List of Archived Posts

2009 Newsgroup Postings (12/03 - 12/20)

Small Server Mob Advantage
Small Server Mob Advantage
Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
70 Years of ATM Innovation
The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
Have you ever though about taking a sabbatical?
The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
70 Years of ATM Innovation
Trade group seeks to stave off cybersecurity mandates
Small Server Mob Advantage
Small Server Mob Advantage
"Portable" data centers
Small Server Mob Advantage
70 Years of ATM Innovation
How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?
"Portable" data centers
Scammers scrape RAM for bank card data
70 Years of ATM Innovation
Small Server Mob Advantage
curiousity q? for the historians
curiousity q? for the historians
How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?
[OT] Ayup. Rocket science is trivial
IBM_s_newest_mainframe_is_all_Linux_
New Gift Card Laws Also Benefit Terrorists
curiousity q? for the historians
Data Breaches Show PCI DSS Ineffective
SQL injection attack claims 132,000+
The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
SSL certificates and keys
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
70 Years of ATM Innovation
70 Years of ATM Innovation
SSL certificates and keys
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
70 Years of ATM Innovation
70 Years of ATM Innovation
Strong Authentication Not Strong Enough
"Portable" data centers
"Portable" data centers
"Portable" data centers
360 programs on a z/10
70 Years of ATM Innovation
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Verizon report goes deep inside data breach investigations
You know you've been Lisp hacking to long when
360 programs on a z/10
xmas card
"Portable" data centers
70 Years of ATM Innovation
70 Years of ATM Innovation
some '83 references to boyd
tty
terminal type and queue drop delay
You know you've been Lisp hacking to long when
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
360 programs on a z/10
360 programs on a z/10
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Why don't people use certificate-based access authentication?
70 Years of ATM Innovation
bulletin board
PDP-10s and Unix
While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Small Server Mob Advantage

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Small Server Mob Advantage
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 2009 21:43:01 -0500
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
SNA never embraced TCP/IP. Many others did, and the protocols survive on top of the Internet.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#82 Small Server Mob Advantage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#83 Small Server Mob Advantage

misc. old nsfnet related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#email860417

recently going thru some boxes found copy of the letter referenced in the above ... dated 03apr86 .. recent reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#42

this is prefix to package of appended emails that were forwarded to us regarding communication group thinking that NSF might have a use for VTAM (& SNA):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109

our nsfnet backbone activities & meetings had gotten canceled ... and we were prevented from bidding on the nsfnet backbone ... even tho there was some statement that what we already had running was at least five yrs ahead of all bid submissions.

there is folklore about an outside consultant hired to do a tcp/ip implementation in vtam. when it was turned in ... it ran faster than lu6.2 ... they were then supposedly told that "everybody knows that a correct tcp/ip implementation would run much slower than lu6.2 and only a correct implementation would be accepted"

this old references working on trying to turn out a product that would simulate NCP/pu4 to host systems ... simulating activity as "cross-domain" ... but all resources were actually owned by the networking infrastructure ... and sna RUs then carried in "real" networking infrastructure (old posts from decade ago):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#66
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#67
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#70

there were various kinds of internal politics that got involved and it never made it to announce/ship.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Small Server Mob Advantage

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Small Server Mob Advantage
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 2009 11:08:28 -0500
PaulGBoulder@AIM.COM (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
I often wonder whether a reason TCP/IP triumphed over SNA was that SNA didn't provide a facility with the scalability of DNS.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#82 Small Server Mob Advantage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#83 Small Server Mob Advantage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#0 Small Server Mob Advantage

for other topic drift ... I've frequently pontificated on possible catch-22 implications that DNSSEC might have for the domain name certification authority industry:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#catch22

some recent DNS news for slightly other topic drift:

Google Public DNS: But Is It Safe?
http://www.internetnews.com/security/article.php/3851101/Google+Public+DNS+But+Is+It+Safe.htm
Geez, Google Wants to Take Over DNS, Too
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2009/12/geez-google-wants-to-take-over-dns-too/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wired27b+%28Blog+-+27B+Stroke+6+%28Threat+Level%29%29
Google Public DNS and Your Privacy
http://www.pcworld.com/article/183671/Google_Public_DNS_and_Your_Privacy.html
Google Public DNS: What It Means For Your Privacy
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/120309-google-public-dns-what-it.html
Google To Boost Internet Speed With New Public DNS Resolver
http://www.crn.com/security/222000590
Google Public DNS offers speed, few features
http://blogs.computerworld.com/15193/google_dns
Google wants to unclog Net's DNS plumbing
http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-10408624-264/google-wants-to-unclog-nets-dns-plumbing/
Google Introduces Public DNS Service
http://www.domainnamenews.com/search-engines/google-introduces-public-dns-service/6747
Google expands plan to run own internet
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/12/03/google_public_dns/
Google Public DNS: Wonderful Freebie or Big New Menace?
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/120309-google-public-dns-wonderful-freebie.html
Google launches free public DNS
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/120309-google-launches-free-public.html
Google Launches Free Public DNS
http://www.pcworld.com/article/183643/article.html
Google launches free public DNS
http://www.macworld.com/article/1144716/google_DNS.html

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 2009 12:16:35 -0500
and for something completely different

As IBM sales suffer, now's the time to buy a new mainframe
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/120409-ibm-mainframe.html

from above ...
But the economy and other factors have cut into IBM mainframe hardware revenue, and IBM's sales team may be feeling some anxiety. IBM System z mainframe revenue decreased 26% year-over-year in the third quarter, and dropped 39% in the second quarter.

... snip ...

misc. past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#67 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#68 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#69 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#70 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#72 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#73 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#74 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#75 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#76 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#77 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#79 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 2009 13:46:29 -0500
Patrick Scheible <kkt@zipcon.net> writes:
Of course an OS with more consistent and friendlier syntax could *also* be tailorable. Indeed, some OSs around before Unix were. Unix won because it was written in a portable language and because it became nonproprietary, not because it was better for the user, administrator, or developer.

there was point in time when cost of hardware to build machines significantly dropped (in part because of advent of vlsi processor chips)... but not the cost of doing proprietary operating systems ... as a result there was enormous mismatch between the cost of hardware and the cost of the OSs. (relatively) nonproprietary/portable unix was able to find a market nitch there.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 4 Dec, 2009
Subject: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Blog: Payment Systems Network
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#xx 70 Years of ATM Innovation

It was during one of the "task force" sessions that the YES CARD vulnerability was explained in some detail ... prompting somebody in the audience to comment that "billions of dollars were spent to prove that chips are less secure than magstripe". a somewhat similar YES CARD presentation was apparently also done at cartes2002 ... referenced at the end of this webpage:
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

misc. past posts mentioning YES CARD:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

another part of modern ATM financial transactions was the advent of database transactions (& ACID properties) ... which provided auditors the assurance to move from paper based infrastructures to computer based operations ... related post on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#27 Father of Financial Dataprocessing

also referring to this celebration:
http://web.archive.org/web/20080616153833/http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/IPRO/JimGrayTribute/pressrelease.html

from above:
Gray's work helped make possible such technologies as the cash machine, ecommerce, online ticketing, and deep databases like Google.

... snip ...

& some old email regarding Jim palming off some of those responsibilities on me when he left for Tandem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801006
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801016

Jim also contributed significantly to benchmarks for financial transactions
http://www.tpc.org/information/who/gray.asp

starting with TPC-A ... debit-credit benchmark
http://www.tpc.org/tpca/default.asp

related to some of the comments in the TPC description

DB2 announces technology that trumps Oracle RAC and Exadata
http://freedb2.com/2009/10/10/for-databases-size-does-matter/ and IBM pureScale Technology Redefines Transaction Processing Economics. New DB2 Feature Sets the Bar for System Performance on More than 100 IBM Power Systems
http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/28593.wss

discussed in this post "From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#43

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401

Refed: **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 2009 18:44:04 -0500
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#3 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401

a little pontification from long ago and far away:
Date: 23 September 1991, 12:52:43 PDT
From: wheeler
To: <large distribution list>
Subject: business planning & cases (ha/cmp, oracle, & informix)

We got a bunch of business case stuff piling up. We've spent quite a bit of time on customer calls thruout the world over the past 8-10 weeks & all of these requests are really starting to pile up (little $250m business here, a little $.25b business there ... and things start to pile up ... that besides the high visiability, leading-edge accounts like governments and the large financial institutions of the world).

One thing that needs to be made clear as some of the IBM'ers that are acquanted with this market place should realize ... in the "traditional" IBM propriatary approach ... hardware is sold ... and then you go looking for applications. In significant portions of this market, the customer has an application (i.e. portable, industry standard, interoperability, etc) ... and they are out looking for platform to run it on (standards world is almost exact opposite of the proprietary business).


... snip ... top of post, old email index

on the other hand regarding batch & interactive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#69 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture

in this ha/cmp time frame ... i had a production business application involving sort which, at one point, ran out of disk space (on unix platform) ... sort ignored the condition and truncated the file with no error indication (i tried it on a number of different unix flavors ... seemed to be a common problem). Batch systems have had to deal with this kind of condition for ages.

misc. past posts mentioning ha/cmp product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

slightly related recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#2

references this news article from today

As IBM sales suffer, now's the time to buy a new mainframe
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/120409-ibm-mainframe.html

from above ...
But the economy and other factors have cut into IBM mainframe hardware revenue, and IBM's sales team may be feeling some anxiety. IBM System z mainframe revenue decreased 26% year-over-year in the third quarter, and dropped 39% in the second quarter.

... snip ...

sometime after we had left ... we were told that ha/cmp software was pulling in over $500m/annum (had no way of validating the statement) ... apparently unrelated to the hardware ... and/or the scaleup stuff that had been transferred (when we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors). some past email on related to cluster scaleup stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Have you ever though about taking a sabbatical?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 4 Dec, 2009
Subject: Have you ever though about taking a sabbatical?
Blog: Greater IBM
In '92, got paid to take a sabbatical bridge to 30yrs ... and not come back. during the executive interview ... there was comment that they could have forgiven me for being wrong ... but they were never going to forgive me for being right. The day that the sabbatical started, got a letter at home claiming that I was promoted (I still don't understand the reason why, it had strongly been implied while regular employee, promotion was something that would never happen).

recent post also mentioning sabbatical and being promoted after leaving:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#57 U.S. begins inquiry of IBM in mainframe market

also somewhat related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#74 My Vintage Dream PC

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Dec 2009 11:23:37 -0500
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
This is why GPL is so important, so the corporate empires HAVE to emit those bits of code back to the public. Or face the consequences. It will be amusing to see the ffmpeg challenges to GPL violators emerge in court. There is nothing stopping you from suing for large amounts of money if you don't adhere to the rules.

Various gov. & other litigation prompted the 23jun69 unbundling announcement ... where software & other things started being charged for
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

... the corporation did make the case that kernel software should continue to be free.

then in the wake of FS debacle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

... which has been described as allowing the clone processors to getting foothold in the market ... the corporation decided to also start charging for kernel software.

however, at least cp67 & vm370 source continued to be shipped as part of the product ... including all the processes and related updates for doing source maintenance (i.e. monthly incremental distributions had both the executables ... as well as the incremental source updates).

it was then in the 80s ... that the "OCO-wars" started (i.e. "object code only" ... aka only the executables and no longer the source).

Some of the counter-arguments to "OCO" ... were products that the company had "logoed" from other vendors ... and the original vendors weren't providing source. Customers would report problems to customer support teams ... which would then go to the corporate product support teams; since the corporate product support teams ... they would then have to forward the problem to the original vendor product support teams. The whole cycle could take months. There were some products in this category that were extremely business critical to some very high profile, large customers.

This would be compared to cases where large, high profile customers (having source) could turn around their own fix in hrs ... in parallel with reporting problem to the corporation. The issuue was whether a particular product was highly critical to the business and what kind of investment did those customers want to have ... providing some control over critical dependencies.

a few past posts mentioning the '80s OCO-wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#41 TSO replacement?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#57 IPCS Standard Print Service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#34 Not Your Dad's Mainframe: Little Iron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#14 SEQUENCE NUMBERS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#67 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#15 Data Areas Manuals to be dropped
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#15 Patents, Copyrights, Profits, Flex and Hercules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#6 Open z/Architecture or Not
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#8 Open z/Architecture or Not
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#14 hacked TOPS-10 monitors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#42 VM/370 Release 6 Waterloo tape (CIA MODS)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#45 dynamic allocation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#72 Linux versioning file system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#0 Timeline: The evolution of online communities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#20 If you don't have access to a mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#48 Timeline: 40 Years Of Unix

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Dec 2009 13:48:05 -0500
"Charlie Gibbs" <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
This shows the fundamental difference in the Unix paradigm. Unix promotes the use of a number of small tools, each of which does one thing well, and which can be easily strung together to do more complex tasks. More prevalent nowadays is the idea that the way to go is with a handful of huge, monolithic, all-in-one applications, sort of like Allan Sherman's "chromium combination manicure scissors and cigarette lighter".

In terms of language, it's like the difference between having an alphabet from which you can build whatever words you want, and having hundreds of pictograms, one per word.


great for one-off, ad-hoc operations ... sometimes not so great for business-critical production operation that has to be reliably repeated time-after-time ... say every night, "when it positively, absolutely, has to be run overnight"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#69 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
slightly older reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#1 Architectural Diversity

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Dec 2009 20:34:14 -0500
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I think it may have been the first unix-y system I used extensively, so I wouldn't have noticed the quirkyness. SMITTY made it exceptionally easy to administer, though. A good example of training wheels, it would show you the commands it generated to perform the requested task. If it was something you did often, you'd probably just remember them. If it was something you did only occasionally, you didn't have to bother.

I'm told (and maybe Lynne has also posted) that AIX is a unix-like skin over a totally different system, maybe a leftover from FS. If so it wasn't quite as obvious as the "Open Edition" skin over z/OS.


there were a number of AIXes ... aix/370 & aix/386 were UCLA's Locus "unix-like"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LOCUS_%28operating_system%29

"AIX V2" was romp/risc ... done by the company that had done pc/ix (at&t port) ... on top of VRM. Original romp/risc was going to be a displaywriter follow-on using cp.r ... written in pl.8. when the product was canceled, the group looked around for another target market and settled on "unix workstation" ... but they needed a unix group to do the port. Then they also needed something for the pl.8 programmers to do ... which became the VRM (sort of virtual machine like). They had the company that had done the PC/IX port, to do it to the abstract virtual machine interface ... with claims that it was faster & less effort than if they did a port directly to the bare hardware.

This was somewhat called into question when the ACIS group did a bare hardware port of BSD
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Software_Distribution

"AIX V3" was for (801 risc romp follow-on) rios/power ... w/o the VRM ... running on native hardware. One of the other issues in the VRM+AIXV2 was new devices required two device driver efforts ... the unix AIXV2 device driver (in C) and then the VRM device driver.

There was a whole lot of corporate "added value" done for AIX V3 ... by all the in-house people ... including the SMIT stuff as well as a bunch of SNA stuff in the kernel (supposedly addressing AIX V3 to the corporate mainframe market ... as opposed to the unix workstation market).

one of the issues possibly missed in the AIX V2 & AIX V3 timeframe was issue of non-proprietary mentioned here (i.e. enormous amount of added value costs a lot to do)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#3 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401

misc. past posts mentioning 801, risc, romp, rios, iliad,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

as mentioned here we went another direction with ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

as well as cluster scaleup ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

also mentioned in
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#43 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#46 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#55 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#56 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#57 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#58 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#59 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#60 MasPar compiler and simulator

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 7 Dec, 2009
Subject: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Blog: Payment Systems Network
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#78 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#81 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#4 70 Years of ATM Innovation

to somewhat return from cluster & DBMS scaleup (& supercomputers)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#55

to payments (although not necessarily quite ATMs) ... two of the people mentioned in this post regarding jan92 meeting (in Ellison's conference room):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

a year or so later show up at a small client/server startup responsible for something called the "commerce server" ... and we were brought in as consultants on doing payment transactions on the server. the small client/server startup also had invented this technology called "SSL" that they wanted to use ... and the result, some people may recognize as frequently referred to as "electronic commerce".

the "commerce server" started out as a large multi-store "mall" paradigm with heavy use of Oracle in the backend.

part of applying "SSL" technology to payments, was detailed walk thru of the business processes of these new entities called Certification Authorities that were issuing things call SSL domain name digital certificates. Another part was putting together a lot of the assumptions about deployment and operation of SSL environments ... as applied to security and payments. Unfortunately, some number of the fundamental assumptions were almost immediately violated, which is the basis of some number of the current exploits.

also part of this "electronic commerce" thing was deployment of something called a "payment gateway" ... some number of past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

which acted as message gateway/switch between webservers on the internet and the payment networks. For the initial deployment, we used an HA/CMP installation with a lot of compensating procedures and other boxes around the edges. HA/CMP was earlier product we had done, that was part of the cluster scaleup (& supercomputer) work mentioned above. some past posts mentioning ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

for other drift ... nearly decade ago, Jim & I were keynote speakers at a nasa "dependable computing" conference
http://web.archive.org/web/20011004023230/http://www.hdcc.cs.cmu.edu/may01/index.html

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Trade group seeks to stave off cybersecurity mandates

From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 7 Dec, 2009
Subject: Trade group seeks to stave off cybersecurity mandates
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Trade group seeks to stave off cybersecurity mandates
http://www.nextgov.com/nextgov/ng_20091204_9658.php?oref=topnews

from above:
A trade association of major defense, telecommunications and financial services businesses wants Congress and the Obama administration to avoid mandates on cybersecurity, instead offer incentives that encourage companies to improve their practices.

... snip ...

Software Lobby Keeping Tabs on U.S. Cybersecurity
http://www.esecurityplanet.com/features/article.phpr/3851341/Software-Lobby-Keeping-Tabs-on-US-Cybersecurity.htm

from above:
With all the talk around federal cybersecurity policy these days, one of the groups with the most skin in the game thought it would be a good idea to take stock of just how much progress has been made.

... snip ...

New Consortium Formed for Cybersecurity Research
http://www.bankinfosecurity.com/articles.php?art_id=1982

so is this in anyway related to the trade group seeking to stave off cybersecurity mandates???

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Small Server Mob Advantage

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Small Server Mob Advantage
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 2009 11:43:06 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
At the time, some internal locations were bursting at the seams in terms of raised floor and 4341s were solution to installing additional computing power ... out in department areas (at some locations, conference rooms became a very scarce resource ... because so many were being taken over for 4341s).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#82 Small Server Mob Advantage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#83 Small Server Mob Advantage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#0 Small Server Mob Advantage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#1 Small Server Mob Advantage

alternative to taking over all the conference rooms (something that happened with big spike in 4341 installs a couple decades ago)

IBM thinks outside the box with containerized data centres
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/12/07/ibm_data_center_containers/

from above:
The idea of putting servers, storage, and networking gear into metal shipping containers and linking them together into a data centre cluster is not a new idea - Sun Microsystems was the first to propose the idea back in October 2006 - but it is catching on enough that IBM is endorsing the concept and shipping a product.

... snip ...

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Small Server Mob Advantage

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Small Server Mob Advantage
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 2009 12:49:17 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
the major internal networking technology was able to have "native" drivers ... but also install "jes2" drivers for communicating with jes2 systems (and allow jes2/mvs systems to participate in the internal network). this feature evolved into these (non-native) jes2 drives adding features to try and rewrite jes2 headers to that they were always compatible with the direclty connected jes2/mvs systems (as countermeasure to have high frequency of jes2/mvs crashing all over the world). the internal technology got blameed for not preventing the hursley mvs systems from crashing (since the internet network technology hadn't been upgraded to filter some of the new san jose jes2 fields ... from reaching the hursley jes2 systems). misc. past posts mentioning hasp, jes2, and/or jes2 networking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#hasp

dislcaimer: my wife did a stint in the jes group (among other things acted as one of the catchers for asp->jes3 ... and did a design document for merged jes2/jes3 product) ... before getting con'ed into going to pok to be in charge of loosely-coupled architecture.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#83 Small Server Mob Advantage

I recently reminded my wife about the problem with adverse interaction between jes2 networking at different release levels (resulting in mvs system crashes) ... and (infamous) incident with hursley systems crashing ... and being blamed on vnet. she quoted some chinese proberb if you ever save somebody ... you are responsible for them for life. she also mentioned somebody in the jes2 group that may have been primarily responsible.

I reminded her that a lot of the characteristics of jes2 networking was inherited from the HASP implementation ... which carried the characters "TUCC" on the (networking) source code changes.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

"Portable" data centers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Portable" data centers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 2009 16:40:59 -0500
lefuller@SBCGLOBAL.NET (Lloyd Fuller) writes:
What do you mean Sun was the first?

The US Army used 360/30 and 360/40s in 18-wheel trailers back in the early 1960s - 40 years before Sun "thought" of the idea. The Army even had those in Vietnam for the division data centers.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#12 Small Server Mob Advantage

maybe mid-60s?? 360 announce 7apr64.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System/360

360/30 FCS jun65, 360/40 FCS apr65
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_FS360.html

... maybe a 1401?
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP1401.html
or 1620?
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP1620.html

there was recent celebration of 50th anniv. of 1401 at computer history museum ... there is also this article ... which includes comment from somebody mentioning working on a 1401 located in marine truck in vietnam (1967)
http://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/hardware/rebuilding-the-ibm-1401

I had sponsored Boyd's briefings at IBM in the 80s. Boyd's biographies has him in 1970 doing a year stint in charge of "spook base" ... a $2.5B(!) windfall for IBM ... although even that was probably not enuf to offset the cost of the failed future system effort
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

and/or the resulting impact that the failure had on the corporate culture.

misc. past posts mentioning Boyd:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd1
misc. URLs from around the web mentioning Boyd:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd2

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Small Server Mob Advantage

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Small Server Mob Advantage
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 2009 18:25:28 -0500
jmfbahciv <jmfbahciv@aol> writes:
No shit. I remember one of our managers taking a look above the ceiling tiles in our area. There must have been miles and miles and miles of wire up there. A couple of guys tried to trace a plug back to find out which system it was wired to. It took them all night, maybe more.

When I was in one of the facilities at Oak Ridge, I looked up. The ceiling was about 50' above me and the wire I saw awed me. There were people who strung each and every one of them over the years.


there were old stories about 3270 coax cables exceeding flr loading limit in some bldgs. (single cable from datacenter to each 3270 terminal). in the 80s standard effort to run a new set of 3270 coax cables had default/standard cost estimate of $1000/cable.

theoritically ... a major purpose for token-ring was single cable to each wiring closet ... then with wires running from MAU boxes in local wiring closets to the terminals (by this time PCs running terminal emulation). one of the design points for terminal emulation paradigm was 300 or more "terminals" per token-ring LAN ... so each individual adapter card had design of very low thruput per card.

the pc/rt had 16bit (AT/ISA) bus and had done their own 4mbit token-ring adapter card ... with design point that individual adapter cards could burst at near maximum thruput of the lan. for rs/6000, they were "forced" to use the PS2 microchannel 16mbit token-ring adapter card ... however a PC/RT 4mbit token-ring adapter card had higher thruput than the PS2 microchannel 16mbit token-ring adatper card.

the los gatos lab was a showplace bldg. built in the 60s ... at the time of bldg. had 2-3 times the normal pairs of phone twisted-pairs going to each office. it was usually possible to find existing unused twisted-pair to do unshielded twisted-pair 10mbit ethernet into each office.

the almaden lab was built in the mid-80s with lots of cat5 ... presumably anticipating token-ring use. however, it was found that shielded twisted-pair 10mbit enet had higher per adapter card thruput, higher aggregate thruput, and lower latency than using the cat5 for 16mbit token-ring (basically instead of having token-ring MAUs in local wiring closet ... there were enet switches or routers).

misc. past posts mentioning 3270 coax flr loading:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#7 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#11 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#42 Arpa address
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#38 Token-ring vs Ethernet - 10 years later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#6 Memory Instrumentation - was "largest parallel sysplex around?"

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 8 Dec, 2009
Subject: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Blog: Payment Systems Network
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#78 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#81 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#4 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#10 70 Years of ATM Innovation

ATM Fraud: New Skimming Scheme Spreads
http://www.bankinfosecurity.com/articles.php?art_id=1985

ATM machine wiki page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automated_teller_machine

How ATM fraud nearly brought down British banking (in early 90s)
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/10/21/phantoms_and_rogues/

ATM skimming has been around at least a decade before the ATM Integrity Task Force ... for instance:

Fake ATM Machine Steals PINs (11May93):
http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/14.59.html#subj3
Fake ATM Machine Steals PINs (19May93):
http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/14.66.html#subj3

another ATM related item

response to NACHA RFI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/nacharfi.htm

and related results (while this was "NACHA", the actual pilot ran on debit/ATM network):
http://web.archive.org/web/20070706004855/http://internetcouncil.nacha.org/News/news.html

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 8 Dec, 2009
Subject: How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?
Blog: Mainframe Exports Network
How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?
http://vkvipinkumar.wordpress.com/2009/11/29/how-to-reduce-the-overall-monthly-cost-on-a-system-z-environment/

from above:
System z, one of the most reliable systems in the world. Most of the mission critical applications depend on it. When the pressure is too high to be competitive in the market, every corporate has to look at ways and means of reducing the MIPS usage.

... snip ...

At the science center in the early 70s there were (at least) three different technologies
1) analytical modeling 2) activity sampling 3) multiple regression analysis

some of the activity evolved into things like capacity planning. misc old posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

One of the analytical models was in cms\apl ... and morphed into the performance predictor that was available on the (virtual machine based) online worldwide sales & marketing HONE system ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

SEs could gather customer performance information and input it into the predictor ... and then ask "what if" questions ... what happens if workload changes and/or what happens if there are configuration changes.

Activity sampling could be overall activity ... or things like PSW sampling ... looking for code "hot-spots". An example was some 370/145 m'code changes for PSW sampling that was used for selecting parts of kernel code to move to 370/148 (ECPS) microcode ... old reference/summary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21

a decade ago ... I got to look at a large application that consumed nearly all of some 40+ large mainframe CECs (avg. $30m+/CEC). There was scores of people in monitoring group that had constantly been doing "hot-spot" analysis.

They also had hired somebody that had acquired the rights to a many times descendant of the performance predictor and ran it through a APL->C language translator ... and was using it in performance & thruput consulting business.

Both of these technologies had identified areas of the application that modest amount of optimization significantly improved thruput ... but it was felt that there still remained a lots of unrealized improvement.

I asked for summary activity statistics for large number of the runs across the different CECs and ran it through multiple regression analysis. I was able to identify an area (undetected by the other methodologies) that with slight changes resulted in 14% improvement.

misc. past posts mentioning multiple regression analysis:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#62 Itanium2 performance data from SGI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#31 capacity planning: art, science or magic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#6 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#17 More on garbage collection
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#18 Code density and performance?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#22 A very basic question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#40 A very basic question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#4 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#7 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#23 Strobe equivalents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#24 Curiousity: CPU % for COBOL program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#28 Why these original FORTRAN quirks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#50 Where can you get a Minor in Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#71 PAAppViewer3 (AppViewer3)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#21 Distributed Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#24 Job ad for z/OS systems programmer trainee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#81 Intel: an expensive many-core future is ahead of us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#5 Why do IBMers think disks are 'Direct Access'?

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

"Portable" data centers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Portable" data centers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 2009 23:11:56 -0500
lefuller@SBCGLOBAL.NET (Lloyd Fuller) writes:
360/30s with < 256K. Full 2314 = 8 x 800K. I am not sure how many tape drives, but they were the old 7-track probably 800 BPI.

One or two of them might have been 360/40s. But all of the ones that I saw in trailers were mod 30s. As far as I know, they all ran DOS: the first DOS not DOS/VS since they were 306s. I think they ran Power, but I am not sure.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#14 "Portable" data centers

previously referenced page (announce & FCS):
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_FS360.html
"page 2" for above:
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_FS360B.html

available store sizes
360/30 ... 16k-64k 360/40 ... 32k-256k

2311s were single drive ... top loader, picture here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_IBM_disk_storage

1316 disk pack for 2311 ... 7.25mbytes (above says same disk pack used in earlier 1311 drives)

2314 had 9 drives ... only 8 addressable ... each pack was 29.2mbytes
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_2314.html

there were address "plugs" ... possible to open drawer for 9th/spare drive, put in new pack ... get it powered up ... and pop out the address plug from one of the other drives and pop it into drive with newly mounted disk. slightly reduced latency that the system saw when changing packs.

2400 tape drives, 9trk 800bpi ... could order 7trk model (for handling older tapes) ... 7trk could select 200bpi, 556bpi, & 800bpi.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_7_track

360/30 system details with 2400 tapes and 2311 disk drives
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP2030.html

i made some contributions to an "online" version of the green card (sense bytes section) ... done in ios3270. except for the A220 information, the sense information was taken from the 360/67 "blue" card (had information about features unique to 360/67 ... and rest filled out with sense information).

I've done a q&d hack on the ios3270 to html
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/gcard.html

360 channel program tape command codes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/gcard.html#25

above has "mode-set" for 7track.

ios3270 was standard package on vm370/cms.

for the 3090 service processor ... it started out with 4331 running a highly customized version of vm370 release6 with the service panels all done in (cms) ios3270. by first-customer-ship ... the "4331" service processor morphed into a pair of 4361s.

DOS/VS was for virtual storage. 370 was initially announced w/o virtual memory (just a few new instructions, TOD-clock, a few other things).

for entry & mid-range machines, it wasn't too bad to add virtual memory ... but the hardware to add virtual memory to 370/165 became a real problem. Eventually there was a proposal to eliminate some number of the original 370 virtual memory features ... which would buy 370/165 schedule six months (concurrent announce and ship of virtual memory for all models at the same time). The problem then became, for the other 370 models ... to go back and remove the 370 virtual memory features that were being dropped for 370/165 (and any software that had already been written to utilize the dropped features had to be rewritten).

for other drift ... "spook base" ... from Boyd biographies ... or "NKP" discussion
http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineArchive/Pages/2004/November%202004/1104igloo.aspx

the above only mentions two 360/65s ... which could hardly account for the $2.5B mentioned in Boyd biographies. The above also mentions frogs generating false positives ... but i've heard stories of other animals also.

another NKP reference
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

Boyd references his stint at NKP in his Organic Design for Command and Control
http://www.d-n-i.net/dni/john-r-boyd/
power point version
http://www.d-n-i.net/boyd/organic_design.ppt

above states it is taken from "original" 1987 version scan'ed to pdf.

I believe the original, original version was given at 1983 briefing I sponsored at ibm ... from which I still have several hardcopies ... a few pages I transcribed in this old posting (including NKP reference)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#8

i've done some quick searches for other references to use of mainframes in that time & place ... but not a whole lot show up.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Scammers scrape RAM for bank card data

From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 9 Dec 2009
Subject: Scammers scrape RAM for bank card data
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Scammers scrape RAM for bank card data
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/12/09/ram_scraper_credit_card_theft/

from above:
Malware sidesteps encryption Forget keyloggers and packet sniffers. In the wake of industry rules requiring credit card data to be encrypted, malware that siphons clear-text information from computer memory is all the rage among scammers

... snip ...

In the past ... observing that the transaction information is required in scores of business processes located at possibly millions of locations around the globe ... I've commented that even if the planet was buried under miles of encryption ... it still wouldn't stop the information leakage.

In the mid-90s, we were asked to participate in the x9a10 financial standard working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments (debit, credit, ACH, stored-value, giftcard, POS, internet, attended, unattended, low-value, high-value, transit turnstyle, etc, aka *ALL*). After some detailed end-to-end threat & vulnerability investigations of the numerous environments ... came up with the x9.59 financial transaction standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

x9.59 standard didn't do anything to address hiding the information ... it just slightly tweaked the paradigm so the information wasn't useful to crooks for fraudulent financial transactions.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 8 Dec, 2009
Subject: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Blog: Payment Systems Network
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#78 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#81 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#4 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#10 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#16 70 Years of ATM Innovation

While general public is possibly more familiar with RDBMS technology ... there is still quite a bit of ATM transactions processed by IMS
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Information_Management_System

from above:

much of the world's banking industry relies on IMS, including the U.S. Federal Reserve. For example, chances are that withdrawing money from an automated teller machine (ATM) will trigger an IMS transaction. Several Chinese banks have recently purchased IMS to support that country's burgeoning financial industry.

... snip ...

old email mentioning Jim passing off consulting to the IMS group to me when he left for Tandem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801016

In the past, fedwire has attributed its 100% availability to "IMS hot-standby" (& automated operator).

long ago and far away, my wife had been talked into going to POK (mainframe land) to be in charge of loosely-coupled architecture. while there she did peer-coupled shared data architecture ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

which saw very little uptake, except for "IMS hot-standby", until sysplex.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Small Server Mob Advantage

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Small Server Mob Advantage
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Dec 2009 12:24:45 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
this old references working on trying to turn out a product that would simulate NCP/pu4 to host systems ... simulating activity as "cross-domain" ... but all resources were actually owned by the networking infrastructure ... and sna RUs then carried in "real" networking infrastructure (old posts from decade ago):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#66
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#67
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#70


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#0 Small Sever Mob Advantage

a little recent x-over from (linkedin) payment network (part of long-winded set of comments)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#20 70 Years of ATM Innovation

referenced in above
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Information_Management_System

from above:
much of the world's banking industry relies on IMS, including the U.S. Federal Reserve. For example, chances are that withdrawing money from an automated teller machine (ATM) will trigger an IMS transaction. Several Chinese banks have recently purchased IMS to support that country's burgeoning financial industry.

... snip ...

also IMS hot-standby ... with respect to the intersection between the IMS hot-standby work and the "real" networking work was some non-linear scaling issues with VTAM session re-stablishment ... while IMS hot-standby was effectively immediately back ... it might take hrs to get tens of thousands of device/terminal sessions re-established. The scenario was that the (real) networking would do simulated SNA at boundaries (as necessary) but was distributed and replicated internally ... and so IMS hot-standby saw opportunity to do shadow sessions on the standby(s) ... to avoid the long delay getting all the SNA sessions re-established.

other posts in the ATM discussion:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#78 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#81 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#4 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#10 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#16 70 Years of ATM Innovation

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

curiousity q? for the historians

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: curiousity q? for the historians.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 2009 11:08:01 -0500
BillF@MAINSTAR.COM (Bill Fairchild) writes:
On the REALLY old boxes (S/360), the performance problem was called a S0C6 specification exception program interrupt and probable ABEND. When the first S/370s were shipped in 1971, the requirement for storage alignment was removed for most instructions, but there was a performance hit.

higher-end machines did instruction fetch a double-word at a time ... for instance, the functional characteristic manual for the 360/65 & 360/67 gave instruction timings ... which included prorated time for the double word instruction fetch ... i.e. the formula for 2-byte instruction included 1/4th of (double word) memory fetch (4-byte instruction included 1/2th of memory fetch).

programmers would use cnop 0,8 in front of the start of a high-use loop ... to align it on a double word boundary ... so branch to the start of the loop would load the first 8byte of instructions in the loop ... rather than wasting time loading anything that came before the loop.

360 65 & 75 functional characteristic manuals:
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/funcChar/A22-6884-3_360-65_funcChar.pdf
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/funcChar/A22-6889-0_360-75_funcChar.pdf

uniprocessor 360/67 was basically a 360/65 with the addition of hardware supporting virtual memory
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/funcChar/A27-2719-0_360-67_funcChar.pdf

multiprocessor 360/67 (described in above) was something of a different beast ... lots of differences from 360/65 multiprocessor (which was basically two independent processors sharing the same real stroage). The 360/67 multiprocessor "channel controller" allowed splitting into independent units ... but multiprocessor operation allowed for things like processors to address all available channels (more like 3081 & 370/xa). control registers were also used to "sense" the "channel controller" configuration settings (and some special models ... to also "SET" the "channel controler" configuration settings ... which not only controlled channel configuration but also memory banks).

360/67 had both 24bit & 32bit virtual addressing modes (more than 24bit addressing also didn't reappear until 3081).

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

curiousity q? for the historians

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: curiousity q? for the historians.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 2009 12:28:43 -0500
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
That is all very well, but it doesn't relate to the comment to which you are replying.

Instructions were aligned on 16-bit boundaries on both System/360 and System/370. The alignment requirement that was _removed_ with System/ 370 was the one for the alignment of *data*.

On a System/370, you could do a double-precision floating-point multiply with a memory operand that was stored at an odd byte address - but this slowed down the instruction. On System/360, that was simply an error that caused a software interrupt. This is what he was referring to.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#22

i was replying to the last part about storage alignment and performance hit ... and pointing out there was also a case for instruction storage alignment for instruction fetch performance ... not just operand alignment for data store/fetch performance.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 10 Dec, 2009
Subject: How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?
Blog: Mainframe Exports Network
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#17 How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?

IBM's newest mainframe is all Linux; With starting price of $212,000, IBM wants to compete directly against higher-end x86 servers
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9142007/IBM_s_newest_mainframe_is_all_Linux_

In the late 80s, one of the justifications for Amdahl's UTS and IBM's AIX/370 running under VM was that field engineering required EREP reports. The effort to retrofit EREP into "unix" was several times larger than the porting effort to mainframe ... so major strategy was to run under VM and rely on VMs EREP support.

somewhat unrelated discussion from ibm-main mailing list mentioning vm370 as the service processor for 3090
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#18

IBM offers cheaper Linux mainframe bundles; The new bundles can include discounts of up to 80 percent over previous offerings
http://www.infoworld.com/d/hardware/ibm-offers-cheaper-linux-mainframe-bundles-631?source=rss_infoworld_news

in-memory stuff was significantly motivated by telco call processing ... in fact, traditional wisdom from mid-90s was that telcos would take over the payment industry ... i.e. only telco call processing had the efficiencies to handle projected volumes in micro-payments ... and those volumes would allow them to move up the value stream to take over the rest of the payment industry. For various reasons that never happened (including micro-payment volumes have yet to appear).

in any case, some of the "in-memory" RDBMS implementations (including support of ACID properties) have benchmarked at ten times thruput of traditional RDBMS ... where all data was cached (i.e. both were running with everything in memory).

misc. pieces from related discussion in linkedin payment group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#78 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#81 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#4 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#10 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#16 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#20 70 Years of ATM Innovation

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

[OT] Ayup. Rocket science is trivial

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [OT]  Ayup.  Rocket science is trivial
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 2009 21:07:13 -0500
well then for the fun of it:
http://www.airspacemag.com/space-exploration/Soviet-Star-Wars.html

and then this one ..
http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/mpl/w_blackbrantxii.html

we were sitting on rooftop patio in nyc looking south and first thot it was some sort of new kind of searchlight over lower manhatten ... not quite as many seemed to notice:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lb45uBaj2Mc

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

IBM_s_newest_mainframe_is_all_Linux_

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM_s_newest_mainframe_is_all_Linux_
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 2009 09:51:55 -0500
tommytsui@GMAIL.COM (Tommy Tsui) writes:
The new system uses IBM's specialty Linux processor and runs either Novell SUSE or Red Hat systems. It does not use the mainframe operating system z/OS but includes mainframe management software as well as IBM's z/Virtual Machine system. Together, they constitute the company's latest "solutions edition," or what IBM says are lower-cost, integrated stacks for the mainframe.

little x-over from (linkedin) Mainframe discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#17 How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#24 How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?

I (semi-facetiously) posted references to these latest product announcements (the quotes about significant price reduction) ... and mentioned ...
In the late 80s, one of the justifications for Amdahl's UTS and IBM's AIX/370 running under VM was that field engineering required EREP reports. The effort to retrofit EREP into "unix" was several times larger than the (whole) porting effort to mainframe ... so major strategy was to run under VM and rely on VMs EREP support

... snip ...

of course, the thread/discussion mentioned other ways that mainframe installations might reduce cost (including improving efficiencies of application through various performance optimization related methodologies).

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

New Gift Card Laws Also Benefit Terrorists

From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 11 Dec, 2009
Subject: New Gift Card Laws Also Benefit Terrorists
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
New Gift Card Laws Also Benefit Terrorists
http://information-security-resources.com/2009/12/09/new-gift-card-laws-also-benefit-terrorists/

from above:
Let's say you are a bad guy and have some "dirty" money to launder. Cards might be a good idea. First of all, there is no limit to how many cards you can buy. You can buy them with cash. You can sell them on an online auction site, transfer the value to...

... snip ...

old post in payment mailing list
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#digcash

discussing some of the differences between the stored-value (gift, merchant, etc) EU chipcards in the 90s (and announcement about new directive ... that seem to result in all the programs evaporating) ... vis-a-vis the magstripe variety in the US.

we were brought in to look at possibly the original such magstripe-based (gift, stored-value, merchant) card deployment (long ago and far away). we had previously done the ha/cmp product on "open system" platform ... and then some number of other vendors started bringing out products that somewhat emulated our ha/cmp product. the original magstripe implementation was done on one of these other platforms ... that then experienced a database corruption problem (that was somewhat the result of unfortunate interaction between multiple failures).

numerous discussions on the regulatory side have been going on from just about the original appearance of the products (back to at least the mid-90s).

small disclaimer ... somewhere along the way ... we had gotten tasked to scope, size, design, & cost a dataprocessing infrastructure for possible national deployment (in the states) of "EU" stored-value chipcard. part of that was looking at the business plans and value propositions for stakeholders.

there are regulations trying to do all sorts of "cards" ... including state driver licenses (in response to 9/11) ... recent news item

Many states still risk noncompliance with Real ID law
http://www.nextgov.com/nextgov/ng_20091202_9218.php

there have been articles about the UK mandating various kinds of cards ... but not possibly a budget for deploying readers that can work with the cards.

"know your customer" mandates, money laundering, various other illegal activity concerns predate 9/11.

one of the speculations about fixing many of the vulnerabilities in the existing payment transaction infrastructures ... that it would migrate the criminals to opening new accounts ... running into "know you customer" mandates. Also a lot of current payment transaction infrastructure exploits don't materially affect financial institution bottom lines ... like fraudulent accounts (with things like synthetic IDs that don't correspond to any "real" person) can.

a card reader news item from today:

TWIC card reader tests need best practices, GAO says
http://fcw.com/articles/2009/12/11/twic-card-reader-tests-need-best-practices-gao-says.aspx

one of the things from more than decade ago ... was that "contact" chip readers had reliability issues and were especially prone to problems outside of a relatively clean environment. there was then some number of studies of contactless vis-a-vis contact chips with regarding to reliability, failure rates, and effect of various kinds of different environmental conditions.

One of the issues in some of these programs is confusing authentication with identification ... where identification solutions then may introduce new vulnerabilities related to unauthorized divulging information. which then results in stuff like this:

Steel-woven wallet pledges to keep RFID credit cards safe
http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2009/12/11/anti_rfid_wallet/

this parallel item somewhat intertwines:

Data Breaches Show PCI DSS Ineffective
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#29

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

curiousity q? for the historians

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: curiousity q? for the historians.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 2009 12:15:21 -0500
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
I'm sorry, I didn't realize that; the context to clearly indicate that you were shifting the topic was lacking.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#22
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#23

it is well documented (just jumping into the middle; as well as bad spelling). i was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s ... somewhat as a result, a researcher was paid to sit in the back of my office for 9mths taking notes on how I communicated. they also got copies of all my incoming & outgoing email and logs of all "instant messages". besides a research report ... it became a stanford phd thesis (joint between language and computer AI) as well as material for other papers and at least one book.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Data Breaches Show PCI DSS Ineffective

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 11 Dec, 2009
Subject: Data Breaches Show PCI DSS Ineffective
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Data Breaches Show PCI DSS Ineffective
http://information-security-resources.com/2009/12/10/data-breaches-show-pci-dss-ineffective/

from above:
Are these companies assuming that a data security breach is cheaper than the security?

How should we understand the Ponemon survey. Is PCI DSS a failure in the eyes of US companies?


... snip ...

somewhat as a result of working on this stuff that is now frequently called "electronic commerce" ... in the mid-90s we were asked to participate in the x9a10 financial standard working group ... which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments (ALL; debit, credit, stored-value, ACH, point-of-sale, attended, unattended, face-to-face, internet, low-value, high-value; aka ALL). as part of that there were end-to-end threat and vulnerability studies of the various environments.

a major issue was the extreme vulnerability of the account and transaction information ... that could easily be used by crooks to perform fraudulent transactions ... but the same information was also required in dozens of business processes located at tens of millions of locations around the globe. As a result, there were diametrically opposing requirements regarding the information ... resulting in making the periodic observation that even if the planet was buried under miles of information hiding encryption ... it still wouldn't stop the information leakage.

for the fun of it, there has been periodic discussion regarding the (existing) Naked Transaction Metaphor ... pieces of it archived here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#payments

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

SQL injection attack claims 132,000+

From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 11 Dec, 2009
Subject: SQL injection attack claims 132,000+
Blog: Information Security
SQL injection attack claims 132,000+
http://www.net-security.org/secworld.php?id=8604

from above:
A large scale SQL injection attack has injected a malicious iframe on tens of thousands of susceptible websites. ScanSafe reports that the injected iframe loads malicious content from 318x.com, which eventually leads to the installation of a rootkit-enabled variant of the Buzus backdoor trojan.

... snip ...

others:

SQL Injection Attack Claims 132,000+
http://it.slashdot.org/story/09/12/10/1334205/SQL-Injection-Attack-Claims-132000
Fast-Moving SQL Attack Hits 125,000-Plus Sites; Nasty SQL injection attack has ties to a credit card-snatching trojan -- and may just be getting started.
http://www.internetnews.com/security/article.php/3852461/FastMoving+SQL+Attack+Hits+125000Plus+Sites.htm
SQL injection attack knocks out at least 132K websites
http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarget.com/security-bytes/sql-injection-attack-knocks-out-at-least-132k-websites/
SQL injection attack knocks out at least 132K websites
http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarget.com/security-bytes/sql-injection-attack-knocks-out-at-least-132k-websites/

When we first started on this stuff related to electronic commerce webservers ... the RDBMS platforms always had more problems ... in part just because RDBMS was so much more complex ... and higher complexity tends to have many more mistakes.

in theory discussions about RDBMS & SQL ... I will periodically admit to being there for the original relational/SQL implementation ... aka
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

but don't claim any responsibility for SQL (over possible alternatives). I've even pontificated on things like NULLS and 3-value logic ... some past threads/posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#40 How to cope with missing values - NULLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#41 How to cope with missing values - NULLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#46 death of Edgar F. (Ted) Codd

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 2009 11:26:21 -0500
Patrick Scheible <kkt@zipcon.net> writes:
TOPS-10 and TOPS-20 didn't have a "previous command" key under any name.

from long ago and far away


Date: 12/16/80 09:33:28
cc: wheeler

I'd appreciate any comments on this file:
Brief description of 3277 keyboard - keys and functions under VM/370 and CMS

key             usual function  (some variation depending on environment)

CLEAR           Clear screen, permits waiting screens of info to appear
DEL             Delete character at the cursor, rest of line contracts
DUP PA1         Attention - Kills CMS, drops into CP READ
ENTER           Sends a line to the computer, also holds a 'more' screenfull
ERASE EOF       Erase from current cursor position to end of line
ERASE INPUT     Erases line being entered
FIELD MARK PA2  Clear screen, except command line
INS MODE        Begin character insert mode at cursor position, line expands
PFn             Programmed (preset) function keys, like entering a word or phrase
RESET           Clears locked keyboard, INS MODE, INPUT INHIBIT, etc.
TEST REQ        Bring back previous command

... snip ... top of post, old email index

if was possible to "assign" function to different keys ... so the "retrieve" function could be assigned to other (usually program function key) than the "TEST REQ" key.

following has layout of 3277 keyboard (towards the bottom of the page)
http://www.quadibloc.com/comp/kyb03.htm

and the "TEST REQ" is lower left.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

SSL certificates and keys

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: SSL certificates and keys
Newsgroups: sci.crypt
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 2009 15:21:42 -0500
pk <pk@pk.invalid> writes:
My question is (apparently) simple, but I can't find a definitve answer.

A SSL certificate, essentially, contains a public key bound to a subject, and the public key is signed by a CA. So clients receiving the certificate, that also recognize the CA, can validate the certificate. So far so good.

But let's use the SSL certificate in a real scenario, like for example an HTTPS transaction. Is the server's public key contained in the certificate actually used in the SSL/TLS process (for signing or encrypting)? Or it's only the ciphersuite that client and server negotiate that matters, and the certificate is used only for server authentication?


we had been called in to consult with small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server ... the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use. the result of that effort is now frequently referred to as "electronic commerce".

as part of that effort we had to do walk thrus of the business processes of these new things calling themselves Certification Authorities ... which issued these things called "digital certificates" (that were representation of their certification process). also part of that was assumptions about security of various parts of the process.

initial assumption was that enduser knew the relationship between the webserver they wanted to talk to and the corresponding URL and the browser would use SSL to show the correspondance between the URL and the webserver being talked to; the combination would provide assurance between the webserver that the user thot they were talking to and the webserver that they were actually talking to.

the original assumption were almost immediately invalidate when the merchants found that using SSL cut their thruput by 90-95% ... and dropped back to using SSL just for checkout/pay. now the user clicks on a button provided by (usually unauthenticated website) that supplies the URL. The result is that SSL is now just the part showing that whatever webserver being talked to is the webserver that it claims to be (potentially totally unrelated to the webserver that the user thinks they are talking to).

SSL had two parts ... the authentication part ... and key-exchange part. With the authentication part falling back to just checking that whoever the webserver claims to be is the webserver it is ... then the primary use of SSL in the world today is (encryption) hiding account numbers and transaction details (for this electronic commerce stuff) while it is being transmitted thru the internet (between two endpoints).

misc. past posts mentioning SSL digital certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#sslcert

now a major motivation for SSL was perceived integrity weakenesses in the domain name infrastructure. however, a walkthru of the Certification Authority business processes have them requiring identification information from SSL certificate applicants ... and then they go thru an expensive, time-consuming, and error-prone process of matching that identification information against the identification information on file with the authoritative agency responsible for domain name ownership (aka the domain name infrastructure that is percieved to have integrity weaknesses motivating SSL).

so the domain name CA operations are somewhat in catch-22 ... backing various aspects of DNSSEC to improve the integrity of domain name infrastructure ... on which they are dependent ... and the improvement of the itnegrity of domain name infrastructure reducing the motivation for SSL domain name certificates.

part of DNSSEC can have domain name owners registering public key with the domain name infrastructure at the same time a domain name is registered. Then all future communication with domain name owners can be digitally signed (and validated with the onfile public key) as countermeasure to things like domain name hijacking (reduces possibility that somebody hijacks a domain and then applies for valid digital certificate as the "registered" domain name owner).

The CA operations could also use the onfile public key to require SSL domain name certificate applicants to digital sign the application. They then can replace their expensive, error-prone and time-consuming identification matching process with a much less expensive, reliable, and efficient authentication process ... by doing a real-time retrieval of the onfile public key to validate the digital signature on the SSL domain name application. However, this also represents a catch-22 for the SSL domain name certificate industry ... since it raises the possibility that everyone could request public key real-time retrieval piggybacked on the doman name lookup response ... aka real-time dynamic public key retrieval in place of stale static digital certificate public key distribution.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#catch22

so while doing some of this electronic commerce stuff, i would get needled by some of the digital certificate proponents about bringing payments into the modern era by requiring digital certificates appended to all payment transactions. i would respond that the "offline" digital certificate paradigm would be reversing modern online payment transactions to at least pre-70s (back in the days of offline transactions and paper booklets of revoked cards). I view that my ridicule of such positions helped motivate the OCSP activities (but then why would payments do two different real-time transactions when it could be done all in one real-time transaction w/o certificate).

The other issue was that typical digital certificate size was 100 times (two orders of magnitude) larger than typical payment transaction size. Besides appending digital certificates being redundant and superfluous, it would also increase payment transaction size by a factor of 100 times (for no useful purpose) ... misc. past posts mentioning the payment transaction bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#bloat

Recognizing the enormous bloat of digital certificates in payment transactions ... the financial standard group spawned a "compressed certificate" standards activity ... looking at possibly getting (useless, redundant and superfluous) appended digital certificates down to only ten times bloat. I was able to use their techniques to demonstrate how it was possible to compress digital certificates to zero bytes ... and then rather than have certificate-less digitally signed transactions ... it would be possible to have mandated zero-byte appended digital certificates. misc. past posts mentioning certificate-less
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#certless

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 2009 09:49:05 -0500
jmfbahciv <jmfbahciv@aol> writes:
Because it wasn't. It was a mainframe and was sold as one. Nobody ever called it a mini. We called the VAXes as Midi, a tad more powerful (and bigger) than the minis. VAXes didn't even run as a mainframe until VMS started to transform into a genuine timesharing system.

vaxs & 43xx sold into similar/same midrange market. price and price/performance seem to break some threshhold and there was huge increase in uptake in the volumes. large customers even had orders of 43xx in numbers of multiple hundreds at a time. part of it was some number of datacenters were bursting at the seams & 43xx (& vaxs) could be installed in areas with minimum preparation (i.e. some locations seeing disappearing conference rooms as they were being converted to computer rooms).

the 43xx followons (4361s & 4381s) had expected to see similar volume uptakes ... but by that time, much of that mid-range market was starting to move to workstations and large PCs (servers) ... which can also be seen in the vax numbers ... old post giving vax volumes sliced & diced by year, us/non-us, model, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0 Computers in Science Fiction

future system was going to completely replace 360/370 ... and that distraction led to drying up 370 (hardware & software) product pipeline, in the wake of failure of future system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

there was mad rush to get products back into the 370 product pipelines. part of that was appetite to pickup a lot of 370 stuff I had been doing all during the future system period. another part was big push to define 370-xa and get it out (which was going to take 7-8yrs). the pok group managed to convince corporate that vm370 needed to be killed and the (burlington mall) vm370 development group shutdown, and all the people moved to POK in order to make mvs/xa schedule. In any case, quite a few people didn't move.

One of the jokes is the head of POK was major contributor to VMS (because of the number of people from the burlington mall group showing up at DEC). With the increasing uptake in midrange (at the time 138/148), endicott manage to assume the vm370 product responsibility ... but had to reconsitute a development group from scratch.

old email in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#15 departmental servers
referring to 43xx multi-hundred order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404b

other old email mentioning 43xx
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

recent posts about work on cluster scaleup was facilitated by being able to port over RDBMS that had vaxcluster support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#40 "Larrabee" GPU design question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#43 "Larrabee" GPU design question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#26 Natural keys vs Aritficial Keys
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#36 Ingres claims massive database performance boost
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#67 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#57 Ikea type font change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#35 DB2 announces technology that trumps Oracle RAC and Exadata
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#38 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#42 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#43 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#46 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#49 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#54 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#26 Check out Computer glitch to cause flight delays across U.S.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 2009 10:00:59 -0500
Jorgen Grahn <grahn+nntp@snipabacken.se> writes:
And around here, they still want me to switch in mid-dialogue from the main keypad to buttons around the display:

yesterday just saw another "upgrade" to ATM screen.

Previously, I would insert my card ... and on the pin-entry screen, there were two (touch screen) buttons "Enter" and a button that would execute my previous/last ATM transaction (after entering pin).

yesterday that screen had several additional buttons/options added ... on the pin-entry (touch) screen; "enter" goes to the next screen, a button that displayed my last transaction, and several new (touch screen) button options.

i could also enter my pin (from the keypad) and then choose the "physical" enter button (on the keypad) ... to go to the next screen.

older ATMs had (had non-touch screen) display with buttons around the screen ... that corresponded to (selected) fields on the screen.

past posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#78 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#81 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#4 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#10 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#16 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#20 70 Years of ATM Innovation

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 2009 10:17:46 -0500
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
As bankers demanded that new regulation should not stifle innovation, a clearly irritated Mr Volcker said that the biggest innovation in the industry over the past 20 years had been the cash machine. He went on to attack the rise of complex products such as credit default swaps (CDS). On the subject of pay, he said: "Has there been one financial leader to say this is really excessive? Wake up, gentlemen. Your response, I can only say, has been inadequate." He said that financial services in the United States had increased its share of value added from 2 per cent to 6.5 per cent, but he asked: "Is that a reflection of your financial innovation, or just a reflection of what you're paid?" (emphasis added)

one of the things is that all the mortgage/CDO/CDS and carrying stuff off-balance, etc.; the bonus/compensation went from related to "profit/net" ... to percent of the transaction size.

as result there was enormous motivation to drastically increase the size and number of transactions w/o regard to RISK and/or whether it might take down the institution (infrastructure &/or the country) ... since the (percent transaction personal) compensation would more than offset any possible adverse results for the institution (profit).

this included getting legislation & regulations changed to facilitate the whole thing.

misc. recent posts mentioning volcker
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#51 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#20 U.K. lags in information security management practices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#25 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook

misc. recent posts mentioning GLBA &/or repeal of Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#0 Audit II: Two more scary words: Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#10 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#11 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#16 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#18 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#20 Decision Making or Instinctive Steering?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#29 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#32 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#36 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#38 People to Blame for the Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#39 'WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE GLOBAL MELTDOWN'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#42 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#46 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#53 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#55 Who will give Citigroup the KNOCKOUT blow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#61 Accounting for the "greed factor"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#65 is it possible that ALL banks will be nationalized?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#0 PNC Financial to pay CEO $3 million stock bonus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#10 Who will Survive AIG or Derivative Counterparty Risk?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#28 I need insight on the Stock Market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#42 Bernard Madoff Is Jailed After Pleading Guilty -- are there more "Madoff's" out there?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#61 Quiz: Evaluate your level of Spreadsheet risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#63 Do bonuses foster unethical conduct?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#74 Why is everyone talking about AIG bonuses of millions and keeping their mouth shut on billions sent to foreign banks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#77 Who first mentioned Credit Crunch?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#0 What is swap in the financial market?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#8 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#13 Should we fear and hate derivatives?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#23 Should FDIC or the Federal Reserve Bank have the authority to shut down and take over non-bank financial institutions like AIG?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#35 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#36 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#37 How do you see ethics playing a role in your organizations current or past?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#40 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#59 Tesco to open 30 "bank branches" this year
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#70 When did "client server" become part of the language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#79 Are the "brightest minds in finance" finally onto something?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#2 CEO pay sinks - Wall Street Journal/Hay Group survey results just released
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#27 US banking Changes- TARP Proposl
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#29 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#31 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#38 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#43 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#46 Who moved my payment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#47 TARP Disbursements Through April 10th
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#49 Is the current downturn cyclic or systemic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#53 What every taxpayer should know about what caused the current Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#56 What's your personal confidence level concerning financial market recovery?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#65 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#3 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#5 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#7 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#27 Flawed Credit Ratings Reap Profits as Regulators Fail Investors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#33 Treating the Web As an Archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#34 Board Visibility Into The Business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#37 Future of Financial Mathematics?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#53 We Can't Subsidize the Banks Forever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#76 Undoing 2000 Commodity Futures Modernization Act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#3 Consumer Credit Crunch and Banking Writeoffs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#17 REGULATOR ROLE IN THE LIGHT OF RECENT FINANCIAL SCANDALS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#22 China's yuan 'set to usurp US dollar' as world's reserve currency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#25 The Paradox of Economic Recovery
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#29 Analysing risk, especially credit risk in Banks, which was a major reason for the current crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#1 IBM to Build Europe, Asia 'Smart Infrastructure'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#13 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#23 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX? (Are settlements a good argument for overnight batch COBOL ?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#40 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#44 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#49 What's your personal confidence level concerning financial market recovery?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#54 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#57 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#74 Administration calls for financial system overhaul
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#77 Financial Regulatory Reform - elimination of loophole allowing special purpose institutions outside Bank Holding Company (BHC) oversigh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#1 Is it possible to have an alternative payment system without riding on the Card Network platforms?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#12 IBM identity manager goes big on role control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#21 The Big Takeover
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#35 what is mortgage-backed securities?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#36 Average Comp This Year At Top Firm Estimated At $700,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#69 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#2 Big Bonuses At Goldman Should Be Applauded, Not Criticized
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#5 Internal fraud isn't new, but it's news
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#89 Audits V: Why did this happen to us ;-(
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#13 UK issues Turning apology (and about time, too)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#17 UK issues Turning apology (and about time, too)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#21 UK issues Turning apology (and about time, too)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#56 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#58 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#62 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#23 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#25 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#48 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#84 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#2 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#17 U.K. lags in information security management practices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#23 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#47 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#51 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#77 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

SSL certificates and keys

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: SSL certificates and keys
Newsgroups: sci.crypt
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 2009 12:35:19 -0500
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#32 SSL certificates and keys

ssl/tsl ... my rfc index
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm

click on Term (term->RFC#) in the RFCs listed by section, then click on "TLS" in the Acronym fastpath ... brings up:
transport layer security (TLS )
see also encryption , security
5734 5590 5539 5489 5487 5469 5430 5425 5422 5421 5289 5288 5281 5246 5238 5216 5114 5081 5077 5054 5018 4934 4851 4785 4762 4681 4680 4642 4572 4513 4507 4492 4366 4347 4346 4279 4261 4217 4162 4132 3943 3788 3749 3734 3546 3436 3268 3207 2847 2830 2818 2817 2716 2712 2595 2487 2246


...

clicking on RFC number, brings up RFC summary in lower frame ... aka:
5246 PS
The Transport Layer Security (TLS) Protocol Version 1.2, Dierks T., Rescorla E., 2008/08/15 (104pp) (.txt=222395) (Obsoletes 3268, 4346, 4366) (Updates 4492) (Refs 793, 1321, 1948, 2104, 2246, 2785, 3268, 3280, 3447, 3526, 3749, 3766, 4086, 4279, 4302, 4303, 4307, 4346, 4366, 4492, 4506, 5081, 5116) (Ref'ed By 5247, 5288, 5289, 5327, 5333, 5352, 5353, 5355, 5369, 5370, 5371, 5387, 5404, 5408, 5409, 5415, 5422, 5425, 5430, 5440, 5458, 5469, 5479, 5482, 5486, 5487, 5489, 5505, 5539, 5550, 5567, 5577, 5582, 5590, 5616, 5626, 5630, 5636, 5677, 5691, 5697, 5734)


...

Clicking on the ".txt=nnn" field retrieves the actual RFC; normally in the upper frame ... but with browser-tabs ... can bring RFC into other tabs.

I do updates & updated-by, I've also done some amount of scanning rfc text to come up with REFs (and therefor REF'ed-By).

i.e.
4492 I
Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) Cipher Suites for Transport Layer Security (TLS), Blake-Wilson S., Bolyard N., Gupta V., Hawk C., Moeller B., 2006/05/16 (35pp) (.txt=72231) (Updated by 5246) (Refs 2246, 3268, 3279, 3280, 4346, 4366) (Ref'ed By 5114, 5246, 5289, 5430, 5479, 5489)


...

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 09:41:55 -0500
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I don't believe I ever heard the 4341 call a mini, it was considered a small mainframe. The later 9370 was a mini, and was entirely rack-mountable.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#33 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

it wasn't about what it was called ... it was what market it was being sold into. some bought it as a datacenter machine ... but midrange was a lot of machines outside the traditional datacenter environment, sometimes being purchased hundreds at a time for distributed operation.

ibm user group SHARE ... saw vax/vms having some competitive advantage (in some of that market) because of the perceived lower skill & resource effort to install and operate.

the datacenter issue ... referred to here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#15 departmental servers

was that cluster of 4341s had lower cost, higher aggregate mip rate, more storage and more channel that 3033. this is separate from 4341 having significantly better price/performance than 3031

as mentioned in the above post ... there was talk by head of POK that claimed that there were 11,000-plus VAX sales that should have been 4341s (4341 having better price/performance ... but as share implied, pure price/performance isn't always the only criteria).

there was also some internal (dept. of dirty tricks) politics. giving some credability to the perceived threat of 4341 to (high-end/pok) 303x machines ... a plant under POK control ... that manufactured a critical component for 4341, at one point, was directed to cut the allocation/supply to endicott (for 4341 manufacturing) in half.

I did some benchmarking for the endicott 4341 engineers against 158 & 3031. The issue was that I was (also) getting to play disk engineer in bldgs. 14&15, as well as supplying them with highly enhanced operating system so they could do engineering & test in operating system environment (they had been running stand-alone, some tests with running MVS in that environment had a 15min MTBF). In any way, the disk labs would get early processor models for testing/validating that disk worked with the machines (in addition to using the machines to testing new disks & controllers). The net was, that I had better access to 4341 (as well as 145, 158, 3031, & 3033) for testing than the performance testing group in Endicott. misc. past posts mentioning getting to play disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

misc. past posts mention RAIN/RAIN4 benchmarks that I did for endicott engineers:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#0 Is a VAX a mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#7 4341 was "Is a VAX a mainframe?"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#0 Microcode?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#7 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#19 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#4 misc. old benchmarks (4331 & 11/750)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#31 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#21 moving on
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#62 Cycles per ASM instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#54 mainframe performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#67 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 10:09:48 -0500
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#33 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#37 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

some of the relationship with endicott (and the science center) ... some past science center posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545

had started before 370 virtual memory was announced. a joint project between endicott & science center (including vnet connection that was used to send source code changes back&forth) involving modifying cp67 (running on 360/67) to simulate 370 (virtual memory) virtual machine (370 had some new/changed instructions that didn't exist on 360/67 and the hardware virtual memory tables were different between 360/67 and 370).

a big part of the simulate 370 virtual memory virtual machine was doing all the operations that took information from the (virtual hardware) tables in the 370 virtual machine and translating it into 360/67 formated "shadow" tables (i.e. 370 information translated into 360 format ... and virtual machine page numbers converted to the "real" page numbers).

this was running in regular use at cambridge a year before "real" 145 hardware supporting virtual memory was even operational (and well before announce). part of the issue was that science center had a lot of users from various educational institutions in the boston/cambrige area (including students) ... and there was security concerns about 370 virtual memory information leaking out. as a result ... the modified cp67 (supporting 370 virtual machine option) wasn't normally run on the real hardware (system used by non-employees) ... but in a 360/67 virtual machine. Then there was a cp67 that modified to run on "real" 370 (instead of 360/67) ... which ran in a 370 virtual machine. Sort of normal operation:

1) real 360/67 2) "standard" cp67 running on real 360/67 3) "H" modified cp67 running in 360/67 virtual machine 4) "I" modified cp67 running in 370 virtual machine 5) cms running in virtual machine

this was in normal operation a year before real 370 (virtual memory) hardware was available. In fact the "cp67-i" system (designed to run on real 370 ... was used in initial test the 370/145 engineering machine (with virtual memory hardware). The "joke" was that initial IPL/boot didn't work ... after some investigation ... it turned out that the hardware engineers had reversed the op-codes for some of the new 370 instructions. The cp67-i system was then patched to use the (incorrect) opcodes and then things booted succesfully.

later ... followon to 370 135/145 product line was the 138/148 ... which had additional virtual memory space available. To increase the competitiveness of 138/148 in the world market (against some foreign 370 processor clones) ... decision was to add operating system "microcode" assist (improvement for VS/1 and VM370 thruput).

I spent a lot of time with the Endicott people on measurement and design of the vm370 feature ... old post with some of the benchmarks used in design of the ECPS microcode assist:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist

there was a lot of work that went into trying to make the 370/148 a "vm370" only machine ... i.e. every 370/148 shipped would come up with vm370 automagically (somewhat like current "LPAR" mainframes). There was a lot of work that went into that ... before it was overruled by corporate (as referenced in earlier post, POK was in the process convincing corporate to kill off vm370 product). Endicott was eventually able to salvage the vm370 product mission ... but not before the vm370-only went by the wayside.

the 4341 was then the followon to the 370/148 ... and even tho by that time I had switched coasts ... I still continued to do some amount of stuff for the Endicott group.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 10:24:37 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
this was running in regular use at cambridge a year before "real" 145 hardware supporting virtual memory was even operational (and well before announce). part of the issue was that science center had a lot of users from various educational institutions in the boston/cambrige area (including students) ... and there was security concerns about 370 virtual memory information leaking out. as a result ... the modified cp67 (supporting 370 virtual machine option) wasn't normally run on the real hardware (system used by non-employees) ... but in a 360/67 virtual machine. Then there was a cp67 that modified to run on "real" 370 (instead of 360/67) ... which ran in a 370 virtual machine. Sort of normal operation:

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#33 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#37 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#38 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

i must have gotten labeled as (computer) security expert ... the company got a new CSO in this period & was often the case (for large commercial corporations), he was a former gov. employee with heavy background in "physical" security (in this case credits included having been head of presidential detail). i got asked to run around with the guy ... providing "computer security" information ... and some of the "physical security" stuff rubbing off.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 12:04:03 -0500
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I don't believe I ever heard the 4341 call a mini, it was considered a small mainframe. The later 9370 was a mini, and was entirely rack-mountable.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#33 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#37 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#38 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#39 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

aka ... if numerous large corporations came and said they wanted to place orders for several hundred (or maybe a thousand) 4341s ... but they weren't going to be installed in traditional datacenters ... would you turn them down??

misc. old email mentioning 4341
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 12:28:13 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
i must have gotten labeled as (computer) security expert ... the company got a new CSO in this period & was often the case (for large commercial corporations), he was a former gov. employee with heavy background in "physical" security (in this case credits included having been head of presidential detail). i got asked to run around with the guy ... providing "computer security" information ... and some of the "physical security" stuff rubbing off.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#39 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

so one weekend doing some of the data gathering runs for ECPS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist

mentioned in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#39 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

i had time on 145 in the (vm370 development group) burlington mall machine room. when the vm370 development group had outgrown space on the 3rd flr of 545 tech sq, they moved out into the vacant SBC bldg. in burlington mall (became vacant as part of the transfer of SBC to CDC).

This was still before future system effort had been killed off
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

and burlington mall being shutdown (so all the people could be moved to pok to work on mvs/xa).

the vm370 group had some piece of future system ... as well as making (internal only) "enhancements" to vm370 for old flavor of DRM (digital rights management) ... basically as countermeasure to ease of hardcopy documents walking out the door (and/or copies) ... all the future system documents were to be available in very carefully controlled (softcopy, online-only) environment on vm/cms. so i came in for weekend time ... and some of the vm370 group were very proud to point-out that the future system DRM was so secure ... even "I" wouldn't be able to get unauthorized access to the documents ... even if I was left physical alone in the machine room.

this was one of the few times I took the bait and then claimed it would take less than five minutes. I then disabled all external access to the system in the machine room and flipped a bit in mainframe storage (pointing out that they needed a whole additional layer of security to prevent such compromises). basically access control was grounded on passwords ... and I flipped a bit in the branch conditional instruction that followed call to subroutine checking whether password was valid (basically everything entered then became a valid password).

I had to chuckle a couple decades later at the YES CARD compromise. A chipcard payment infrastructure was defined that started to be deployed in the 90s in europe ... and a large pilot deployment in the US in the early part of the decade (all evidence evaporating after YES CARD compromise became more public). old reference to presentation at cartes 2002:
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

basically trivial to create a counterfeit card. the infrastructure was such that once the YES CARD was validated ... the card was then asked 1) if the correct PIN had been entered. a YES CARD was programmed to always answer YES. Then the YES CARD was asked 2) if the transaction should be done offline (YES) and 3) if the transaction value was within the account credit limit (YES) ... aka even if account number was voided (used as fraud countermeasure in magstripe infrastructure), the transaction wouldn't go online to know that the account was no longer valid.

related discussion mentioning YES CARD presentations at the ATM Integrity Task Force (same time frame as the cartes 2002 presentation):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#78 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#16 70 Years of ATM Innovation

there were other fraud countermeasures that were part of the infrastructure ... that counterfeit YES CARD was also programmed to ignore ... basically a myopic focus on compromise of a valid card ... as opposed to counterfeit YES CARD attacking the rest of the system. The people doing the pilot deployment in the US had the YES CARD explained to them ... and the response was to change features in valid cards ... which had absolutely no effect on the fraud/operation of counterfeit YES CARD (it was after the initial deployment that others began to recognize the implications and the whole thing was allowed to evaporate). Misc. past posts mentioning YES CARD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

misc. past posts mentioning the incident with the Future System document "DRM":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#55 Security via hardware?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#11 Some credible documented evidence that a MVS or later op sys has ever been hacked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#67 Invitation to Join Mainframe Security Guru Group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#34 Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#5 Moving to the Net: Encrypted Execution for User Code on a Hosting Site
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#15 Mainframe hacking (getting back on topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#40 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 2009 10:40:39 -0500
jmfbahciv <jmfbahciv@aol> writes:
<grin> If they had, Unix would not be what it is today. Sometimes, a dearth of resources produces the best OS.

there is the comparison of tss/360 (peaking at around 1200 people) ... the "official" product for 360/67 ... and (virtual machine) cp67/cms (at around 10-12 people) at the science center ... misc. past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

there is the folklore about tss/360 being decommited & getting reduced to around 20 people ... and significantly improving performance. scenario was there were lots of different routines ... with several different people responsible for each routine. reduced to 20 people, one person was responsible for several routines ... and realized that in normal execution path thru the kernel ... the "design" had requirement that each individual routine had to call the scheduler ... when only a single call (per pass thru the kernel) would suffice (folklore is that in some cases, the change accounted for reduction in million instructions executed).

recent posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#33 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#37 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#38 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#39 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#40 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#41 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 2009 11:55:17 -0500
Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
http://www.redorbit.com/news/technology/1799588/boeings_new_dreamliner_ready_for_maiden_voyage/index.html

the summer of '69 I was brought into boeing to help with fledging bcs (boeing computer service) ... idea was bring most of boeing dataprocessing into bcs so that it could be put on a profit/loss accounting basis ... rather than expense basis (and least on paper) ... trying to change how dataprocessing was viewed in the corporation. as part of that, bcs was going to be able to also sell computer services outside the corporation (not just offering services to internal users).

bcs was being done out of corporate hdqtrs dataprocessing that had 360/30 for doing payroll. datacenter was expanded to fit in 360/67 (simplex). that summer, the "gov. aerospace" division also moved the 360/67 mutliprocessor from huntsville to seattle.

huntsville had been using the 360/67s to run two copies of os/360 mvt13 (as two separate systems) ... with special hacks to use virtual memory hardware (w/o paging). the issue was that mvt had some significant problems with storage fragmentation for long running applications. the major use of the machines were for (long running) channel attached 2250 graphics applications. the hack to mvt13 was to use virtual memory hardware to overcome storage fragmentation ... being able to rearrange non-contiguous "real storage" to appear contiguous (in virtual memory).

one of the challenges for bcs was having the person that had been running the 360/30, take over renton and everett datacenters. renton datacenter had more than a dozen 360/65s (i wasn't sure, everytime i visited ... they pointed to pieces of 2-3 360/65s sitting in the halls waiting to be installed, 360/65s were showing up faster than they could be installed) ... that was in addition to at least one 360/75 and some amount of non-IBM hardware.

i rented basement apartment from aircraft engineer that was working on 747 up in everett. 747 no. 3 was flying FAA certifications flts over the skys of seattle that summer. the engineer mentioned that they were having some work problems in everett and there was various kinds of vandalism on the planes (some that would have had disastrous results if they hadn't been caught).

It is 40yrs later ... lots of 747s are still flying ... and appears that they will for some time ... and they are trying to come out with 787 (tempting to make some observation about it being 747+40).

I got to go thru some of the 747 orientation presentations given to customers. One of the things that I remember was comments that 747 would be carrying so many people, that 747s would always have minium of four jetways at the gate (to get the people off and on).

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 2009 12:02:48 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
one of the challenges for bcs was having the person that had been running the 360/30, take over renton and everett datacenters. renton datacenter had more than a dozen 360/65s (i wasn't sure, everytime i visited ... they pointed to pieces of 2-3 360/65s sitting in the halls waiting to be installed, 360/65s were showing up faster than they could be installed) ... that was in addition to at least one 360/75 and some amount of non-IBM hardware.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#43 Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage

the (renton) 360/75 was used for some amount of classified work ... when classified work was running ... there was black rope around the perimeter of the 360/75 area ... there was black sheet over the 360/75 front panel lights and the 1403s had the "windows" papered over ... and badges were color coded as to people's cleared level.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 2009 13:45:26 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
the (renton) 360/75 was used for some amount of classified work ... when classified work was running ... there was black rope around the perimeter of the 360/75 area ... there was black sheet over the 360/75 front panel lights and the 1403s had the "windows" papered over ... and badges were color coded as to people's cleared level.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#43 Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#44 Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage

not very good of the front panel lights ... but picture of 360/75
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_2423PH2075.html

things started out as announced 360/60 and 360/70 (basically "fast" hardwired 360/60) ... somewhere along the way the memory subsystems were upgraded from 1mic to 750ns ... and the models renamed 360/65 & 360/75.

references 360/60 announcement
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_FS360.html

another picture of 360/75 front panel:
http://csg.uwaterloo.ca/~jwgraham/g+m/jwg-glob.jpg

corporate hdqtrs was across the street from boeing field and the sst bldg was down the street:
http://www.super70s.com/super70s/Tech/Aviation/Aircraft/SST.asp
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_2707
http://www.unrealaircraft.com/classics/sst.php

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 2009 21:19:40 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
one of the things is that all the mortgage/CDO/CDS and carrying stuff off-balance, etc.; the bonus/compensation from related to "profit/net" ... to percent of the transaction size.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#35 70 Years of ATM Innovation

.. couple items from today ...

Regulators Resist Volcker Wandering Warning of Too-Big-to-Fail
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=aDbxsIHM30H8&pos=11

and ..

Twelve-Trillion-Dollar Lessons From Saving The Fat Cats; The transfer of wealth to Wall Street does nothing to lower unemployment, but it sure gets stocks soaring again.
http://www.forbes.com/2009/12/15/morgan-stanley-citigroup-personal-finance-investing-ideas-goldman-sachs.html

previous (unrelated) posts in this thread ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#78 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#81 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#4 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#10 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#16 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#20 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#34 70 Years of ATM Innovation

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 2009 10:39:18 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Regulators Resist Volcker Wandering Warning of Too-Big-to-Fail
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=aDbxsIHM30H8&pos=11


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#46 70 Years of ATM Innovation

'Too big to fail is one of the biggest problems we face in this country.'
http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1946375_1947251_1948043,00.html

a couple others

Citigroup gains huge tax break in deal with IRS
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/34442183/ns/business-washington_post/

from above:
I've been doing taxes for almost 40 years, and I've never seen anything like this, atax expert says, as U.S. gives up billions to secure repayment of TARP funds

... snip ...

Regulators to give banks Basel grace period
http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKTOE5BF01O20091216?pageNumber=1

tv business news comment (just now) was that some Basel II capital requirements will be delayed until mid-2020s (going on nearly 30 yrs after initial draft). when draft Basel II came out a decade ago ... it had a new section for "qualitative requirements" (in addition to long standing quantitative requirements), effectively would have required that the board demonstrate that they knew how the business operated. then over several review cycles, the qualitative section nearly disappeared.

and ...

Fraud prosecutions fell as crisis loomed
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2009-12-15-prosecute-fraud_N.htm

misc. past posts about needing more transparency and visability (including suspending some work on significantly increasing trade security/integrity ... apparently because a side-effect would have also significantly increased transparency and visability):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#35 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#65 What can agencies such as the SEC do to insure us that something like Madoff's Ponzi scheme will never happen again?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#73 What can we learn from the meltdown?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#80 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#0 Audit II: Two more scary words: Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#1 Audit II: Two more scary words: Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#20 Decision Making or Instinctive Steering?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#29 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#51 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#42 Bernard Madoff Is Jailed After Pleading Guilty -- are there more "Madoff's" out there?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#47 Bernard Madoff Is Jailed After Pleading Guilty -- are there more "Madoff's" out there?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#75 Whistleblowing and reporting fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#15 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#36 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#53 Are the "brightest minds in finance" finally onto something?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#56 When did "client server" become part of the language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#45 Artificial Intelligence to tackle rogue traders
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#67 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#20 IBM forecasts 'new world order' for financial services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#29 Transparency and Visibility
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#23 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX? (Are settlements a good argument for overnight batch COBOL ?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#12 IBM identity manager goes big on role control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#30 An Amazing Document On Madoff Said To Have Been Sent To SEC In 2005
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#57 MasPar compiler and simulator

past posts mention Gramm's wife on board of Enron (and Enron's audit committee).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#48 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#53 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#55 Who will give Citigroup the KNOCKOUT blow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#65 is it possible that ALL banks will be nationalized?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#10 Who will Survive AIG or Derivative Counterparty Risk?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#28 I need insight on the Stock Market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#61 Quiz: Evaluate your level of Spreadsheet risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#63 Do bonuses foster unethical conduct?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#0 What is swap in the financial market?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#13 Should we fear and hate derivatives?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#29 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#51 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#53 What every taxpayer should know about what caused the current Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#7 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#33 Treating the Web As an Archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#17 REGULATOR ROLE IN THE LIGHT OF RECENT FINANCIAL SCANDALS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#30 An Amazing Document On Madoff Said To Have Been Sent To SEC In 2005
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#84 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#77 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Strong Authentication Not Strong Enough

From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 16 Dec, 2009
Subject: Strong Authentication Not Strong Enough
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Strong Authentication Not Strong Enough
http://www.informationweek.com/news/security/vulnerabilities/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=222001977

from above:
many banks around the world that rely on one-time-password authentication systems. Accounts at these banks have been compromised by man-in-the-middle attacks -- the report uses the term man-in-the-browser -- despite the use of two-factor security.

... snip ...

Two factor authentication is assumed to be more secure if the different factors have independent/different compromises ... AND they involve components that don't have their own compromises.

Several of these were identified in the mid-90s ... which resulted in the EU FINREAD standard (in the late 90s) ... as countermeasure

as previously noted ... most of this has been well understood for over a decade.

Hackers are defeating tough authentication, Gartner warns, One-time passwords, aren't enough to stop cybercrooks from plundering bank accounts
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9142309/Hackers_are_defeating_tough_authentication_Gartner_warns_
Hackers are defeating tough authentication, Gartner warns; One-time passwords, aren't enough to stop cybercrooks from plundering bank accounts
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/121509-hackers-are-defeating-tough-authentication.html

insecurity, not just the browsers ... whole infrastructure ... for instance, things like keyloggers ... the browser has very little control over. it was motivation for the EU finread standard starting more than a decade ago ... basically a whole plethora of insecurities & vulnerabilities in the end-point; ... basically, the EU finread ... moved the (transaction) end-point to a much simpler & much more secure environment. misc. past posts mentioning EU finread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#finread

... oh, and from slightly related recent thread in sci.crypt newsgroup:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#32 SSL certificates and keys
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#36 SSL certificates and keys

and another facet from "70 Years of ATM Innovations" discussion in the linkedin Payment Systems Network
http://www.linkedin.com/newsArticle?viewDiscussion=&articleID=90108466&gid=50424

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

"Portable" data centers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Portable" data centers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 2009 11:38:11 -0500
shmuel+ibm-main@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
>for the 3090 service processor ... it started out with 4331 running a
>highly customized version of vm370 release6

ITYM VM/SP R6; I don't believe that IBM was still using VMF/370 (free VM) internally by the time the 3090 came out.

>DOS/VS was for virtual storage. 370 was initially announced w/o virtual
>memory (just a few new instructions, TOD-clock, a few other things).

But there were strong indications that the 370/145 had paging. The implementation of the DOS Emulator Feature only made sense if the hardware was designed for paging.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#18 "Portable" data centers

the modifications for vm370 release 6 to be service processor started well before 3090 came out. it was a copy of standard vm370 release 6 (predates vm/sp) and then "frozen" (with respect to the standard product) and then various enhancements added ... like interfaces to all the diagnostic hardware that was going to be in the 3090. i provided some number of tools and other stuff, supporting the effort. Some of the stuff was things I had done for the disk engineering & product test labs ... to eliminate large class of failures (they had been running stand-alone with trivial monitor ... after having tried to use MVS and experienced 15min MTBF with a single "testcell"):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

At the time they had started the effort ... they gathered up as much stuff as they could ... anticipating that vm370 release 6 ... would not be current thru the lifetime of the 3090; TROUT ... some past posts with other old email from TROUT period:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#27 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#31 virtual memory

i was blamed for onlined computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s. The POK engineering manager that headed up the 3090 service processor ... had observed all the issues with the 3081 service processor ... having to write everything from scratch and was a big proponent of using as much as possible readily available tools (i.e. 3090 service processor screens were actually CMS IOS3270). In any case, the guy heading up the effort also became somewhat active in some of the computer conferencing and took some amount of hits for the activity (although not nearly as much as I did). He also took hits on scope-creep in the effort and growing demand for people and resources.

DOS Emulator feature had base/bound (significantly simpler than all the segment and page table stuff; just check the address against the "bound" ... and then add in the "base") ... not for paging but for address translation ... like some LPAR implementations ... still required a contiguous amount of real-memory.

I was undergraduate in the 60s ... but still doing a lot of work on both os/360 (responsible for academic and administrative system at the univ. ... including doing highly customized os/360 system for careful placement of datasets and PDS members to optimize arm seek & getting approx three times thruput improvement for student jobs). I was also allowed to do a lot of cp67 ... rewriting lots of the kernel code.

Anycase, recent posts about Boeing trying to move all of their dataprocessing into BCS (fledging BCS started out in boeing corporate hdqtrs administrative ... which had single 360/30 for payroll):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#43 Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#44 Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#45 Boeings New Dreamliner Ready For Maiden Voyage

and I got dragged into it. I was con'ed into giving one week class (during spring break, '69) to the fledging BCS technical staff (and the ibm technical support team). I was then brought in as full-time BCS employee for the summer of '69. Part of responsibility was installing cp67 operation in corporate hdqtrs machine room (which until then just had a 360/30 for payroll). Part of BCS was to take over the renton datacenter (a little corporate internal politics) ... which was the largest operation I had seen ... summer of '69 there were always pieces for 2-3 360/65s staged around in the hallways ... because 360/65s were arriving faster than they could be installed.

In any case, after 370s were available ... but not yet with virtual memory support ... one of the IBM SEs on the boeing account did a "hacked" version of cp67 to use 370 DOS Emulator (aka address base+bound, contiguous real storage) ... again much more like LPAR support. He did do complete swap of a virtual machine address space (i.e. virtual machine size had to match the base+bound contiguous area) ... so could run more virtual machines that there was total real storage available.

As mentioned in the above ... summer of '69 ... Boeing also moved the 360/67 multiprocessor from Huntsville to Seattle (this was separate from the 360/67 uniprocessor installed in corporate hdqtrs). Huntsville had been using it to run a highly modified version of MVT release 13. Problem was that MVT had significant problem with storage fragmentation with long running jobs. Huntsville had a large collection of 2250s with long running graphics application. Hack to MVT was to use the 360/67 address translation hardware to re-arrange real storage to appear "contiguous" (no paging) ... this was different than the early 370 hack to cp67 to use the base+bound (instead of full address translation) and real contiguous storage for primitive virtual machine swapping.

Before virtual memory was announced, 370/145s weren't shipped with the microcode-load to support virtual memory ... however, the front panel "rollers" for the PSW ... had a "xlate" label for one of the bit/lights.

for other topic drift, recent post about science center working with endicott on support 370 virtual memory architecture ... before hardware was even available:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#38 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#39 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#40 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

science center worked with endicott to modify cp67 (running on 360/67) to provide support for 370 virtual machines. This required having a "370" option ... and then simulating new instructions and misc. other stuff for "370" virtual machinesl

Then a "different" cp67 was modified to run in those "370" virtual machines (rather than on 360/67, this "CP67I" was regularly running in 370 virtual machine a year before hardware became available). This 370'ized cp67 was used by endicott for testing ... when they had an engineering 370/145 with first virtual memory hardware working.

other lore ... unbundling announcement was 23jun69 ... misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

and they started charging for application software, SE services, other stuff ... but managed to make the case that kernel software was still free.

one of the things I did as undergraduate at the univ. was add tty/ascii support to cp67. Part of that was trying to make the 2702 do something that it couldn't really do. Somewhat as a result, the univ. started a clone controller effort ... where the channel interface was reverse engineered and channel interface board built for an Interdata/3. The Interdata/3 was then programmed to simulate 2702 (but with the additional stuff I wanted to do). This got written up, blaming four of us for clone controller business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

Clone controller business has been cited as major motivation for the "future system" effort ... which was going to completely 360/370 ... and as different from 360/370 as 360 had been from prior generations. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

Eventually FS effort was killed ... but during the effort ... the 370 product pipeline was allowed to dry up (since it was going to be completely replace) ... and when it was killed there was mad rush to get stuff back into (hardware & software) 370 product pipeline. The lack of products was also credited with allowing clone processors to gain a foothold in the market.

I had done a lot of stuff for cp67 as undergraudate ... that was picked up and shipped in the product. For the morph from cp67->vm370 much of that was dropped as "simplification". Now, all during the future system effort, I continued to do 370 stuff (and ridiculed pieces of the FS activity ... which wasn't exactly a career enhancing thing to do, since the senior executives were still senior executives after the dust cleared). Misc. old email about 370 stuff:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

so the mad rush to get stuff back into the product pipeline, included picking up some stuff that I had continued to do (a lot that had been dropped in the morph from cp67->vm370). Some of it was incorporate in standard product releases ... however a portion was selected to be release as a separate "resource manager" component. And then, somewhat motivated by the clone processors foothold in the market ... it was decided to start transition to charging for kernel software ... and my "resource manager" was selected to be the guinea pig. As a result I had to spend some amount of time with lawyers and busines people about kernel software charging policies.

vm370 release 6 "product" then was towards the end of this transition ... the base product was free ... but there was BSEPP (entry & mid-range, aka endicott machines) & SEPP (high-end, pok machines) chared-for "add-ons".

In any case, There was no vm370 release 7 ... the next release was all "charged for" and called VM/SP release 1 (no separate kernel free and non-free, it was all non-free). Then the next stage was the OCO-wars ... not only charged-for ... but no longer shipping full source ... and providing full source maintenance on monthly PLC service tapes.

Another result of the unbundling announcement ... was major blow to SE education ... basically apprentice type operation as part of SE team at customer account (couldn't figure out how to justify charges for this activity ... but required to). This was original motiviation for HONE ... misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

... allow SEs in the branch office to play with operating systems in cp67 virtual machines. After initial 370 announcement ... the non-virtual memory 370 "changes" (few new instructions, other stuff) was incorporated into the HONE cp67 systems (allowing ipl of 370 operating systems gen'ed to use the new instructions).

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

"Portable" data centers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Portable" data centers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 2009 13:18:52 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
I had done a lot of stuff for cp67 as undergraudate ... that was picked up and shipped in the product. For the morph from cp67->vm370 much of that was dropped as "simplification". Now, all during the future system effort, I continued to do 370 stuff (and ridiculed pieces of the FS activity ... which wasn't exactly a career enhancing thing to do, since the senior executives were still senior executives after the dust cleared). Misc. old email about 370 stuff:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#49 "Portable" data centers

in the early 80s, I wrote a "open door" about my salary and being underpayed. After a couple weeks, I got back a written response from HR saying that they had studied my complete employee history and I was being payed exactly what I was suppose to.

This was about the time I was being asked to interview new hires ... supposedly to work in a new group under my (technical) direction. They told me what HR was offering them as starting salaries. I then wrote I follow-up to HR's response ... pointing out that they were offering starting salaries to these new hires that was 1/3rd more than I was currently making.

A couple weeks later I got the first of a series of raises that would eventually bring me up level to starting salaries that HR was offering the new hires that I was interviewing. It was (then) fairly obvious that HR's initial response wasn't true.

old post mentioning being told never forgive you for being right
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#48 time spent/day on a computer

misc. recent posts referencing business ethics is oxymoron, Boyd's to be or to do, and/or the never forgive you for being right quote:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#53 CROOKS and NANNIES: what would Boyd do?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#25 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#37 How do you see ethics playing a role in your organizations current or past?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#56 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#5 mainframe replacement (Z/Journal Does it Again)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#71 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#74 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#73 And, 40 years of IBM midrange
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#47 U.S. begins inquiry of IBM in mainframe market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#52 Revisiting CHARACTER and BUSINESS ETHICS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#57 U.S. begins inquiry of IBM in mainframe market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#34 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#60 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#37 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#38 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#6 Have you ever though about taking a sabbatical?

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

"Portable" data centers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Portable" data centers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 2009 16:34:52 -0500
rfochtman@YNC.NET (Rick Fochtman) writes:
IIRC, the DAT box was optional on the 370/145 and became standard on the 370/148. Ditto the 370/155 and 370/158 and 370/165 and 370/168. The 168 was unique in the 370 series because it used outboard channels; as I recall , it was the only 370 that did so.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#14 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#18 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#49 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#50 "Portable" data centers

most 370/145s could have 370 virtual memory enabled with just a different microcode load.

the real bear was all the hardware needed to upgrade a 370/165 for virtual memory. this was so difficult that 370 virtual memory announcement was slipping ... finally there was a case made to drop several features from the 370 virtual memory architecture ... in order to buy back some of the 370/165 schedule slippage. this required other models that already had full virtual memory running ... to remove the dropped features. also software that had already been written to utilize the full 370 virtual memory features had to be redone.

370/148 (& 138) had additional storage for microcode and there was big push to add operating system microcode enhancments ... to help differentiate the 138/148 from some of the clones (especially in world trade countries). As referenced in these recent posts ... I got talked into doing a lot of the work for ECPS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#17 How to reduce the overall monthly cost on a System z environment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#38 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

this old post has some of the kernel analysis that was used in choosing what went into ECPS microcode:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21

I also got dragged into lots of the product planning meetings for 138/148 with business meetings at various world trade locations (positioning 138/148 against clones in foreign markets). endicott was on its way to making 370/148 a product offering that came with vm370 pre-installed with everything running under vm370 (regardless of whatever else the customer ran ... a little like current LPAR environment). this was vetoed by corporate hdqtrs when POK convince corporate that vm370 product was to be killed, the burlington mall development group shutdown and all the people moved to POK ... as necessary in order to make the mvx/xa ship schedule. endicott eventually managed to save the vm370 product mission ... but essentially had to reconstruct a development group from scratch (but too late to make vm370 come preinstalled on all 148s).

the issue in the entry & mid-range machines was that 370 instructions were simulated in native micro-engine instructions ... tended to avg. approx. ten native instructions for every 370 instruction. ECPS was able to drop 370 kernel instructions into native instructions at nearly 1:1 ... resulting in ten times speedup. In some cases, when something similar was attempt for POK "high-end" machines ... there were cases where it actually ran slower ... the problem was that the hardware had been optimized to the point that 370 instructions were running at nearly full hardware speed (already). Even the later SIE had some scenarios where it would run slower than direct kernel 370 code. Some of this is touched on in this previously mentioned old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#email810630
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#27 virtual memory

that discusses some of the difference between the 3081 SIE and 3090 SIE implementation. There was even scenarios were the 3081 service processor had to perform "microcode" paging operations (using a 3310/piccolo FBA device).

there was 370/195 with outboard channels (basically an upgraded of 360/195 with few additional instructions ... but never got any of the virtual memory support upgrade).

165 & 168 had outboard channels. 370/158 had integrated channels. for 303x ... the 303x (outboard channel) channel director was a 370/158 engine with the integrated channel microcode ... but w/o the 370 instruction set microcode. A 3031 ... then was two 370/158 engines ... one with the integrated channel microcode (but w/o 370 instruction set microcode) and a processor (with the 370 instruction set microcode but no integrated channel microcode). A 3032 ... was a 370/168 with new covers ... and reconfiguration to use the 303x channel director as its outboard channels. A 3033 started out being 370/168 wiring diagram mappped to chips that were about 20% faster (which would have resulted in machine about 20% faster than 168-3). The chips also had about ten times the circuits per chip ... that were going to be left unused. Before 3033 shipped there was effort to redo critical sections of 168 logic to better utilize the extra circuits (picking up speed by doing more things "on-chip" ... rather than the latency of going "off-chip"). The 3033 eventually shipped about 50% faster than 168-3.

sjr/bldg.28 was still running an aging MVT 370/195 system when the bldg.15 disk product test lab got an early engineering 3033. Carefully pipelined ... 370/195 would peak at about twice 3033 sustained thruput ... however most codes ran about same thruput on 370/195 as 3033. The batch turn-around on the MVT system could be a couple weeks ... even for some things like the air-bearing simulation program that was part of 3380 disk head design. getting to play disk engineer in both bldg14 disk engineering and bldg15 disk product test ... and providing them an operating system ... so they could do on-demand testing of multiple testcells simulataneously ... allowed me some latitude in running other types of applications on those machines (even several testcell testing load was only couple percent of processor ... since it was strictly i/o intensive) ... aka previously disk testcell testing, running stand-alone, was prescheduled around the clock, one testcell at a time. In any case, was able to move the air-bearing simulation work over to the 3033 in bldg15 ... and provide on-demand compute intensive service.

misc. past posts mentioning getting to play disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

360 programs on a z/10

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 360 programs on a z/10
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 2009 17:07:03 -0500
mike@MENTOR-SERVICES.COM (Mike Myers) writes:
Yes, I had forgotten about SIO/HIO/TIO and was reminded of those by your first post. I can't recall if I ever personally wrote a SIO instruction. Most of the channel programming I ever did was at the EXCP level, so i don't recall writing a SSCH instruction either.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#14 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#18 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#49 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#50 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#51 "Portable" data centers

370 introduced options for SIO/HIO ... SIO fast, Halt device, and Halt channel.

when i was building an extremely robust operating systems for the disk engineering and product test labs ... one of the things was getting a controller or the 303x channel director to reset/re-impl ... as part of "severe" recovery process (never take down the system ... and require minimum of manual operations).

it turns out that most controllers would reset/re-impl if you very quickly hit all of the controller's subchannel addresses with HDV (basically couple instruction loop). A 303x channel director would also reset/re-impl ... if you hit all six channel addresses with halt channel.

misc. past posts mentioning getting to play disk engineer in bldgs. 14 & 15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

in the move from 360/370 "real storage" to 370 virtual memory ... all the channel programs required to be hit. most access methods built channel programs with "real" storage addresses and then would execute EXCP. The 360 & 370 channels executed channel programs assuming all the addresses were "real".

moving to 370 virtual memory ... all the channel programs built in application space would be referring to virtual addresses ... not real addresses. When this was passed to kernel with EXCP ... EXCP had to build shadow/duplicate channel program that substituted real addresses for the virtual addresses (as well as some housekeeping to pin the virtual pages at the real address).

In cp67, this had been going on for some time ... taking the channel program from the virtual machine SIO ... and building a shadow/duplicate channel program with real addresses ... rather than virtual addresses. The routine in cp67 that performed this function was CCWTRANS. The initial work on os360 to move to 370 virtual memory ... borrowed a copy of CCWTRANS (out of cp67) to do the shadow/duplicate channel program.

Part of the justification for SSCH was help with the enormous pathlength in MVS for I/O redrive ... after taking an interrupt (leaving device idle during the period). One of the other things I did for operating system for bldg. 14&15 ... was highly optimized the I/O redrive pathlength.

This ran into problem with early (internal) work with 3880 disk controller. There was some early performance product acceptance test of the 3880 that met with no problem. However, when they swapped a 3830 disk controller with an early 3880 on 3033 in bldg15 (had a string of 16 3330 drives) ... things completely fell apart. I was getting yelled at that it was my fault. Turns out that 3830 had fast horizontal microcode engine ... and the 3880 had a much slower vertical microcode engine. There was some additional hardware paths in the 3880 (to handle 3mbyte data transfer) but commands and control operations were much slower. As part of making the 3880 appear as fast as the 3830 ... the 3880 started presented operation complete early ... before it was completely finished. 3880 assumed that it could finish in the delay that it took the processor to handle the interrupt ... do the other operating system gorp ... before getting back to redrive the 3880 with new operation. My optimized pathlength was hitting the controller with redrive in much shorter period ... before it had finished its cleanup. This resulted in having to present CC=1 to the SIO with SM+BUSY (controller busy). The processing then had to requeue the operation that it attempt to start (and go off and do something else). Later the 3880 had to present an additional CUE interrupt (to indicate it was no longer busy ... because of having presenting the earlier controller busy). This added all sorts of additional overhead and delay ... compared to the identical workload & 3330s using 3830 controller (instead of 3880 controller).

recent post mentioning the SM+BUSY scenario and redrive latency (dedicated processor being able to handle queued i/o and much lower latency redrive operation).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#74 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 2009 17:21:20 -0500
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#35 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#46 70 Years of ATM Innovation

repeal will be slightly over ten years from GLB act in '99

Bipartisan Senate Bill Would Reinstate Glass-Steagall Act
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2009/12/glass_steagall.html

from above:

"The American people shouldn't be subsidizing the risk-taking of Wall Street traders, but that's exactly what has happened since the repeal of Glass-Steagall,"

... snip ...

previous posts mentioning pecora hearings (doing some amount of work on html'ing transcripts of the pecora hearings) i.e. '30s senate hearings leading up to Glass-Steagall:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#58 OCR scans of old documents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#59 As bonuses...why breed greed, when others are in dire need?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#77 Who first mentioned Credit Crunch?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#8 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#23 Should FDIC or the Federal Reserve Bank have the authority to shut down and take over non-bank financial institutions like AIG?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#40 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#56 What's your personal confidence level concerning financial market recovery?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#65 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#5 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#33 Treating the Web As an Archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#22 China's yuan 'set to usurp US dollar' as world's reserve currency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#25 The Paradox of Economic Recovery
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#29 Analysing risk, especially credit risk in Banks, which was a major reason for the current crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#40 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#57 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#35 what is mortgage-backed securities?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#23 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#2 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#20 U.K. lags in information security management practices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#25 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 2009 18:23:53 -0500
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
Typically installations, especially colleges, tended to under-configure the memory, which was expensive back when. Nothing slows don a TS system like too little vcore, and all the tuning in the world can't help.

i made page management algorithm & page I/O several times more effective.

this showed up in comparison of the 1mbyte 360/67 cp67 system at the grenoble science center vis-a-vis the 768kbyte 360/67 cp67 system at cambridge science center. After fixed memory and kernel, the CSC 768kbyte had 104 (4k) pages available and the grenoble 1mbyte had 155 (4k) pages available.

The CSC system ran 75-80 users with similar workload and response as the grenoble system ran with 35 users.

grenoble had done a acm article about changing cp67 to reflect the common academic virtual memory management of the time. With only 2/3rds the virtual pages ... & NOT emulating the academic virtual memory management of the era ... I was able to support twice as many users doing effectively the same workload.

other posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#33 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#37 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#38 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#39 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#40 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#41 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#42 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

misc. past posts mentioning grenoble science center:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#7 HELP: Algorithm for Working Sets (Virtual Memory)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#1 Multitasking question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#18 Old Computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#20 Is Al Gore The Father of the Internet?^
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#26 TECO Critique
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#6 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#49 Swapper was Re: History of Login Names
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#30 Computer History Exhibition, Grenoble France
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#24 Vector display systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#3 Alpha performance, why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#50 Alpha performance, why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#23 Tools -vs- Utility
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004.html#25 40th anniversary of IBM System/360 on 7 Apr 2004
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#59 real multi-tasking, multi-programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#13 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#0 Hard disk architecture: are outer cylinders still faster than
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#73 Athlon cache question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#37 Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#48 Secure design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#47 Moving assembler programs above the line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#10 Exceptions at basic block boundaries
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#15 Exceptions at basic block boundaries
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#28 IBM's mini computers--lack thereof
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#23 Code density and performance?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#4 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#0 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#7 About TLB in lower-level caches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#37 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#0 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#31 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#36 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#37 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#42 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#1 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#17 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#25 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#14 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#11 Article on Painted Post, NY
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#19 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#21 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#34 REAL memory column in SDSF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#50 Where can you get a Minor in Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#46 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#15 when was MMU virtualization first considered practical?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#60 Scholars needed to build a computer history bibliography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#5 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#79 IBM Floating-point myths
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#32 MTS memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#65 No Glory for the PDP-15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#70 New test attempt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#79 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#64 Crippleware: hardware examples
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#21 What if the computers went back to the '70s too?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#12 August 7, 1944: today is the 65th Anniversary of the Birth of the Computer

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Verizon report goes deep inside data breach investigations

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 17 Dec, 2009
Subject: Verizon report goes deep inside data breach investigations
Blog: Computer Security and Forensics
Verizon report goes deep inside data breach investigations
http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/news/article/0,289142,sid14_gci1376412,00.html

from above:
The follow-up to April's 2009 Data Breach Investigation Report looks under the hood of the company's probes, analyzing how breaches happen and how to protect sensitive data.

... snip ...

Verizon report highlights attack trends
http://www.thetechherald.com/article.php/200950/4919/Verizon-report-highlights-attack-trends
New Verizon Business Report Outlines 15 Most Common Attacks - data breaches/Attacks
http://www.darkreading.com/security/attacks/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=222001216

another

Spyware, keyloggers and SQL injection are top attacks in 2009
http://www.computerweekly.com/Articles/2009/12/11/239683/Spyware-keyloggers-and-SQL-injection-are-top-attacks-in.htm

Most of the major breaches in the news are with respect to financial account numbers and/or financial transaction data.

In the mid-90s we were asked to participate in the x9a10 financial standard working group that had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for ALL retail payments. As part of the effort there were detailed end-to-end threat & vulnerability studies of the numerous different areas. One of the findings was that it was relatively trivial for crooks to use such information for fraudulent financial transactions. However, the information was also required in scores of business processes at millions of locations all around the globe. As a result, we've periodically observed that even if the planet was blanketed under miles of information hiding encryption ... it still wouldn't prevent information leakage.

The x9a10 worked resulted in the x9.59 financial transaction standard ... that slightly tweaked the current paradigm and eliminated the usefulness of the information to the crooks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

Besides the diametrically opposing requirements for the information (never divulge account numbers ... EVER ... even at POS ... and at the same time having to readily provide the information, aka "dual-use" metaphor) ... we've also used the security proportional to risk metaphor

The value of the information can be worth a couple dollars (per transaction) to a merchant (basically profit from the purchase) and a few cents to a merchant processor (profit for processing the transaction). The same information is worth 2-3 orders of magnitude more to the crooks (100 to 1000 times) ... as a result crooks can conceivably outspend by a factor of 100 times attacking the system ... as what is available for defending the system.

The x9.59 paradigm tweak eliminated the value of the information to the crooks as well as the fraudulent transactions that might happen if the information was divulged (i.e. eliminated the motivation for the crooks to perform these class of breaches ... and eliminated any resulting fraudulent transactions if the information did leak).

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

You know you've been Lisp hacking to long when

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: You know you've been Lisp hacking to long when
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 2009 21:12:42 -0500
Ryan McCoskrie <ryan.mccoskrie@invalid.invalid> writes:
*Recovering from shock of cascading post* It meant it in plural. I grew up calling the things brackets (singular bracket). It's a heap easier that way.

Also a little confession here. I changed the specifics of the dream that I had. I was drowning in the middle of an infinite sea of brackets.

Anybody else have stories about having hacked to long?


i got a student job to re-implement/port the 1401 MPIO program to 360/30. MPIO was the tape<->read/print/punch unitt record frontend for 709 (which ran ibsys tape<->tape). It was possibly somewhat make-work ... getting experience with 360 ... while waiting for the whole operation to be replaced with 360/67 (aka 360/30 had 1401 hardware emulation which could run MPIO w/o it having to be ported).

In any case, I got to design & implement my own monitor, dispatcher, storage management, device drivers, interrupt handlers, error recover, etc.

The application eventually grew to 2000 cards ... and took approx. 30 minutes to assembler and generate "binary" (actually hexadecimal) executable txt deck (if conditional assemblers were set to assembler for os/360 system services & macros ... it took nearly 30 minutes to assemble the five DCB macros ... just about hr total).

The datacenter shutdown for weekends ... so I had the whole room from 8am sat. to 8am monday ... 48hrs straight ... little hard making monday classes after not have slept since friday night.

because it took so long to reassemble ... to perform testing ... i got in the habit of modifying the executable cards ... by putting the appropriate card into 026/029 keypunch ... duping out to the columns needing the change ... and then "multi-punching" the new hex into the appropriate place. after spending some number of weekends doing this ... i got so that i could read the holes in the card ... fan the deck looking at the columns with the "address" field punch holes until I came to the address/card I wanted.

there about some past discussions about computer literacy is when you start thinking/dreaming in machine code ... as opposed to english (or other natural language). computer language literacy ... is not when you can design a program and then easily translate it into C, Pascal, Cobol, Fortran or PLI (or whatever) ... but when the program is being designed directly in the language that it will be written in (small analogy to writing english poems in english ... rather than in some other language and then translating to english).

then you are sometimes faced with a problem that nobody understands how the program works ... and there are no english words to describe it ... and being blamed (its your fault) because you are unable to describe the workings in a way that other people can understand (because there are no english words for describing how it works); aka if they can't understand it ... it isn't their fault.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

360 programs on a z/10

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 360 programs on a z/10
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2009 09:37:46 -0500
mike@MENTOR-SERVICES.COM (Mike Myers) writes:
ISAM did some pretty interesting channel programming. It was back in the late '60s and early '70s while teaching the internals of ISAM and BDAM to Program Support Reps that I learned about self-modifying channel programs (fun stuff).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#52 360 programs on a z/10

not long after joining the science center ... I got sent out to Denver on cp67 customer support call ... King Resources was trying to get a large ISAM application running under cp67 ... and I spent a week working 3rd shift in their datacenters. This was when machine room was still a "show place" (1st floor downtown office building with outside glass floor-to-ceiling) ...

as mentioned here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#21 Small Server Mob Advantage

channel programs built in a "virtual environment" (whether the virtual machine or from application virtual address space) got "translated" into shadow/copy channel programs (with real addresses) that were the ones that really executed.

lots of ISAM "self-modifying" was reading/writing BBCCHHR values which were later used by other CCWs in the same channel program.

additional challenge for cp67 was "minidisks" ... disk spaces that "virtual cylinder zero" that was other than "real cylinder zero" ... which required translating "CC" field also (so seek BBCCHH fields were copied also & translated also). Since the real seek was then pointing to the copied value ... when a read operation read in a new "BBCCHHR" ... it was into the virtual location ... not the location pointed to by the seek actually executed. After doing all sorts of fiddling ... trying to recognize ISAM channel programs and reads that were fetching BBCCHH field ... the eventual solution was to recognize "full-pack" virtual disks that didn't do the fiddling with seek BBCCHH (and hope noboby really wanted to run ISAM channel programs on minidisks).

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

xmas card

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: xmas card
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2009 09:44:37 -0500
UK Border Agency delights with festive e-card
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/12/18/border_agency_card/

reference an 1981 "rexx xmas card" ... would blink colors on 3279 (I tried to reproduce in html):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#54 An old fashioned Christmas

on the internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

as mentioned this wasn't the dec87 xmas worm that appeared on bitnet (which was a full year before the infamous internet worm). misc. past posts mentioning bitnet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

"Portable" data centers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Portable" data centers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2009 11:31:56 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
there was 370/195 with outboard channels (basically an upgraded of 360/195 with few additional instructions ... but never got any of the virtual memory support upgrade). ... sjr/bldg.28 was still running an aging MVT 370/195 system when the bldg.15 disk product test lab got an early engineering 3033. Carefully pipelined ... 370/195 would peak at about twice 3033 sustained thruput ... however most codes ran about same thruput on 370/195 as 3033. The

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#51 "Portable" data centers

370/195 was pipelined and to get peak sustained thruput ... just about had to be carefully constructed loops totally within the pipeline. 370/195 didn't have branch prediction or speculative execution ... so (a non-carefully constructed pipeline looping branch) would drain the pipeline. most codes had frequent branches keeping the pipeline from being more than half-full and running at half peak thruput (or about the same as 3033).

the 370/195 group came up with idea for hyperthreading ... basically emulate two processor smp ... with two PSWs, two sets of registers, etc. ... but no additional pipeline or execution units. the idea was if single execution stream only kept the pipeline half-full at half-thruput ... then two independent execution streams might be able to keep the pipeline full and the execution units fully busy.

i got invited to participate because of other work on smp. however, the effort never got as far as even being announced.

for other drift ... one of the nails in the "future system" coffin
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

was analysis that if a FS machine was built from 195 technology ... applications running on such a machine would have thruput of 370/145 (that was one of the FS sections that had a complete enuf definition that analysis could be perform ... lots of the other FS was so inadequately defined that couldn't be analyzed). The actual comparison was Eastern Airlines reservation system (SystemOne), optimized for running on 370/195 ... the comparison pointed out that the best thruput it could expect to achieve (on the highest performance FS system) was that of running on 370/145

another site of some hardware & FS discussion from the FS period:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

a few misc. tidbits from above:
Whereas the Model 168 had required 40 months to evolve from development to initial shipment, the 3033 was shipped to its first customer after only 28 months in development. IBM achieved that feat by remapping the Model 168 design into the circuitry intended for VANDERBILT and making a number of tweaks in the design to improve performance. Of course, IBM could have delivered a machine with similar or better performance in 1975 instead of 1977, if they hadn't killed all the System/370 design projects to avoid competition with the FS fantasy.

... snip ...

later the Eastern Airline res system was the basis for Amadeus ... and my wife served a short stint as chief architect; she sided with the selection of x.25 (over sna) ... and the SNA forces managed to have her replaced. However, it didn't do them any good, since Amadeus went with x.25 anyway ... a couple recent posts mentioning Amadeus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#33 IBM touts encryption innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#55 IBM halves mainframe Linux engine prices

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2009 14:58:55 -0500
sidd <sidd@situ.com> writes:
the rollback of Glass Steagall began a loooong time ago. It was barely alive by 1999. For a good timeline see:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/wallstreet/weill/demise.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#53 70 Years of ATM Innovation

a few posts from last year referring to that PBS program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#13 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#46 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#71 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#97 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#2 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#51 IBM CEO's remuneration last year ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#66 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#89 Credit Crisis Timeline
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#36 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#41 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#67 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#70 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#16 Fraud due to stupid failure to test for negative
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#53 Your thoughts on the following comprehensive bailout plan please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#78 Isn't it the Federal Reserve role to oversee the banking system??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#82 Fraud in financial institution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#18 Once the dust settles, do you think Milton Friedman's economic theories will be laid to rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#19 What's your view of current global financial / economical situation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#28 Does anyone get the idea that those responsible for containing this finanical crisis are doing too much?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#37 The human plague
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#51 Why are some banks failing, and others aren't?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#8 Global Melt Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#9 Do you believe a global financial regulation is possible?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#26 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#57 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#61 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#58 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#64 Is This a Different Kind of Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#9 Blind-sided, again. Why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#20 Five great technological revolutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#23 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#35 Is American capitalism and greed to blame for our financial troubles in the US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#55 Is this the story behind the crunchy credit stuff?

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2009 18:32:21 -0500
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#53 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#60 70 Years of ATM Innovation

another flavor:

Gramm=Leach-Bliley Act
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramm-Leach-Bliley_Act

from above:
Citicorp (a commercial bank holding company) merged with Travelers Group (an insurance company) in 1998 to form the conglomerate Citigroup, a corporation combining banking, securities and insurance services under a house of brands that included Citibank, Smith Barney, Primerica and Travelers. This combination, announced in 1993 and finalized in 1994, would have violated the Glass-Steagall Act and the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 by combining securities, insurance, and banking, if not for a temporary waiver process.[1] The law was passed to legalize these mergers on a permanent basis.

... snip ...

and ...
The merger violated the Bank Holding Company Act (BHCA), but Citibank was given a two-year forbearance that was based on an assumption that they would be able to force a change in the law. The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act passed in November 1999, repealing the BHCA and portions of the Glass-Steagall Act, allowing banks, brokerages, and insurance companies to merge, thus making the Citigroup/Traveler Group merger legal.

Top Citigroup officials were allowed to review and approve drafts of the legislation before it was formally introduced.[4]

After resigning as Treasury Secretary and while secretly in negotiations to head Citigroup, Robert Rubin helped broker the final deal to pass the bill.[4] He later became one of 3-CEO's that headed up CitiCorp.


... snip ...

Citigroup has often been cited as the too big to fail institution in the most financial distress and the most in need of gov. bail-out.

the PBS program was somewhat more circumspect about Rubin's role in this ... possibly in part, because the program is from 2003 and predates it all coming crashing down.

The Long Demise of Glass-Steagall
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/wallstreet/weill/demise.html

from above:
After 12 attempts in 25 years, Congress finally repeals Glass-Steagall, rewarding financial companies for more than 20 years and $300 million worth of lobbying efforts. Supporters hail the change as the long-overdue demise of a Depression-era relic

... snip ...

the show includes interviews with Levitt (SEC Chairman) ... Levitt mentioned in this periodically cited reference:

Greenspan Slept as Off-Books Debt Escaped Scrutiny
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&refer=home&sid=aYJZOB_gZi0I

from above:
That same year Greenspan, Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin and SEC Chairman Arthur Levitt opposed an attempt by Brooksley Born, head of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, to study regulating over-the-counter derivatives. In 2000, Congress passed a law keeping them unregulated.

... snip ...

Other news articles have Gramm's wife becoming head of CFTC until Gramm's success in legislation that exempted the regulation ... and then she leaves to join Enron's board and also member of their audit committee.

recent story about SEC during the height of the problems leading up to the current situation:

Fraud prosecutions fell as crisis loomed
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2009-12-15-prosecute-fraud_N.htm

misc. past posts mentioning news reference to Rubin &/or Levitt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#53 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#65 is it possible that ALL banks will be nationalized?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#10 Who will Survive AIG or Derivative Counterparty Risk?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#16 The Formula That Killed Wall Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#18 HSBC is expected to announce a profit, which is good, what did they do differently?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#28 I need insight on the Stock Market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#42 Bernard Madoff Is Jailed After Pleading Guilty -- are there more "Madoff's" out there?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#61 Quiz: Evaluate your level of Spreadsheet risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#63 Do bonuses foster unethical conduct?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#0 What is swap in the financial market?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#13 Should we fear and hate derivatives?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#23 Should FDIC or the Federal Reserve Bank have the authority to shut down and take over non-bank financial institutions like AIG?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#35 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#29 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#51 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#7 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#33 Treating the Web As an Archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#17 REGULATOR ROLE IN THE LIGHT OF RECENT FINANCIAL SCANDALS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#84 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#77 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

some '83 references to boyd

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: some '83 references to boyd
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2009 23:32:48 -0500
I sponsored a Friday's after work at local watering holes. Jim Gray used to come before he left for Tandem. A frequent place was a deli that opened up across the street from the main plant site ... they had an "overflow" room that was normally closed ... but they would open it for friday's after work and give us half-price on pitchers of Anchor Steam (and for some reason the door to the overflow room had my name on it).


Date: 8 November 1983, 17:28:20 PST
To: wheeler

I am trying to set up a meeting for Thursday, December 1 at Santa
Teresa Lab to review VM/DASD strategy. Each of you had indicated an
interest.  The time was chosen to be convenient for any Yorktown
people who might be attending the XB/Jupiter strategic design review
on Tuesday and Wednesday, November 29 and 30th.

The purpose of the VM/DASD strategy meeting is to look for ways to
better exploit the DASD technology/VM technology combination over
the next four years. We would hope to achieve some concensus on
hardware and software product directions for the next few years. My
proposal for speakers and agenda is:

8:00 3380/VM Issues..................
8:30 GPD DASD Plan...................
9:00 GPD Cache Plan..................
9:30 GP Processor Performance........
10:00 CMS on VMXB....................
10:30 Discussion.....................
11:30 Wrap Up........................

... snip ... top of post, old email index

Date: 11/10/83 07:43:36
From: wheeler

talk is by ret. Col. Boyd. He was a korean war fighter pilot. During the 60's he went back to school and invented Boyd's law which is used for both training fighter pilots and designing planes. He also was head of lightweight fighter R&D for pentagon. He currently is attempting to re-organize how the pentagon is run and is working with legislators to pass several bills to that effect.

His talk is on strategy & tactics ... with somewhat a military bent, but covers non-military situations also. It is extremely interesting in itself ... but also very useful for anybody in a position of doing any sort of strategy planning which could include advisory contingencies.

He has talked twice before at IBM. The information covered is vast/dense and if you don't have a good background in strategy & tactics, somewhat over whelming the first time ... characterized as being much better the next day after allowing for reflection (or mind boggling).


... snip ... top of post, old email index

Date: 11/10/83 07:57:54
From: wheeler

col. boyd talks dec. 1st from 8am to 3pm in sj research auditorium.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

Date: 11/10/83 07:48:39
To: wheeler

Tough luck Boyd and the GPD disk cache hoohoo are in conflict.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

Date: 11/23/83 13:38:32
From: wheeler

re: friday; today is virtual friday .... & it has been a long week. TGIF. A reminder, John Boyd is speaking from 8am to 3pm in the research auditorium on Dec. 1st.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

Date: 12/02/83 10:49:06
From: wheeler

re: friday; cc: friday; after work at eric's. hopefully the die-hards have recovered from Boyd's visit. At this moment, reproduction still hasn't started on the foils. Maybe by tonight.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

Date: 12/09/83 12:31:11
From: wheeler

re: friday; cc: friday; little wet today ... everybody recovered from Boyd's talk and ready for Eric's???


... snip ... top of post, old email index

misc. recent posts mentioning Boyd's To Be or To Do:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#25 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#5 mainframe replacement (Z/Journal Does it Again)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#71 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#47 U.S. begins inquiry of IBM in mainframe market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#34 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#60 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#37 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#51 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401

misc. past posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd1

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

tty

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 2009 00:28:46 -0500
Subject: Re: tty
MailingList: hillgang II
Shmuel wrote:
Shirley there were more 134.5 baud 1050, 2740 and 2741 terminals than there were TTY's, to say nothing of those 2260's and 3270's. Also, how many people in 1976 were using real TTY's rather than, e.g., "glass teletypes", TI "Silent" 700, running at 300, 1200 or 2400 bps?

three people came out and installed cp67 at the univ. in jan68. The terminal support was 2741 & 1052 ... but it did some interesting tricks to automagically recognize the terminal type ... and issued the 2702 SAD command to (re-)associate the appropriate line-scanner with each address/port.

the univ. had some tty/ascii terminals ... and so one of the things I had to do to cp67 was add tty support ... and tried to do it consistent with the existing automagic terminal type recognition. Everything worked (as long as it was leased lines) ... however, I wouldn't work for using a single dial-up number for all terminal types. The problem was that 2702 took short-cut and hardwired the baud rate oscillator to each port/address ... so while it was possible to associate any available type of (tty/ascii, 2741, 1052) line-scanner with each port ... it would change the hard-wired port baud rate.

this somewhat motivated the univ. to start a clone controller project ... where the channel was reversed engineered and a channel interface board was built for an Interdata/3. The Interdata/3 was programmed to simulate a 2702 ... as well as do dynamic baud rate recognition. The project evolved an Interdata/4 handling the channel interface with multiple Interdata/3s dedicated to the line/port scanner functions. Four of us got written up, blamed for clone controller business. Interdata was selling the boxes as clone terminal controller ... and then was relogo'ed when Perkin/Elmer bought Interdata. They were sold through the 80s ... especially into fed. gov. accounts. I even ran across some in the late 90s still in heavy use (large datacenter handling merchant point-of-sale card-swipe terminals).

misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

At the univ, I also did a hack to HASP on an MVT release 18 system ... that added 2741 & TTY terminal support ... and incorporated support for the CMS editor syntax (although completely rewritten from scratch for hasp) ... for CRJE capability.

... and some old photos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#oldpicts

including CDI miniterm at home in the late 70s ... before being replaced by 3101 "glass-teletype"

In Mar1970 ... I was able to take home a "portable" 2741 that came in two large suit cases (about 40lbs each). It was later replaced with a "real" 2741 installed at home. That continued until '77 when I got the miniterm in place of the 2741.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

terminal type and queue drop delay

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: terminal type and queue drop delay
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 2009 01:05:35 -0500
MailingList: hillgang II
a recent thread on the subject (in linkedin zvm group) ... prompted by presentation at the last hillgang meeting:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#80 OpenSolaris goes "tic'less"???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#82 OpenSolaris goes "tic'less"???

and then ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#37 Hillgang user group presentation yesterday

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

You know you've been Lisp hacking to long when

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: You know you've been Lisp hacking to long when
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 2009 10:43:06 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
there about some past discussions about computer literacy is when you start thinking/dreaming in machine code ... as opposed to english (or other natural language). computer language literacy ... is not when you can design a program and then easily translate it into C, Pascal, Cobol, Fortran or PLI (or whatever) ... but when the program is being designed directly in the language that it will be written in (small analogy to writing english poems in english ... rather than in some other language and then translating to english).

then you are sometimes faced with a problem that nobody understands how the program works ... and there are no english words to describe it ... and being blamed (its your fault) because you are unable to describe the workings in a way that other people can understand (because there are no english words for describing how it works); aka if they can't understand it ... it isn't their fault.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#56 You know you've been Lisp hacking to long when

some drift/variation on "computer language"

past threads discussing SQL "3-value" logic operations with NULLs ... would have results that were the "inverse" of what people would intuitively expect:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#40 How to cope with missing values - NULLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#75 NULL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#22 3 value logic. Why is SQL so special?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#23 3 value logic. Why is SQL so special?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#29 3 value logic. Why is SQL so special?

recent posts about people getting confused with boolean query operations out at 6-7 terms ... peoples' expectations being the inverse of (confusing AND & OR results) what they were getting (I knew somebody who would remind people that one of his specialties was expert in doing 40+ SQL clauses):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#88 Continous Systems Modelling Package
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#25 Old datasearches

In the early 70s, I wrote a PLI program to analyze 360 assembler listings. One of the common failure modes in cp67 was attempting to use a register (frequently for address value) that hadn't been correctly initialized. I was trying to identify all possible execution flows thru a program and keep track of registers use & initialize/not-initialize history. Basically reduce the program to groups of sequentially executed instructions ... bracketed at the top 1) coming after a conditional branch or 2) join of two or more execution flows (aka target of branch instructions) and at the bottom with a 1) conditional branch or 2) join of some other execution flows (target of branch instruction).

Then for exercise ... I tried generating higher level (PLI like) statment representation of the assembler statements (aka a 360 "A R5,something" becomes "R5 = R5+something". Trying to represent some of the conditional execution flow with if/then/else sometimes got very (very) messy.

Results of instructions could have four state (four-value logic) ... and some highly optimized sequences might have series of instruction followed by two or three branch instructions (i.e. instruction results in four possible states, conditional branch instructions had four bits ... could represent any combination of the four states. Simple flavor would be "test-under-mask" of single bit ... simple binary true/false. However, "TM" could specify testing of up to eight bits ... and condition was "all ones", "all zeros", or "mixed" (at least one one and at least one zero).

misc. past posts mentioning the PLI program:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#12 360 "OS" & "TSS" assemblers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#36 Assembly language formatting on IBM systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#38 GOTOs cross-posting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#34 Macros and base register question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#21 REXX still going strong after 25 years
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#36 Vintage computers are better than modern crap !
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#35 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#16 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#52 Where should the type information be?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#32 transputers again was: The demise of Commodore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#1 Greatest Software Ever Written?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#27 Why these original FORTRAN quirks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#21 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#1 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#57 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#65 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#49 Any benefit to programming a RISC processor by hand?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#30 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#43 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#32 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 2009 11:05:42 -0500
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
I have seen 115 users on a 2065 (KL10B) with 8MW of memory, three RP06es for PS: and paging, and student registration applications running on around 40 of the terminals.

Slowish, but fully workable. You wouldn't like to start a compile, but a small assembly e.g. FAIL, would work.

I tuned a lot of underpowered systems in the 1980s. I always spread out the swap with a little bit on each disk, and that helped a lot for the underpowered systems. Like Prime 550-II's with two megabytes of memory running 30 terminals.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#54 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

old post that if things went linear from 75-80 users on cp67 768kbyte 360/67 to vm370 32mbyte 3081k (two 7mip processors) ... that there should be several thousand users ... instead of typically 300 users.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#31 Big I/O or Kicking the Mainframe out the Door

the statement was that relative system disk performance had declined by at least an order of magnitude during the period ... the increase in number of users was proportional to the disk performance improvement ... not proportional to improvement in other system components.

i had started on this several years earlier ... noticing that disk improvements wasn't keeping pace with the rest of the system. Part of this was having done "dynamic adaptive resource management" (as undergraudate in the 60s on cp67 ... sometimes also referred to as "fair share" scheduler because the default scheduling policy was "fair share") and something about "scheduling to the bottleneck". Trying to dynamically adapt to the bottleneck ... put a lot of focus on constantly identifying what was the bottleneck.

initial when some of the disk division executives heard the statement about disk performance declining by an order of magnitude (or more) ... they assigned the division performance group to refute the statement. After a couple weeks they came back and effectively said that I had slightly understated the issue. Part of their study then turned into SHARE (user group) presentation about how to configure and optimize disk for improved system thruput.

a recent reference with a slightly different characterization of the 3081:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#59 "Portable" data centers
referring to Sowa's FS comments
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

other posts mentioning the 360/67 & 3081 comparison
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#43 Bloat, elegance, simplicity and other irrelevant concepts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#55 How Do the Old Mainframes Compare to Today's Micros?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#10 Virtual Memory (A return to the past?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#46 The god old days(???)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#4 IBM S/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#38 Why SMP at all anymore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#66 Pentium 4 Prefetch engine?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#62 any 70's era supercomputers that ran as slow as today's supercomputers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#68 Q: Merced a flop or not?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#40 MVS History (all parts)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#61 MVS History (all parts)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#23 Smallest Storage Capacity Hard Disk?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#5 index searching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#11 Microcode? (& index searching)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#20 index searching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#8 What are some impressive page rates?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#9 What are some impressive page rates?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#16 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#15 360 longevity, was RISCs too close to hardware?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#39 100% CPU is not always bad
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#55 What is the "name" of a system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#13 Today's mainframe--anything to new?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#53 Performance and Capacity Planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#32 Old Hashing Routine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#27 oops
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#13 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#67 SSL vs. SSL over tcp/ip
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#9 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#86 IBM mainframe history, was Floating-point myths
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#40 Fantasy-Land_Hierarchal_NUMA_Memory-Model_on_Vertical
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#57 "Engine" in Z/OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#8 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#71 308x Processors - was "Mainframe articles"

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 2009 11:32:35 -0500
jmfbahciv <jmfbahciv@aol> writes:
Yep, that's the IBM flavor. They did massive data munching very well.

we had worked with several of the non-mainframe RDBMS when we were doing ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

after we left, we were approached by somebody from corporate hdqtrs and asked if we would help him approach some of these vendors (that didn't have mainframe offerings) about doing port to mainframe and making standard mainframe product offerings.

a common refrain was that bare-bones port wasn't so much of an issue ... but constant regression testing for (standard mainframe) 300 disk drive configuration (something they viewed as standard part of mainframe DB2) ... was an enormous cost that they didn't expect to recover (and they could get much better ROI applying the resources to other kinds of features/enhancements).

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

360 programs on a z/10

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 360 programs on a z/10
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 2009 14:45:37 -0500
gabe@GABEGOLD.COM (Gabe Goldberg) writes:
Speaking of ISAM doing interesting channel programming -- ISAM was implicated in a very early VM security/integrity threat. Details elude me and I sadly don't have the program which used ISAM to penetrate VM, but it was discussed in this research

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#52 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#57 360 programs on a z/10

ISAM and other kinds of (looping) channel programs were demonstrated being able to do denial-of-service attack (hanging channel).

one of the things I did in paging access method on cp67 ... demonstrate that run-of-mill virtual machines (w/o special privileges for channel programs) could still do all of their disk access w/o needing channel programming capability.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

it also significantly raised the abstraction ... eliminating the "overhead" of channel program abstraction ... and significantly reduced the overhead. Also with the higher level abstraction ... I could do significantly higher level of optimization (under the covers). In the 80s, some (otherwise identical) CMS benchmarks against standard filesystem on same hardware configuration and same 3380 drives ... I could show three times thruput improvement with moderately i/o intensive workload.

the higher level abstraction also enabled being able doing other kinds of optimization with trivially sharing executable code and other stuff.

some old email about moving page-mapped stuff (and other things) from cp67 to vm370:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

as undergraduate in the 60s ... i was doing lots of different cp67 stuff ... some of which shipped in standard product. I would also periodically get reguests for doing various kinds of enhancements from the vendor. Although I didn't hear about these guys until much later:
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

in retrospect, some of the requested features may have originated from that market segment.

At the science center there, was some interesting security issues with the cp67 "service" ... since there was student and other non-employee access from various educational institutions in the boston and cambridge area.

One such was the science center had ported APL\360 to CMS for CMS\APL ... redoing internal storage management so that it operated much more efficiently with multi-megabyte workspaces in a virtual memory environment ... as well as added function to access CMS system services (which caused some uproar with the APL purists as violating APL). In any case, it opened up APL use to a whole new class of applications (large modeling & "what-if" things ... some of the things that are done with spreadsheets today). In any case, some of the corporate business planning people had the highest classified and most valuable of corporate assets loaded on the cambridge system (complete cuostmer details) so they could run business modeling remote from Armonk.

The security had to demonstarte that students and other non-employees (and in fact, non-authorized employees) couldn't access the most valuable of corporate assets.

Something similar was required in the joint exercise with Endicott ... applying changes to cp67 to add simulation of 370 virtual memory virtual machines (long before virtual memory for 370 was announced). There was requirement that even the very existance of the activity to support 370 virtual memory virtual machines (on the cambridge cp67 360/67) didn't leak to student users and other non-employees in any way.

Note that various of the cp67 & vm370 commercial time-sharing service bureaus provided other kinds of limitations on virtual machine capabilities to eliminate denial-of-service kinds of exploits. Some of them had moved up to value stream into lots of online financial information ... and would have lots of customers from competing wall street firms (where potentially there was very large sums of money involved).

Much later there was folklore about certain class of gov. customers requesting *ALL* the MVS source that (exactly) corresponded to specific executing MVS system (as part of a certain kind of MVS certification). Supposedly there was a corporate task force that spent $5m dollars studying the issue ... before concluding that it wasn't practical.

for other drift, this is post with tale about the FS effort implementing a DRM facility for all "future system" documents ... no hard copies ... and detailed control for authorization and access:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#41 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
and security related precursor post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#39 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

360 programs on a z/10

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 360 programs on a z/10
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 2009 15:53:23 -0500
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#52 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#57 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#68 360 programs on a z/10

some of the CTSS people went to the science center on the 4th flr ... some refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

and others went to Multics on the 5th flr. one of the things that the Multics group prided themselves on was the customer associated with this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#42 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#43 another 30 year thing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#44 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#45 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation

related to customer mentioned in here (and about changing from a 20 vm/4341 order to 210) ... old email:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404b

in these posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#12 Multics Nostalgia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#15 departmental servers

i've mentioned before that it wasn't fair to compare total number of multics installations to total number of vm installations ... or even the total number of internal corporate vm installations ... but mention of csc/vm in these old posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

and one of my hobbies was providing & supporting highly customized (csc/vm) systems to internal datacenters ... and at one point I had internal customer set that was larger than the aggregate number of multics installations ... reference at the bottom of this page:
http://www.multicians.org/multics.html
also shown here:
http://www.multicians.org/site-timeline.html

working on some financial standards group in the early to mid 90s ... there were some members that had email that went thru here:
http://www.multicians.org/site-dockmaster.html

above mentions docmaster is now property of:
http://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic_heritage/museum/

for other topic drift ... the above use to show (maybe still does) a MISSI/MLS video tape. I talked them into letting me have a physical copy of the video tape ... because I wanted to produce a voice-over spoof/satire on MLS.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 2009 19:40:15 -0500
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
That is indeed the case with PDP10s.

Properly wirewrapped, heavy wider-than-19in cabinet, scary looking power supply, serious looking disk, tape and network cables; and in between all this a cute little front end PDP11.


3081 was originally never going to have a single processor version ... supposedly everything was going to have minimum of two processors.

the only problem was that TPF (renamed airline control program ... because customers were using for other things, like financial networks) didn't have multiprocessor support.

so there is one or two comments about 3081 here:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

and there was lots of pressure to do something about TPF (& 3081s) ... initially there was lots of tailoring vm for TPF environment (running on multiprocessor but trying to improving the thruput of TPF running in a non-multiprocessor virtual machine ... which actually resulted in degrading thruput of nearly every other vm multiprocessor customer) ... and eventually shipping a non-multiprocessor version of 3081.

eventually they did ship a "3083" ... which was only a single processor. now standard "360" multiprocessor was two processors that could be divided and run as two single processors. The 3081 was referrred to as "dyadic" because it couldn't be configured to run as two single processors (in part because there weren't complete two sets of all possible hardware components).

so I've been told that there was a problem with simply removing the 3081 components for one of the processors to create one processor 3083. the problem was supposedly the top of the 3081 was "processor 0" and the second processor was in the middle "processor 1". Simply removing "processor 1" left the box (dangerously?) top-heavy. There actually had to be some amount of additional effort & work to remove the top processor components and "re-assign" "processor 0" to the middle processor.

misc. recent posts mentioning 3083:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#66 Mainframe articles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#68 IT Infrastructure Slideshow: The IBM Mainframe: 50 Years of Big Iron Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#70 Mainframe articles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#77 Operating Systems for Virtual Machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#55 IBM halves mainframe Linux engine prices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#65 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#67 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#39 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 20 Dec 2009 07:42:49 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
I had to chuckle a couple decades later at the yes card compromise. A chipcard payment infrastructure was defined that started to be deployed in the 90s in europe ... and a large pilot deployment in the US in the early part of the decade (all evidence evaporating after yes card compromise became more public). old reference to presentation at cartes 2002:
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#41 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

more than a decade later and still trying to work out the kinks:

Upgraded Dutch Payment Card Still Vulnerable to Relay Attack
http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/185093/upgraded_dutch_payment_card_still_vulnerable_to_relay_attack.html

from above:
In the relay attack, the victim's card details are recorded through a tampered payment terminal. The PIN number is observed by a fraudster and then communicated to an accomplice performing a simultaneous transaction somewhere else.

... snip ...

misc. past posts discussing YES CARD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Why don't people use certificate-based access authentication?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 20 Dec, 2009
Subject: Why don't people use certificate-based access authentication?
Blog: Payment Systems Network
ong-winded x-over from sci.crypt posting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#32 SSL certificates and kyes

the question was asked several times in the mid-90s.

part of the answer was that even shorten digital certificate was typically 100 times larger than typical payment payload ... misc. past posts mentioning the enormous (certificate-base) payload bloat:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#bloat

and it was relatively trivial to demonstrates the actual certificates were redundant and superfluous. it was one of the reasons that in the mid-90s the x9a10 financial standard working group came up with a digitally signed financial transaction that didn't require an appended digital certificate (the x9a10 financial standard working group had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

There was some efforts in the financial standard working group ... recognizing the enormous payload bloat penalty represented by digital certificates, started a standardization effort for "compressed" digital certificates ... possibly hoping to get the enormous bloat down to only a factor of ten times. Using their techniques, I was able to show that it was possible to compress a digital certificate to zero bytes ... so rather than defining a standard for a financial transaction w/o any digital certificate ... it would be possible to have a financial transaction that mandated a zero-byte digital certificates (also avoiding the enormous payload bloat penalty). For some certificate-less posts/discussions:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#certless

For some other topic drift ... some old email proposing a PGP-like, publickey, certificate-less operation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email810506
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email810515

another part of the certificate-based payments from the mid-90s (besides the enormous payload bloat) was the proposal that 1) each consumer would pay $100/annum for their own certificate and 2) payment transactions with appended digital certificates would reverse the burden of proof in disputes (as enticement to get merchants to play). The issue then was why would every person in the world spend $100 per annum to have the dispute burden of proof shifted to them.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

70 Years of ATM Innovation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 70 Years of ATM Innovation
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 20 Dec 2009 08:11:34 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
previous posts mentioning percora hearings (doing some amount of work on html'ing transcripts of the pecora hearings) i.e. '30s senate hearings leading up to Glass-Steagall:

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#53 70 Years of ATM Innovation

as previously mentioned, last spring ... I had been asked to do something with the scans of the tens of thousands of pages of Pecora hearing transcripts ... anticipating that something similar might go on ... but then nothing seemed to happen. however, somebody wanted a recent reminder of this article from a year ago ...
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/06/opinion/06chernow.html?_r=1

misc other posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#78 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#81 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#4 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#10 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#16 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#20 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#34 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#35 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#46 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#47 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#60 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#61 70 Years of ATM Innovation

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

bulletin board

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: bulletin board
Date: Sun, 20 Dec 2009 08:35:30 -0500
MailingList: hillgang II
On Fri, Dec 18, 2009 at 11:40:38PM -0500, Gabe Goldberg wrote:
Online bulletin board usage is hardly CPU-limited; it's limited by bandwidth between-the-ears and from remote terminal to host. It wasn't measured in VM monitor data, it was measured by dramatically decreased human wait time. So 4x bandwidth was a happy improvement.

old pictures ... mentioned previously
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#oldpicts

has me on the hill behind the house in '93 ... next to small r/o satellite dish which was getting a full usenet feed.

i got it free for writing some drivers (both unix & dos) for the modem and co-authoring an article in boardwatch magazine (somewhat morphed now, but at the time a bulletin board magazine). i had a dos machine running "waffle" (old bulletin board system) ... as well as a rs/6000 and a sgi indy.

some waffle dos software references here (although the webpage lists software dates of 31dec1969):

http://shareware.pcmag.com/category/Waffle-bulletin-board-system/307.html

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

PDP-10s and Unix

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: PDP-10s and Unix
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 20 Dec 2009 09:36:02 -0500
jmfbahciv <jmfbahciv@aol> writes:
It's not difficult to implement backwards compatible machine instructions. We did it with the KA-floating point instructions. All you need is a way to trap the instruction. CPU architectures do trap illegal instructions...don't they?

doing 370 virtual machines on cp67 360/67 ... was the reverse ... it trapped (360) illegal instructions and was "forward" compatible with unannounced & not even built yet ... 370s.

then a copy of cp67 was modified to run in the 370 architecture (new instructions, some differences in the hardware virtual memory tables). for instance, 360/67 reset the hardware virtual memory "associative" array (look-aside buffer), everytime CRO was reloaded ... which would be required if a virtual page was "stolen" and the associated page table entry was invalidated. 370 originally defined explicit PTLB, ISTE, and IPTE instructions to perform similar function.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 20 Dec 2009 09:41:31 -0500
jmfbahciv <jmfbahciv@aol> writes:
There is no way DEC could handle a 300 disk drive configuration. JMF went on a trip to some insurance company in Connecticut and saw their hardware setup. He came back humbled and in awe.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#67 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night

maybe aetna? ... I frequently visited them in hartford. they were also the first "big/true" blue commercial customer to install Amdahl machine. they were also pulled into SBS 3-way partnership with IBM and COMSAT.

at one point there was an attempt to try and convince me to go onsite at aetna for six months, in belief that it would divert aetna from installing the Amdahl machine.

--
40+yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970




previous, next, index - home