M business case to cover documentation and education ... and I couldn't use total life-cycle and customer savings, I had to show incremental new sales (on the order of $200M-$300M) ... and oh-by-the-way, customers were buying DASD as fast as they could be made and any FBA support would just switch them from the same amount of CKD to FBA. past posts mentioning ckd, fba, multi-track search
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

The big cloud massive megadatacenters now involve hundreds of thousands of systems with millions of processors, being managed by several scores of people.

Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.computerweekly.com/feature/Can-the-mainframe-remain-relevant-the-cloud-and-mobile-era

from above:
A 2012. study from WinterGreen Research demonstrated the savings of an IBM zEnterprise 114 mainframe over a VMware setup using HP ProLiant DL685. WinterGreen Research calculated that a suite of Linux web services applications running on 80 HP blade servers with VMware would cost $127,225 a year, while the same application configuration on the zEnterprise 114 would cost $67,787. The zEnterprise 114 (or z196) server is cost-efficient because it uses less power and fewer software licences, the study said.

... snip ...

Note that the megadatacenters of the large cloud operators have been at the very forefront of "green" in terms of power, cooling, heat, operations, etc. They've also been claiming for at least a decade they build their own systems for 1/3rd the price of brand name systems and typically operate with linux and other software not requiring software licenses. The megadatacenters with hundreds of thousands of systems and millions of processor are typically operated by scores of people (large thousands of systems per person)

Max. configured z196 with 80 processors had list price of $28M and system rating of 50BIPS. IBM financials claim that the IBM mainframe group earns total of $6.25 for every dollar in processor sales ... making typical z196 cost around $175M (or $3.5M/BIPS). IBM had base list price for e5-2600 blade of $1815 with system rating of 400BIPS-600BIPS. Cloud claims of 1/3rd brand name costs come in around $1/BIPS.

April 7, 1964 System/360 Announcement
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PR360.html

I've mentioned before that with the enormous reduction in system costs for cloud megadatacenters ... other costs represent an increasing percentage of TCO ... motivating the significant investment in green and automation.

The Data Center Era
http://www.wired.com/insights/2014/03/data-center-era/

from above:
#3. Virtualization. One of the datacenter world's pain points is that servers spend most of their time idle. Only about 15% of processing cycles, on a good day, accomplish work. The virtualization process decreases idle time by combining different applications on the same piece of hardware. The technology was first applied to servers, but it's migrating to storage systems and networking equipment.

... ship ...

Also I've mentioned the similarity between current cloud "on-demand" and early virtual machine cp67 online service "on-demand". One of the issues was automation to reduce offshift costs and leave system available 7x24. Back then systems were rented/leased and charges were based on the system meter that run whenever the processor and/or channels were "busy". There was gimmick for cp67 terminal I/O that would be active to accept incoming characters but allow the channel to be idle when nothing was going on. The processor and all channels had to be idle for at least 400ms before the system meter would actually come to a stop. Note that long after systems had been converted to purchase, MVS still had a system task that would wake up every 400ms (making sure that the system meter never stopped).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Boyd for Business & Innovation Conference

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Boyd for Business & Innovation Conference
Date: 30 Mar 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
Boyd for Business & Innovation Conference
http://rady.ucsd.edu/exec/open/boyd-conference/

when i was an undergraduate, I was convinced to spend a summer helping setup Boeing computer services ... one of the half dozen or so 1st employees ... basically consolidate all dataprocessing in single business unit to better monetize the investment. Part of this was Renton datacenter which I thought was possibly the largest in the world with something like $300m in large IBM mainframes. However, they had a D/R scenario where Mt. Rainier warms up and massive mud slide takes out the Renton datacenter. the estimate was the loss of the Renton datacenter for a week would cost Boeing more than the cost of the data center ... so Renton was being replicated at the new 747 plant up in Everett. note communities closer to Mt. Rainier have civil defense sirens for such mud slide emergency ... somewhat similar to what you may see for tsunami warnings in hawaii. reference:
http://www.citizenreviewonline.org/june2004/danger.htm
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Rainier_Volcano_Lahar_Warning_System

Later I would meet John Boyd and sponsor his briefings at IBM. His biographies have him doing stint in command of "spook base" (at the same time I was at Boeing) claiming it was a $2.5B windfall for IBM (nearly ten times that of Renton datacenter and over $17B in today's dollars). spook base reference, gone 404, but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

One of Boyd's briefings was Organic Design for Command and Control ... where he concludes that what he is really talking about is "Appreciation and Leadership". During the briefing, he says that US corporate culture is being contaminated by former military officers, infused with rigid, top/down, command & control paradigm, climbing the corporate ladder. copy here:
http://slightlyeastofnew.com/439-2/
and
http://dnipogo.org/john-r-boyd/

Note that when Boyd passed, it was the Marines that were at Arlington (the Air Force had pretty much disowned him, even tho he wrote the fighter pilot training manual used by just about every air force in the world and was instrumental in the design of the f15, f16, f18, and a10). Circa 1990, the Marine Commandant had leveraged Boyd for a make-over of the corp and his effects went to Quantico. After he was gone, there was some attempt by the Air Force to revive Boyd:
There are two career paths in front of you, and you have to choose which path you will follow. One path leads to promotions, titles, and positions of distinction.... The other path leads to doing things that are truly significant for the Air Force, but the rewards will quite often be a kick in the stomach because you may have to cross swords with the party line on occasion. You can't go down both paths, you have to choose. Do you want to be a man of distinction or do you want to do things that really influence the shape of the Air Force? To be or to do, that is the question. Colonel John R. Boyd, USAF 1927-1997

From the dedication of Boyd Hall, United States Air Force Weapons School, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. 17 September 1999


--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2014 11:33:28 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
Quite right. There are some applications, notably databases with rapid updates and a low tolerance for errors, where you need to run them on one big server where you can lock the transactions, and they don't scale out to lots of micros. The classic applications were airline reservations and banking, and as far as I can tell, that's still their major uses. Mainframe reliability is phenomenal--I have read about a TPF system that was up continuously for a decade through multiple software and hardware upgrades.

ITA Software showed that you can do great stuff with parallel search on racks of micros for looking up airline schedules and fares, but when it comes to actual reservations of actual tickets with actual money, they tend to use Oracle.


I've posted several times that in the 90s, there was billions being spent by the financial industry to redo overnight batch settlement to straight through processing using parallel processing in lots of "killer micros" and parallel processing. The issue at the time was that 60s&70s batch stuff had been front-ended with "real-time" transactions ... but were really just queuing stuff for batch settlement overnight. A combination of increase in business and globalization was both increasing workload and the size of the overnight window.

However, they were doing RYO implementations using some off-the-shelf parallel processing libraries that introduced a factor of 100 times overhead (compared to cobol batch) ... and they didn't bother to do the speeds in feeds ... and ignored comments when I (and others) pointed the problem out. In any case the efforts went down in flames when they tried to move from toy demos into production (the parallel library overhead totally swamping the throughput improvements expected with large number of "killer micros").

Last decade I was involved with some straight through financial transaction work that was taken to industry bodies that saw quiet high acceptance. It basically had business rules that generated fine-grain SQL operations ... and depended on the enormous work by the RDBMS vendors (including oracle, ibm, and others) in parallel scaleup for throughput. A demo involved max mainframe overnight batch workload moved to parallel straight-through processing could be accomplished in small fraction of the time using a modest number of server boxes. Then the whole thing hit a brick wall. We were told there were stil quite a few that bore scars from the 90s effort and things would have to wait until they were gone before another attempt was made.

Many airline res. systems have had a problem that because of the limited TPF facilities ... that actual sophisticated data management is done on DB2 under MVS ... and the TPF systems are taken down periodically to have their data rebuilt from the DB2 copies. I've posted before being called into the largest res system and asked to look at their ten impossible things for an application that represented 1/4 of their workload. I came back after two months with new implementation that could handle everything for the whole world on ten parallel rs/6000 580s. and solved all their ten impossible things. Much of the problems arose from the manual efforts required for moving back and forth between TPF and MVS/DB2. I then offerred to look at the application that accounted for 40% of their workload. However, everything came to halt ... the executive finally admitted that he actually didn't want me to solve the problem ... just wanted to tell the parent board that I was working on it (one of the board members I had known more than a decade earlier in IBM). The problem was the executive had a couple thousand people performing various manual operations ... for a paradigm that was originated in the 60s ... and trade-offs made then were no longer applications. It was now possible to totally change the paradigm, automate all those activies ... but that also eliminated the executive's large empire.

past posts mentioning availability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

Gray's (30yr) old presentation that hardware had improved to the point that outages were primarily human mistakes, environmental, and/or software errors (no longer hardware)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

past posts mentioning above:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#39 repeat after me: RAID != backup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#47 repeat after me: RAID != backup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#65 The 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#0 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#26 Check out Computer glitch to cause flight delays across U.S. - MarketWatch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#28 Check out Computer glitch to cause flight delays across U.S. - MarketWatch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#68 But... that's *impossible*
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#28 Intel Nehalem-EX Aims for the Mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#4 Did a mainframe glitch trigger DBS Bank outage?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#14 Age
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#65 When will MVS be able to use cheap dasd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#73 Mainframe hacking?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#69 No command, and control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#23 zLinux OR Linux on zEnterprise Blade Extension???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#25 Julian Assange - Hero or Villain
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#93 Itanium at ISSCC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#98 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#77 Just for a laugh... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#30 24/7/365 appropriateness was Re: IBMLink outages in 2012
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#16 X86 server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#99 PDP-10 system calls, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#33 Historians: The Paper Trail through History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#19 Where Does the Cloud Cover the Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#16 How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#37 The Subroutine Call
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#75 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#23 Scary Sysprogs and educating those 'kids'

recent posts mentioning "straight-through" processing efforts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#42 COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#30 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#42 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#49 Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#35 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#80 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#3 We need to talk about TED
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#29 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#81 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#83 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#22 US Federal Reserve pushes ahead with Faster Payments planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#90 Why do bank IT systems keep failing ?

past posts discussing airline res system work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#17 Old Computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#100 Why won't the AS/400 die? Or, It's 1999 why do I have to learn how to use
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#103 IBM 9020 computers used by FAA (was Re: EPO stories (was: HELP IT'S HOT!!!!!))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#136a checks (was S/390 on PowerPC?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#20 Competitors to SABRE?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#26 Disk caching and file systems. Disk history...people forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#69 Block oriented I/O over IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#45 Did AT&T offer Unix to Digital Equipment in the 70s?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#49 Did AT&T offer Unix to Digital Equipment in the 70s?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#17 I hate Compaq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#0 TSS/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#3 News IBM loses supercomputer crown
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#2 Computers in Science Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#3 Why are Mainframe Computers really still in use at all?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#12 Why did OSI fail compared with TCP-IP?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#43 IBM doing anything for 50th Anniv?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#83 HONE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#83 Summary: Robots of Doom
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#67 Tweaking old computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#48 InfiniBand Group Sharply, Evenly Divided
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#30 diffence between itanium and alpha
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#67 unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#3 Ping: Anne & Lynn Wheeler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#47 What makes a mainframe a mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#6 Mainframe not a good architecture for interactive workloads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#44 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#58 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#14 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#6 Xah Lee's Unixism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#23 Demo: Things in Hierarchies (w/o RM/SQL)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#29 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#26 IBM 3614 and 3624 ATM's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#85 The TransRelational Model: Performance Concerns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#22 The Soul of Barb's New Machine (was Re: creat)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#41 something like a CTC on a PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#67 intel's Vanderpool and virtualization in general
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#47 Using the Cache to Change the Width of Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#22 System/360; Hardwired vs. Microcoded
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#44 What was new&important in computer architecture 10 years ago ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#44 Intel engineer discusses their dual-core design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#7 HASP/ASP JES/JES2/JES3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#5 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#6 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#9 Arpa address
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#4 How Many 360/195s and 370/195s were shipped?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#18 RAMAC 305(?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#18 50th Anniversary of invention of disk drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#52 US Air computers delay psgrs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#22 Bidirectional Binary Self-Joins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#41 US Airways badmouths legacy system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#41 Fast and Safe C Strings: User friendly C macros to Declare and use C Strings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#72 The top 10 dead (or dying) computer skills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#8 nouns and adjectives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#53 Migration from Mainframe to othre platforms - the othe bell?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#19 American Airlines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#32 CLIs and GUIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#41 Automation is still not accepted to streamline the business processes... why organizations are not accepting newer technologies?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#33 IBM touts encryption innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#55 IBM halves mainframe Linux engine prices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#66 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#59 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#73 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#74 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#80 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#19 Processes' memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#52 Article says mainframe most cost-efficient platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#42 IBM 3883 Manuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#16 Sabre Talk Information?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#81 Hashing for DISTINCT or GROUP BY in SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#17 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#42 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#14 Sabre; The First Online Reservation System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#43 Sabre; The First Online Reservation System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#8 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#77 program coding pads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#35 Last Word on Dennis Ritchie
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#92 Innovation and iconoclasm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#8 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#70 Disruptive Thinkers: Defining the Problem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#7 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#23 How to Stuff a Wild Duck
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#50 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#16 System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#59 history of Programming language and CPU in relation to each
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#13 Should you support or abandon the 3270 as a User Interface?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#1 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#7 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#52 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#65 Linear search vs. Binary search
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#87 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#0 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#20 Write Inhibit

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2014 11:59:56 -0400
helbig@astro.multiCLOTHESvax.de (Phillip Helbig---undress to reply) writes:
Right. However, Rdb on a VMS cluster (up to 96 nodes supported), using the VMS lock manager, is quite scalable. There is really nothing better. Sadly, HP has decided to end the life of VMS.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#4 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#10 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?

I had worked with Jim at IBM research ... original sql/relational ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

and then he left for Tandem (and pawned off a bunch of stuff on me). In the late 80s, I was doing some work on cluster scaleup and working with various RDBMS vendors (primarily ingres, oracle, sybase, informix). At that time, Jim was at DEC ... and at '91 ACM SIGOPS conference (asilomar), he and I got into a little of dustup ... over whether high availability could be reliably done on off-the-shelf hardware (pushing the DEC position). A few years later he was at Microsoft (dec had been bought and its rdbms had been sold to oracle) and he had to get up on the stage with Gates and push high availability for windows (on intel platform).

Both Ingres and Oracle had VMS cluster support in the same source base with their oracle platform. Part of my work then was to provide syntax compatibility with their VMS cluster support to ease the cluster implementation on non-VMS base. At the time, Ingres had a list of things that could be improved on the VMS implementation which I was able to take into account when I'm doing ha/cmp implementation. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

this is reference to Jan92 meeting in Ellison's conference room to have 16-way by summer of 1992 and 128-way by year-end 1992
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

old email on cluster scaleup work ... both commercial & DBMS as well as scientific/technical with national labs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

however, by middle of feb1992, cluster scaleup had been transferred, we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors, and it was announced as supercomputer for scientific/technical *ONLY*, 17Feb1992 press
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
11May1992 press
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

contributing was the mainframe DB2 group was complaining if I was allowed to continue, it would be at least five years ahead of where they were at. Folklore is that after IBM pullback in 1992, Oracle reversed engineered the ha/cmp support allowing them to port to other (non-VMS) platforms. At the time, IBM was working on non-mainframe RDBMS originally for OS2 ... but it had limited function and scaleup.

More recent reference to "release no software before its time" ... non-mainframe DB2 scaleup competing with Oracle non-mainframe scaleup.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#43 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#46 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The IBM Strategy

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The IBM Strategy
Date: 01 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#8 The IBM Strategy

semi-related ... from recent post in a (facebook) IBM retirees group:

(virtual machine based) online service bureau Tymshare made their CMS-based online computer conferencing available for free to the IBM user SHARE group starting in Aug1976 .... archives here:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

I made arrangements with Tymshare to get regular distribution of the computing conferencing files to put up internally inside IBM, also available on the internal network and on the HONE system. My biggest problem was getting approval from IBM lawyers ... they were afraid internal IBMers might get contaminated by customer information. Note in the past, publicly available SHARE reports had been labeled "IBM Confidential - Restricted" ... aka available to internal employees on a "need to know" basis only ... because they would contradict what was being told internal developers.

.....

NOTE: One such SHARE document that got stamped "IBM Confidential -Restricted" was the public SHARE report that CERN did comparing TSO and vm370/cms.

How IBM Is Retooling Itself for Future Cloud Business
http://www.eweek.com/cloud/how-ibm-is-retooling-itself-for-future-cloud-business.html

In 1980, STL cons me into doing support for channel extender as part of move of 300 people from the IMS group to offsite bldg (channel attached 3270s with service back to STL datacenter ... they had tried "remote" 3270 and found them totally unacceptable). Part of the support is downloading channel programs to the remote end and running the extension "full-duplex" ... to minimize the significant channel protocol chatter latency. Posts mentioning channel extender
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

The vendor then tries to get my support released, but it is blocked by a group in POK that has been playing with some serial stuff. They are afraid if it is in the market, they would have trouble justifying theirs, however theirs isn't released until decade later, as ESCON with ES/9000 in 1990 (by that time, it is already obsolete).

In 1987, I'm asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they are doing which eventually becomes fibre-channel standard. It is full-duplex and includes downloading I/O program to the remote end to minimize as much as possible protocol chatter latency. Some POK channel engineers then become involved and define an enormously heavyweight protocol on top of FCS that drastically cuts the native I/O throughput. This eventually comes out as FICON ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

Peak I/O benchmark for z196 uses 104 FICON to get 2M IOPS ... about the same time a single FCS is announced for e5-2600 blade claiming over 1M IOPS (native, aka two such FCS would have higher native throughput than 104 FICON).

As mentioned upthread, max configured z196 with 80 processors is rated at 50BIPS (625MIPS/processor) and goes for $28M or $560,000/BIPS ... compared to possibly $1/BIPS for e5-2600 blade (rated between 400-600 BIPS ... depending on clock speed around 30BIPS/processor).

max. configured EC12 with 101 processors is rated at 75BIPS (743MIPS/processor) and specs only has it with 30% higher I/O throughput than z196 (around 2.6M IOPS).

Part of the issue is that access to main storage (cache miss), measured in number of processor cycles, is compareable to 1960s access to disk (when measured in number of 1960s processor cycles). For decades, risc processors have had throughput advantage over i86 with things like out-of-order execution, superscaler, speculative execution, etc. However, for the past several generations of i86 server processors they have gone to risc core with hardware layer that translates i86 instructions into risc miro-ops ... largely negating the throughput difference between risc and i86. By comparison this only starts to show up in z196, the claims are about half the per processor throughput improvement going from z10 to z196 (469MIPS/processor to 625MIPS/processor) is starting to adapt some of these throughput features that have been in risc for decades (and also in several generations of i86 server chips).

A single typical cloud megadatacenter has more processing power (with hundreds of thousands of systems and millions of processors) than the aggregate of all mainframes in the world today ... and is typically run by total staff of 70-100 people.

Separate from the massive I/O throughput difference between native FCS and FICON ... and the massive difference in processor BIPS rates ... there is also system structural difference for I/O.

The 14 z196 SAPs saturate at 100% busy doing 2.2M SSCH/sec ... however the recommendation is to keep SAPs at 70% busy (or less) or 1.5M SSCH/sec (again compared to single FCS announced for e5-2500 blade claiming over 1M IOPS). The SAP SSCH/sec limit and the FICON limit is possible reason why ec12 is only claiming 30% higher I/O than z196, even tho it has 50% more aggregate processor (101 processors, 75BIPS, 743MIPS/processors versus 80 processors, 50BIPS, 625MIPS/processor ... compared to 30BIPS/processor for e5/2600 blade)

In the past there was some non-mainframe system analysis for typical TCP throughput that had 5k instruction pathlength with five buffer copies. This was compared to approx. equivalent LU6.2 operation through VTAM that had 150k instruction pathlength and 16 buffer copies. To act in cloud, the mainframe network pathlength needs to come down by couple orders of magnitude.

Long ago and far away, the original mainframe TCP/IP product had some throughput issues getting approx. 44kbytes/sec throughput using nearly whole 3090 processors. I did the software changes to support RFC1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research, got 4341 sustained channel throughput between 4341 and a Cray, using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The IBM Strategy

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The IBM Strategy
Date: 01 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#8 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#12 The IBM Strategy

Microsoft, Oracle, IBM still rule enterprise software: But look out, here comes the cloud
http://www.zdnet.com/microsoft-oracle-ibm-still-rule-enterprise-software-but-look-out-here-comes-the-cloud-7000027926/

... and

Oracle overtakes IBM as second-largest software vendor, Gartner says
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2138080/oracle-overtakes-ibm-as-secondlargest-software-vendor-gartner-says.html
Oracle overtakes IBM as second-largest software vendor, Gartner says
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2014/033114-oracle-overtakes-ibm-as-second-largest-280251.html
Oracle overtakes IBM as second-largest software vendor, Gartner says
http://www.infoworld.com/d/the-industry-standard/oracle-overtakes-ibm-second-largest-software-vendor-gartner-says-239534

... and

Don't let the Google-Amazon price war lead to the wrong cloud
http://www.infoworld.com/d/cloud-computing/dont-let-the-google-amazon-price-war-lead-the-wrong-cloud-239515
In Response to Google And Amazon, Microsoft Drops Azure Prices, Adds New "Basic" Tier
http://techcrunch.com/2014/03/31/microsoft-azure-matches-amazons-price-cuts-and-introduces-new-basic-tier/

Part of the issue (for large cloud operations) is provisioning for "on-demand" operation ... which tends to have provisioning for instantaneous demand. By comparison, mainframe is so enormously expensive that attempt is made to have queue of batch operations that are able to keep the machine constantly busy (and don't provision for peaks and troughs of on-demand operation).

In the past, personal computer boxes were so inexpensive that TCO was cheaper to have dedicated box for each individual operation (managing shared use was more expensive than having dedicated box for each operation) ... even if load rarely exceeded 10-15%. Non-cloud datacenters grew to the point that they might have thousands of such boxes.

In the late 90s, this become an opportunity for virtualization ... 7-10 shared virtual boxes on a single physical box w/o much the management difficulty and overhead of shared use. This accelerated in the last decade with the massive throughput increases in i86 server boxes. In the middle of last decade, IBM started doing sales programs that massive throughput increase of i86 servers from generation to generation ... along with virtualization consolidation of physical boxes ... easily justified upgrading i86 servers every generation. However this market approach was diminishing returns ... which contributed to IBM eventually unloading its server business (coupled with rise of outsourcing to cloud vendors who were assembling their own i86 servers for 1/3rd the cost of brand name servers).

This telco item ... discussed in more detail in the "Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7

goes along with the report that the communication group prepared for the executive committee in the mid-80s that 56kbit/sec links were sufficient and customer wouldn't want T1 (1.5mbit/sec) links before the early 90s. The motivating issue was that the 37x5 boxes only supported up to 56kbits/sec. The methodology for the report was studying customers with 37x5 "fat pipes" ... multiple parallel 56kbit/sec links treated as single logical link. They weren't able to find any six link "fat pipes". The issue that the communication group didn't know (and/or didn't both to include) was at the time, typical telco tariff for T1 was about the same as five or six separate 56kbit links. We did a trivial customer survey and found 200 mainframe customers with installed T1 links ... however they had switched to non-IBM vendor for the full T1 support (and so didn't show up in the way that the communication group prepared its report for the executive committee).

For mainframes disk virtualization dates back 30yrs ... when they stopped making real ckd dasd ... and starting "emulating" (virtualizing) them on industry standard FBA disks (while this was less efficient and cost effective than native disk use, they were forced to because the inability of the POK favorite son operating system to provide FBA support). The next stage was 20yrs ago when STK introduces virtual disks with ICEBERG
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storage_Technology_Corporation
posts mentioning ckd, multi-track search, fba, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

IBM's initial attempt to respond with its own virtual disk floundered, and IBM took to marketing relogo'ed STK ICEBERGs.

As part of HSDT,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

in the early 80s I was putting in T1 links as part of internal HSDT ... but operating clear channel. In '85, bell said they were going to start enforcing 193rd bit T1 standard ... but didn't initially have the interfaces that supported it. So put in avanti T1 Ultramuxes to do the bit stuffing ... and configured an extra 56kbit side-channel for fireberd/phoenix bit-error-testing. quicky search engine turns up this ref from 1983 (references low-cost T1 tariff)
http://books.google.com/books?id=7xNVAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA3-PA65&lpg=RA3-PA65&dq=avanti+ultramux&source=bl&ots=xxaCxGk4hd&sig=N8kxRiomy4YA4EsJ8e31m2xn3OM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Zcs6U4ecIIvJsQT7m4H4Cg&ved=0CDAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=avanti%20ultramux&f=false

Note now all this is being handled by tcp/ip over single shared link.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
Date: 01 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

Largely motivated by gov. and other litigation, 23Jun69 IBM announces unbundling, starting to charge for application software (they managed to make the case that kernel/SCP software should still be free), SE services, maintenance, etc.

One of the issues was previously large part of SE training was sort of apparentice as part of a team at the customer site. However, with unbundling, nobody could figure out how this (non-support) SE time could not be charged for. Eventually the company came up with HONE (hands-on network environment), several (virtual machine) CP67 datacenters with access from branch offices that allowed SEs to work with guest operating systems. Virtual Machines (and CP67) had originally been done at the Cambridge Science Center. CSC also did a port of APL\360 to CP67/CMS as CMS\APL. Then CMS\APL was used to start deliverying marketing and sales support applications on HONE. Eventually the virtual guest use dwindled away and the marketing and sales applications came to totally dominate all use.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

One of my hobbies was producing highly enhanced production operating systems for internal datacenters ... including HONE operation. In the early days HONE was being cloned around the world, they would frequently ask me to go along for the installs. One of the first was when EMEA hdqtrs moved from Westchester to Paris and I was asked to go over for the install. Most of the time, there was little awareness that one of my systems were being used outside of the datacenter. It would came as quite a shock to top DPD executives when they would periodically learn that HONE was running my systems.

During the FS period, 370 projects were being killed off ... but I continued working on 370 (and periodically ridicule FS). With the FS failure, there was mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines ... which contributed to decision to pickup some of my stuff for customer product release. The lack of 370 products during the FS period contributed to allowing clone processors to gain a market foothold. With the death of FS, the mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines, and the market foothold by clone processors, the decision was changed to transition to start charging for kernel/SCP software.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

It was decided to separately package some of my kernel performance enhancements as a separate product item as the guinea pig for starting to charge for kernel software. I got to spend a lot of time with lawyers and business people on policies for kernel software charging.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network during the late 70s and early 80s. Folklore is when the executive committee (chairman, ceo, pres. etc) was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. Possibly contributing to not getting fired ... was supposedly something like 27,000 employees were following it online ... as well as the many internal datacenters running my distribution.

Virtual machine based online service bureau Tymshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

made their CMS-based online computer conferencing available for free to the IBM user SHARE group starting in Aug1976 .... archives here:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

I made arrangements with Tymshare to get regular distribution of the computing conferencing files to put up internally inside IBM, also available on the internal network and on the HONE system. My biggest problem was getting approval from IBM lawyers ... they were afraid internal IBMers might get contaminated by customer information. Note in the past, publicly available SHARE reports had been labeled "IBM Confidential - Restricted" ... aka available to internal employees on a "need to know" basis only ... because they would contradict what was being told internal developers. some posts referencing computer mediated converstation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

some old email mentioning vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare
some old email mentioning hone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#hone
some old email mentioning internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until late '85 or possibly early 86)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vnet

for some topic drift, this old post has list of the corporate locations that added one or more new network nodes during 1983 (year that internal network passed 1000 nodes)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8
other past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

1Jan1983 was the great change-over from arpanet IMPs to tcp/ip. At the time there was approx. 100 IMP network nodes with approx. 255 connected hosts. The tight control of the Arpanet IMP boxes was one of the reasons that limited arpanet growth. The switch-over to tcp/ip eliminated that bottleneck. some collected posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/internet.htm

from long ago and far away:

Date: 10/13/78 17:01:53
To: wheeler

Lynn,

We have a problem here in RESPOND, and I wonder if you can help. You may remember that the HONE system has now moved to Uithoorn, but we still have a VM test system here, used by the Network and CE groups for TP program development - RETAIN, ITPS, IBTS etc. on the CON/370 network. The system is a 4 meg 158AP on SEPP LTR 505, with paging only on 3330s, and several large Batch test machines (regularly 2 x MVS, 2 x MVT, 1 x VS1) along with various CMS interactive users - total about 40 simultaneous logged on. The problem shows as very sluggish performance with fairly low CPU, high paging and very high steal rates. Typically, an IND would give CPU 75%, APU 62%, paging 20/sec, steal 104%. The first discovery was that paging is the average of CPU + APU, so steal is double the true rate, but even so 52% seems excessive. I have been discussing this with Richard Kogut, John Hartmann and others, and brought it up at an ISC workshop this week, but nobody seems to have a very clear idea of whether steal is good or bad. In fact, we find that because the top bit of DMKPTRXX is never set on, there are hardly any pages in the free list or flush list at any time, and we usually have to look in the SELECT loop. By forcing use of the flush list (by skipping the test of DMKPTRXX in DMKPTRRS), we get steal right down, but paging goes higher, and though it seems to improve response at times of heavy load, it makes it worse under medium load. So far I haven't been able to come up with anything I am sure is good. Four possibilities to try occur to me at present:

(1) Use the flushlist every time, but instead of selecting the top entry from it each time a page is needed, use the SELECT loop method to pick the next available flush page. This should help to make the selection of flushed pages a bit more random, rather than grouping one user's pages together.

(2) In the SELECT loop, choose first a page of a user not in queue, and only choose an in-queue one on a second time round the loop. (This really implies a 0th time round the loop before using the existing 1st and 2nd passes.)

(3) Also in a 0th pass, turn on the reference bit again immediately after the RRB if it shows the bit was on. This should give preference to pages RRB'd by queue drop, and avoid leaving a trail of false unreferenced pages as it goes down the CORTABLE.

(4) Rework the routine in DMKSTP which sets DMKPTRXX so that the bit is set on at a level where it can improve performance. Our latest observations show that with flushing, Batch machine performance is never very bad, but never very good, but without flushing it can be a lot better, but also a lot worse under load.

Before I sit down to reinvent all these things, I am wondering if you have tried any of them before. In other words, have they been rejected as no good?

If you could let me have your opinion of them, I should be very grateful.

Respond, Portsmouth, England.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

paging related posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#clock

Alan Hakim ... for other topic drift ... from a recent post in the ibm-main mailing list about VS1 running faster under vm370 than on bare machine:

part of the issue was i had a much better page replacement algorithm with a significantly shorter pathlength (not just VS1/VSE, but also MVS) ... originally done while i was undergraduate in the 60s for cp67.

the other part was that DOS & VS1 used 2k virtual pages ... that allowed for far more efficient compaction in small real storage (compared to 4k virtual pages) ... but by the time of 138/148 nominal real storage was 1mbyte (and increasing) ... so it was no longer a useful trade-off.

note one of the page replacement issues was global LRU versus local LRU. I had done global LRU as undergraduate in the 60s about the same time there was some work on local LRU published academically.

At Dec81, Asilomar ACM SIGOPS, Jim Gray (I had worked with at ibm research, but had left for Tandem), asked me if i could help a co-worker get his Stanford PHD ... it involved work on global LRU similar to what i had done as undergraduate in the 60s ... but his thesis advisor was getting enormous pushback from person behind local LRU. I had lots of data directly comparing global LRU to local LRU replacement algorithms, both implemented on cp67 running on 360/67, showing global LRU significantly outperforming local lru. past post on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#46

unfortunately IBM management blocked me sending a replay for nearly a year
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email821019

I was being blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s ... folklore is that when the executive committee (chairman, ceo, pres, etc) was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. In any case, hopefully IBM management blocking my sending a reply was somehow viewed as punishment for online computer conferencing (rather than taking sides in the academic dispute).

trivia ... his thesis advisor went on later to be president of stanford.

As an aside, other topic drift ... very early in the life of REX (renamed REXX for customer distribution). I wanted to demonstrate that REX wasn't just another pretty scripting language. I decided to re-implement IPCS (a large assembler implemented dump reader) in REX ... the objective was to do it in half-time over a period of 3months and the result have ten times the function and ten times the performance of the original (took some slight of hand to have the REX implementation run ten times faster than the assembler implementation. I finished early so started doing a library of automated examination scripts that looked for typical/well-known failure signatures.

I figured that it would be replace to customers in place of the existing IPCS ... but for various reasons that never happened ... even though it eventually came to be used by nearly every internal PSR and most of the internal datacenters. Failing to get it released for customers, I did get permission to do "how to" implementation presentations at user group meetings ... and within a few months, similar implementations were started to appear outside IBM. old posts mentioning DUMPRX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

Further topic drift, IBM field engineering required a bootstrap service process that started with being able to scope failing parts. Starting with 3081 TCMs ... it was no longer able to scope operations ... so they built a "service processor" that had probes into TCM operation. The service processor could be "scoped" for faults ... and repaired ... and then a working service processor could be used to scope the machine. The 3081 service processor had infrastructure written from scratch. For the 3090 service processor (3092), they started with using 4331 for the service processor using a highly modified version of vm370/cms release 6... which evolved into a pair of 4361s (for availability/redundancy). This is old email from the 3092 support group (since release 6 was no longer an officially supported product) ... they were making extensive use of DUMPRX and looking at including it with shipped 3092s.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#email861031
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#email861223

other 3092 trivia ... all the service processor menu screens were done in (CMS) IOS3270

more 3092 trivia ... even for straight 3090 MVS accounts ... that had no FBA support ... two 3370 FBAs were still required for a 3090 order for the two (4361) 3092 "service processors"

as I periodically comment, even though real CKD disks have no been manufactured for decades, IBM mainframes still require (simulated) CKD disks (on industry standard fixed-block disks) because of the inability of MVS to provide FBA support. posts mentioning CKD, multi-track search, fba
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd --
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
Date: 02 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives

For other drift, related to escon already obsolete when its announced with es/9000 in 1990. This has an account of the end of IBM's ACS
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

it was terminated in the late 60s after ibm management decided that it would advance the computer state-of-the-art too fast and IBM might loose control of the market. At the end of the article it has list of items from ACS that show up with es/9000 two decades later. Person running ACS leaves not long afterwards and starts their own clone processor company.

Towards the end of article it has reference to multithreading ... now common in most i86 server chips. One of the multiprocessor projects that I once got sucked into was an effort by the 370/195 group to implement multithreading (never got announced). Peak 370/195 throughput was 10MIPS, while it had pipelining, sucperscaler, out-of-order execution, etc ... it didn't have branch production ... so conditional branches stalled the pipeline. Most codes ran half peak throughput because of conditional branches. The idea was to implement dual i-stream, two PSWs, two sets of registers, etc ... but w/o actual doubling the rest of the hardware. The concept was that pair of instruction streams, each running at half peak throughput (because of conditional branches) would keep the execution units fully busy. misc. multiprocessor &/or posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

With regard to upstream references to (failed) Future System and 37x5 ... this has account that major motivation for FS was to significantly increase the complexity for clone controllers: "The rise and fall of IBM"
http://www.ecole.org/en/seances/CM07

from above:
IBM tried to react by launching a major project called the 'Future System' (FS) in the early 1970's. The idea was to get so far ahead that the competition would never be able to keep up, and to have such a high level of integration that it would be impossible for competitors to follow a compatible niche strategy. However, the project failed because the objectives were too ambitious for the available technology. Many of the ideas that were developed were nevertheless adapted for later generations. Once IBM had acknowledged this failure, it launched its 'box strategy', which called for competitiveness with all the different types of compatible sub-systems. But this proved to be difficult because of IBM's cost structure and its R&D spending, and the strategy only resulted in a partial narrowing of the price gap between IBM and its rivals.

... snip ...

periodic claims that the baroque 37x5ncp/vtam interface was continuation of the FS objectives. Also note the killing off 370 efforts during the FS period, gave clone processors a market foothold. posts mentioning Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

as an aside, as undergraduate, I extended the cp67 2741/1052 terminal support to include ascii/tty ... but in doing so tried to make the 2702 do something it couldn't quite do. Somewhat as a result the univ started a clone controller project using interdata/3, reverse engineering 360 channel interface and building channel board for the interdata/3 programmed to emulate 2702 ... and do the things that 2702 wouldn't do. This gets written up blaming four of us for (some part of) the clone controller business. This later morphs into a interdata/4 for the channel interface and clusters of interdata/3s dedicated to line-scanner. Interdata markets the implementation to customers. Later Perkin-Elmer acquires Interdata and it is marketed under the Perkin-Elmer logo. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

In the time-frame that SNA was evolving my wife was co-author of a networking architecture ... which they had to name "peer-to-peer networking" ... since the communication group had co-opted "networking" for SNA applied to communication. It is (internal) document AWP39 (for a reference the APPN internal architecture document is AWP164)

some recent posts mentioning AWP39
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#44 What Makes code storage management so cool?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#19 z/OS is antique WAS: Aging Sysprogs = Aging Farmers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#26 SNA vs TCP/IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#99 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
Date: 02 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#14 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement

The cp67 development group split off from the cambridge science center and moved to the 3rd flr taking over the IBM Boston programming center. In the growth morphing from cp67 to vm370, the group outgrew the 3rd flr and moved out to the old vacant SBC bldg. in Burlington Mall. some past CSC posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

During the FS period, large parts of the company were redirected to work on FS. During the FS period, 370 stuff was being suspended and/or killed off. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

With the demise of FS, there was a mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines ... including kicking off 3033 and 3081. some more detail
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

the 370/xa was also kicked off at the same time. The head of pok then managed to convince corporate to kill off vm370 product, shutdown the burlington mall group and move all the people to POK (or otherwise they wouldn't be able to make the mvs/xa ship schedule 7-8yrs later). The plan was to not tell any of the burlington mall people until the very last moment in order to minimize the number that might be able to escape. However, the information leaked allowing many to escape the POK move. There was even a joke that the head of POK was one of the biggest contributors to the new DEC VAX/VMS project. Also, the leak kicked off a major witchhunt to identify the source of the leak ... fortunately nobody in Burlington gave me up.

Eventually Endicott managed to save the VM370 product mission, but had to reconstitute a development group from scratch. There is even some amount of stuff in the vmshare archives about the code quality during this period
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

During the morph from cp67 to vm370, there was significant amount of simplification ... including dropping a lot of stuff that had been picked up and included in cp67 that I had done as an undergraduate. During the FS period, I continued to do cp67 stuff (even periodically ridiculing FS and even claiming what I had running was better than stuff they were still blue skying about). I eventually managed to migrate a bunch of stuff to vm370 ... and continued my hobby of providing production systems with lots of enhancements for internal datacenters (CSC/VM) ... some old email:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430 ..

with the failure of FS, the mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipelines ... contributed to decision to picking up bits & pieces from csc/vm for inclusion in vm370 release 3.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#8

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Apr 2014 20:15:08 -0400
hancock4 writes:
With our 360-40, we had an IBM C/E come in once a week for preventive maintenance. He took apart all the computer's mechanical devices for cleaning, lubrication, and adjustment. I've heard of shops that didn't bother to do that it, and the results were not pretty.

I've periodically mentioned the univ. was talked into replacing 709/1401 combination with 360/67 running tss/360. 1401 handled unit record front end for 709 ... doing card reader->tape and tape->printer/punch ... tapes moved back and forth between 1401 & 709 ... and 709 ran ibsys tape->tape.

as part of transition, the 1401 was replaced with 360/30 ... while 360/30 had 1401 hardware emulation and able to directly run 1401 "MPIO" ... i got student job to reimplement MPIO on 360/30. I eventually had assembler program with conditional assembly statements for a stand-alone version and version running with system services under os/360 that was box of cards (about 2000 statements). Stand-alone version i got to design and implement my monitor, scheduler, device drivers, interrupt handlers, error recovery, storage management, ettc.

univ. shutdown datacenter from 8am sat. until 8am monday ... so i had the whole machine room to myself for 48hrs straight. This continued through the summer ... but going into school year ... it was little hard making monday classes after have been up for 48hrs straight.

I fairly early learned that the first thing i did when i came in was to take everything apart and clean it.

some recent posts mentioning redoing MPIO for 360/30:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#24 Is Microsoft becoming folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#50 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#39 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#24 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#18 A Brief History of Cloud Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#69 model numbers; was re: World's worst programming environment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#16 Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#24 Aging Sysprogs = Aging Farmers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#54 Curiosity: TCB mapping macro name - why IKJTCB?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#23 Scary Sysprogs and educating those 'kids'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#26 [OT ] Mainframe memories

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
Date: 02 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading; Probe Centers on Whether It's Insider Trading When High-Frequency Traders Act on Information Others Can't See
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304886904579473874181722310

FBI to Investigate Wall Street's Latest Blemish: High-Frequency Trading
http://www.thewire.com/business/2014/03/fbi-to-investigate-wall-streets-latest-blemish-high-frequency-trading/359938/

"The Market Is Rigged" - Michael Lewis Explains How HFTs "Screw" Investors Every Day
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-03-31/market-rigged-michael-lewis-explains-how-hfts-screw-investors-every-day
The Wolf Hunters of Wall Street; An Adaptation From 'Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,' by Michael Lewis
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/06/magazine/flash-boys-michael-lewis.html?pagewanted=all

note the market has always been rigged ... even before HFT
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/
... its illegal but they don't have anything to worry about from SEC

High Frequency Trading: Why Now And What Happens Next
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-03-31/high-frequency-trading-why-now-and-what-happens-next
Here Come The Feds: FBI Probing HFT
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-03-31/here-come-feds-fbi-probing

Michael Lewis this morning on TV business news:

"Even if SEC was trying to do its job ..... "

also not trying to blame HFT traders ... they are just naturally predators taking advantage of glitches in the system ... view everybody else as prey.

...

Michael Lewis' Flash Boys: How to curb high-frequency trading.
http://www.slate.com/articles/business/the_edgy_optimist/2014/04/michael_lewis_flash_boys_how_to_curb_high_frequency_trading.html
High-Speed Trading Is Turning Wall Street Into a Casino
http://time.com/45822/high-speed-trading-is-turning-wall-street-into-a-casino/
On A 'Rigged' Wall Street, Milliseconds Make All The Difference : NPR
http://www.npr.org/2014/04/01/297686724/on-a-rigged-wall-street-milliseconds-make-all-the-difference
New York State AG Eric Schneiderman: Some high-frequency trading practices "may be illegal"
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-york-state-ag-eric-schneiderman-some-high-frequency-trading-practices-may-be-illegal/
FBI Seeks Help From High-Frequency Traders to Find Abuses
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-31/fbi-said-to-probe-high-speed-traders-over-abuse-of-information.html
Michael Lewis' Flash Boys: How to curb high-frequency trading
http://www.slate.com/articles/business/the_edgy_optimist/2014/04/michael_lewis_flash_boys_how_to_curb_high_frequency_trading.html?wpisrc=burger_bar
MICHAEL LEWIS: David Einhorn A 'Dumb Tourist' In A Casino
http://www.businessinsider.com/michael-lewis-david-einhorn-a-dumb-tourist-in-a-casino-2014-4
From The Small To The Big: Earthquakes, Avalanches, & High-Frequency Trading
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-02/small-big-earthquakes-avalanches-high-frequency-trading
High-Frequency Trading Allegations Lead To Confrontation On CNBC
http://news.firedoglake.com/2014/04/02/high-frequency-trading-allegations-lead-to-confrontation-on-cnbc/
Presenting The Next Market Rigged By High Frequency Trading
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-02/presenting-next-market-rigged-high-frequency-trading
Michael Lewis Doesn't Like High-Frequency Traders - Bloomberg View
http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-03-31/michael-lewis-doesn-t-like-high-frequency-traders
High-Frequency Traders Chase Currencies as Stock Volume Recedes
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-02/high-frequency-traders-chase-currencies-as-stock-volume-recedes.html
High-Speed Trading Is Turning Wall Street Into a Casino
http://time.com/45822/high-speed-trading-is-turning-wall-street-into-a-casino/
Lewis Explains The Casino: "Why Are You Even Arguing" That This Is Not Rigged?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-02/lewis-explains-casino-why-are-you-even-arguing-not-rigged
Have We Reached Peak Wall Street?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-02/have-we-reached-peak-wall-street
It's 3:29:57 pm - Do You Know Where Your Massive "Send DJIA Green For 2014" Order Is?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-02/its-32957-pm-do-you-know-where-your-massive-send-djia-green-2014-order
Peak HFT?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-02/peak-hft

past posts mentioning HFT:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#36 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#44 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#13 Study links ultrafast machine trading with risk of crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#21 Study links ultrafast trading with risk of crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#86 The Dangers of High-Frequency Trading; Wall Street's Speed Freaks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#22 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#73 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#84 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#31 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#32 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#37 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#66 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#85 Study: One in Five Firms Misrepresent Earnings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#22 Four Signs Your Awesome Investment May Actually Be A Ponzi Scheme
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#39 History--punched card transmission over telegraph lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#38 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#42 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#44 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#7 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#29 Destructive Destruction? An Ecological Study of High Frequency Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#41 Computer Simulations Reveal Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#75 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#67 The End Of 'Orderly And Fair Markets'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#30 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#49 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#58 Traders Said to Rig Currency Rates to Profit Off Clients
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#59 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#89 FBI Finds Holes in System Protecting Economic Data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#10 What Makes Infrastructure investment not bizarre
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#12 What Makes Infrastructure investment not bizarre
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#50 IBM Furloughs U.S. Hardware Employees to Reduce Costs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#16 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#53 Retirement Savings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#93 High Frequency Terrorism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#1 IBM board OK repurchase of another $15B of stock
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#15 Boyd Blasphemy: Justifying the F-35
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#40 The Wall Street Code: HFT Whisteblower Haim Bodek on Algorithmic Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#76 A Little More on the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#40 ELP weighs in on the software issue:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#54 Pensions, was Re: Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#82 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#84 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#89 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#28 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#29 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#43 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#56 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#65 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#7 N.Y. Barclays Libor Traders Said to Face U.K. Charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#64 Wells Fargo made up on-demand foreclosure papers plan: court filing charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#93 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#100 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The IBM Strategy

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The IBM Strategy
Date: 03 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#8 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#12 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#12 The IBM Strategy

How Boeing merges its data centers with the Amazon and Microsoft clouds; Carving data up into "puzzle pieces" keeps sensitive information secure.
http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/04/how-boeing-merges-its-data-centers-with-the-amazon-and-microsoft-clouds/

sounds a little like effort to consolidate all Boeing dataprocessing into BCS from summer 1969. A little x-over from "Boyd for Business & Innovation Conference"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#9 Boyd for Business & Innovation Conference

when i was an undergraduate, I was convinced to spend a summer helping setup Boeing computer services ... one of the half dozen or so 1st employees ... basically consolidate all dataprocessing in single business unit to better monetize the investment. Part of this was Renton datacenter which I thought was possibly the largest in the world with something like $300m in large IBM mainframes. However, they had a D/R scenario where Mt. Rainier warms up and massive mud slide takes out the Renton datacenter. the estimate was the loss of the Renton datacenter for a week would cost Boeing more than the cost of the data center ... so Renton was being replicated at the new 747 plant up in Everett. note communities closer to Mt. Rainier have civil defense sirens for such mud slide emergency ... somewhat similar to what you may see for tsunami warnings in hawaii. reference:
http://www.citizenreviewonline.org/june2004/danger.htm
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Rainier_Volcano_Lahar_Warning_System

Later I would meet John Boyd and sponsor his briefings at IBM. His biographies have him doing stint in command of "spook base" (at the same time I was at Boeing) claiming it was a $2.5B windfall for IBM (nearly ten times that of Renton datacenter and over $17B in today's dollars). spook base reference, gone 404, but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

actually the spring of 1969 ... I had been talked into giving a one week computer class (during spring break) to four people that were part of the startup BCS team ... and the IBMers assigned to the effort.

other past posts mentioning BCS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#32 Roads as Runways Was: Re: BA Solve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#130 early hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#66 360 Architecture, Multics, ... was (Re: X86 ultimate CISC? No.)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#8 "HAL's Legacy and the Vision of 2001: A Space Odyssey"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#9 "HAL's Legacy and the Vision of 2001: A Space Odyssey"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#23 Linux IA-64 interrupts [was Re: Itanium benchmarks ...]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#50 IBM 705 computer manual
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#56 YKYBHTLW....
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#32 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#55 TSS/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#44 PDP-10 Archive migration plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#30 Computers in Science Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#22 Computer Terminal Design Over the Years
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#43 Killer Hard Drives - Shrapnel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#64 10 choices that were critical to the Net's success
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#71 bps loader, was PLX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#72 bps loader, was PLX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#30 Computer History Exhibition, Grenoble France
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#56 cost of crossing kernel/user boundary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#64 cost of crossing kernel/user boundary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#34 Thoughts on Utility Computing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#37 Thoughts on Utility Computing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#32 SR 15,15 was: IEFBR14 Problems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004.html#53 Mainframe not a good architecture for interactive workloads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#55 If there had been no MS-DOS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#46 Finites State Machine (OT?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#58 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#8 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#19 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#10 Where should the type information be: in tags and descriptors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#47 Gartner: Stop Outsourcing Now
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#40 All Good Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#43 Sprint backs out of IBM outsourcing deal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#29 PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#30 PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#11 Not Your Dad's Mainframe: Little Iron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#13 The SEL 840 computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#44 The not-so-little shop of 747s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#49 Where can you get a Minor in Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#50 Where can you get a Minor in Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#44 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#54 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#74 The interactive experience on yesterday's Unix?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#19 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#60 Scholars needed to build a computer history bibliography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#26 T3 Sues IBM To Break its Mainframe Monopoly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#36 What do YOU call the # sign?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#36 windows time service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#71 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#72 Price of CPU seconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#64 Crippleware: hardware examples
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#60 Costing for IT Services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#12 why stopped?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#83 F111 related discussion x-over from Facebook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#13 Four decades of a flying giant
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#15 System/360 Announcement (7Apr64)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#5 mainframe replacement (Z/Journal Does it Again)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#2 The computer did it
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#3 The computer did it
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#41 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#15 Mainframe Hall of Fame: Three New Members Added
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#37 Young Developers Get Old Mainframers' Jobs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#33 Survey Revives Depate Over Mainframe's Future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#49 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#61 Source code for s/360 [PUBLIC]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#89 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#90 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#29 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#76 Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#0 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#75 Is Security a Curse for the Cloud Computing Industry?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#21 QUIKCELL Doc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#54 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#66 Global CIO: Global Banks Form Consortium To Counter HP, IBM, & Oracle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#18 taking down the machine - z9 series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#47 C-I-C-S vs KICKS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#50 C-I-C-S vs KICKS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#51 Mainframe Hacking -- Fact or Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#61 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#59 z196 sysplex question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#26 Global Sourcing with Cloud Computing and Virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#65 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#59 Boeing Plant 2 ... End of an Era
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#73 Speed of Old Hard Disks - adcons
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#7 Mainframe upgrade done with wire cutters?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#66 Boeing Plant 2 ... End of an Era
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#54 Downloading PoOps?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#61 Do you remember back to June 23, 1969 when IBM unbundled
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#65 Who was the Greatest IBM President and CEO of the last century?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#37 movie "Airport" on cable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#70 1979 SHARE LSRAD Report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#87 Scanning JES3 JCL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#19 Deja Cloud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#42 Drones now account for one third of U.S. warplanes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#51 5 meg hard drive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#52 5 meg hard drive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#61 Hybrid computing -- from mainframe to virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#18 Memory versus processor speed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#40 STSC Story
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#0 Top IBM Salespeople Are Leaving In Droves, Say Those Who Have Quit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#3 Quitting Top IBM Salespeople Say They Are Leaving In Droves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#69 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#92 Naked emperors, holy cows and Libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#4 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#7 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#13 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#50 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#55 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#74 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#13 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#25 Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#60 Bridgestone Sues IBM For $600 Million Over Allegedly 'Defective' System That Plunged The Company Into 'Chaos'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#19 Why IBM chose MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!' made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#32 [OT ] Mainframe memories

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 8150?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM 8150?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 3 Apr 2014 11:06:59 -0700
michaelpetersonsc writes:
It was the 1st Ibm PC. with floppies and 256 k ram and a monochrom screen

>On Monday, February 20, 1995 10:19:29 AM UTC-5, Chris Call wrote:
> Can anyone ID a machine for me? It's an IBM8150. It runs a system called DCPX,
> and runs at least one application written in 3790 macro assembly language.


wow from 1995, must be april 1st

8100 used UC (universal controller) ... also used in 3705 and 3081 service processor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_8100

above references that it ran two different incompatible systems, DPPX and DPCX

at one point evans asked my wife to review it ... and shortly afterwards it was decommited.

old email about MIT lisp group asking evans for 801/risc chips and he offered 8100 instead.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#email790711

first ibm "personal computer" was 5100 ... done in 1973
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_5100

by the palo alto science center ... it ran PALM processor ... emulating subset of 360 and ran a version of apl/360. predating later better known 5150 introduced in 1981.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Personal_Computer

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
Date: 03 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#14 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#16 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement

Note mid-70s, the US HONE datacenters were consolidated in silicon valley and by the late 70s, vm370 had been enhanced to provide the largest single-system-image (loosely-coupled cluster) of large POK tightly-coupled (multiprocessor) mainframes, including load-balancing and failure recovery across the complex. With vm370 non-strategic, this sort of support was not released to customers until a few years ago (30yrs later). The consolidation into datacenter with load-balancing across user population spread across multiple timezones allowed for improved "on-demand" useage ... peak useage in one timezone taking advantage of valley useage in other timezones (some analogies to current public cloud computing).

landmark trivia, when facebook moved into silicon valley it occupied a new bldg built next door to the old HONE datacenter.

I transferred from the cambridge science center to san jose research in this period ... and there use to be a joke that I worked 4shifts ... 1st shift in bldg.28/sjr, 2nd shift got to play disk engineer in bldgs14&15 ... some old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk
third shift in bldg90/stl, and then 4shift/weekends at HONE ... some old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

Somewhat as a result of online computer conferencing a researcher sat in the back of my office for 9months, took notes on how i communicated, face-to-face, telephone; went with me to meetings, and to copies of all my incoming & outgoing email and logs of all my instant messages. The result was a research report, a Stanford phd on computer mediated communication (joint between language and computer ai, Winograd was one of the advisers), papers and books ... one of the books was "Knowledge Machines":
http://www.amazon.com/Knowledge-Machines-Language-Information-Technological/dp/0582071313/

Part of the online computer conferencing was referred to as Tandem Memos ... from IBM Jargon:

Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

Which were kicked off with a trip report I distributed 2nd & 3rd April1981 about a visit to Jim Gray at Tandem. I had worked with Jim at IBM Research and when he was leaving he palmed off bunch of stuff on me as well as writing the MIP envy tome copy hear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email800920
slightly later version a Jim's site that Microsoft keeps:
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/gray/
here
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/gray/papers/CritiqueOfIBM%27sCSResearch.pdf

and from IBM Jargon:

MIP envy - n. The term, coined by Jim Gray in 1980, that began the Tandem Memos (q.v.). MIP envy is the coveting of other's facilities - not just the CPU power available to them, but also the languages, editors, debuggers, mail systems and networks. MIP envy is a term every programmer will understand, being another expression of the proverb The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

... snip ...

Note that MIP envy predates my tandem trip report by several months.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
Date: 04 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#14 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#16 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#21 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement

Note that the communication group was notorious for corporate dirty tricks. In the late 80s they were distributing a lot of internal misinformation things like that the internal network had to be converted to SNA/VTAM and that the NSFNET backbone (precursor to modern internet) could be run over SNA/VTAM (somebody collected a lot of the emails and forwarded them to us). some old NSFNET backbone email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
collected NSFNET backbone SNA/VTAM misinformation, heavily clipped and redacted to protect the guilty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109
some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

They also were strongly opposing TCP/IP for mainframe ... when they no longer could directly oppose it ... they switched to saying that since they had corporate strategic responsibility for everything that crossed the datacenter walls ... it was their responsibility to release TCP/IP ... they enormously inflated the monthly price as well as crippling it in various ways. The original TCP/IP product got 44kbytes/sec throughput using nearly whole 3090 processor. I did the software enhancements to support RFC1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research between 4341 and a Cray, got sustained 4341 channel throughput using only modest amount of 4341 CPU (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

In the late 80s, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at the internal, annual world-wide communication group conference supposedly on 3174 performance. However, he opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication was strongly fighting off distributed computing and client/server trying to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm and install base ... and the disk division was seeing data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to reverse the problem, but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group .... with its stranglehold on datacenters and corporate strategic ownership of everything that crossed the datacenter walls. This stranglehold on the datacenter was major factor in the company going into the red a few years later. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

Old post referencing Theo's passing (MAINTCMS @ UITHONE)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#9

includes old email exchange regarding adding FULIST, BROWSE, IOS3270 in shared segment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#email781010
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#email781011

I had originally done paged mapped filesystem for CP67/CMS with a whole lot of bells and whistles supporting shared segments ... and was on the look out for things to put in shared segments. I then migrated it to vm370/cms ... some old email reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

a very small subset of csc/vm was picked up for inclusion in vm370 release 3 ... including a small piece of the shared segment support as DCSS (but w/o the page mapped filesystem support). I had benchmarks easily showing 3times throughput improvement for filesystem stuff with paged mapped over standard cms filesystems, at the time CDF ... but also later EDF. past posts mentioning paged map filesystem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap
and other posts mentioning shared segments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 4 Apr 2014 07:34:19 -0700
ltsai85613@GMAIL.COM (Tsai Laurence) writes:
as the subject, if your shop using AWS service, what is it? Backup svc? Solution ?

How Boeing merges its data centers with the Amazon and Microsoft clouds; Carving data up into "puzzle pieces" keeps sensitive information secure.
http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/04/how-boeing-merges-its-data-centers-with-the-amazon-and-microsoft-clouds/

sounds a little like effort to consolidate all Boeing dataprocessing into BCS

the spring of 1969 ... I had been talked into giving a one week computer class (during spring break, I was still undergraduate and taking classes) to four people that were part of the startup BCS team ... and the IBMers assigned to the effort.

then that summer spent in Seattle helping setup Boeing computer services ... one of the half dozen or so 1st employees ... basically consolidate all dataprocessing in single business unit to better monetize the investment. Part of this was Renton datacenter which I thought was possibly the largest in the world with something like $300m in large IBM mainframes (that summer 360/65s were arriving faster than they could be installed, there were constantly pieces of 360/65s in the hallways around the machine room).

However, they had a D/R scenario where Mt. Rainier warms up and massive mud slide takes out the Renton datacenter. the estimate was the loss of the Renton datacenter for a week would cost Boeing more than the cost of the data center ... so Renton was being replicated at the new 747 plant up in Everett. note communities closer to Mt. Rainier have civil defense sirens for such mud slide emergency ... reference
http://www.citizenreviewonline.org/june2004/danger.htm
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Rainier_Volcano_Lahar_Warning_System

Later I would meet John Boyd and sponsor his briefings at IBM. His biographies have him doing stint in command of "spook base" (at the same time I was at Boeing) claiming it was a $2.5B windfall for IBM (nearly ten times that of Renton datacenter and over $17B in today's dollars). spook base reference, gone 404, but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

recent posts mentioning BCS/Boeing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#31 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#32 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#37 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#9 Boyd for Business & Innovation Conference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#19 The IBM Strategy

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tandem Memos

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Tandem Memos
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Apr 2014 13:32:45 -0400
I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until some time late 85 or possibly early 86) during the late 70s and early 80s. Folklore is when the executive committee (chairman, ceo, pres. etc) was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.

Part of the online computer conferencing was referred to as "Tandem Memos" ... from IBM Jargon:

Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

Which were kicked off with a trip report I distributed 2nd & 3rd April1981 about a visit to Jim Gray at Tandem. I had worked with Jim at IBM Research and when he was leaving he palmed off bunch of stuff on me as well as writing the "MIP envy" tome ... copy here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email800920

slightly later version a Jim's site that Microsoft keeps:
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/gray/
here
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/gray/papers/CritiqueOfIBM%27sCSResearch.pdf

and from IBM Jargon:

MIP envy - n. The term, coined by Jim Gray in 1980, that began the Tandem Memos (q.v.). MIP envy is the coveting of other's facilities - not just the CPU power available to them, but also the languages, editors, debuggers, mail systems and networks. MIP envy is a term every programmer will understand, being another expression of the proverb The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

... snip ...

Note that "MIP envy" predates my tandem trip report by several months (Sept1980 versus Apr1981).

Before he left, Jim would frequently come to "fridays" (drinking). One night we were discussing that so few people in the corporation used or knew anything about computers (especially top executives and upper management). We discussed any silver bullet application that might motivate executives to start using computer (and as a result help understand the business). We came up with idea to do online telephone books ... but we had criteria that the effort to implement needed to be less than 8hrs of each of our time.

some went 404 or moved ... but still at wayback machines

Tribute press release:
http://web.archive.org/web/20080616153833/http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/IPRO/JimGrayTribute/pressrelease.html

podcast of the tribute:
http://web.archive.org/web/20080604010939/http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=23082
http://web.archive.org/web/20080604072804/http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=23083
http://web.archive.org/web/20080604072809/http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=23087
http://web.archive.org/web/20080604072815/http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=23088
general session youtube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9ZUz3DoZPc

tribute also by ACM SIGMOD
http://www.sigmod.org/publications/sigmod-record/0806

in the panel discussion, one of the Tandem people talked about Jim doing online telephone book for Tandem. I then get up and talk about earlier effort at IBM SJR.

A couple years after Gray left, I met John Boyd and would sponsor his briefings at IBM ... sort of the equivalent to IBM upper management and top executives not using nor understanding computers:

How mission command works: Sherman's memoirs (III) show that it is based in trust, and must work as a two-way street
http://ricks.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2014/04/02/how_mission_command_works_shermans_memoirs_iii_show_that_it_is_based_in_trust_and_m
General Sherman (IV) says one sign of effective leadership is having a small staff
http://ricks.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2014/04/04/general_sherman_iv_says_one_sign_of_effective_leadership_is_having_a_small_staff

There was recent article that cutting 20% of the (bloated number of) flag officers in the pentagon would save more money than cutting all A10s ($5B over 5yrs, $1B/yr compared to $3.5B cutting A10s) ... in large part because it would also require eliminating their massive staffs.

Boyd used to tell the story of reviewing war games ... and referring to admirals & generals had no "finger feel" for the war rooms ... since they spent all year playing golf while letting their staffs practice.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 4 Apr 2014 16:00:20 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#23 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://beta.slashdot.org/story/200323

Note NSFNET backbone was precursor to modern internet (and cloud computing).
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

we had been working with various players and were suppose to get $20M to tie together the various NSF supercomputer sites. Then congress cuts the budget and some other things happen. Finally they come out with an RFP but internal politics prevent us from bidding. The director of NSF tries to help by writing the company a letter, but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments about what we already have running is at least 5yrs ahead of bid responses). Some old nsfnet related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
posts mentioning NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

We had project with T1 and faster speed links on the internal network .. some of the past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

... one of the differences was that all internal links had to be encrypted ... which effectively required link encryptors. some old crypt related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#crypto

includes some proposal for a PGP-like implementation in 1981. One of the issues was that software DES for sustained full-duplex T1 would have required dedicating 100% of both processors of large mainframe 3081K.

Now I didn't like what I had payed for T1 link encryptors and finding link encryptors faster than T1 was really hard ... so I got involved in doing our own; the design was to be able to handle several megabytes (not megabits) per second sustained and could be built for under $100. At first the corporate crypto product group claimed that it significantly reduced DES crypto strength. It took me 3months to figure out how to explain to them what was going on and convince them it was significantly stronger than DES rather than significantly weaker. However it was hollow victory, and I realized that there were three kinds of crypto 1) the kind they don't care about, 2) the kind you can't do, 3) the kind you can only do for them (I was told I could build as many as I wanted, but they would have to all be sent to an address in Maryland; and I couldn't use any of them).

Later (after we left), we were brought in as consultants to a small client/server startup that wanted to do payments on their server; they had developed this technology they called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". We had to map the technology to payment business process, audit/walk-thru these new businesses selling SSL domain name certificates, and establish deployment requirements. Almost immediately webservers found that "SSL" cut their throughput 80-90% and they dropped back to just using "SSL" for checkout/payment.

Note, basic SSL assumption was that users understood the relationship between the webserver they wanted to talk to and the URL they typed in. The browser would then use SSL to validate that the webserver being talked to corresponded with the URL typed in. Both were needed for the webserver being talked to was the webserver the user thought they were talking to. Webservers dropped back to only using SSL for checkout/payment. Now the URL the user typed in was no longer validated. Then payment URL was provided by clicked on button from the unvalidated webserver. The result was that now SSL established that the webserver being talked to was the webserver it claimed to be (but not necessarily the webserver the user thought it was).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
Date: 05 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#14 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#16 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#21 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#22 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement

After I left, somebody sent me a complete copy of Tandem Memos ... assuming we are talking about the same person ... I likely have both hard & soft copy. Part of the lore was somebody had run off six copies duplexed on 6670 and put in tandem 3-ring binders and mailed to the corporate executive committee.

I'm sure Mark Smotherman at Clemson would like everything he could get on FS
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/fs.html
he has been working on lots of historical stuff
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/hist.html
that has lots of references.
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/architects.html
including ACS
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs.html
and discussion of end of ACS
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

Above discusses ACS was shutdown because IBM management was worried that it would advance computer state-of-the-art too fast and they would loose control of the market. It has some discussion of features showing up more than 20yrs later in ES/9000.

FS Trivia ... was partitioned into 12-13(?) sections. My wife reported directly to person responsible for "interconnect" ... and she got to do detailed reviews of lots of other sections. One of her comments was that many other sections were little more than presentations ... no specs and/or any idea of how they might be implemented.

From Ferguson/Morris Computer Wars (effect of Future System failure):

... and perhaps most damaging, the old culture under Watson Snr and Jr of free and vigorous debate was replaced with sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers. It's claimed that thereafter, IBM lived in the shadow of defeat

... and:
But because of the heavy investment of face by the top management, F/S took years to kill, although its wrongheadedness was obvious from the very outset. "For the first time, during F/S, outspoken criticism became politically dangerous," recalls a former top executive.

... snip ...

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
Date: 05 Apr 2014
Blog: Facebook
also (linkedin) IETF
http://lnkd.in/dthBCEH

TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://beta.slashdot.org/story/200323

references

CERF: Classified NSA Work Mucked Up Security For Early TCP/IP
http://blog.veracode.com/2014/04/cerf-classified-nsa-work-mucked-up-security-for-early-tcpip/

Note NSFNET backbone was precursor to modern internet (and cloud computing).
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

we had been working with various players and were suppose to get $20M to tie together the various NSF supercomputer sites. Then congress cuts the budget and some other things happen. Finally they come out with an RFP but internal politics prevent us from bidding. The director of NSF tries to help by writing the company a letter, but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments about what we already have running is at least 5yrs ahead of bid responses). Some old nsfnet related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

We had project with T1 and faster speed links on the internal network ... one of the differences was that all internal links had to be encrypted ... which effectively required link encryptors. some old crypt related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#crypto

includes some proposal for a PGP-like implementation in 1981. One of the issues was that software DES for sustained full-duplex T1 would have required dedicating 100% of both processors of large mainframe 3081K. Now I didn't like what I had payed for T1 link encryptors and finding link encryptors faster than T1 was really hard ... so I got involved in doing our own; the design was to be able to handle several megabytes (not megabits) per second sustained and could be built for under $100. At first the corporate crypto product group claimed that it significantly reduced DES crypto strength. It took me 3months to figure out how to explain to them what was going on and convince them it was significantly stronger than DES rather than significantly weaker. However it was hollow victory, and I realized that there were three kinds of crypto 1) the kind they don't care about, 2) the kind you can't do, 3) the kind you can only do for them (I was told I could build as many as I wanted, but they would have to all be sent to an address in Maryland; and I couldn't use any of them).

Later (after we left), we were brought in as consultants to a small client/server startup that wanted to do payments on their server; they had developed this technology they called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". We had to map the technology to payment business process, audit/walk-thru these new businesses selling SSL domain name certificates, and establish deployment requirements. Almost immediately webservers found that "SSL" cut their throughput 80-90% and they dropped back to just using "SSL" for checkout/payment.

Note, basic SSL assumption was that users understood the relationship between the webserver they wanted to talk to and the URL they typed in. The browser would then use SSL to validate that the webserver being talked to corresponded with the URL typed in. Both were needed for the webserver being talked to was the webserver the user thought they were talking to. Webservers dropped back to only using SSL for checkout/payment. Now the URL the user typed in was no longer validated. Then payment URL was provided by clicked on button from the unvalidated webserver. The result was that now SSL established that the webserver being talked to was the webserver it claimed to be (but not necessarily the webserver the user thought it was).

Talk to Vint ... however as I mention, software crypto at the time couldn't keep up with full-speed links (even DES crypto saturate large mainframe processing power) ... and hardware stuff I played with in order to run full speed ... I got visited. Even two decades ago ... SSL was still too expensive for software.

for fun of it ... former co-worker at ibm ... also mentions vint from the 70s
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

other trivia ... also mentions former RFC editor ... in 90s he let me help him with STD1

Somewhat because of having done "electronic commerce", in the mid-90s we were invited to be part of the X9A10 financial standard transaction working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments (which resulted in x9.59 financial transaction standard).

About the same time the card associations were working on internet payment standard (and a different point-of-sale standard). When the internet payment standard was first published, I did a RSA pubilc key operations profile and a business process profile. A friend had a copy of the BSAFE library (standard RSA public key software library) and had improved it so that it ran four times faster. I got him to run the RSA public key operations profile on a number of different platforms and reported the results back to the card association working group. The group (including representatives from several well known vendors) response was that the numbers were 100 times too slow. It was obvious none of them had ever done any real live public key work ... since they should have said it was four times too fast. Six months later when they had a prototype running, the actual numbers were within a couple percent of the earlier profile numbers (the speedups to BSAFE had been incorporated into standard distribution).

the article references

CERF: Classified NSA Work Mucked Up Security For Early TCP/IP
http://blog.veracode.com/2014/04/cerf-classified-nsa-work-mucked-up-security-for-early-tcpip/

from above:
It's hard to listen to Cerf lamenting the absence of strong authentication and encryption in the foundational protocol of the Internet, or to think about the myriad of online ills in the past two decades that might have been preempted with a stronger and more secure protocol and not wonder what might have been.

... snip ...

SSL has been used to encrypt/hide transaction info while transmitting because evesdropping can use information for form of replay attack to perform fraudulent transactions. X9.59 uses strong authentication and slightly tweaked the paradigm to eliminate replay attacks (crooks could no longer use previous transaction information to perform fraudulent transactions). This then also eliminates the need for SSL "hiding" the information. It also eliminates the risk from data breaches (data at rest).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959

The agency may be ambivalent about x9.59 since it eliminated need for encryption ... however, it also eliminated the need for identification (purely used strong authentication). There has been PAIN/CAIN paradigm: privacy/confidential, authentication, identification, non-repudiation. I badgered the Hayden/Inglis panel
http://lsgs.georgetown.edu/events/InternationalEngagementonCyber2014

about lot of people not understanding difference between authentication and identification. Inglis sort of needled back about non-repudiation.

the internal network was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late '85 or possibly early '86. At the great change over to tcp/ip on 1jan1983, the arpanet had something like 100 IMP nodes and possibly 255 connected hosts, while internal network was rapidly 1000 nodes. list of corporate locations during 1983 that added one or more nodes.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8

mid-80s, the internal network supposedly had more than half of all link encryptors (straight DES, typically 9.6kbit to 56kbiit) in the world. there were sporadic problems with various national agencies activating link encryptors ... especially when the link crossed national boundaries ... even when it was between corporate locations

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Apr 2014 12:50:57 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
True, but many of those that didn't had that newfangled thing called a disk drive that you could copy your scrambled cards to, and then do a sort with a computer program.

Not perfect, as there would be CPU time charges, but it would be an option in many cases.

Also, sequence numbers simplify putting the cards in order by hand if it comes to that.


cp67/cms had an "update" program that relied on sequence number convention (default cols 73-80) ... and the standard cms editor could output file image with sequence numbers automatically generated ... science center settle on default of starting with 1000 and incrementing by 1000.

an original source was kept static for some time so that multiple people could work on it simulataneously and having some probability of their different changes could work w/o too much conflict ... as separate update files. problem was that for an update file ... you still had to manually type the sequence numbers for the new/changed card images.

as an undergraduate ... I was making so many source changes (update files) that I got tired of manually typing the new sequence number field ... and wrote a preprocessor to the update file that would automatically generate the required sequence numbers.

an update sequence might have something like ./ r 510000 512000

aka replace 3 cards in the base source, numbered 510000, 511000, and 512000 (or all cards from 510000 to 512000) with new cards (potentially 100 or more) ... and output the modified source as new (temporary work) file for assembly.

For the preparser i added the syntax ./ r 510000 512000 $

where the "$" indicated that preparser was to generate default sequence numbers in the following cards. In this case it would default to first sequence number 510100 and increment by 100.

it also allowed to override the default ./ r 510000 512000 $ 510010 10

i.e. first replaced statement started with 510010 and increment by 10.

later at the science center, the "$" update preprocessor was included in the multi-level update process (serially apply several updates in fixed sequence) ... and then later incorporated into part of the standard update program processing.

Initially, this would apply the first update to the original source, producing a temporary file, then apply the 2nd update to the temporary file producing a new temporary file, and then repeat until all updates had been applied.

Later cms editors were enhanced to generate edit changes in update file format (rather than whole new source program).

In the mid-80s, when Melinda was looking for the original multi-level update process ... I was able to pull all the files off an archive tape I had and send them to her.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email850906
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email850908

it was very fortunate timing. shortly later, Almaden research was having a operations problem involving mounting random tapes as scratch and I lots nearly everything I had from the 60s & 70s as undergraduate and from science center ... even triple-replicated on three different tapes (but all in the same tape library).

past a.f.c. post with more detailed discussion of syntax
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#45 sorting

includes this reference to ibm documentation on multi-level update
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/HCSD0B00/2.6?SHELF=hcsh2a70&DT=20040720092957

some past posts mentioning multi-level source update
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#63 Source code for s/360 [PUBLIC]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#60 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#39 1971PerformanceStudies - Typical OS/MFT 40/50/65s analysed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#3 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#80 TSO Profile NUM and PACK
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#12 program coding pads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#27 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#34 Data Areas?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#49 z/OS's basis for TCP/IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#22 The Invention of Email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#72 Any cool anecdotes IBM 40yrs of VM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#61 Google Patents Staple of '70s Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#61 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#68 What Makes code storage management so cool?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#9 IBM ad for Basic Operating System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#19 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#19 Write Inhibit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#22 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#57 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems

some past posts mentioning operation problems at almaden:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#42 vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#51 Scholars needed to build a computer history bibliography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#52 TOPS-10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#8 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#13 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#4 Why do IBMers think disks are 'Direct Access'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#66 Evolution of Floating Point
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#17 old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#51 Source code for s/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#65 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#0 Old EMAIL Index
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#45 Is email dead? What do you think?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#39 1971PerformanceStudies - Typical OS/MFT 40/50/65s analysed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#89 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#3 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#4 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#12 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#16 Dennis Ritchie
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#62 Hard Disk Drive Construction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#22 The Invention of Email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#72 Any cool anecdotes IBM 40yrs of VM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#61 Google Patents Staple of '70s Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#68 What Makes code storage management so cool?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#9 IBM ad for Basic Operating System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#60 Bridgestone Sues IBM For $600 Million Over Allegedly 'Defective' System That Plunged The Company Into 'Chaos'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#59 write rings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#92 write rings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#19 Write Inhibit

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Apr 2014 12:59:06 -0400
The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT; In 1964, mainframes weren't new, but the System/360 revolutionized the computer industry
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2014/040414-the-mainframe-turns-50-or-280427.html

Fifty years on, mainframer remembers 'a fantastic time to be an engineer' The IBM System/360 revolutionized business computing with the first set of compatible, scalable systems
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2014/040414-fifty-years-on-mainframer-remembers-280428.html

Note end of ACS (advanced computer system) 360.
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

has some details about 360 business and cost structure. ACS360 was canceled by IBM management because they were afraid that it might advance the state-of-the-art too fast and IBM would loose control of the market. At the bottom it lists features that show up in ES/9000 more than 20 years later.

some recent posts mentioning "mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#0 The Mother of All Demos: The 1968 presentation that sparked a tech revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#3 We need to talk about TED
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#5 Application development paradigms [was: RE: Learning Rexx]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#6 Application development paradigms [was: RE: Learning Rexx]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#7 The Mother of All Demos: The 1968 presentation that sparked a tech revoluti
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#10 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#18 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#22 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#23 Scary Sysprogs and educating those 'kids'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#27 Hardware failures (was Re: Scary Sysprogs ...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#33 Warnings for the U.S. military about innovation and the information age: The Pentagon looks like a minicomputer firm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#50 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#52 IBM Wild Ducks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#68 Imprecise Interrupts and the 360/195
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#71 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#73 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#94 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#97 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#4 IBM Plans Big Spending for the Cloud ($1.2B)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#15 Quixotically on-topic post, still on topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#18 Quixotically on-topic post, still on topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#27 IBM sells x86 server business to Levono
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#35 OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#39 Resistance to Java
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#44 Resistance to Java
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#46 Resistance to Java
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#70 Salesmen--IBM and Coca Cola
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#72 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#81 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#83 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#84 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#97 Where does the term Wild Duck come from?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#102 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#14 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#20 9th Feb 2014
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#21 The PDP-8/e and thread drifT?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#22 US Federal Reserve pushes ahead with Faster Payments planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#66 F-35 JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER IS A LEMON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#71 assembler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#72 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#88 Optimization, CPU time, and related issues
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#93 Curious observation: lack of a simple optimization in a C program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#96 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#8 Microsoft culture must change, chairman says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#16 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#22 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#23 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#25 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#26 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#27 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#30 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#32 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#33 Long lived code? Long live long lived code!?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#40 Missed Alarms and 40 Million Stolen Credit Card Numbers: How Target Blew It
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#51 Can we logon to TSO witout having TN3270 up ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#54 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#55 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#65 Cracking IBM Mainframe Password Hashes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#71 Last Gasp For Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#90 Enterprise Cobol 5.1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#95 IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue would rather you forgot
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#101 Reflexivity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#4 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#8 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#9 Boyd for Business & Innovation Conference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#10 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#11 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#12 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#13 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#14 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#19 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#21 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#22 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#23 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Zeus malware found with valid digital certificate

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Zeus malware found with valid digital certificate
Date: 05 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Zeus malware found with valid digital certificate
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2014/040414-zeus-malware-found-with-valid-280416.html

Bank-raid ZeuS malware waltzes around web with 'valid app signature'; Check your vaults. Did someone just lose their secret software signing key? http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/04/05/digitally_signed_zeus/

two issues:

1) at 1996 MDC at SanFran, all the banners said "Internet" ... but all the sessions started with "protect you investment". "protect you investment" was convention of being able to embedded visualbasic programming code in data files ... this grew up from generation of closed, safe, small business local area networks. what was happening the underlying networking structure was being expanded to the internet ... but with little or no countermeasures from moving from a safe, closed business LAN environment to the open anarchy of the internet. afterwards saw the rise of a whole new class of threats and vulnerabilities. Much of the anti-virus scanning was after the fact add-ons not fundamentally changing the base infrastructure.

2) I spent much of the 90s campaigning against digital certificates as an insecure and vulnerable paradigm. We had been brought in to a small client/server startup as consultants because they wanted to do payment transactions on their server; they had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use; the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". we had to map "SSL" technology to payment business process, do audit/walk-throughs of new businesses selling SSL domain name certificates and creating deployment requirements (some that were almost immediately violated). Part of the deployment was using "SSL" for backend interface between ecommerce webservers and the "payment gateway" (which sits on the internet and handles transactions between ecommerce webservers and payment network backends). By the time the payment gateway deployment was done, SSL handshaking was being used for the transaction ... but actual digital certificate use had been eliminated. My analogy is digital certificates are the analogy to letters of credit or introduction from sailing ship days ... and/or for no-value operations that can't afford the cost of real-time information.

some past posts on SSL domain name certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#sslcerts

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

U.S. States Investigating Breach at Experian

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: U.S. States Investigating Breach at Experian
Date: 05 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
U.S. States Investigating Breach at Experian
http://krebsonsecurity.com/2014/04/u-s-states-investigating-breach-at-experian/

Experian in hot seat after exposing millions of social security numbers [Updated] Did Experian subsidiary play fast and loose with Americans' data?
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/04/experian-in-hot-seat-after-exposing-millions-of-social-security-numbers/
Exclusive: U.S. states probing security breach at Experian unit
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-us-experian-databreach-20140403,0,6398507.story

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The dark side of digital banking

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The dark side of digital banking
Date: 05 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Rise in Digital Banking Heightens Fraud Risk, Bankers Say
http://www.americanbanker.com/issues/179_65/rise-in-digital-banking-heightens-fraud-risk-bankers-say-1066675-1.html

In the mid-90s, there were presentations at financial industry conferences about consumer online dialup banking moving to the internet ... mostly around the high support costs to running proprietary dialup operation ... in part, there were dozens of different drivers for the different modems, plus several different versions for every software release ... however there were significant compatibility issues with installation of after-market serial port devices (resulting in things like having to re-install from scratch).

However, at the same time the commercial dial-up cash-management/online banking operations were saying that they would never move to the internet because of a long list of security issues ... most of which continue to this day (and are responsible for much of the fraud).

posts mentioning dial-up banking (and move to internet)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#dialup-banking

Note around the start of the century there were efforts to provide customers with chip-cards that would provide for 2-factor authentication and could be used to address most of the fraud issues. However, part of one program they appeared to acquire a lot of obsolete serial-port card readers that they were giving away free to their customers (a major motivation for the development of USB was the enormous support costs related to consumers dealing with serial-port devices ... and USB was obsoleted existing inventory of serial-port devices). Apparently all the industry institutional knowledge about the enormous support difficulties with serial-port devices had evaporated over a period of 5-6yrs. In any case, the enormous consumer backlash because of the operational difficulties (including having to reinstall systems from scratch) resulted in industry conclusion that chipcards weren't practical in the consumer/home market (when the actual problem was the obsolete serial-port cardreaders ... not the chipcards themselves). In the wake of that fiasco, nearly all of the consumer chipcard related efforts were shutdown.

Note for a whole lot more background ... there is this discussion in the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force)
http://lnkd.in/dthBCEH

which was kicked off with this item

TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://beta.slashdot.org/story/20032

it actually turns out that a lot of people hadn't done the necessary speeds&feeds adequately

other recent posts mentioning NSA, crypto & tcp/ip
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#9 NSA seeks to build quantum computer that could crack most types of encryption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#11 NSA seeks to build quantum computer that could crack most types of encryption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#32 NSA Insiders Reveal What Went Wrong
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#36 Why IBM chose MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!' made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#77 In a Cyber Breach, Who Pays, Banks or Retailers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#22 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#23 Quixotically on-topic post, still on topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#35 OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#58 UK government plans switch from Microsoft Office to open source
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#62 UK government plans switch from Microsoft Office to open source
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#29 Broadband pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#33 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#66 F-35 JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER IS A LEMON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#72 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#85 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#3 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#9 NSA chief criticises media and suggests UK was right to detain David Miranda
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#13 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#47 Stolen F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China's Stealth Fighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#49 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#81 Eisenhower's military-industrial warning rings truer than ever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#102 How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#0 Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#6 Credit Card Breach at California DMV Provides Yet Another Warning of Cyber Insecurities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

As US card fraud rises, firms increase security spending

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: As US card fraud rises, firms increase security spending
Date: 05 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
As US card fraud rises, firms increase security spending
http://www.finextra.com/news/fullstory.aspx?newsitemid=25932

There is some recent discussions in posts in the "The dark side of digital banking" discussion,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#32 The dark side of digital banking

and also the "Zeus malware found with valid digital certificate" discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#30 Zeus malware found with valid digital certificate

in this group. I also make reference to this recent article in an IETF discussion:
http://lnkd.in/dthBCEH

which was kicked off with this item

TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://beta.slashdot.org/story/20032

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Apr 2014 10:10:32 -0400
Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.itworld.com/business/264694/internet-golden-age-online-services

from above:
Before there was the World Wide Web, back when 2,400 BPS modems were "high-speed", millions of people used online services, like AOL, CompuServe, and GEnie to work with each other, gossip, and share Star War jokes.

... snip ...

then back when 300BPS was "high-speed" (and before)

various virtual-machine based online services ... original cp67 based like NCSS and IDC ... which fairly quickly moved up value stream into financial information
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_CSS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interactive_Data_Corporation

both NCSS and IDC got some people from the cambridge science center and lincoln labs (which was first location running cp67 outside the science center). NCSS was bought by dun & bradstreet. IDC continues as online web-based service.

The NCSS wiki mentions a hacking story that made NYT in July1981 where the master password list was compromised.

then tymshare & tymnet
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymnet
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymshare

tymnet was spun off in the 80s when M/D bought Tymshare. I've mentioned before that tymshare started offerring their cms-based online computer conferencing free to the SHARE IBM user group in Aug1976 ... archives here
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

past posts mentioning virtual machine based online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

somewhat dwarfing all of them was the internal HONE system providing online sales&marketing support applications world-wide. some past posts mentioning HONE (&/or apl)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

silicon valley location trivia: in the mid-70s, the US HONE datacenters were consolidated in silicon valley. when Facebook started in silicon valley, they were in new bldg. built next door to the old HONE datacenter.

I've also recently mentioned NCSS & Tymshare recently with respect to 4th generation language ... Ramis, Nomad, FOCUS (& SQL, all going on virtual machine based infrastructure) )
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#77 Bloat
references
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramis_software
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomad_software
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOCUS

and of course original sql/relational System/R at bldg.28 some past post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

I've mentioned IDC with reference to the last decade financial mess. In the congressional hearings into the major role that the credit rating agencies played in the whole mess, there was testimony that rating agencies where "selling" triple-A ratings for toxic CDOs when they knew they weren't worth triple-A. past posts mentioning toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

Part of this was attributed to the rating agency business process had became mis-aligned in the early 70s when they switched from the buyers paying for the ratings to the sellers paying for the ratings. IDC had bought the pricing-services division about this time in the early 70s (could make snide reference that the rating agencies no longer needed to know the value of what they were rating). Then in Jan2009, there was a very brief reference to IDC helping value toxic assets ... when there was still the facade that TARP (trouble asset relief program) funds were actually supposed to be used for buy toxic assets (rather then the CEO compensation enhancing program)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#21 Banks to embrace virtualisation in 2009: survey
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#31 Banks to embrace virtualisation in 2009: survey
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#32 What are the challenges in risk analytics post financial crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#49 US disaster, debts and bad financial management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#53 Are the "brightest minds in finance" finally onto something?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#49 Is the current downturn cyclic or systemic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#50 TARP Bailout to Cost Less Than Once Anticipated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#45 S&P's History of Relentless Political Advocacy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#82 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#2 Royal Pardon For Turing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Apr 2014 11:01:14 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
When did aux and control files come in?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#28 System/360 celebration set for ten cities; 1964 pricing for oneweek

Melinda's email mentioned in above
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email850908

Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1985 14:10:41 EDT
From: Melinda
To: wheeler

Lynn, I was truly touched by your having spent part of your Saturday morning loading up those CP-67 EXECs for me. It was extraordinarily thoughtful of you and has helped me answer almost all of my questions about the CP-67 implementation.

I have been working my way through the EXECs and believe that I have them all deciphered now. I was somewhat surprised to see how much of the function was already in place by the Summer of 1970. In particular, I hadn't expected to find that the update logs were being put at the beginning of the textfiles. That has always seemed to me to be one of the most ingenious aspects of the entire scheme, so I wouldn't have been surprised if it hadn't been thought of right away. One thing I can't determine from reading the EXECs is whether the loader was including those update logs in the loadmaps. Do you recall?

Of the function that we now associate with the CTL option of UPDATE, the only substantial piece I see no sign of in those EXECs is the use of auxfiles. Even in the UPAX EXEC from late January, 1971, it is clear that all of the updates listed in the control files were expected to be simple updates, rather than auxfiles. I know, however, that auxfiles were fully implemented by VM/370 Release 1. I have a First Edition of the "VM/370 Command Language User's Guide" (November, 1972) that describes them. The control file syntax at that point was

updlevel upid AUX

Do you have any memories of the origin of auxfiles?

Thank you again,

Melinda


... snip ... top of post, old email index

The cp67 development group had split off from the science center and moved to the 3rd flr taking over the IBM Boston Programming center. The science center multi-level update was targeted at development. The development group added aux files for PTFs.

trivia ... the person that invented DNS ... was student at MIT and had job at science center and implemented a program that did its best to merge updates that had been developed independently for the same source ... doing its best to resolve/flag conflicts (which was not part of the multi-level update process going forward).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 6 Apr 2014 10:16:22 -0700
cfmpublic@NS.SYMPATICO.CA (Clark Morris) writes:
From what I recall from over 35 years ago was that her friends thought that the government snooping was a normal state of affairs. Given the records retention requirements in the United States (and maybe other countries), most organizations have to keep a huge amount of documentation including all e-mails so that the government can later troll through them to prove wrongdoing. For organizations the exposure is not snooping by the government of jurisdiction which can get the data anyway but by foreign governments doing it for other reasons.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#23 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

when the (virtual machine) cp67 development group split off from the science center and moved to the 3rd flr taking over the ibm boston program center ... they only had a part of the 3rd flr ... the rest of the 3rd flr was listed in the bldg registry as a law firm. However the telco closet for the 3rd flr was on the ibm side ... and it clearly listed the other occupant as a certain 3-letter agency. this agency was also member of share ... installation code "CAD" (supposedly for cloak-and-dagger).

in aug76, tymshare started offerring its cms-based online computer conferencing to share for free ... archives here:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

"CAD" shows up periodcially in the postings. other reference ... gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

vm370 profs email system was in extensive use by the gov ... deleting email didn't remove it from the backup tapes. the archived email played a role in investigation into
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair

note in the above ... possibly one of the reasons that the VP was out of the loop ... was he was administration point-person for deregulating the financial industry ... where some of his relatives played prominent roles ... one such
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Apr 2014 16:41:29 -0400
"Stanley Daniel de Liver" <admin@127.0.0.1> writes:
It might have depended on geography; I recall 300->2400 dialup BBS. 4 times the speed!

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

When I switched from 2741 to CDI miniterm at home, i went from 134.5 to 300.

then when I switched from CDI miniterm to 3101 (ibm glass teletype), i switched from 300 to 1200.

then from 3101 to ibm/pc went from 1200 to 2400.

home images of cdi miniterm, 3101, and ibm/pc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#oldpicts

code name for 3101 was topaz ... misc past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#0 Why so little parallelism?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#15 The Genealogy of the IBM PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#39 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#40 DEC and news groups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#74 What do YOU call the # sign?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#37 Baudot code direct to computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#51 Baudot code direct to computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#22 IBM PC competitors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#40 My "Green Screen" IBMLink is still working
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#66 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#0 tty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#27 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#15 I actually miss working at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#27 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#16 Unbuffered glass TTYs?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#24 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#21 Teletypewriter Model 33

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Apr 2014 18:19:06 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

ibm had done threat and vulnerability study of allowing dial-ins to corporate infrastructure and built a special corporate encrypting 2400 modem. semi-related to requirement for link encryptors on internal network (not just home terminal program, one of the major vulnerabilities was considered hotel telco closet) ... recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#9 NSA seeks to build quantum computer that could crack most types of encryption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA

next step was 14.4 telebit trailblazer (early 90s)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telebit
... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#19 Is Al Gore The Father of the Internet?^
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#20 Is Al Gore The Father of the Internet?^
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#62 Modem "mating calls"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#6 Oldest system to run a web browser?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#33 The Vintage Computer Forum
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#8 were dumb terminals actually so dumb???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#24 August 7, 1944: today is the 65th Anniversary of the Birth of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#27 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards

I also got a satellite 9.6kbit full usenet feed ... for doing a couple drivers and co-authoring article in boardwatch mag old pictures also have one of the sat. dish for the article (1993) ... as usenet increased they had to double the sat feed to 19.2kbit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#oldpicts

past posts mentioning corporate encrypting modem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#11 Security Proportional to Risk (was: IBM Mainframe at home)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#62 Wireless security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#57 high speed network, cross-over from sci.crypt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#35 Metroliner telephone article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#5 Are there more stupid people in IT than there used to be?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#30 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#66 Memory Mapped Vs I/O Mapped Vs others
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#16 should I encrypt over a private network?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#30 I need magic incantation for a power conditioner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#60 Cybercrime Checks Into The Hotel Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#25 Fear the Internet, was Cool Things You Can Do in z/OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#19 disclosing "business" information on the internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#35 Chase, Bank of America credit cards too hacker-friendly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#20 Writing article on telework/telecommuting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#31 IBM bans Siri: Privacy risk, or corporate paranoia at its best?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#23 Teletypewriter Model 33

posts refs boardwatch mag article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#38 Vanishing Posts...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#39 I'll Be! Al Gore DID Invent the Internet After All ! NOT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#66 UUCP email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005l.html#16 Newsgroups (Was Another OS/390 to z/OS 1.4 migration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#11 An Out-of-the-Main Activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#17 What if phone company had developed Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#16 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#19 IBM-MAIN longevity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#19 Another one bites the dust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#84 Anyone going to Supercomputers '09 in Portland?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#74 bulletin board
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#75 Posts missing from ibm-main on google groups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#92 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#26 Anyone here run UUCP?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#67 Royal Pardon For Turing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Apr 2014 23:04:44 -0400
re
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

one of the vm/370 developers from the old burlington mall development group, left the company and was doing mainframe consulting ... including Dialog (in silicon valley, had spun off from lockheed. He would invite me to visit him & dialog ... they had gotten as9000. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#38 blast from the past ... macrocode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#27 CPU time/instruction table
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#44 Old datasearches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#56 Are prefix opcodes better than variable length?

including some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#email810318
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#email810421

past post about "online before the internet"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#46 Old datasearches

references

diaglog.com history site:
http://www.dialog.com/about/history/

Reflections on the Beginnings of Dialog: The Birth of Online Information Access
http://support.dialog.com/publications/chronolog/200206/1020628.shtml

Online Before the Internet: Early Pioneers Tell Their Stories Part 1: In the Beginning;
http://www.dialog.com/about/history/pioneers1.pdf

Online Before the Internet: Early Pioneers Tell Their Stories Part 2: Growth of the Online Industry;
http://www.dialog.com/about/history/pioneers2.pdf

other past posts referencing dialog:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#33 Did AT&T offer Unix to Digital Equipment in the 70s?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#46 The Alpha/IA64 Hybrid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#0 Search for Joseph A. Fisher VLSI Publication (1981)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#61 10 choices that were critical to the Net's success
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#30 Empires and Imperialism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#88 Continous Systems Modelling Package
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#24 Old datasearches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#47 Graph of total world disk space over time?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Apr 2014 09:08:33 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
The descendant of DOS is z/VSE, while the descendant of MVS is z/OS. I gather one typically runs them both under z/VM.

DOS was popular both among low end shops, and among shops with highly sophisticated application environments that just wanted the operating system to load the program and get out of the way. That probably is still the case with z/VSE, more the latter than the former.


During FS period in the first half of the 70s, 370 efforts were being suspended and/or killed off. With the failure of FS, there was mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

For POK (high-end mainframes), 3033, 3081, and XA-architecture were all kicked off. some reference to 3033 & 3081
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

XA became known internal as "811" for the Nov1978 publication date on the architecture/design documents. 811 had 31bit addressing, SSCH for I/O, access registers (access to multiple address spaces), program call & return (original MVS moved lots of subsystems into their own address space, application call to subsystem required expensive path through kernel, switching address space, etc ... "program call" & "return" turned it into privileged system table with all the rules and hardware instructions). MVS then morphs in MVS/XA.

At the same time Endicott kicked off "e-architecture" (for low & mid-range) ... basically a single virtual address space managed by the microcode ... hardware instructions that mapped and unmapped real address into virtual address. It is where the "E" in VSE comes from. The 4341 during developement was known as "E4" ... old 4300 email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

In the reference email there is periodic reference to "E4", early 4341 engineering machine. I was getting to play disk engineer in bldgs. 14&15 some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

they would typically get #2 or #3 engineering model of new machine ... for doing disk i/o testing. The referenced email has the Endicott performance test group asking me to do benchmarking tests on E4 machine ... because I have better access to a machine, than they do.

some past posts mentioning "811"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#8 Security Proportional to Risk (was: IBM Mainframe at home)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#9 Security Proportional to Risk (was: IBM Mainframe at home)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#28 ibm history note from vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#24 |d|i|g|i|t|a|l| questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#31 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#61 Why these original FORTRAN quirks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#57 IBM to the PCM market(the sky is falling!!!the sky is falling!!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#28 IBM 360 Model 20 Questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#71 IBM 360 Model 20 Questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#76 T3 Sues IBM To Break its Mainframe Monopoly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#30 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#0 It keeps getting uglier
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#31 IBM announced z10 ..why so fast...any problem on z 9
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#29 DB2 & z/OS Dissertation Research
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#6 What is "timesharing" (Re: OS X Finder windows vs terminal window weirdness)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#19 What happened to computer architecture (and comp.arch?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#74 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#100 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#2 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#3 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#8 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#22 Personal use z/OS machines was Re: Multiprise 3k for personal Use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#72 "SIE" on a RISC architecture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#45 PROP instead of POPS, PoO, et al
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#15 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#21 Dataspaces or 64 bit storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#32 IBM Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#18 IBM Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#43 CKD DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#70 vm/370 3081
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#62 z/OS 1.13 preview
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#67 IBM Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#20 New job for mainframes: Cloud platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#39 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#42 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#46 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#48 A brief history of CMS/XA, part 1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#50 Dyadic vs AP: Was "CPU utilization/forecasting"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#2 WHAT WAS THE PROJECT YOU WERE INVOLVED/PARTICIPATED AT IBM THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#8 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#12 Clone Processors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#31 big-little
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#66 M68k add to memory is not a mistake any more
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#20 M68k add to memory is not a mistake any more
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#29 5 Byte Device Addresses?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#19 Co-existance of z/OS and z/VM on same DASD farm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#71 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Apr 2014 09:23:07 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
I don't know about 9600 bps, but 4800 worked just fine on an unconditioned line. OTOH, 56Kbps required a leased line. Then DDS came along and leased lines became less attractive.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#39 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

the IBM mainframe telecommunication controller ("37x5") boxes only had support up to 56Kpbs. In the early and mid-80s, I had HSDT project with T1 and faster speed links
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

and T1 was becoming more and more of an issue. in the mid-80s, the communication prepared a report for the corporate executive committee explaining whay IBM (mainframe) customers weren't interested in T1 before the early to mid-90s.

The 37x5 boxes had "fat pipe" support where multiple parallel 56kbit links would be treated as single logical link. They showed survey of customers using "fat pipel" ... numbers with 2, 3, 4, 5, etc 56kbit links ... and didn't find any operating with six. What they didn't know (or bother report) was at the time, telco tariff for T1 was about the same as 5-6 56kbit links. We did a trivial survey and found 200 mainframe customers with T1 links ... what they were doing was installing T1 and switching to some non-IBM vendor box. recent post discussing their biasing the methodology for report to justify that they didn't have more than 56kbit/sec support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#13 The IBM Strategy

I've claimed this was factor in senior disk engineer claim that communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. posts reference communication group dumb terminal paradigm and install base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

other past posts mentioning "fat pipe":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#4 Sv: First video terminal?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#67 Total Computing Power
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#28 SR 15,15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#59 SR 15,15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#37 network history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#7 Xah Lee's Unixism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#59 Q ALLOC PAGE vs. CP Q ALLOC vs ESAMAP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#4 Google Architecture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#21 SNA/VTAM for NSFNET
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#45 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#19 Nerdy networking kid crashes the party
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#24 August 7, 1944: today is the 65th Anniversary of the Birth of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#44 SNA: conflicting opinions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#80 Entry point for a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#83 Entry point for a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#69 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#16 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#40 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#54 Did My Brother Invent E-Mail With Tom Van Vleck? (Part One)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#98 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#41 Where are all the old tech workers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#41 VM Workshop 2012
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#80 A joke seen in an online discussion about moving a box of tape backups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#87 Gordon Crovitz: Who Really Invented the Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#89 Gordon Crovitz: Who Really Invented the Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#29 History--punched card transmission over telegraph lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#24 Does the IBM System z Mainframe rely on Security by Obscurity or is it Secure by Design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#47 PC/mainframe browser(s) was Re: 360/20, was 1132 printerhistory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#45 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#66 OSI: The Internet That Wasn't
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Apr  7 09:36:58 2014
scott_j_ford@YAHOO.COM (Scott Ford) writes:
Maybe the people who are so vocal about the government should live/work in another country. Its their rules and your a guest.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#23 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#36 Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

the internal network (by far mostly vm/370 machines) was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late '85 or early '86.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

About that time there were claims that the internal network had more than half of all link encryptors in the world (I got it from a major link encryptor vendor in silicon valley). there were frequent issues with local governments about turning on link encryptors ... especially when they crossed national boundaries ... even though they were going from one corporate location to another (problems all over the world). For an idea ... old post listing all the corporate locations around the world that added one or more new nodes on the internal network during 1983
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8

other recent posts mentining link encryptors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#63 Reject gmail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#79 CSSMTP and AUTH LOGIN smtp command
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#49 Do you know where all your sensitive data is located?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#63 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#24 Does the IBM System z Mainframe rely on Security by Obscurity or is it Secure by Design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#31 The Vindication of Barb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#69 The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#23 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#10 "NSA foils much internet encryption"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#9 NSA seeks to build quantum computer that could crack most types of encryption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Apr 2014 10:58:50 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#29 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#40 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

more articles

Half-century milestone for IBM mainframes
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-26886579
Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe
http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/14/04/07/065213/fifty-years-ago-ibm-bet-the-company-on-the-360-series-mainframe
Why won't you DIE? IBM's S/360 and its legacy at 50
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/04/07/ibm_s_360_50_anniversary/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The dark side of digital banking

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The dark side of digital banking
Date: 07 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#32 The dark side of digital banking

In the late 90s, there was the EU FINREAD standard that was designed to counteract nearly all exploit/vulnerabilities of online banking. It was carefully crafted cardreader in conjunction with hardware token ... however it was one of casualties of the ill-fated serial-port cardreader effort in the early part of the century.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#dialup-banking

For some reason doing search engine on "EU FINREAD" first turns up my past postings on the subject.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#finread

The online EU info has gone 404, but some lives on at the wayback machine
https://web.archive.org/web/20030812170411/http://www.finread.com/pages/finread_initiatives/finread_initiatives/01_finread_initiatives.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
Date: 07 Apr 2014
Blog: IETF
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA

Vint Cerf wanted to make internet secure from the start, but secrecy prevented it Tells Google Hangout buds that tech was 'classified' at the time...
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/04/07/internet_inception_security_vint_cerf_google_hangout/

I've pontificated that because of technology at the time, it would have greatly impacted throughput ... as seen with SSL that used RSA for session key-exchange and then faster symmetrical for actual transmission ... still hit throughput so badly that ecommerce servers dropped back to just using SSL for payment/checkout.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Apr 2014 23:12:47 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
various virtual-machine based online services ... original cp67 based like NCSS and IDC ... which fairly quickly moved up value stream into financial information
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_CSS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interactive_Data_Corporation

both NCSS and IDC got some people from the cambridge science center and lincoln labs (which was first location running cp67 outside the science center). NCSS was bought by dun & bradstreet. IDC continues as online web-based service.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#39 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#41 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

VisiCalc co-creator documents our frayed, decaying communications infrastructure
http://www.fierceenterprisecommunications.com/story/visicalc-co-creator-documents-our-frayed-decaying-communications-infrastruc/2014-04-07

I've periodically mentioned before that Bob was at MIT and then worked on financial stuff at IDC ... before doing Visicalc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VisiCalc

from above:
Bricklin was joined by Bob Frankston, and the two worked on VisiCalc for two months during the winter of 1978-79, forming Software Arts. Bricklin wrote, "[W]ith the years of experience we had at the time we created VisiCalc, we were familiar with many row/column financial programs. In fact, Bob had worked since the 1960s at Interactive Data Corporation, a major timesharing utility that was used for some of them and I was exposed to some at Harvard Business School in one of the classes." Bricklin is referring to the variety of report generators that were in use at that time, including Business Planning Language (BPL) from International Timesharing Corporation (ITS) and Foresight, from Foresight Systems. However, these earlier timesharing programs were not completely interactive, nor did they run on personal computers.

... snip ...

recent posts mentioning bob &/or visicalc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#70 Lotus 1-2-3 rebooted: My trip back to the old (named) range
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#47 Goodbye, Lotus 1-2-3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#57 The Internet: Missing the Light
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#21 CTSS DITTO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#74 The Mother of All Demos: The 1968 presentation that sparked a tech revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#84 The Mother of All Demos: The 1968 presentation that sparked atech revolutio
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#88 DCF on OS/2
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#2 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#3 IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue wouldrather you f

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
Date: 07 Apr 2014
Blog: IETF
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#45 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA

I mentioned above that card association defined so many public key operations as part of the payment protocol that it would significantly drive up the payment processing overhead (by two orders of magnitude).

I also spent much of the 90s and early part of the century showing how public key could be done much more efficiently w/o digital certificates & PKI. Part of the card association public key operations included explicitly appending digital certificates to every payment transaction. It turns out that the payload size for digital certificates were (also) two orders of magnitude larger than the standard base payment payment transactions (*AND* they were redundant and superfluous). some posts mentioning digital certificate payload boat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#bloat

I guess that I spent so much time ridiculing digital certificates ... the the CA business got a work item started in the X9 financial standard association for "compressed" digital certificates (possibly only 10 times size bloat rather than 100 times size bloat). However, I then showed how I could use their compression techniques to create zero-byte digital certificates ... so rather than prohibiting PKI digital certificates from being appended to every payment transaction ... could mandate that there be a zero-byte digital certificate appended to every digital certificate.

I've frequently drawn the analogy between digital certificates and the letters of credit/introduction from sailing ship days ... when relying parties had no other method of obtaining information about complete stranger. They are from the days of offline email ... somebody would phoneup their electronic post-office, exchange email and hangup ... and then have to deal with first-time email from complete stranger in an offline environment.

The PKI, digital certificates forces attempting to mandate digital certificates for payment comments were making comments about bringing payments into the modern age. My analogy was it would regress it at least 30yrs to offline credit card transactions from the 60s before online terminals and real-time authorizations. As more and more of the world went online ... the market niche for digital certificates was shrinking ... useful for 1) offline world that hadn't yet become online, all-the-time, and 2) no-value operations that could afford online infrastructure (even as costs for dataprocessing and electronic connectivity was rapdily dropping).

One of the catch-22s for PKIs ... was they were claiming very expensive and secure process of certification, trust, and issuing ... which needed to charge exorbitant amount for each certificate ... but wasn't justified trying to sell into the offline, no-value market segment. past posts mentioning some PKI catch-22
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#catch22

In the 90s, the PKI industry was floating a $20B/annum business case on wallstreet ... charging $100/yr per person per digital certificate. They were initially assuming that the financial industry would be glad to do such a transfer of wealth ... however, the financial industry already had an online infrastructure ... and a PKI, offline infrastructure was a step backwards. We were called in to help wordsmith the cal. electronic signature act ... which was under heavy pressure from the PKI industry to mandate digital certificates (forcing public to cough up the $100/yr ... which didn't happen). post mentioining cal. electronic signature act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#signature

History of Risks
http://wiki.cacert.org/Risk/History

These are mostly technical exploits ... not business process exploits

The typical CA ("Certification Authority") business process is validating some fact with an authoritative agency (for that fact) and then issue/sell a certificate (representing that certification). Corrupted use of "Certificate Authority" somewhat obfuscates that there is any process other than selling certificates.

For SSL domain name digital certificate the authoritative agency is the domain name infrastructure which is the root trust agency for domain name ownership. The SSL CA industry has somewhat backed various forms of DNSSEC as countermeasure to "domain name takeover" (where an imposter takes-over a domain name, which would allow them to obtain a valid SSL domain name certificate). A domain name applicant registers a public key and then all future communication is digitally signed (and verified with the onfile public key at the domain name authority) as countermeasure to "domain name takeover".

Now the SSL CA industry then could also start requiring SSL domain name certificate applications also be digitally signed ... which they could verify by doing a real-time retrieval of the public key. This also allows the SSL CA industry to replace an expensive, time-consuming, and error-prone identification process with an inexpensive, efficient, and reliable verification process.

The catch-22 is that if the SSL CA industry can do real-time public key retrieval, then other entities could start doing real time public key retrieval also ... starting to mitigate any requirement for SSL domain name certificates.

I have done some amount with indexing RFCs and organizing contents of RFCs (postel use to let me help with STD1). I would follow all the ISOC copyright requirements ... and then the copyright was changed to say original authors retained rights to RFCs. I got a take-down warning from one such author with respect to RFCs predating the change in ISOC RFC policy (trying to make ISOC copyright changes retroactive) ... saying that I would be charged with $6/hit on my website (running to millions) ... even invoking the president of ISOC. I had to hire a copyright lawyer ... to explain to the president of ISOC that I had complied with all copyright provisions.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online service

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
Date: 07 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#39 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#41 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Old post about VMSG and ITPS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#55
including this email (about ITPS gateway for the internal network) ... allowing ITPS to sent and received from CMS (on the internal network)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#email791206

note ... the PROFS group had used an early pre-release version of the internal VMSG as the PROFS email client. When the VMSG author offered much enhanced version of VMSG to PROFS ... they tried to get him fired (apparently had claimed responsibility for it). The whole thing quieted down after he showed that all PROFS messages in the world contained his initials in non-displayed field. After that, the VMSG author would only distribute source to me and one other person. Jim also mentions VMSG in his "MIP Envy" tome
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email800920

Trivia: my brother was Apple regional marketing rep (largest physical area in conus) ... when he would come to town ... I would sometimes get to go to business dinners ... even getting to argue the MAC design with the developers (before MAC was announced).

Other trivia ... Apple was using IBM S/38 to run the business. My brother figured out how to dial into the S/38 remotely and track manufacturing and delivery schedules.

More trivia ... for some time, I was the only IBMer invited to the (silicon valley) Hacker's meetings (old-timer gray beard white hats).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hackers_Conference

cp67 supported "dialed" terminal ... instead of logging into cp67 ... it was possible to "dial" a virtual guest machine and cp67 would do a one-to-one maping of real terminal to a virtual terminal ... i.e. it was possible from 2741 to "dial" a os360/cics guest running in a virtual machine ... and be connected as cics terminal (rather than cp67 login).

IBM Pisa scientific center also modified CP67 for "SPM" ... messages normal that would appear on cp67 terminal could be routed to software running in a virtual machine. This could be used by service virtual machine (software) to communicate with users ... i.e. internal network software running in virtual machine could receive and send text & commands. One application was internal network software used it for forwarding messaging between users on different machines in the internal network. This was ported to vm370 ... and for some reason not released to customers (even tho it was a superset of VMCF, IUCV and SMSG combined) ... old post/reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#51

The author of REXX used it to implement a multi-user spacewar games ... spacewar server was setup and communicated with spacewar clients (using 3270 for display and keyboard for commands) via SPM ... even those running on different real machines. The spacewar SPM interface was fairly straight-forward and people started writing spacewar client robots that started beating humans (in part because they would make much faster moves). Eventually, spacewar server was updated to charge an energy penalty inversely proportional to interval between moves (below a certain threshold, leveling playing field between robots and humans). a little snippet of MFF (client) code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#27
and post with some old spacewar email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#74

SPM was also used for early automated operators ... since you could have SPM task running in the "operator" logon.

The local IBM branch office at the univ. had magtape selectric terminal for awhile. However, CTSS runoff document formatting had been re-implemented on cp67/cms as script at the science center in the mid-60s. then in 1969, GML was invented at the science center and GML tag processing was added to cms script (a decade later, GML morphs into ISO standard SGML, and after another decade morphs into HTML at CERN). Note GML comes from "G", "M", & "L" are the first letters of the last names of the three inventors. posts mentioning script, gml, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

IBM's principles of operation was one of the first major IBM publications redone in cms script. It was actually a subset of the architecture "redbook" (for being distributed in dark red 3ring binder). cms script command line option would either format the full "redbook" (which had a lot of feature justification, alternatives, engineering notes, etc) or just the principles of operation subset.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online service

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
Date: 08 Apr 2014
Blog: IBM Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#39 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#41 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#48 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

passthru virtual machine ... was a server virtual machine that implemented networked 3270s ... and relied on psuedo-device implementation done for vm370. dialed terminals had cp67&vm370 doing one-for-one mapping to a virtual guest. A user on one machine would "dial" the local PVM virtual machine from 3270 terminal ... PVM then would interact with PVM at remote machine ... which would create a psuedo-3270 ... as if it was a real 3270 (at the remote site) ... PVM simulation would then transparently handle extending terminal operation using the real local 3270 to simulate a psuedo-3270 at the remote location.

CCDN was internal 3270 terminal network for os/360 (and descendants), lots of internal services, RETAIN, ATS, HONE, etc ... were all available from CCDN "owned" terminals. A (internal) vm370 CCDN gateway was done ... so it was possible to "dial" the CCDN gateway ... and simulate a CCDN "owned" terminal and access mainframe hosts & services with CCDN. The internal PVM then included the ability for anybody on the internal network to "dial" the CCDN gateway ... and then access any of these other internal services.

The author of VMSG then wrote CMS applications PARASITE & STORY. PARASITE was similar to PVM ... but running in local CMS virtual machine ... creating psuedo-3270s on the local vm370 host (under PARASITE control). STORY was a programmed 3270 scripting language (before IBM/PC and HLLAPI). PARASITE would either provide a simulated 3270 interface to the end user or purely interact with STORY ... and/or some combination. A STORY could spawn a psuedo-3270 (via PARASITE) and then dial the local PVM service ... and then request connection to some remote system ... including the CCDN gateway. A STORY connected to the CCDN gateway then could log into RETAIN and retrieve PTF bug reports and PTF (all under program control). old post with PARASITE & STORY details, including some sample stories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#35
a automatic PUT bucket retrain retriever story
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#36

When the IBM (ascii) 3101 came and started being used for home terminal program, a service virtual machine software was created (similar to PVM) that would simulate 3270 operation mapped to 3101 ascii block mode. old post with reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#0

Later, the host side was greatly expanded for use with 3270 terminal emulator (pcterm) written for IBM/PC. Home IBM/PC would connect over ascii serial line to the vm370 host side. The host side would use the psuedo-3270 interface to simulate 3270 on the vm370 and communicate with pcterm running on the IBM/PC that would simulate 3270 operation. The pcterm communication used sophisticated HUFFMAN encoding to compress transmission going across the wire. They also kept cache of recently transmitted strings ... and would first attempt to see if cache location could be transmitted (instead of the actual string). old post with reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#51

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 11:43:49 -0400
hancock4 writes:
Who knows what could have been--perhaps if IBM didn't screw up "Future System" so much they may have developed a new, more powerful and efficient architecture than what we use today. S/360-S/370 users would've been relegated to emulation until they got around to converting.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#29 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#40 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#43 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

note that this discussing of FS and 3033 & 3081 in the wake of FS failure
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

FS died in the mid-70s & 3081 announced five years later
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP3081.html

which was the FS 370 emulator and had enormously bad ratio of performance to circuitry ... especially compared to clone processors. past posts mentioning FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

Part of the FS problem was lots of it was totally blue sky ... presentations ... but no detailed specification about how any of it might be implemented. Another part was that they were talking about doing single-level store ... somewhat like TSS/360 ... but w/o any idea about why TSS/360 single-level store performed so badly (a simplified version was eventually done for s/38 ... where file performance issue wasn't a significant issue). At the univ. I had worked with TSS/360 IBM SE and we did a synthetic fortran edit, compile, and execution benchmark. TSS/360 with four simulated users had much worse performance, response, and throughput than CP67/CMS with 35 simulated users (benchmarks done on same, identical hardware). Later at the science center, I implemented a paged-mapped filesystem for CMS ... that had much higher throughput than the standard CMS filesystem (and drew on lots of stuff that I saw had been done wrong in TSS/360). This contributed to my tendency to ridicule FS and claiming I had been running code than their blue sky ideas. misc. past posts mentioning paged-mapped filesystem for CMS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

note low & mid-range 360s & 370s were microcoded engines that tended to avg. 10 native instructions per 360/370 emulated instruction (somewhat analogous to modern day 370 emulators running on intel platforms). The result was that the native engine performance was ten times the 370 performance. I've referenced this in the past for the ECPS microcode done for 370 138&148 where selected high-use parts of VM370 kernel was dropped into microcode on approx 1:1 ... resulted in ten times performance increase for those code paths. old post describing measuring vm370 kernel to come up with the highest used code paths.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist
past posts mentioning 360/370 microcode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mcode

I've mentioned before being told that in the gov. IBM trial ... they had some of the executives from seven dwarfs testify. One of them claimed that by the end of the 50s, all the computer vendors knew that they needed a compatible hardware line to be succesful (enormous growth potential customers spending enormous amounts of money to develop software and then not being able to grow to faster platform). Supposedly they said that IBM top management were the only ones that managed to make the different plant managers toe the line ... and not do incompatible tweaks based on their model. The other side of that was that if IBM was the only company doing the single, most important thing ... they could stumble in lots of other areas and still beat the competition. past posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#44 bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#20 1401 series emulation still running?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#231 Why couldn't others compete against IBM?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#33 Big black helicopters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#39 Big black helicopters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#85 The demise of compaq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#0 Did Intel Bite Off More Than It Can Chew?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#71 Card Columns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#43 Computer folklore - forecasting Sputnik's orbit with
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#0 IBM/Watson autobiography--thoughts on?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#4 IBM/Watson autobiography--thoughts on?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#60 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#77 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#42 1960s: IBM mgmt mistrust of SLT for ICs?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#34 IBM 8000 ???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#8 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#63 Remembering the CDC 6600
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#45 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#14 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#21 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#29 A brief history of CMS/XA, part 1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#57 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#69 Who was the Greatest IBM President and CEO of the last century?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#12 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#105 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#27 PDP-10 system calls, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#73 Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 11:58:41 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
note that this discussing of FS and 3033 & 3081 in the wake of FS failure
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#29 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#40 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#43 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#50 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

sowa references Amdahl left after advanced computer was killed
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs.html

this reference to end of ACS ... has ibm management killing it because they were afraid that it would advance state-of-the-art too fast and they would loose control of the market
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

above also discusses some ACS features finally showing up in es/9000 more than 20 years later.

past posts mentioning FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Rather nice article on COBOL on Vulture Central

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Rather nice article on COBOL on Vulture Central
Date: 10 Apr 2014 12:34:56
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
jcewing@ACM.ORG (Joel C. Ewing) writes:
The sentence where "VMS" appears has a subject of "computer firms" (plural), so it is possible the intended reference was to non-IBM software such as VAX/VMS rather than a typo. Since COBOL was supplied by multiple manufacturers, only two of the four items listed (CICS, DB2) are with certainty a reference to IBM-only products.

I've periodically mentioned that in the wake of demise of FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

the head of POK convinced corporate to kill the VM370 product, shutdown the development group and transfer all the people to POK (or otherwise they wouldn't be able to make the mvs/xa ship schedule). The plan was not to tell the development group people until the very last minute in order to minimize the number that might escape ... however the information leak. A resulting joke was that head of POK was one of the biggest contributors to VAX/VMS (people escaping to work at DEC in the very early days of VMS). Endicott did manage to save the vm370 product mission ... but had to reconstitute a development group from scratch.

reference to Bob Bemer helped create COBOL and coined the words COBOL and CODASYL
http://www.computerhope.com/people/bob_bemer.htm

I've posted this Bemer reference in the past about the "biggest computer goof ever" ... 360 was originally suppose to be an ascii machine.
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM
also father of ASCII
http://www.bobbemer.com/FATHEROF.HTM
and history index
http://www.bobbemer.com/HISTORY.HTM

and cics was originally developed at customer.
http://web.archive.org/web/20050409124902/www.yelavich.com/cicshist.htm

in 69 CICS changing to program product ... and the univ I was at got selected to be beta test site ... and I got tasked with support & debugging ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#cics

and DB2 started out as system/r on vm370 370/145
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

and then tech transfer to endicott for SQL/DS. Then one of the people in this referenced meeting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

claimed to have done the technology transfer from endicott back to STL for DB2.

this account has how the corporation was all wrapped up in eagle ... research was able to do the tech transfer to endicott and get it out as sql/ds ... "under the radar"
http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/SQL_Reunion_95/sqlr95-SQL_DS.html
then when eagle imploded ... there was request about how fast could there be a MVS port.
http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/SQL_Reunion_95/sqlr95-DB2.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 20:11:23 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
But we do use iSystem (formerly AS/400) today! IBM may have messed it up at the time, so that the 360 was not killed, but as hardware got faster, the overhead of extra layers of interpretation mattered less... and the Future System became possible.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#29 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#40 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#43 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#50 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#51 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT

as/400 was follow-on to combination of s/36 & s/38
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System_i
... and dropped another FS feature in s/38 ... capability-based addressing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System_i#History
above references:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capability-based_addressing

the capability-based addressing could result in five levels of storage indirection. a late analysis of FS was that Eastern Airlines System/One res. system (ACP/TPF running on 370/195) ported to FS built from the fastest technology available ... would have throughput of 370/145 ( factor of 15-30 times slowdown) ... put some of the final nails in the FS coffin
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

very early 80s, there was effort to move large number of internal microprocessors to 801/risc ... low & mid-range 370, controllers, as/400, etc. For various reasons the efforts floundered ... and continued using cisc ... when 801/risc tanked, as/400 did real fast & quick CISC-chip replacement (in the wake of these 801/risc efforts floundering, there were some number of engineers that leave and show up at other vendors working on risc efforts).

and of course ... nearly decade later (90s), as/400 does move (from CISC) to 801/risc with power/pc ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RS64
which it still uses
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Power_Systems

aside ... capability based system can be done in software ... I've mentioned before tymshare having done gnosis (and I was brought in to review/audit as part of its spin-off when M/D bought tymshare).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOSIS
to Key Logic as KeyKOS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KeyKOS

Original gnosis had significant pathlength overhead oriented towards accouting whenever capability boundary was crossed ... targeted for tymshare's service bureau business. This was eliminated in KeyKOS and Key Logic had some demo applications where they took all several airline control program (ACP/TPF) applications and redid them for KeyKOS environment ... and showed it outperforming TPF running on the same hardware (the higher level capability inferface allowed higher level abstractions giving the lower level operating system much more latitude for optimizations).

GNOSIS/KeyKOS descendants
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extremely_Reliable_Operating_System
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coyotos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CapROS

ACP (airline control program) was renamed TPF in recognition of its uptake by financial institutions and other industries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transaction_Processing_Facility

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2014 11:15:40 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA


re
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

turned into longer running thread in the (linkedin) IETF group
http://lnkd.in/dthBCEH

a couple other references in above:

CERF: Classified NSA Work Mucked Up Security For Early TCP/IP
http://blog.veracode.com/2014/04/cerf-classified-nsa-work-mucked-up-security-for-early-tcpip/
Vint Cerf wanted to make internet secure from the start, but secrecy prevented it Tells Google Hangout buds that tech was 'classified' at the time...
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/04/07/internet_inception_security_vint_cerf_google_hangout/

other recent posts mentioning the article:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#29 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#32 The dark side of digital banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#33 As US card fraud rises, firms increase security spending
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#42 Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

other in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#39 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#41 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#46 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#48 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#49 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 13:02:34 -0400
JimP. <pongbill127@cableone.net> writes:
The post office seems to think that they have to raise rates to make up shortfalls in cash flow in. What they really need to do, is lower their postage rates to get customers back.

Post office revenue has been sufficient except for legislation passed by congress that USPS is required to provide pre-retiree benefit funding ... not required by any other agency or corporation.

some claims are that it was result of heavy pressure by powerful lobbying groups aimed at further privatising of the gov.
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/five-things/the-u-s-postal-service/11433/
http://www.savethepostoffice.com/how-postal-service-began-prefunding-retiree-health-care-and-fell-deep-hole
http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2012-08-02/understanding-the-post-office-s-benefits-mess

this also comes up in the military industrial complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

... where 70% (or more) of the intelligence budgets goes to for profit corporations ... and over half the people are provided by for profit corporations ... some speculation, that for-profit companies may have different priorities that the agencies that they are supposedly working for (and can account for some number of recent problems) ... past reference:
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

including this Success of Failure scenario by for-profit-companies
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

one of the scenarios is gov. agencies aren't allowed to lobby congress ... while some claims that congress expects on the order of 5% of appropriations that go to for-profit companies.

posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#39 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#41 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#46 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#48 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#49 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#54 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"NSA foils much internet encryption"

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: "NSA foils much internet encryption"
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Apr 2014 10:27:09 -0700
mike.a.schwab@GMAIL.COM (Mike Schwab) writes:
NSA used the Heartbeat bug for at least the last two years.
http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/04/heartbleed-bug-internet-security-ssl


I would claim that this is another instance of length issues not being handled correctly in C programming language ... something that I've pontificated a lot in the past. C language length issues used to be much higher percentage of exploits ... but as other forms of exploits came into their own ... it has declined as percentage of all exploits.

old reference to IBM research report looking at length related exploit ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#42 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#43 another 30 year thing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#44 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#45 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation

including reference that Multics never had length related exploits.

the original mainframe tcp/ip product was implemented in vs/pascal and also was not known to have any length related exploits. It did have some throughput issues ... but I did the changes to support RFC1044 and got possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed (original on 3090 got 44kbytes/sec using full 3090 processor, some tuning tests at cray research between cray and 4341, got sustained 4341 channel medita throughput using only modest amount of 4341 processor) ... some past references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

old posts about doing analysis on the full CVE exploit database ... trying to calculate percentage of types of exploits ... and then later NIST coming up with similar results.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#43 security taxonomy and CVE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#20 Why does Windows allow Worms?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#20 Buffer overruns

recent post about rise of new kind exploit in the late 90s, resulting in buffer length exploits being smaller percent of total
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#30 Zeus malware found with valid digital certificate

recent long-winded discussion in the (linkedin) IETF (internet standards) group
http://lnkd.in/dthBCEH
discussing

TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://beta.slashdot.org/story/200323

recent ibm-main posts mentioning above
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#42 Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

past posts mention c-language epidemic length related exploits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#buffer

I've had other issues with SSL over the years ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#sslcert

we had been brought into to consult with small client/server startup on payment transactions that they wanted to do on their server, they had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". We got to do mapping of the technology to payment business process ... and also reviews of these new business operations (PKI/CAs) selling SSL domain name certificates. some recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#23 Quixotically on-topic post, still on topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#26 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#13 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#30 Zeus malware found with valid digital certificate

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

NSA and Heartbleed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: NSA and Heartbleed
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Apr 2014 21:01:18 -0700
Matt Simpson <usenet@news.jmatt.net> writes:
I think this report is BS. After Heartbleed became public knowledge due to research by somebody else, Bloomberg's mysterious sources suddenly said "Old news, NSA has been exploiting that for years, but we just now decided to tattle on them".

Of course, I don't trust the NSA's denial either. I'm sure that, if the NSA had been aware of the bug, that they would have taken advantage of it and lied about it. I just don't put much faith in the reports of unknown sources who have not demonstrated that they really know anything that isn't already public. I'd be more likely to believe it if somebody (like Snowden) claimed the NSA had found a hole in SSL before the hole was common knowledge.


openssl
http://www.openssl.org/

tls heartbeat read overrun
http://www.openssl.org/news/secadv_20140407.txt

from above:
A missing bounds check in the handling of the TLS heartbeat extension can be used to reveal up to 64k of memory to a connected client or server.

Only 1.0.1 and 1.0.2-beta releases of OpenSSL are affected including 1.0.1f and 1.0.2-beta1.

Thanks for Neel Mehta of Google Security for discovering this bug and to Adam Langley <agl@chromium.org> and Bodo Moeller <bmoeller@acm.org> for preparing the fix.

Affected users should upgrade to OpenSSL 1.0.1g. Users unable to immediately upgrade can alternatively recompile OpenSSL with -DOPENSSL_NO_HEARTBEATS.

1.0.2 will be fixed in 1.0.2-beta2.


... snip ...

1.0.1 18jan-2012 ...
http://www.openssl.org/news/

slightly over two years ... modulo whenever various applications incorporated versions of openssl with the bug.

past posts mention c-language epidemic length related exploits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#buffer

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#42 Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#56 "NSA foils much internet encryption"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

NSA and Heartbleed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: NSA and Heartbleed
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 13 Apr 2014 07:32:28 -0700
also google+
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/ZETe6miwtR6

How the NSA shot itself in the foot by denying prior knowledge of Heartbleed vulnerability
http://www.zdnet.com/institutional-failure-led-to-nsa-missing-the-heartbleed-flaw-7000028366/

from above:
Summary: In admitting it didn't know about a massive security flaw in one of the Web's most used encryption libraries, the NSA inadvertently revealed a massive institutional failure.

... snip ...

there are various tools and techniques for looking for length related vulnerabiilties. in this case, the agency is caught between rock and hard place ... denying it knew about the vulnerability implies incompetence ... while if it knew and didn't tell questions its motives.

one goes along with the spreading Success Of Failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

after the congressional Success Of Failure investigation, the agency was put on probation and not allowed to manage its own projects. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

it is possibly exacerbated by the increasing privatizing with at least 70% of its budget and over half the people working for for-profit companies ... which may not have the same motivations as the agency.

Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
How Booz Allen Hamilton Swallowed Washington
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington
Investigate Booz Allen Hamilton, not Edward Snowden; The firm that formerly employed both the director of national intelligence and the NSA whistleblower merits closer scrutiny
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jun/14/edward-snowden-investigate-booz-allen

there is even small IBM relationship ... after Gerstner left IBM, he went on to head up a major private-equity company ... which then bought Booz. Lots of articles about companies bought by private-equity companies are under heavy pressure to service the debt load (loan to buy company is put on that company's books, analogy with house flipping except company can be sold for less than it was bought and the private-equity company still makes enormous profit ... since it doesn't have to pay off the loan). over half corporate defaults are by companies currently or formally owned by private equity.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

past private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#pivate.equity
past gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

past posts mention c-language epidemic length related exploits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#buffer

recent heartbeat/heartbleed &/or NSA:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#29 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#32 The dark side of digital banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#33 As US card fraud rises, firms increase security spending
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#42 Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#45 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#47 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#54 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#56 "NSA foils much internet encryption"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#57 NSA and Heartbleed

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 16:27:04 -0400
from a.f.c. thread/post from fall 2011
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#31 Civilization, doomed?

Diamond's Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed ... describes how new world empires expanded with the introduction of potatos from europe. military expeditions included having to carrying their own food ... potatos had significantly higher food value per pound (compared to what they previously had available) ... extended the range of military expeditions.

...

corollary would be that logistics played role in size of empires.

recent posts in the original thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#39 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#41 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#46 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#48 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#49 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#54 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#55 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
Date: 13 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#18 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading

SEC Busts HFT Firms For "Tricking People Into Trading At Artificial Prices"
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-04/sec-busts-hft-firms-tricking-people-trading-artificial-prices
SEC charges trading firm owner, others in 'spoofing' case
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/04/us-sec-enforcement-spoofing-idUSBREA331DD20140404

CME Sued For Giving "High-Frequency Traders Peek At Market" Since 2007
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-13/cme-sued-giving-high-frequency-traders-peek-market-2007
HFT Purge Begins: SEC Prepares To "Remove" Some High Frequency Trading Firms
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-13/hft-purge-begins-sec-prepares-remove-some-high-frequency-trading-firms
Exclusive: SEC eyes test that may lead to shift away from 'dark pools'
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/11/us-sec-darkmarkets-idUSBREA3A0CP20140411
SEC nixes high-frequency trading platforms
http://nypost.com/2014/04/13/sec-nixes-high-frequency-trading-platforms/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 08:46:36 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
Unlike a lot of later indian wars King Philip's War was a real two-sided fight that could have gone either way. The "Great Swamp Fight" that ended it was about on par with what was going on in European wars and Ireland at the same time. Unfortunately there was plenty of badness on both sides. There's not much left to see today - a granite monument in the middle of a swamp.

You omit the part about the colonists interning indians on an island in the middle of Boston Harbor where many starved and then selling the survivors into slavery in the West Indies. Those were not not nice times.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#59 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

past references to "Why Nations Fail" ... that the original english settlement at jamestown virginia attempted to emulate the spanish model of enslaving the locals and living off their labors ... the problem was that the natives arorund jamestown didn't have the numbers and/or organization (to emulate the spanish model) and the colony almost starved the first two years. they then changed the mix and imported british slaves as substitute ... and slave class written into the charters from the crown:

The clauses of the Fundamental Constitutions laid out a rigid social structure. At the bottom were the "leet-men," with clause 23 noting, "All the children of leet-men shall be leet-men, and so to all generations."

... snip ...

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#31 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#32 Back to the future: convict labor returns to America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#84 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#15 Imbecilic Constitution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#7 Is there a connection between your strategic and tactical assertions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#17 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#29 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#34 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#71 Is orientation always because what has been observed? What are your 'direct' experiences?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#28 What Makes sorting so cool?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:56:54 -0400
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
I used to think that about $4/gallon. But when it happened, people bitched and kept pumping gas into their SUVs.

Griftopia has chapter on cftc use to require that players have substantial position in the commodity because speculators resulted in wild, irrational price swings. then 19 secret letters went out allowing specific speculators to play which resulted in the huge spike over $100 the summer of 2008 (and corresponding spike in gas). posts mentioning griftopia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#griftopia

then in 2011, a senator released transaction data showing speculators caused the huge spike in oil over $100 the summer of 2008 ... and main stream press mostly criticized the senator for releasing information. specific posts mentioning release of oil speculation transaction data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#18 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#57 speculation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#37 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#52 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#12 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#78 Fed may restrict bank ownership of commodities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#8 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#16 Precious Metals Manipulation Worse Than Libor Scandal, German Regulator Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#101 How the Fed Let the World Blow Up in 2008; High oil prices blinded the Fed to the growing danger before the crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#102 Royal Pardon For Turing

there are periodic reports that CFTC is thinking about limiting such speculation ... but never seems to get around to it ... of course there are also periodic reports that CFTC is thinking about limiting the CDS gambling betting (approaching $1000 trillion) ... but that seems to happen also ... when the head of CFTC first said they were thinking about curbing CDS gambling ... they were quickly replaced with somebody that wouldn't ... until her husband got item added to CFTC "modernization" that prevented CDS regulation (originally billed as favor to ENRON), at which time she stepped down and joined the ENRON board and was member of the board's audit committee. posts mentioning enron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

there was some prosecution of some of the same institutions doing (CFTC) commodity speculation ... put together toxic CDOs designed to fail, sold them to their customers and then took out CDS bets that they would fail ... recent news item from today

Yes, the SEC was colluding with banks on CDO prosecutions
http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2014/04/09/yes-the-sec-was-colluding-with-banks-on-cdo-prosecutions/
SEC Was Colluding With Banks On CDO Prosecutions
http://news.firedoglake.com/2014/04/14/sec-was-colluding-with-banks-on-cdo-prosecutions/
The SEC's Internal Battles over Goldman Sachs Probe
http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202650075059/The%20SECs%20Internal%20Battles%20over%20Goldman%20Sachs%20Probe

past posts mentioning toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

past references to the new head of CFTC chosen that wouldn't regulate CDS and then when her husband got legislation passed to that effect, she steps down and joins ENRON board (and member of audit committee)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#39 'WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE GLOBAL MELTDOWN'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#46 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#48 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#53 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#55 Who will give Citigroup the KNOCKOUT blow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#65 is it possible that ALL banks will be nationalized?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#10 Who will Survive AIG or Derivative Counterparty Risk?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#28 I need insight on the Stock Market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#61 Quiz: Evaluate your level of Spreadsheet risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#63 Do bonuses foster unethical conduct?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#0 What is swap in the financial market?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#13 Should we fear and hate derivatives?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#29 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#51 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#7 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#33 Treating the Web As an Archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#17 REGULATOR ROLE IN THE LIGHT OF RECENT FINANCIAL SCANDALS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#84 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#77 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#54 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#28 Our Pecora Moment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#67 The Python and the Mongoose: it helps if you know the rules of engagement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#38 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#36 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#29 Ernst & Young sued for fraud over Lehman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#52 Are Americans serious about dealing with money laundering and the drug cartels?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#41 Advice from Richard P. Feynman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#54 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#74 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#41 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#31 US real-estate has lost $7T in value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#5 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#57 speculation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#59 Why Hasn't The Government Prosecuted Anyone For The 2008 Financial recession?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#77 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#38 Four Signs Your Awesome Investment May Actually Be A Ponzi Scheme
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#28 Flag bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#29 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#13 Jack Lew Shows His True Colors By Forcing Deregulation of Derivatives on the CFTC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#98 Royal Pardon For Turing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:01:28 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#59 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#61 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#62 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

recent related to dominant theme (inclusive/exclusive) in "why nations fail" ... book review on the topic

Why We're in a New Gilded Age
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2014/may/08/thomas-piketty-new-gilded-age/

here
http://www.amazon.com/Capital-Twenty-First-Century-Thomas-Piketty-ebook/dp/B00I2WNYJW/

lot more detail on this topic
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html
from this article
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping
Date: 14 Apr 2014
Blog: IETF
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#102 How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping

There are two separate issues that I've pontificated a lot about

late 90s, EU had FINREAD standard as countermeasure to replay attacks, evesdropping, compromised PCs (including two-factor authentication that could be subverted by compromised PCs) and a bunch of other stuff. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#finread

in the mid-90s, there were presentations at financial conferences about why consumer dialup banking was moving to the internet (mostly based on the enormous customer support costs related to doing proprietary dialup systems in conjunction with serial port modems) ... at the same time the cash management/commercial dial-up banking operations were saying they would never move to the internet because of a long list of threats ... that continue to this day. posts mentioning dial-up banking (and move to internet)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#dialup-banking

startup of this century there was introduction of financial chipcards in the consumer market ... the institution apparently acquired a load of obsolete serial port cardreaders for free give aways. In the wake of the enormous customer support problems with the serial port devices (including having to re-install systems from scratch; apparently all the institutional knowledge about enormous support costs of serial port devices in the consumer market had evaporated over period of 5-6yrs; these problems were also major motivations for USB) there was rapidly spreading opinion in the financial industry that hardware tokens/chipcards weren't practical in the consumer market ... and all such efforts were abandoned in the consumer market (including FINREAD; however, it wasn't problem with hardware tokens and chipcards ... it was problem with obsolete serial port cardreaders).

one such program that was abandoned (even tho it didn't involve serial port readers), was one we wrote the specs for NACHA (we weren't nacha members so somebody else submitted on our behalf)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/nacharfi.htm
results of the NACHA trials ... gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20070706004855/http://internetcouncil.nacha.org/News/news.html
... 23July2001 ... digital signature can secure ATM card payments on the internet

note the above was an X9.59-like implementation with digital signatures not requiring PKI and/or digital certificates. Now a primary use of SSL in the world today is this earlier thing we did that is now frequently called electronic commerce that hides transactions details as countermeasure to crooks being able to use information in a kind of replay attack to do fraudulent financial transactions. One of the X9.59 issues is it slightly tweaked the infrastructure ... and it was no longer possible for crooks to use such information ... so it was no longer necessary to hide the information (as mentioned upthread) ... besides eliminating the risk of crooks doing fraudulent transactions from evesdropping attacks on information in transit ... it also eliminated the similar risk from data breaches. x9.59 reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

Slight IETF drift ... before he passed, Postel sponsored a talk I gave on the details at ISI (and USC computer security graduate students come over ... there was standing room only in the ISI room) ... other trivia Postel also use to let me help with STD1.

related thread in this group:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#45 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#47 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping
Date: 14 Apr 2014
Blog: IETF
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#102 How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#64 How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping

and the other subject is C-language length related programming bugs ... lots of past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#buffer

I would claim that this (Heartbleed) is another instance of length issues not being handled correctly in C programming language ... something that I've pontificated a lot in the past. C language length issues used to be much higher percentage of exploits ... but as other forms of exploits came into their own ... it has declined as percentage of all exploits.

old reference to IBM research report looking at length related exploit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#42 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#43 another 30 year thing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#44 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#45 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation

including reference that Multics never had length related exploits.

the original mainframe tcp/ip product was implemented in vs/pascal and also was not known to have any length related exploits. It did have some throughput issues ... but I did the changes to support RFC1044 and got possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed (3090 got 44kbytes/sec using full 3090 processor, some tuning tests at cray research between cray and 4341, got sustained 4341 channel medita throughput using only modest amount of 4341 processor) ... some past references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

old posts about doing analysis on the full CVE exploit database ... trying to calculate percentage of types of exploits ... and then later NIST coming up with similar results.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#43 security taxonomy and CVE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#20 Why does Windows allow Worms?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#20 Buffer overruns

recent post about rise of new kind exploit in the late 90s, resulting in length related exploits being smaller percent of total
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#30 Zeus malware found with valid digital certificate

other recent refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#56 "NSA foils much internet encryption"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#57 NSA and Heartbleed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#58 NSA and Heartbleed

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SEC Goldman Lawyer Says Agency Too Timid on Wall Street Misdeeds

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: SEC Goldman Lawyer Says Agency Too Timid on Wall Street Misdeeds
Date: 14 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
SEC Goldman Lawyer Says Agency Too Timid on Wall Street Misdeeds
http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-08/sec-goldman-lawyer-says-agency-too-timid-on-wall-street-misdeeds.html
SEC Lawyer on Goldman CDO Case Describes How the Agency Wimped Out
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/04/sec-lawyer-on-goldman-cdo-case-describes-how-the-agency-wimped-out.html
Was the SEC Rolled By Goldman?
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2010/07/was-the-sec-rolled-by-goldman.html
Retiring White House Prosecutor Says the SEC Is Corrupt
http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/04/09/65578/
Retiring SEC Attorney Says Agency Fails To Hold Powerful Accountable
http://news.firedoglake.com/2014/04/09/retiring-sec-attorney-says-agency-fails-to-hold-powerful-accountable/
Put This Guy In Charge Of The SEC
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-09/put-guy-charge-sec

this is recurring ... it shows up at the Madoff congressional hearings in the testimony by the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff. It also shows up in Sarbanes-Oxley enforcement (congressional rhetoric in passing SOX was that it would prevent future ENRON and Worldcom and guarantee that executives and auditors would do jail time) ... but required SEC to do something. Apparently even GAO didn't thing SEC was doing anything ... doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings ... even showing uptic after Sarbanes-Oxley (and nobody doing jail time).

posts mentioning enron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
posts mentioning madoff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff
regulatory capture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#regulatory.capture
posts mentioning sarbanes-oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Yes, the SEC was colluding with banks on CDO prosecutions

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Yes, the SEC was colluding with banks on CDO prosecutions
Date: 14 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Yes, the SEC was colluding with banks on CDO prosecutions
http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2014/04/09/yes-the-sec-was-colluding-with-banks-on-cdo-prosecutions/
SEC Was Colluding With Banks On CDO Prosecutions
http://news.firedoglake.com/2014/04/14/sec-was-colluding-with-banks-on-cdo-prosecutions/
The SEC's Internal Battles over Goldman Sachs Probe
http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202650075059/The%20SECs%20Internal%20Battles%20over%20Goldman%20Sachs%20Probe

posts mentioning toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How widespread is tax evasion? Cost of 'round-tripping,' a method investors use to avoid the tax collector

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How widespread is tax evasion? Cost of 'round-tripping,' a method investors use to avoid the tax collector
Date: 14 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
How widespread is tax evasion? Cost of 'round-tripping,' a method investors use to avoid the tax collector
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140410141924.htm

posts mentioning tax evasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 23:57:40 -0400
Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net> writes:
I just mailed a letter in Canada, and it cost $1.05. It used to be until March 31, that one could buy a stamp for a letter and not have to pay a surcharge. Now, if one does not buy a package worth of stamps, instead of $0.80 plus tax, it is now $1 plus tax.

When I was a kid, I started collecting stamps just after the price rose from five cents to six cents.


one of the people at the science center was an offspring of one of the people that discovered DNA ... and did a lot of stuff using cms\apl at the science center.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

he later left and joing boeing computer services in washington dc. one of the times I visited him there, he said he had worked on the model justifying usps 1st stamp increase (to 13cents ???)

a little more recent, a little over decade ago, we had several meetings with the new executive brought in to look at moving USPS into electronic commerce and web related services. it turns out that there were several structural issues in USPS that contributed to difficulties. recent post mentioning more recent USPS difficulties
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#55 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

recent posts mentioning boeing computer services (one of the earliest employees helping consolidate boeing dataprocessing into BCS)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#31 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#32 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#37 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#9 Boyd for Business & Innovation Conference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#19 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#23 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

other past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#37 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#39 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#41 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#46 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#48 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#49 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#54 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#59 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#61 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#62 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#63 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How the Internet wasn't Commercial Dataprocessing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How the Internet wasn't Commercial Dataprocessing
Date: 15 Apr 2014
Blog: Google+
How the Internet wasn't Commercial Dataprocessing
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/6GQ81suuspK

x-over from thread in linkedin IETF group
http://lnkd.in/bwZeUhw

As an aside, the talk Postel had me give at ISI ... was actually "How the Internet wasn't Commercial Dataprocessing" ... similar to the original theme of the other recent discussion ... but different.
http://lnkd.in/dthBCEH

Last thing we had done before leaving IBM was their HA/CMP product (high availability, cluster multiprocessing) ... which included looking at lots of ways things fail &/or can be attacked ... including TCP/IP ... and coming up with fixes &/or countermeasures.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

Two of the people that we had worked with at Oracle ... mentioned in this reference to Jan1992 meeting in ellison's conference room
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

had (also) left and were at this small client/server startup responsible for something called "commerce server" ... and we were brought in as consultants because they wanted to do payments on their server.

Part of the effort was something called "payment gateway" that sat at service processor and handle transactions between e-commerce webservers and the payment networks. The non-internet service processor trouble desk had requirement to do 1st level problem determination within five minutes. The first internet trouble call from e-commerce webserver resulted in NTF (no-trouble found) after three hrs of manual investigation. I had to do an enormous amount of work, documentation, creating infrastructure and processes to 1) minimize outages as much as possible and 2) when outages couldn't be recovered automagically, being able to diagnose outage within five minutes. Basically a lot of compensating procedures for the internet to try and bring it up to commercial dataprocessing standard.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#payment

There was then tracking of failures, attacks, and exploits. An early datapoint was that flat-file based e-commerce webservers had much fewer exploits than RDBMS based e-commerce webservers ... sort of the security maxim that vulnerabilities/exploits are proportional to complexity. The issue was that there were lots of defenses and countermeasures for e-commerce servers. Maintenance for the servers typically required taking them off the internet and disabling all the defenses and countermeasures ... when service was completed, the defenses and countermeasures had to be re-enabled before reconnecting to the internet. The problem tended to be that RDBMS maintenance took so much more time that it would overrun the maintenance window and everybody was in a rush to get the service back online. In the rush to get things back online, re-enabling all the defenses and countermeasures was periodically overlooked.

some posts on assurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#assurance
internet related posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
Date: 15 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#18 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#60 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading

SEC is Kinda Thinking About Doing Something About High Frequency Trading
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/04/sec-is-kinda-thinking-about-doing-something-about-high-frequency-trading.html
Regulators Weigh Curbs on Trading Fees; SEC Officials Consider Testing 'Maker-Taker' Plans
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303887804579501881218287694

other recent (linkedin) "Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security" group posts mentioning SEC:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#7 N.Y. Barclays Libor Traders Said to Face U.K. Charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#46 Wells Fargo made up on-demand foreclosure papers plan: court filing charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#64 Wells Fargo made up on-demand foreclosure papers plan: court filing charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#82 S&P Judge Tentatively Rules It Must Face Deception Claims
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#66 SEC Goldman Lawyer Says Agency Too Timid on Wall Street Misdeeds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#67 Yes, the SEC was colluding with banks on CDO prosecutions

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Three Expensive Milliseconds

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Three Expensive Milliseconds
Date: 16 Apr 2014
Blog: Facebook
Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/14/opinion/krugman-three-expensive-milliseconds.html

latest

SEC is Kinda Thinking About Doing Something About High Frequency Trading
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/04/sec-is-kinda-thinking-about-doing-something-about-high-frequency-trading.html

kind of like they were suppose to enforce sarbanes-oxley claims for which it would prevent future enrons & worldcoms and guarantee that executives and auditors would do jail time. apparently even GAO didn't think SEC was doing anything and started doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings (and nobody doing jail time). Another was the Madoff congressional hearings that had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff (SEC's hands were forced when he turned himself in).

posts mentioning sarbanes-oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
posts mentioning enron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
posts mentioning madoff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff
regulatory capture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#regulatory.capture

... and then this small firestorm

SEC Goldman Lawyer Says Agency Too Timid on Wall Street Misdeeds
http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-08/sec-goldman-lawyer-says-agency-too-timid-on-wall-street-misdeeds.html
SEC Lawyer on Goldman CDO Case Describes How the Agency Wimped Out
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/04/sec-lawyer-on-goldman-cdo-case-describes-how-the-agency-wimped-out.html
Was the SEC Rolled By Goldman?
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2010/07/was-the-sec-rolled-by-goldman.html
Retiring White House Prosecutor Says the SEC Is Corrupt
http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/04/09/65578/
Retiring SEC Attorney Says Agency Fails To Hold Powerful Accountable
http://news.firedoglake.com/2014/04/09/retiring-sec-attorney-says-agency-fails-to-hold-powerful-accountable/
Put This Guy In Charge Of The SEC
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-09/put-guy-charge-sec

last decade finding that they could pay the rating agencies for triple-A ratings (even when the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional hearings) .... allowed loan & mortgage business to be redirected through as new wallstreet business ... resulting in over $27T being done with enormous fees & commissions skimmed by wallstreet. Claims are that this new business resulted in wallstreet tripling (as percent of GDP) during the period (and bonuses spiked over 400%). posts mentioning toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

In the late 90s, I was brought in to NSCC (before merger with DTC becoming DTCC) to look at improving integrity of transactions on exchange flrs. I worked on it for awhile but then got a call saying it was being suspended because as a side-effect of integrity work would have greatly increased visibility and transparency ... antithetical to traders & exchanges (wallstreet culture). Note the person testifying in the congressional hearings (that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff) was asked if new regulations were needed. He said that while new regulations might be needed, much more important was visibility and transparency.

Note this is reference (predating HFT) that while illegal stuff might be common place, they didn't need to worry about SEC
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

One of the scenarios is HFT firm paying brokers to process their trades ... the HFT firm would front run the customers trades with a trade of their own ... making money back on the difference.

here is example of game is rigged: The Holy Grail Of Trading Has Been Found: HFT Firm Reveals 1 Losing Trading Day In 1238 Days Of Trading
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-03-10/holy-grail-trading-has-been-found-hft-firm-reveals-1-losing-trading-day-1238-days-tr

Defending Kickbacks
http://baselinescenario.com/2014/04/15/defending-kickbacks/

from above:
The SEC is thinking of requiring brokers to act in the interests of their clients. The defense is, "We'll have to change the way we do business." How is that not an admission that they aren't currently acting in the interests of their clients?

and this has come up before, NY AG appears to be stepping in when SEC is not doing anything (then FEDs would tell him to back off)

N.Y. Attorney General Sends Subpoenas to About Half a Dozen High-Speed Firms
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304626304579505931086501344?mod=djemalertMARKET
High-Speed Traders Said to Be Subpoenaed in N.Y. Probe
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-16/high-speed-traders-said-to-be-subpoenaed-in-n-y-probe.html
New York AG Sends Subpoenas To HFT Firms Including Tower, Jump and Chopper
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-16/new-york-ag-sends-subpoenas-hft-firms-including-tower-jump-and-chopper

recent posts mentiong HFT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#54 Pensions, was Re: Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#82 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#89 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#28 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#29 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#43 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#56 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#65 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#7 N.Y. Barclays Libor Traders Said to Face U.K. Charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#93 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#100 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#18 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#60 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#71 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 11:17:02 -0400
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
Well, expensive is relative.

Steel closed at $390/metric ton friday at the LME. Aluminium at $1840, and the difference is smaller than it has been historically.

That is a mass/cost ratio of 4.72. The density is 2.7 kg/liter vs 7.2 kg/liter, and the raw strength is 1:3, roughly, in steels favour. But very few applications are limited by the raw strength. See how airplanes use the profiles to have sufficient strength where it matters.

But where you just need a rigid shell with some elasticity and weight/mass is not a big issue; like with railcars; steel wins every time.


for more drift ... past reference to Ford got into the gasoline power auto business when the conventional wisdom was that electric cars would "win" ... then "french" steel totally changed the game ... increased the strength of steel by three times (&/or reduced weight of steel required by nearly factor of three) ... making gasoline powered vehicles much more competitive/
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#7 Looking for a real Fortran-66 compatible PC compiler (CP/M or DOSor Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#69 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#102 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#19 OT for sidd about physics

two cyl. engine model A sold less than 1000

then "French" steel
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanadium

reducing the weight by 2/3rds with two cylinder engine ... made the Model T a significantly more attractive vehicle.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model_T

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Another Golden Anniversary - Dartmouth BASIC

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Another Golden Anniversary - Dartmouth BASIC
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 16 Apr 2014 13:51:33 -0700
etech@TULSAGRAMMER.COM (Eric Chevalier) writes:
Maybe not a BIG mainframe impact, but BASIC certainly had it's place in the mainframe sun, starting with VS BASIC, program product 5748-XX1. Between 1979 and 1981 I worked for Ryan-McFarland, developers of RM-BASIC, RM-FORTRAN and RM-COBOL. My last project at RMC was to help port RM-BASIC to both VM and OS/MVS. I left before the project was completed, but it did eventually come to market as BASIC/VM (Program Number 5668-996) and BASIC/MVS (Program Number 5665-948).

IBM Boston programming center did CPS for os/360 supporting Basic and conversational PLI.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversational_Programming_System

Also had microcode assist for the 360/50. a lot was subcontracted out to allen-babcock ... some old
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/allen-babcock/cps/CPS_Progress_Report_may66.pdf
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/allen-babcock/cps/Draft_Eval_Microprogram_Mar66.pdf

I've mentioned before that CP67 group split off from science center (on 4th flr) ... and took over the ibm boston programming center on the 3rd flr ... in the process of morphing into the vm370 group. misc. past posts mentioning the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

one of the former cps people even did a port to CMS.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#14 Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#8 OT: CPL on LCM systems [was Re: COBOL will outlive us all]

other past references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#71 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#100 Indirect Bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#26 Is there a correspondence between 64-bit IBM mainframes and PoOps editions levels?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#72 AMC proposes 1980s computer TV series "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#36 Lisp machines, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#24 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#28 World's worst programming environment?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 10:29:12 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#59 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#61 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#62 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service

Mahan wrote on seapower in the late 1800s ... and was the standard reference around the world for a long time. He also mentioned the effects of all the gold from the new world on Portugal & Spain ... including this post with quote about stopping producing anything of their own and buying them (lots from England):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#34 General Mills computer

The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783 (A. T. Mahan), 1890,
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/13529
loc1287-91:
The mines of Brazil were the ruin of Portugal, as those of Mexico and Peru had been of Spain; all manufactures fell into insane contempt; ere long the English supplied the Portuguese not only with clothes, but with all merchandise, all commodities, even to salt-fish and grain. After their gold, the Portuguese abandoned their very soil; the vineyards of Oporto were finally bought by the English with Brazilian gold, which had only passed through Portugal to be spread throughout England.

... snip ...

post also has several other quotes from various sources on what is something analogous in the US with international corporations, including quote from former IBM senior vice president (and head of IBM research).

Mahan books have been scanned on are free at a number of locations on the web ... however they can be somewhat tedious to read. One of the people I meet in Boyd get togethers ... recently published a book with copies of some of Mahan's articles written for more general audience that appeared in magazines.
http://www.amazon.com/21st-Century-Mahan-Military-Conclusions-ebook/dp/B00BKRX0J0/
posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

"Buyout of America: How Private Equity Is Destroying Jobs and Killing the American Economy"
http://www.amazon.com/Buyout-America-Private-Destroying-American-ebook/dp/B002SV37FO/

more on something analogous is happening in US now. past references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#80 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#29 After a Romney Deal, Profits and Then Layoffs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#40 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#29 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#1 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#8 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#77 IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today

the "LBO" industry got such a bad reputation in the 80s from their looting companies and killing jobs ... that in the early 90s, they changed their name to "private equity".

private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

some x-over with resurrection of IBM ... Gerstner had been involved in private-equity before being brought in to resurrect IBM ... and even tho the IBM scenario wasn't directly private equity ... he used some of the same techniques ... and then after leaving IBM went on to be head of one of the largest private equity firms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

Stockman in "The Great Deformation"
http://www.amazon.com/Great-Deformation-Corruption-Capitalism-ebook/dp/B00B3M3UK6/

talks about stock buybacks are mini-form of LBO ... and that IBM continues to be one of the biggest players ... most recently

New IBM Buyback Plan Is For Over 10 Percent Of Its Stock
http://247wallst.com/technology-3/2013/10/29/new-ibm-buyback-plan-is-for-over-10-percent-of-its-stock/
IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-01-21/ibm-asian-revenues-crash-adjusted-earnings-beat-tax-rate-fudge-debt-rises-20-fund-st
HBR Blows The Lid Off C-Suite Over-Compensation
http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2012/02/22/hbr-blows-the-lid-off-c-suite-over-compensation/

and another area is employee retirement
http://www.amazon.com/Retirement-Heist-Companies-American-ebook/dp/B003QMLC6K
some ibm specific:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

from above:
IBM couldn't just pull the plug on the subsidy, because pension law doesn't allow a company to take away a benefit a person has already earned or take away a pension right or feature the company has granted. "So we had to design something different," Sauvigne said. Enter Louis V. Gerstner Jr., IBM's new president. He'd headed RJR Nabisco in 1993 when it faced a similar dilemma: how to reduce pensions and remove the retirement subsidy without obviously violating the law or provoking an employee backlash. Gerstner and IBM turned to Watson Wyatt, the same consulting firm that had helped Nabisco solve its pension problem.

... snip ...

Gerstner had "won" competition to be next CEO of AMEX. Then AMEX & KKR were in competititon for LBO of RJR ... KKR "won" ... but ran into problems and hired Gerstner away to turn RJR around.

other recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#16 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#25 IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#34 IBM sells x86 server business to Lenovo (was Levono)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#48 IBM Dumps Its Server Business On Lenovo For $2.3B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#79 Shocking news: Execs do what they're paid to do
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#101 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#104 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#54 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 11:36:49 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
"Buyout of America: How Private Equity Is Destroying Jobs and Killing the American Economy"
http://www.amazon.com/Buyout-America-Private-Destroying-American-ebook/dp/B002SV37FO/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#59 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

loc116-18:
Furthermore, private-equity firms from 2000 through the first half of 2007 bought companies that employed close to 10 percent of the American private sector (roughly ten million people).

and loc425-27:
But attempts to rein in the LBO kings would not get very far. Newly elected President George H. W Bush was certainly not going to invest any time in restricting their activities. The Bush and Kravis families (Henry Kravis co-ran KKR) were very close. Ray Kravis, Henry's father, had offered Bush his first postcollege job.

... snip ...

note in previous administration as VP ... he had been the administration "point person" for deregulation of the financial industry resulting in the S&L mess (where the LBO industry played major role) ... and had family members involved including
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan

recent refs to 80s administration point person for financial deregulation:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#46 What Gates Didn't Get Done
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#49 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#32 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#36 Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?

S&L mess intertwined with LBO industry borrowing money to do take-overs, including packaged as yunk bonds sold into the S&Ls

loc465-67:
At about the same time that LBO groups became private-equity firms, junk bonds were renamed high-yield bonds, and investment banks like Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, full of former Drexelites, began to sell them increasingly to mutual funds, money managers, and insurers

and loc450-51:
The buyout fund investors, such as state pensions, who put cash down in buyouts lost much of their money. S&Ls and other junk-bond buyers, who funded 33 percent of the transaction price, also came away with very little.

... snip ...

more recent reference to corporations currently & previously involved in private equity deals account for more than half corporate defaults (enormous debt put on their books as part of value extraction by their owners):
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

recent refs to buyout companies accounting for majority of corporate defaults:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#47 McCain: Send Petraeus back to Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#58 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#62 UK government plans switch from Microsoft Office to open source
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#2 Private-equity firms play major role in defense industry today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#17 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#39 Spy Chief Says Snowden Took Advantage of "Perfect Storm" of Security Lapses
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#107 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#58 NSA and Heartbleed

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
Date: 17 Apr 2014
Blog: IBMers
Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-16/why-ibm-tumbling-bric-sales-plunge-total-revenue-lowest-2009

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump (Update)
http://phys.org/news/2014-04-ibm-1q-hardware-slump.html
IBM profit falls 21 percent on weak hardware sales, workforce writeoffs
http://www.infoworld.com/t/technology-business/ibm-profit-falls-21-percent-weak-hardware-sales-workforce-writeoffs-240681
IBM profit falls on weak hardware sales, transition costs
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2014/041614-ibm-profit-falls-on-weak-280772.html
IBM profit falls on weak hardware sales, transition costs
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2144860/ibm-profit-falls-on-weak-hardware-sales-transition-costs.html
IBM profit falls 21% on weak hardware sales, transition costs
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9247728/IBM_profit_falls_21_on_weak_hardware_sales_transition_costs
IBM Q1 Earnings Drop As Hardware Sales Decline
http://www.eweek.com/it-management/ibm-q1-earnings-drop-as-hardware-sales-decline.htmlhttp://www.zdnet.com/ibm-lands-500-million-private-cloud-deal-with-the-hartford-7000028474/
IBM Q1 2014 Earnings
http://www.businessinsider.com/ibm-q1-2014-earnings-2014-4
IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-16/ibm-sales-fall-again-pressuring-rometty-s-profit-goal.html
IBM's Q1 revenue disappoints, hardware whacked again
http://www.zdnet.com/ibms-q1-revenue-disappoints-hardware-whacked-again-7000028518/
IBM's quarterly finances sapped by leech-like hardware division
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/04/16/ibm_q1_2014_results/

and from last fall

IBM Adds $15 Billion Buyback After Six-Quarter Sales Slump
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-29/ibm-adds-15-billion-to-buybacks-after-six-quarter-sales-slump.html
New IBM Buyback Plan Is For Over 10 Percent Of Its Stock
http://247wallst.com/technology-3/2013/10/29/new-ibm-buyback-plan-is-for-over-10-percent-of-its-stock/
IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-01-21/ibm-asian-revenues-crash-adjusted-earnings-beat-tax-rate-fudge-debt-rises-20-fund-st

Latest version of: Big Blue: Buyback Machine On Steroids
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-17/big-blue-stock-buyback-machine-steroids

from above:
So how has IBM and its ilk achieved revenue-less earnings growth? After all, reported EPS has gone from about $7 per share to $15 during the period. The short answer is that its executives and board have utilized every accounting and financial engineering short-cut in the book to disguise an equity liquidation campaign as a splendid strategy for "growth".

... snip ...

recent posts mentioning stock buybacks:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#14 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#16 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#25 IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#34 IBM sells x86 server business to Lenovo (was Levono)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#48 IBM Dumps Its Server Business On Lenovo For $2.3B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#79 Shocking news: Execs do what they're paid to do
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#101 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#104 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#54 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#31 Apple's long IRS-Irish history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#75 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How the Internet wasn't Commercial Dataprocessing

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How the Internet wasn't Commercial Dataprocessing
Date: 17 Apr 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
post several places on linkedin, facebook, google, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#70 How the Internet wasn't Commercial Dataprocessing

Part of the discussion in the IETF standards group was how heartbleed is another length related failure ... which have been epidemic in C-language implemented applications going back decades.

Also discussed were issues with doing "electronic commerce" ... we had been brought in to consult with small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server ... they had also invented this technology called SSL they wanted to use (the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce"). One of the issues was by the time we were done with the webserver to payment gateway interface
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

... we realized that PKI, CAs, and digital certificates were redundant and superfluous ... but it was too late to change.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#sslcert

Somewhat as result of doing electronic commerce, in the mid-90s we were invited to participate in the x9a10 financial standard working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments. After doing detailed, end-to-end threat & vulnerability analysis for several retail payments the x9.59 financial transaction standard was created.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959

One of the things in x9.59 is that eliminates hiding transaction and other information as countermeasure to fraudulent financial transactions .... it does nothing to prevent data breaches, skimming, evesdropping, etc ... but it eliminates the risk of crooks being able to use the information. Since main use of SSL in the world was hiding electronic transaction information, it also eliminated the main use of SSL.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

As an aside, in numerous other crypto forums and discussions there is repeated claim that there has been no known fraud as result of direct attack on SSL ... it is way easier to attack other parts of the infrastructure to obtain information to enable fraudulent financial transactions (and as an aside, which are nearly all addressed by x9.59 standard).

original posts references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#102 How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#45 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#47 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#64 How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#65 How the IETF plans to protect the web from NSA snooping

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:37:45 -0400
greymausg <maus@mail.com> writes:
Is it possible that the `danes' of Greenland simply moved South as the weather deteriorated.. Rather than die in situ?.

there was program about having two major settlements in Greenland ... one was affected earlier by cooling temperatures and abandoned first and then the second settlement.

eastern settlement and climate change
http://archaeology.about.com/od/vikings/qt/eastern_settlement.htm

from above:
About a century after the Norse settlement of Iceland and after the point when land became scarce there, Erik the Red (also spelled Eirik the Red) was kicked out of Iceland for killing a handful of his neighbors after a land dispute. In 983, he became the first recorded European to set foot on Greenland. By 986, he had set up the Eastern Settlement, and taken the best land for himself, an estate called Brattahild.

... snip ...

two settlements & references "returnees" from greenland
http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/archaeologists-uncover-clues-to-why-vikings-abandoned-greenland-a-876626.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:47:25 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#59 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#75 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#76 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

Kravis pioneers LBO/PE industry and founds KKR; Kravis and Bush families are close. PE-industry was using CLOs for corporate debt take-overs ... similar to CDOs ... also paying for triple-A ratings (as opposed to "junk bonds" used in the heyday of LBOs during the S&L crisis).
http://www.amazon.com/Buyout-America-Private-Destroying-American-ebook/dp/B002SV37FO/

Note over $27T in triple-A rated toxic CDOs done during the bubble last decade

Looser to Gerstner to be next CEO of AMEX, leaves with his protege, goes to Baltimore and acquires what is referred to as "loan sharking" business. They make some number of other acquisitions, eventually acquiring Citibank in violation of Glass-Steagall. Greenspan gives them exemption while they lobby washington for repeal of Glass-Steagall ... enabling too big to fail. Protege leaves and becomes head of another too big to fail (JPMorgan/Chase).
http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/05/15/why-jamie-dimons-2-billion-gambling-loss-will-not-speed-financial-reform/
and on time's list of those responsible for financial mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877329,00.html

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

Head of CFTC suggests regulating CDS ... and is quickly replaced. The new head prevents any action in CDS while her husband in the senate gets legislation that would prevent it, she then resigns and joins the ENRON board and audit committee. Her husband was also the major player in getting Glass-Steagall repealed and on Time's list of 25 people responsible for the financial mess (along with former head of Citi and Greenspan). Not regulating CDS is characterized as favor to ENRON ... but law of unintended consequences has too big to fail packaging toxic CDOs designed to fail, selling to their customers and then taking CDS bets that they would fail. Estimates of world-wide CDS gambling is between $800T & $1000T.
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

this has CDS bets much lower
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Credit_default_swap
this has possibly over $1200T ($1.2 quadrillion)
http://www.dailyfinance.com/2010/06/09/risk-quadrillion-derivatives-market-gdp/

One of the people helping Citi repeal Glass-Steagall was sec. of treasury and former head of goldman-sachs (contributing to references that treasury is goldman's branch office in washington), after GLBA passes (repeals Glass-Steagall), he resigns and joins CITI as co-CEO
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Rubin
He was later followed as sec. of treasury by another head of goldman-sachs (& on times list of those responsible)
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877341,00.html
who is then followed by somebody described as Rubin protege
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timothy_Geithner

Bush (son) also on list of those responsible for financial crisis
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877320,00.html

Supposedly Sarbanes-Oxley is passed to prevent future ENRON (& Worldcom) and claims that it guarantees executives and auditors do jail time (but requires SEC to do something, however apparently even GAO doesn't think SEC is doing anything and starts doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings ... even increasing after SOX ... and nobody doing jail time)

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

They need somebody to replace head of CIA that will go along with Team B analysis justifying huge increase in appropriations for MICC (the head of CIA was disagreeing with Team B analysis). At least two stories on selection of Bush (father) as head of CIA: 1) Rumsfeld sidelines a republican party rival, 2) would go along with Team B analysis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_B

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#team.b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

During the 80s, the administration is involved supporting Iraq in the Iran/Iraq war ... even claims of providing WMDs. Then it is involved in Iran/Contra afair ... although claims that the VP (father) was "out of the loop" (administration point person for financial deregulation, S&L mess, etc)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_War
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair

Private equity posts (formally LBO & junk bonds during S&L mess)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

also on Times list reponsible for financial crisis is Bernie Madoff. Madoff congressional hearings had person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff (SEC's hands were forced when Madoff turned himself in)
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877337,00.html

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff
regulatory capture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#regulatory.capture

Bush (vp, father) was major proponent of S&L deregulation (major beneficiary was family friend in LBO industry ... as well as other members of family)
http://www.amazon.com/Best-Way-Rob-Bank-Own-ebook/dp/B00H5B9Z80/
above author was major regulator and constantly blocked
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_K._Black
this also spends a lot of time on S&L mess
http://www.amazon.com/Two-Trillion-Dollar-Meltdown-Rollers-ebook/dp/B0097DE7DM/

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970






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