List of Archived Posts

2014 Newsgroup Postings (05/14 - 06/08)

Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject
HFT is harmful, say US market participants
Is end of mainframe near ?
Tech Time Warp of the Week: Relive the Days When Apps Were Cards Punched Full of Holes
Is end of mainframe near ?
DEC Technical Journal on Bitsavers
Epic failures: 11 infamous software bugs
[Cryptography] Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
Is end of mainframe near ?
Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject
History of computing part 2 Ye olde code: Grace Hopper and UNIVAC
DEC Technical Journal on Bitsavers
Is end of mainframe near ?
Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
Is end of mainframe near ?
Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
350 DBAs stare blankly when reminded super-users can pinch data
350 DBAs stare blankly when reminded super-users can pinch data
Is end of mainframe near ?
Thomas Piketty Is Right About the Past and Wrong About the Future
Has the last fighter pilot been born?
Three Reasons the Mainframe is in Trouble
Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
Jon Stewart Disembowels SecTreas Geithner
Does IBM CEO Rometty Understand Cloud?
Special characters for Passwords
Special characters for Passwords
Target Results Hurt by Canada, Data Breach
SEC probes Schwab, Merrill, for anti-money laundering violations - sources
Credit Suisse's Guilty Plea: The WSJ Uses the Right Adjective to Modify the Wrong Noun
Special characters for Passwords
Special characters for Passwords
Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
Special characters for Passwords
Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
weird trivia
Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
Special characters for Passwords
Special characters for Passwords
Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe
SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
To Forgive Design: Understanding Failure
Jon Stewart Disembowels SecTreas Geithner
Barclays Manipulated Gold as Soon as It Stopped Manipulating Libor
The Pentagon Is Playing Games With Its $570-Billion Budget
Is end of mainframe near ?
Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe
Has the last fighter pilot been born?
SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
Is end of mainframe near ?
Has the last fighter pilot been born?
a long way from IBM 1620 System Summary Manual
China Wants Banks To Remove High-End IBM Servers Amid Spy Dispute
Interesting and somewhat disturbing article about IBM in BusinessWeek. What is your opinion?
Credit Suisse, BNP Paribas at Risk of Criminal Charges Over Taxes, Business With Banned Nations
SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
Time that Senior Board members were held responsible for Criminal Actitivites of their Companies
Association Of Certified Fraud Examiners Release 2014 Report On Fraud
Interesting and somewhat disturbing article about IBM in BusinessWeek. What is your opinion?
Costs of core
HFT is harmful, say US market participants
Is end of mainframe near ?
Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
Did these tech and telecom companies assess the risk and return with respect to Anti-Money Laundering challenges?
Spacewar Oral History Research Project
Did these tech and telecom companies assess the risk and return with respect to Anti-Money Laundering challenges?
non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
OT - Quantum Teleportation Feat Brings Ultrafast Computer Networks Step Closer To Reality
weird power trivia
Costs of core
Costs of core
real vs. emulated CKD
Costs of core
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
real vs. emulated CKD
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Costs of core
Why Financialization Has Run Amok
Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
Costs of core
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
A lifetime ban on lobbying for lawmakers?
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
The SEC's Mary Jo White Punts on High Frequency Trading and Abandons Securities Act of 1934
Xanadu, The World's Most Delayed Software, Is Finally Released After 54 Years In The Making
SEC Caught Dark Pool and High Speed Traders Doing Bad Stuff
weird power trivia
The Decline and Fall of IBM

Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject.
Date: 14 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Why Geithner Was Pro-Bailout
http://www.americanbanker.com/bankthink/why-geithner-was-pro-bailout-1067478-1.html

Bill Black: Geithner's Single Most Revealing Sentence
http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2014-05-13/bill-black-geithner%E2%80%99s-single-most-revealing-sentence
Timothy Geithner Reveals Himself in His New Book
http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117741/timothy-geithner-reveals-himself-his-new-book
Geithner's Other Ad Hominem Attacks on Barofsky
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2014/05/geithners-ad-hominem-attacks-barofsky.html
Barofsky Responds to Geithner
http://econintersect.com/b2evolution/blog1.php/2014/05/13/barofsky-responds-to-geithner

Over at the WCEG: The Consensus Is That Tim Geithner's Blocking of Mortgage Foreclosure Relief Was His Biggest Unforced Error as U.S. Treasury Secretary (Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality...)
http://delong.typepad.com/sdj/2014/05/the-consensus-is-that-tim-geithners-blocking-of-mortgage-foreclosure-relief-was-his-biggest-unforced-error-as-us-treasury.html
This man made millions suffer: Tim Geithner's sorry legacy on housing
http://www.salon.com/2014/05/14/this_man_made_millions_suffer_tim_geithners_sorry_legacy_on_housing/
Tim Geithner on Why Obama Passed Over Elizabeth Warren to Head the Consumer Protection Bureau
http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2014/05/tim-geithner-book-obama-elizabeth-warren-consumer-bureau

posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
posts mentioning Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HFT is harmful, say US market participants

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: HFT is harmful, say US market participants
Date: 14 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
HFT is harmful, say US market participants
http://www.finextra.com/news/fullstory.aspx?newsitemid=25992

Tech More: Credit Suisse High Frequency Trading Michael Lewis Bernie Madoff How Knowledge of Credit Suisse's Dark Pool For High-Frequency Trading Leaked Out On LinkedIn
http://www.businessinsider.com/credit-suisses-dark-pool-for-high-frequency-trading-leaked-on-linkedin-2014-4

The High Frequency Trading Lawsuit That Has Wall Street Running Scared
http://wallstreetonparade.com/2014/05/the-high-frequency-trading-lawsuit-that-has-wall-street-running-scared/
Complaint For Violation Of The Federal Securities Laws
http://wallstreetonparade.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/show_temp-HFT-complaint.pdf

recent posts mentionin HFT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#54 Pensions, was Re: Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#82 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#89 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#28 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#29 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#43 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#56 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#65 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#93 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#18 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#60 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#72 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#3 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#20 HFT, computer trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#25 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#70 Obama Administration Launches Plan To Make An "Internet ID" A Reality

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is end of mainframe near ?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is end of mainframe near ?
Date: 15 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#67 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#74 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#75 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#81 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#92 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?

upthread I post quite about about history of SQL/RDBMS as well as non-mainframe higher TPC-certified transaction rates as well as lower cost & energy per transaction (while still meeting all ACID properties) ... and part of non-mainframe higher throughput/capacity is able to directly use industry standard native fibre-channel and fixed-block disks (aka both mainframes and non-mainframes using identical hardware, but mainframes have additional overhead/bottleneck of emulating legacy channels and CKD disks on industry standard hardware). One of the issues is while IBM has done DBMS TPC-certified benchmarks for its non-mainframe platforms, there haven't been official mainframe TPC-certified benchmarks for decades. Sometimes customers will leak some of their mainframe numbers or IBM will publish things like the peak z196 I/O benchmark ... from which it is possible to infer an upper limit on transaction throughput (otherwise it tends to lots of hand waving and FUD). For instance peak z196 I/O has 104 FICON (heavy weight legacy channel emulation layer on industry standard fibre-channel) to reach 2M IOPS when there was announce of a single native fibre-channel for E5-2600 claiming over one million IOPS (i.e. two native fibre-channel beat 104 fibre-channel with FICON layered on top). posts mentioning FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon
posts reference original relational/SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

public clouds have also done an enormous amount on cluster scaleup for non-ACID non-transaction technology ... like HADOOP ... developed for handling hundreds of millions of concurrent operations coming in from all over the world. IBM reference:
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/data/infosphere/hadoop/
also
http://strata.oreilly.com/2011/01/what-is-hadoop.html

recently there has even been press about being able to support SQL against HADOOP backends.

part of the issue is that i86 machines span the range from low end $200 laptops & desktops to servers that are more powerful than largest ec12 and clusters that have more processing than all the mainframes in the world today.

periodically there will be mainframe framing/FUD comparing largest mainframe against $200 entry machine ... somewhat akin to comparing a E5-4600V2 with 360/30

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech Time Warp of the Week: Relive the Days When Apps Were Cards Punched Full of Holes

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Tech Time Warp of the Week: Relive the Days When Apps Were Cards Punched Full of Holes
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 16 May 2014 08:50:51 -0400
Tech Time Warp of the Week: Relive the Days When Apps Were Cards Punched Full of Holes
http://www.wired.com/2014/05/tech-time-warp-punched-cards/

recent posts mentioning tray of cards:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#76 Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#85 Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is end of mainframe near ?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is end of mainframe near ?
Date: 17 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
A former coworker at IBM San Jose Research had left and was working at VLSI chip shop up valley ... where they were using large mainframe. He had taken the AT&T C compiler and fixed a lot of the bugs and made a lot of performance enhancements as part of porting the USB unix vlsi chip design tools to vm370/cms. Another company had picked up his work and was marketing it as mainframe C compiler. IBM then licensed that mainframe C compiler to market under its own logo.

One day the IBM marketing rep stops by and asks him what he is doing. He says he is writing Ethernet support so that the chip designers can use SGI graphics workstations with vm370/cms. The marketing rep tells him that he should be doing token-ring support instead or otherwise they might find they aren't getting timely support and maintenance on their machine. After marketing rep leaves, I get an irate phone call and have to listen to an hour of 4-letter words regarding IBM. Early the next morning, the senior VP in charge of engineering, calls a press conference to say that they were eliminating IBM gear and replacing it with SUN servers.

IBM corporate starts all sorts of studies to figure out the technical reasons for customers replacing large mainframe with SUN servers ... nobody really wants to deal with the actual reason.

Late 80s, senior disk engineer gets a talk scheduled at the annual, internal, world-wide communication group conference supposedly on 3174 performance ... however he opens the talk with statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had stranglehold on datacenters with its corporate strategic ownership of everything that crossed the datacenter walls ... and it was fighting off distribute computing and client/server trying to preserve its dumb terminal install base and paradigm. The disk division was seeing drop in disk sales with data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms. The disk division had come up with several solution to address the problem, but they were all being vetoed by the communication group. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

The 3090 was the first good new high-end IBM mainframe after the FS debacle and the Q&D efforts with 3033 & 3081
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
other future system posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

... however, it was never going to really achieve its potential because of the communication group datacenter stranglehold. Top executive predictions of over $100B/annum mainframe business (over $219B in 2014 dollars) is stillborn with the communication group datacenter stanglehold, the company going into the red and on verge of being broken up into the 13 "baby blues".
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

1qtr2014 $480M mainframe processor sales is approx. 14 ec12 equivalents @$33m or approx. 58/yr. e5-2600v1 benchmarks at 527BIPS or over ten times max. z196 @50BIPS and 7times ec12 @75BIPS. e5-2600v1 to e5-4600v2 goes from 16processors to 48 faster, smaller, more efficient processors ... or two e5-4600v2 is equivalent of full year ec12 sales, a high-density e5-4600v2 rack then is equivalent of 30yrs of ec12 sales and public cloud megadatacenter with 10,000 racks is equivalent of 300,000yrs of ec12 sales.

mainframe has to leverage industry standard components because the volume is so low, aka industry standard fibre-channel and fixed-block disks (with legacy conventions emulated on top). Each new generation of chip technology every couple yrs requires new plants at several billion each, which requires selling enormous number of chips. mainframe chips can only be relative minor mods. to industry standard (representing possibly only hr or two of modern chip fab production). some ficon posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

past posts in discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#67 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#74 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#75 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#81 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#92 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DEC Technical Journal on Bitsavers

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: DEC Technical Journal on Bitsavers
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 18 May 2014 10:08:28 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
After a long hiatus, more documents are on Bitsavers.

There are quite a few from MAI, and there's also a collection of the DEC Technical Journal. I remember something in there I wanted to see once, but I don't remember what it was or what issue.

Anyways, I downloaded the first one, and saw that it was about the VAX 8600, a pipelined VAX. It also had cache. It was mentioned therein that it had an 80 nanosecond cycle time.

The 360/195 had a 60 ns cycle time, so I thought I'd see if I could find information with which to compare them.

The table of the cost of computing power over time gave the 370/195, an update of the 360/195 with some additional abilities, 5.72 normalized MIPS, and the VAX 8600 4.19 normalized MIPS. (The Vax 8650, in the next entry, had 7.00 normalized MIPS.)

For Whetstone, the best MWIPS DP score (it depends on what FORTRAN compiler you use) is 2.57 for the VAX 8600, and 4.77 for the 360/195.

This is impressive performance for what was a much smaller and less expensive machine.


past post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#46
with old emails included copy of 8800 announce and some discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email880324
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email880329

old post with decade of vax sales, sliced in diced by year, model, us/non-us (86xx 1st shipped 1200 in 1985)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0

360/195 to 370 update gave it the early 370 instructions (before virtual memory announce) and some better hardware error handling and instruction retry. when i got sucked into the 370/195 hyperthreading project (never announced/shipped) had peak 370/195 was 10mips ... but w/o branch prediction and speculative execution, conditional branches in normal codes kept it around 5mips. a pair of instruction streams running at 5mips each ... would have kept hardware running at 10mips.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Epic failures: 11 infamous software bugs

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Epic failures: 11 infamous software bugs
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 18 May 2014 10:14:31 -0400
Epic failures: 11 infamous software bugs; Celebrate 'Debugging Day' by remembering these monster problems from the past
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9183580/Epic_failures_11_infamous_software_bugs

says it won't talk about y2k ... which we had lots of discussion here back end of last century
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#24 BA Solves Y2K (Was: Re: Chinese Solves Y2K)

includes this item from an internal discussion group discussing the "looming" y2k problem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#email841207

a couple other in that discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#21 Roads as Runways Was: Re: BA Solves Y2K (Was: Re: Chinese Solve Y2K)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#22 Roads as Runways Was: Re: BA Solves Y2K (Was: Re: Chinese Solve Y2K)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#23 Roads as Runways Was: Re: BA Solves Y2K (Was: Re: Chinese Solve Y2K)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#27 Roads as Runways Was: Re: BA Solves Y2K (Was: Re: Chinese

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[Cryptography] Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [Cryptography] Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
Date: Sun, 18 May 2014 09:29:53 -0400
Mailing List: Cryptography
On 05/17/14 23:03, James A. Donald wrote:
What we need is a protocol for provably public assertions, where you can be sure you are seeing the same document as everyone else sees, and that the past cannot be rewritten.

in prior life, we had worked with the guys responsible for commerce server at a small client/server startup and we were brought in as consultants because they wanted to do payment transactions on their server; the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use; the result is now periodically called "e-commerce".

Part of work was mapping "SSL" technology to payment business process and working out recommendations on how it was deployed. Part of this was that 1) it was necessary that the user needed to know the association between the webserver they thought they were talking to and the URL they typed into the browser and 2) "SSL" would provide the association between the typed in URL and the webserver that they were talking to. Both "1" and "2" were required to establish that the webserver the user thought they were talking to was the webserver they were actually talking to.

Almost immediately this was violated. Webservers found that "SSL" cut their throughput by 90+% and so they dropped back to use "SSL" just for check-out/paying. As a result, users were contacting a non-validated webservers and then they would click on a button and the non-validated webserver would provide a (SSL) URL ... which the browser would validate. Now the best that could be said is that the webserver that the user was talking to was the webserver that they claimed it was (not necessarily the webserver the user thought they were talking). This was when I coined the term "merchant comfort digital certificates" ... referring to it provided a sense of comfort (in contrast to "security").
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#sslcert

Note another part of ecommerce was a "payment gateway" which handled transactions between commerce servers on the internet and the payment networks. They wanted to use "SSL" for this ... but I had complete authority for this (I only could recommend about the browser/server operation). First I required that it have mutual "SSL" authentication ... code which didn't exist at the time we started ... and then a process that exchanged "public keys" out of band (the payment gateway public key was shipped with the ecommerce server software, somewhat like CA keys are included as part of browser software, and ecommerce server public keys were part of registering ecommerce servers with payment gateway). By the time things were done, "SSL" digital certificates were purely an artificial aspect of the software library being used ... aka the "digital certificates" were redundant and superfluous.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

I've then done several scenarios for browsers ... having caches of public keys for online authoritative agencies ... where real-time public keys can be obtained (similar to real-time mapping of domain name to "ip-addresses") ... like domain name servers serving public keys and payment gateways serving public keys ... which browsers can cache (so it doesn't have to be done everytime).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#catch22

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is end of mainframe near ?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is end of mainframe near ?
Date: 18 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
The better analogy is legacy mainframe with copper landlines and non-mainframe with fiber optics, cellphones and other wireless devices (aka legacy channel protocol emulation as heavy weight FICON on top of industry standard fibre-channel standard, drastically cutting native throughput). Mainframe volumes have dropped to such a low point that it is increasingly having to leverage (non-mainframe) industry standard technology with increasingly thinning veneer of legacy emulation ... while majority of innovation is going on elsewhere ... with some of it periodically being back ported to mainframe environment.

It is mistake to assume that non-mainframe environment is limited to what you see on the $200 laptops and desktops.

posts mentioning FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

other recent posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#67 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#74 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#75 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#81 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#92 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject.
Date: 18 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#0 Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject.

Geithner, Staying on Script
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/18/business/geithner-staying-on-script.html?_r=0
Tim Geithner, unreliable narrator
https://medium.com/@felixsalmon/fc88741a0025
Observations on Credit and Surveillance -- Tim Geithner on Alexander Hamilton: "America's Original Mr. Bailout"
http://mattstoller.tumblr.com/post/86032733013/tim-geithner-on-alexander-hamilton-americas-original
'Stress Test,' by Timothy F. Geithner
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/25/books/review/stress-test-by-timothy-f-geithner.html?

posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
posts mentioning Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

History of computing part 2 Ye olde code: Grace Hopper and UNIVAC

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: History of computing part 2 Ye olde code: Grace Hopper and UNIVAC
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 18 May 2014 13:02:29 -0400
Grace Hopper, UNIVAC, and the First Programming Language
http://beta.slashdot.org/story/202189
History of computing part 2 Ye olde code: Grace Hopper and UNIVAC
http://www.linuxvoice.com/history-of-computing-part-2/

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DEC Technical Journal on Bitsavers

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: DEC Technical Journal on Bitsavers
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 18 May 2014 17:23:56 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Pity. Multithreading allows a pipelined computer to at least achieve its peak maximum throughput even if it lacks features like branch prediction or out-of-order execution (which, of course, the 195 _did_ have, it being *invented* for the 91), and even if the programs it's running are badly written for a pipelined machine with lots of dependencies.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#5 DEC Technical Journal on Bitsavers

this has multithreading originally as part of acs/360 (Sidebar: Multithreading near the bottom of the page, red/blue bit)
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

I can't quite remember names of those involved in 370/195 (other than it wasn't Sussenguth). conditional branches stalled 195 pipeline which was major reason most codes tended to only run 195 at half rated speed (and assumption that two threads would reasonably keep 195 busy).

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is end of mainframe near ?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is end of mainframe near ?
Date: 18 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
this has z/os max z196 peak i/o with 2M IOPS with 104 FICON ... I have yet to see equivalent for EC12 although ec12 documentation has statements that EC12 is only 1.3times the I/O of z196
ftp://public.dhe.ibm.com/common/ssi/ecm/en/zsw03169usen/ZSW03169USEN.PDF

note that linkedin swizzles URLs and what is clicked on is different than what is displayed ... and the swizzled URL for FTP frequently don't work.

The above also has zHPF improves upon original FICON by providing TCW ... that describes something similar to what I did in 1980 for channel-extender work at the IBM Santa Teresa (now silicon valley) lab ... and superset was defined for original fibre-channel standard in 1988. About concurrent with above, emulex announces single fibre-channel standard for e5-2600(v1) claiming over one million IOPS.

confirmed, clicking on linkedin's swizzled FTP link results in linkedin "link error" message ... instead have to copy/paste the displayed URL ... from referenced doc (note there are similar/analogous issues with emulating CKD on top of industry standard fixed-block disks)
IBM zEnterprise 196 I/O Performance Version 1 Table of Contents Introduction 2 zEnterprise 196 SAP capacity 3 High Performance FICON for System z (zHPF) architecture performance features 8 z196 FICON Express8 channel performance with the extension to zHPF multitrack support 10 z196 Sequential Access Method Extended Format Data Sets and DB2 I/O performance 16 Sequential Access Method (SAM) Extended Format Data Sets 16 DB2 for z/OS prefetch I/O 16 DB2 Logging and Deferred Writes 19 DB2 Utilities 19 Summary of DB2 I/O eligibility 19 zHPF exploitation on z/OS 20 FICON Express8 channel performance using zHPF and FICON protocols at up to 100 km of distance 21 IBM Health Checker for z/OS 28 zHPF fields on RMF Channel Activity report 30 Summary 34 Request for Feedback 34 Acknowledgments 35

posts mentioning FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

other recent posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#67 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#74 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#75 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#81 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#92 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#8 Is end of mainframe near ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
Date: Mon, 19 May 2014
Mailing List: Cryptography
On 05/18/14 15:14, John Kemp wrote:
Do you mean the basics of network protocols, or the basics of HTTP itself? HTTP _depends_ on network datagrams (UDP) vs. streams (TCP) but does not itself have such a semantic ingrained (although mostly it trades in request response patterns of some kind).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#7 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?

while HTTP was supposedly atomic UDP like protocol ... it was built on TCP ... which would provide retry ... and browsers wouldn't have to.

This caused a whole lot of problems ... TCP session close has finwait list of recently closed sessions to catch possibly dangling packets arriving after session close. This was being processed linearly ... original implementation assumed very small number of session close in FINWAIT. The use of TCP by HTTP exploded the number of session closes on the FINWAIT list. Scaleup of early webservers were finding they were spending 95-99% of their time running FINWAIT list. NETSCAPE itself had rapidly expanding number of webservers to handle the load ... until it got a sequent server ... which had dealt with the FINWAIT problem when they had customers with 20,000 telnet sessions and growing FINWAIT problem. It was another six months or so before the other vendors came out with rewrite of FINWAIT handling for the (mis-)use of TCP by HTTP (during which time webservers went through mini-crisis)

TCP has minimum 7-packet exchange for a session (besides the FINWAIT issue). VMTP had defined a minimum 5-packet exchange for reliable operation. In prior life I was on the XTP technical advisory board that defined a minimum 3-package exchange for reliable operation.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#xtphsp

I hypothesized webservers registering their public keys with domain infrastructure (at same time as domain registration). DNSSEC would have option to return any optional public key with ip-address lookup response. Then HTTPS/SSL-light could be done on XTP by piggybacking symmetric key (encrypted with server's public key) with initial encrypted data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#catch22

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is end of mainframe near ?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is end of mainframe near ?
Date: 19 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
Note issue is there is increasing disparity between processor/cache performance and latency to storage. measured in number of processor cycles it is comparable to 60s mainframe processor cycles to access disk. There is claim about incremental improvement in z196 and ec12 processor throughput adopting features that have been in risc and i86 for several generations. z196 80 processor is still only 50BIPS and ec12 101 processor is 75BIPS while E5-2600v1 blade is 527BIPS

I've posted numerous times that the MVS guys told me even if I provided them fully integrated fixed-block disk support I still needed a $26M incremental profit business case to cover documentation and education *AND* I couldn't use life cycle savings ... I never could find out the reason

Note lots of mainframe gear is industry standard with veneer of legacy layered on top. the big public cloud operators doing hundreds of thousands of systems per megadatacenters (aka a cloud megadatacenter has more processing that the aggregate of all mainframes in the world today) claim they assemble for 1/3rd cost of brand name servers. They also have massive ongoing RAS programs that are periodically published ... including specs fed back to component vendors. since the volume is so large ... there are lots of vendors vying for the business (these aren't what is commonly found in $200 PCs). For some time, server chip makers have been saying they ship more chips directly to the big cloud operators than to brand name server vendors

IBM 4300s were the leading edge of cluster "supercomputers" and distributed computing tsunami. In 1979 I was asked to do 4300 benchmarks for LLNL looking at a 70 4341 compute farm.

This post has decade of vax/vms sales, sliced & diced by year, model, US & non-US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0

IBM 4300s sold similar numbers in small unit orders (into the same mid-range market) ... but big difference between 4300s and vax/vms was that large corporations also had orders for hundreds of 4300s at a time and put them out in departmental areas (inside IBM, departmental conference rooms became a scarce commodity because so many were taken over for vm/4341 systems ... somewhat to dismay of the communication group).

IBM (DEC & others) assumed that the mid-range market explosion would continue ... but about the middle of the 80s, the mid-range market was moving fast to workstations and large PCs for servers ... as can be seen in the DEC sale numbers (4361/4381 followons to 4331/4341 also starting to see big drop off in sales). The current ibm mainframe sales are maybe 2% of what it had been in the mid-80s (in inflation adjusted dollars).

Other z196/ec12 processor trivia (and growing mismatch between processor cycle time and memory access latency)... as stated much of thruput increase is attributed to starting to include features that have been in risc/i86 for decades ... out-of-order execution, branch prediction, speculative execution ... most are compensation for processor stalls waiting for memory access. This talks about the end of ACS/360 in the 60s ... shutdown because IBM management were afraid that it would advance state-of-the art too fast and they would loose control of the market.
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

at the end of the above, it discusses features from ACS/360 that finally show up over 20yrs later in ES/9000. Just in front of that discussion, there is some discussion of hyperthreading (now common in most risc/i86 chips ... also compensation for processor stalls because of memory access latency). I had gotten dragged into helping with a hyperthreading effort for the 370/195 (that never got announce/shipped). The 370/195 pipeline had out-of-order execution ... but w/o branch prediction and speculative execution, conditional branches stalled the processor. Conditional branches in most codes kept 195 to only half rated throughput. The idea was to have two hyperthread instruction streams ... each tending to operate at half rated throughput ... would keep the execution units fully busy.

note that industry standard BIPS benchmark aren't actually count of instructions (for instance not being able to account for difference between RISC and CISC architectures) ... it is the count of the iterations divided by the count done by a reference processor platform, a IBM 370/158 (assumed to be a one MIPS processor). Similarly, TPC benchmarks are specific kind of DBMS transaction benchmarks ... while IBM does audited TPC benchmarks for all its other platforms, it hasn't done them for mainframes for decades ... not just issue showing total transactions/SEC ... but also when they started including total system costs per transaction and total energy used per transaction.

The lack of participation in industry standard benchmarks frequently is accompanied by obfuscation, misdirection, FUD.

disclaimer: TPC started primarily by former co-worker at IBM research (during days of implementation of original relational/SQL DBMS). He is also credited with formal definition of transaction and ACID properties ... which also enhanced DBMS for financial operations (providing auditors significant higher confidence in computer records).

As an aside, I've mentioned before doing stint as chief scientist at financial operation that had 43 max. configured IBM mainframes ... the number needed to finish settlement in the overnight batch window ... no machine older than 18m. There were at least another half dozen larger such operations in the financial industry. These operations account for a significant fraction of total IBM mainframe revenue. They would gladly use fewer significantly larger mainframes (if they were available). Much of the industry had spent billions in the 90s on conversions off the mainframe which failed in spectacular ways ... and those involved in the failures are very risk adverse about trying again (industry comments are those will have to retire before industry sees next attempts at moving off mainframe). I've previously mentioned that 1qtr2014 mainframe processor revenue is now down to equivalent of 14 max configured ec12 (@$33M).

I've detailed before that in the mid/late 90s much of the financial industry was afraid that payment would move to telcos (payment fees account for nearly half bottom line for many institutions). Issue was that prospect of micropayments would result in massive increase in transactions ... totally swamping the financial institution mainframe backends. The only industry with infrastructure that could handle the projected transaction rates were the telco non-mainframe backends developed for handling call record volumes. So far the feared rise of micropayments hasn't occurred (I have recent really long-winded discussion of this in crypto mailing list ... efficient crypto to provide secure financial transaction and not exceed the total computational capacity of the planet).

other recent posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#67 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#74 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#75 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#81 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#92 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#8 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#12 Is end of mainframe near ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
Date: Mon, 19 May 2014
Mailing List: Cryptography
On 05/19/14 08:01, John Kemp wrote:
Heh Thanks to Lynn's history lesson, I am reminded of the days when "micropayments" were last going to revolutionize commerce (on the web).

And along came SSL, combined with the lowering of transaction fees by the credit cartel...


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#7 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#13 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?

SSL was 94/95 ... and banking industry applied MOTO rates to internet transactions.

96/97 the banking industry was afraid that the telco industry would take over the payment industry. the payment fees were contributing nearly half banking bottom line and were heavily prorated based on possibility of fraud in transactions.

micropayment had prospect of enormous increase in transactions ... totally swamping the existing payment backends. the only platforms that could possibly handle the transaction rates were backends for telco developed for handling callrecords (still ACID properties leveraging new "in-core" DBMS technologies).

telcos figured they could combine micropayment and callrecord charges in the same statement.

banks were afraid that once the telcos had the micropayment market, they would leverage it to move upstream and take over the rest of the payment industry ... using technology to be substantially more cost effective than banks.

the micropayment volumes never quite emerged and the telcos stumbled not being very diligent managing non-payment of statements. when statements were purely callrecords ... it wasn't actually out-of-pocket expense, basic use of infrastructure already there. With payments, the telcos had already transferred the money to the merchant/recipients and needed to recover that money from their customers. Within a couple years, all the telcos that had made big move into payments had all backed out.

Even at that, the bank industry was still afraid of new entries into banking that could be much more efficient and competitive. At about 1:03:30 I'm starting to blather that rhetoric on floor of congress about the primary purpose of GLBA was to keep new competitors out of the banking industry (specifically referring to new technology and corporations like microsoft).
http://www.isoc-dc.org/2014/05/confidentiality-2020-can-we-keep-secrets-any-more/

GLBA now better known for repeal of Glass-Steagall (enabling too big to fail). posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
posts mentioning Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

cal. state was working on legislation for electronic signature, data breach notification, and op-in personal data sharing. cal. managed to get data breach notification before preemption by congress
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

... but bank industry managed to get "opt-out" added to GLBA and passed preempting cal. state "opt-in"

The card associates in that time-frame did define SET specification with enormous amounts of crypto and digital certificates. When it was 1st published, I did crypto-opt profile and had friend benchmark with BSAFE library on several platforms ... and provided the information back to the SET group (that included several vendors). The response was the numbers were 100 times too slow. They obviously hadn't ever done any real live operations since this was an improved BSAFE library that was four times faster than the regular libray. Six months later, initial SET prototype was very close to the profile benchmark numbers.

The other issue was that it required appending digital certificates to every normal payment transaction (besides encrypting the content of the transaction). The only problem was that the typical digital certificate payload sizes were 100 times larger than a normal payment transaction payload size (and I was already constantly pointing out that they were redundant and superfluous ... but they also resulted in payload bloat of factor of 100 times). past posts mentioning payment transaction bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#bloat

Somewhat as a result, the CA industry got a work item in the financial industry standards body to do compressed digital certificates ... possibly down to only ten times payload bloat (rather than 100 times payload bloat) ... still ignoring that the digital certificates were redundant and superfluous. However, I demonstrated using some of their proposed techniques, compression of digital certificates to zero bytes. Rather than eliminating redundant and superfluous digital certificates, the industry could managed zero byte digital certificates appended to every payment transaction.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 19 May 2014 13:55:38 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#64 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#65 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape

IBM, Fujifilm squeeze more terabytes out of tape storage; Summary: IBM's advance means a standard tape cartridge could store 154 terabytes of uncompressed data.
http://www.zdnet.com/ibm-fujifilm-squeeze-more-terabytes-out-of-tape-storage-7000029624/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
Date: Mon, 19 May 2014
Mailing List: Cryptography
On 05/19/14 17:28, Jerry Leichter wrote:
To this day, I've never seen a good description of a full protocol - from the end-user-visible components down to the bits on the wire - that, were it implemented, would solve the problem: How can I be sure that when the browser says I'm talking to eBay, I'm *really* talking to eBay? (I not even concerned with the "my conversation is visible only to me and eBay" (encryption) part, was that's trivial once you've solved the "is it the right eBay" (authentication) part.) Things like certificate pinning and such are an attempt to solve this problem without ripping out the entire existing SSL/PKI infrastructure - and are likely the only *practical* solution we are likely to get; but I'm not sure we even know what a "clean whiteboard" solution would look like.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#7 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#13 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#15 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?

somewhat having done e-commerce, in mid-90s we were invited to participate in the x9a10 financial standard working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments. we did some number of end-to-end threat & vulnerability studies.

the result was x9.59 financial transaction standard which basically was simple digital signature on standard payment transaction (small enough to transmit end-to-end and authenticated with public key onfile with users financial institutions).

the standard allowed for security proportional to risk: ... i.e. registering integrity level of the associated private key (software key, hardware token key, integrity level of hardware token, etc). the standard also allowed for co-signing by FINREAD conformant hardware token interface ... developed in the 90s as countermeasure to compromised PCs (i.e. had independent display and PIN entry that token couldn't be operated w/o human action in secure independent environment ... and transaction detail displayed ... which couldn't be spoofed by compromised PC). posts mentioning security proportional to risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proportional.to.risk
posts mentioning FINREAD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#finread

One of the results, was attackers could no longer use information from data breaches (at least involving x9.59 transactions) as enabler for performing fraudulent financial transactions.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

x9.59 no longer even needed ssl to hide financial transaction information as countermeasure to fraudulent transactions. x9.59 references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

A couple things happened start of the century

1) a large chipcard pilot was deployed in the US with free chipcard reader give away. However, they apparently wear obsolete serial-port readers which resulted in significant customer support issues and resulting rapid spreading opinion in the industry that chipcards weren't practical in consumer market (i.e. it wasn't a chipcard problem, it was serial port problem). Now 95-96 timeframe there were presentations by dialup online banking operations about main motivation to move to internet was significant customer support problems with serial port dialup modems (effectively support problems offloaded to ISPs). Apparently institutional knowledge about the serial-port customer support problems had evaporated in a 5yr period. Serial-port customer support problems was also major motivation for USB. In the wake of this activity, there was pullback from all consumer chipcard related programs (including FINREAD).

2) In the same time frame, there were some number of chipcard-based and non-chipcard "safe" payment products developed that had high acceptance by major online ecommerce merchants (accounting for something like 70+% of ecommerce transactions). Merchants had been indoctrinated for decades that payment (interchange) fees had a significant fraud prorated surcharge. The major merchants were expecting that "safe" internet payment products would result in 90% reduction in the fees charged. With payment fees accounting for something like 50% of bottom line, a 90% reduction is a big hit. The banks decided that instead of 90% reduction for safe internet products, they would add a surcharge to the highest rate the merchants were already paying. There result was major cognitive dissonance with the merchants and whole thing imploded.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

350 DBAs stare blankly when reminded super-users can pinch data

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: 350 DBAs stare blankly when reminded super-users can pinch data
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 21 May 2014 09:21:55 -0400
350 DBAs stare blankly when reminded super-users can pinch data
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/21/got_privileged_users_three_hundred_and_fifty_dbas_just_stare_blankly/

20yrs ago in financial industry security standards groups ... that included participation by agency people ... accepted state-of-the-art were countermeasures against insiders and rogue sysadmins.

40yrs ago, I was once baited into demonstrating.

During the 370 development, there was a "Pentagon Papers" type event where copied internal details of unannounced 370 appeared in industry press (very early 70s)

After that, countermeasures were copier id/serial numbers placed in all company copy machines that would appear on all copied pages ... an example is in this scan of copy of old presentation by Jim Gray ("IBM SJ 086" at bottom of each page).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

So during FS (massive internal effort to completely replace 370, canceled w/o ever being announced) ... various references and past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

there were special high-integrity, internal vm370 systems built that held softcopy of FS documents that (supposedly) could only be viewed online using local 3270 terminals. one weekend I had time on mainframe that happened to be in datacenter containing one such system. On friday afternoon, running through some preparation ... they bragged that left alone in the datacenter, even I wouldn't be able to compromise the security.

I sat down at the machine console and first disabled all external access and then did one-byte modification to kernel storage ... the effect was that everything typed as a password would be accepted as valid. I commented that countermeasure to somebody alone in the datacenter would included things like 1) encryption of softcopy data (not just simple password protected) and 2) restrictions on ability to use machine panel.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

350 DBAs stare blankly when reminded super-users can pinch data

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 350 DBAs stare blankly when reminded super-users can pinch data
Date: 21 May 2014
Blog: Facebook
also Google+
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/CmyMshdGkcB

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#18 350 DBAs stare blankly when reminded super-users can pinch data

Two somewhat different issues ... why he did it and being able to do it ... although a change in culture may have been a major factor in both. Also during last decade there was increasing privatization ... with a profit motive wanting lots of private data and not concerned about privacy violations (70% of budget and over half the people frequently w/revolving door at highest levels)

Gov. intelligence has been heavily privatized ... which have used resources for their own profit ... in addition to having culture of making frequent use of individual's private information for their own profit.

about 1:03:30 ... you have me starting to blather about cal. state legislation for electronic signature, data breach notification, and opt-in privacy sharing (institutions can only use your private information when they have record of you specifically authorizing the use).
http://www.isoc-dc.org/2014/05/confidentiality-2020-can-we-keep-secrets-any-more/

electronic signature and data breach notification managed to pass ... before opt-in passed, a federal preemption bill passed allowing sharing unless they have record of individual objecting.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#signature

past stats. are that insiders are involved in 70% of data breaches resulting in identity theft and fraudulent financial transactions.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#identify.theft

Neither the crooks nor the institutions wanted that information made public. Also, normally an entity will take security measures for self-protection ... however in the data breaches, institutions weren't at risk, it was the public (institutions had little motivation to take security measures). It was hoped that publicity from the data breach notification might motivate security measures.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

A couple yrs ago, at a national, annual privacy meeting in DC, there was panel of the FTC commissioners. Somebody in the audience got up and asked if they were ever going to do anything about (even the heavily watered down) opt-out privacy sharing. He said he worked for call center technology company that was used by majority of financial & insurance industry ... and none of the call centers ever record any information from an "OPT-OUT" call (i.e. there would never be a record of anybody objecting to their personal information being shared). The FTC commissioners just ignored him.

Cal. "opt-in" would have precluded telcos, financial institutions, insurance companies, social media companies ... all institutions ... from doing anything with individual information (not limited to gov. agencies, but everybody) ... unless they had record of specific authorization

In any case, you now have gov. agencies dominated by for-profit companies that have long history of using individual's personal information however they want. semi-related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is end of mainframe near ?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is end of mainframe near ?
Date: 21 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
The big threat now to x86 are the chips that were developed to be enormously more power efficient ... originally for portable devices. These are also starting to threaten x86 server chips in the large cloud megadatacenters (claims are more x86 server chips now ship directly to cloud operators than to brand name server vendors, like IBM, HP, etc; aka the future of X86 servers going forward is with megadatacenters, not the single server purchases) ... the x86 server price/BIPS has plummeted to such an extent that energy costs are starting to dominate (aka watts/BIPS). A cloud megadatacenter will typically already have several million processors. Having ten times as many ARM chips for the same aggregate BIPS rate, about the same system cost and floor space ... but lower watts/BIPS, isn't a difficult problem to deal with. Currently x86 server system costs for a typical megadatacenter will be on the order of a couple max configured EC12s ... but will be significantly more BIPS than the aggregate of all mainframes in the world today. The threat to x86 is if they can't compete on watts/BIPS (because price/BIPS has so drastically fallen).

The old 90/10 rule ... last 10% takes 90% of the effort ... except it is now more like 98/2 ... i.e. 1q2014 (inflation adjusted) mainframe processor sales are possibly 2% of its heyday in the 80s. The last 2% might possibly represents 98% of the effort (to move off mainframe). There is periodically similar discussion over in the (customer) ibm-main mailing list (originated on the ibm sponsored bitnet in the 80s). This week a couple more announcements of moving of Z-mainframe and queries about mainframe jobs in particular areas of the country.

not strictly mainframe

Cloud Wars: Now Even the CIA Slams IBM's Technology
http://www.testosteronepit.com/home/2014/5/23/cloud-wars-now-even-the-cia-slams-ibms-technology.html
"The Trouble With IBM"
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-05-22/ibms-eps-target-unhelpful-amid-cloud-computing-challenges

Nearly all the 360s were microcoded machines ... native engines with a layer of (microcode) programming (somewhat akin to Hercules today that runs on variety of platforms) ... too expensive to build 360 native specific hardware. Even if the number of current installations stabilize at around 2% of mainframe heyday in the 80s ... commodity hardware continues to become much faster and much cheaper (upfront fab and chip design costs runs to the billions, but it is recouped by spreading the upfront costs across an enormously large volume), it is becoming increasingly likely mainframes will see a return to the days of 60s. It is already seen with emulating legacy channels (FICON) on industry standard fibre-channel standard and CKD DASD emulation on industry standard fixed block disks.

other recent posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#67 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#74 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#75 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#81 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#92 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#8 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#12 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Thomas Piketty Is Right About the Past and Wrong About the Future

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Thomas Piketty Is Right About the Past and Wrong About the Future
Date: 22 May 2014
Blog: Facebook
Thomas Piketty Is Right About the Past and Wrong About the Future; Capital in the 21st Century deserves all of its praise, but it should not serve as gospel on inequality.
http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/05/thomas-piketty-is-right-about-the-past-and-wrong-about-the-future/370994/

Convention is that Summers was Rubin protege and Geithner was mentored by both Rubin & Summers. Rubin was point person for CITI getting repeal of Glass-Steagall (enabling too big to fail former contender with Gerstner for CEO of AMEX had acquired CITI in violation of Glass-Steagall, Greenspan gave him exemption while he lobbies washington) added to GLBA; original rhetoric for GLBA was its primary purpose was to keep new entries out of banking (eliminate competition, specifically citing walmart and m'soft). As soon as GLBA was on its way, Rubin resigns and joins CITI (original items reference co-CEO/chairman Rubin had previously been head of Goldman). During this period Geithner was in NYC as head of NYFED.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Summers
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Rubin

After the person lost to Gerstner to be next CEO of AMEX, he leaves and takes his protege with him, after taking over CITI, his protege leaves and becomes CEO of one of the other top four too big to fail.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
posts mentioning gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

it was last decade (with Rubin at CITI and Geithner at NYFED) ... some of the worst stuff went on in the economic mess. At end of 2008, the four largest TBTF were still holding $5.2T in "off-book" toxic assets (with CITI holding the most).
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home

CITI was one of the biggest beneficiaries of the bailout and Goldman was the biggest beneficiary of the AIG bailout

video up, you can even catch me blathering about glba starting about 1:03:30
http://www.isoc-dc.org/2014/05/confidentiality-2020-can-we-keep-secrets-any-more/

cal. was doing electronic signature, data breach notification, and opt-in privacy sharing (institutions can't share unless you are on record as approving). financial industry tried to preempt data breach notification and opt-in, cal. got data breach notification passed but an opt-out privacy sharing got added to GLBA and passed (preempting opt-in). "opt-out" allows institution to share unless they have record of you objecting. At annual, national privacy conference in panel with all the FTC commissioners, somebody from call center industry said that no financial institution was keeping any records from 1-800 "opt-out" calls (FTC just ignored him)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

2010, CBO had analysis that baseline budget had all federal debt retired by 2010 ... but after congress allowed fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002 (required spending not exceed revenue), congress increased spending by $6T and cut tax revenue by $6T for a $12T budget gap. Over $2T of the spending increase was for DOD, a little over $1T for the two wars and the other $1+T couldn't be accounted for. In the same period, various things in the financial industry allowed over $27T in securitized instruments to be be done (the end of 2008, over $5.2T in toxic assets were still be carried offbook by just the four largest too big to fail, aka TARP with only $700B appropriated for purchase of toxic assets was farce, the $700B was redirected to other purposes, and had to rely on Federal Reserve to try to clean up all the toxic stuff behind the scenes).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

Jan2009, I was asked to HTML'ize Pecora hearings (30s senate hearings that resulted in glass-steagall, had been scanned the fall of 2008 at Boston public library) with lots of internal HREFs and URLs between what happened then and what happened this time (comment that some expectation that new congress had appetite to do something). I worked on it spring of 2009 and then got a call saying it wouldn't be needed after all (references to enormous piles of wallstreet money totally burying capital hill).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

regarding Geithner (and mentor Rubin; participated in repeal of glass-steagall and then resigns to join citi)

Geithner: As Wrong about Soccer as Regulation
http://therealnews.com/t2/component/content/article/75-william-black/2078-geithner-as-wrong-about-soccer-as-regulation

above includes: "Geithner: Citi's Great Protector from Effective Regulation" and "Geithner's 'Man Crush' on Rubin"

Note Black was regulator during S&L crisis (that didn't go along) ... and was involved in some of the prosecutions, over 700 do jail time)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_K._Black
VP claims that he didn't know anything about Iran/Contra
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
... because he was so busy as administration's point person for finance ... where family members were involved, including
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
then last decade another family member presides over mess 70 times bigger (and nobody doing jail time)
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/03/30000-criminal-referrals-led-1000-felony-convictions-major-fraud-cases-sl-crisis-even-single-prosecution-today-even-though-2008-crisis-70-times-bigger.html

recent posts mentioning Geithner &/or Piketty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#8 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#30 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#63 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#80 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#2 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#7 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#14 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#15 Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#0 Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#9 Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Has the last fighter pilot been born?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Has the last fighter pilot been born?
Date: 22 May 2014
Blog: Disciples of Boyd's Strategy
A Drone Could Be the Ultimate Dogfighter; Air Force officer proposes robot fighter with minimal human control
https://medium.com/war-is-boring/397851a4892c

also facebook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#90 A Drone Could Be the Ultimate Dogfighter

Note claims are that fly-by-wire is already a long way down that path ... computers able to control flt that no human could hope to do ... even able to compensate for significant damage.

General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Dynamics_F-16_Fighting_Falcon
The Fighting Falcon is a fighter with numerous innovations including a frameless bubble canopy for better visibility, side-mounted control stick to ease control while maneuvering, a seat reclined 30 degrees to reduce the effect of g-forces on the pilot, and the first use of a relaxed static stability/fly-by-wire flight control system helps to make it a nimble aircraft.

... snip ...

Relaxed stability
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relaxed_stability A less stable aircraft requires smaller control deflections to initiate maneuvering; consequently drag and control surface imposed stresses will be reduced and aircraft responsiveness will be enhanced. Since these characteristics will typically make control by the pilot difficult or impossible, an artificial stability will typically be imposed using computers, servos, and sensors as parts of a fly by wire control system

... snip ...

... aka many modern planes already aren't flown by the pilot.

sorry been missing from this discussion. a week ago linkedin throttled my postings after somebody complained ... either about 1) posting a SLASHDOT reference to "this day in history" about (SLASHDOT) getting a takedown notice from m'soft or 2) problems at IBM that including a lot of news URLs (linkedin wouldn't tell me) ... in any case a couple that got throttled

there is folklore about plane inverting after crossing equator because of computer programming ... human indicating intention and computer deciding how ... sort of split between strategic and operational ... question is level of computer sophistication

but f16 and fly-by-wire was already computerized that were too fast for the pilot ... pilot removed from lower level loops too fast for human ...

.....

air-to-air is now largely about missiles that are already computer controlled ... and countermeasures are increasingly becoming computer controlled (some ongoing about over horizon operation) similarly somebody has pointed out that cruise missiles are drones that aren't designed to return.

vehicle w/human will include some amount of environmental factors like g-forces ... which are eliminated if human isn't factor ... which can be leveraged with other factors to offset any advantage of having human on board. this already has fly-by-wire faster than human operation and needing compensation for g-forces affecting human pilot
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Dynamics_F-16_Fighting_Falcon

F35 is already becoming one of the most massive computer programs in history. F22 was 1.7million lines/statements of computer code, F35 has exploded into 24million lines/statements. F35 is turning into two decade project. Drones are going through several generations per year. Unfortunately F35 is such a massive resource sinkhole that it is hard/difficult to do much else.

Google autonomous car project has stated that computers are evolving so fast, things that were impossible two years ago are now becoming easy.

Don't think of it as 1:1 adversary ... possibly more like 100 autonomous for every F35. Remote human operation won't be 1:1 ... remote human will have to deal with swarms of hundreds.

And F35 with its 24M LOC, it still involves enormous amounts of computer technology even with a human aboard (except it may have a decade or two behind by the time it delivers).

Note that ELP (and other) analysis is that F35 wasn't designed for air-to-air fighter ... but for bomb delivery with F22 flying cover and handling air-to-air (aka implication is they had to modify the story when F22 numbers got cut way back). some recent:
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/2014/05/f-35b-adds-to-its-list-of-failure.html
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/2014/05/fitting-location.html
some amount of ELP comments from this
http://ausairpower.net/APA-2009-01.html

one of the discussions is that the F35 internal mounts aren't designed for launch of air-to-air missiles (like in F22) ... either air-to-air missiles would have to be carried externally (impacting stealth profile) ... or require redesign ... discussion here
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com.au/2013/06/f-35s-air-to-air-ability-limited.html

boyd posts & refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Three Reasons the Mainframe is in Trouble

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Three Reasons the Mainframe is in Trouble
Date: 22 May 2014
Blog: Enterprise Systems
Back when 3274/3278 was introduced ... we complained long & loud about the human factors being worse than 3272/3277 ... this was in the days of human factor studies showing human productivity much better with 1/4 sec response. Finally, the 3274/3278 product administrator responded that 3274/3278 was not designed for interactive computing ... but for data entry (aka electronic keypunch). Part of the issue was to cost reduce 3278 manufacturing ... a lot of the 3277 electronics were moved back into the controller ... this enormously drove up protocol chatter and latency on the coax and increased processing load in 3274 controller ... making hardware latency typically on the order 1/2 second (impossible to have 1/4 sec response). By comparison (direct channel attahc) 3272/3277 hardware latency was .086secs needing .164 system response for 1/4sec human response (one of my hobbies was providing highly enhanced mainframe production operating systems for internal datacenters ... which were getting .11sec system response ... with .086sec 3272/3277 resulted in under .2sec response). By comparison MVS systems had second plus system response ... so they never noticed the 3272/3277 -> 3274/3278 change.

Later PC 3277 emulation had at least three times upload/download data rate of PC 3278 emulation (because 3274 processing bottleneck and coax protocol latency overhead).

past posts reference to 3272/3277 comparison to 3274/3278
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#19 3270 protocol
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#6 IBM 327x terminals and controllers (was Re: Itanium2 power
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#22 What is timesharing, anyway?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#12 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#15 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#42 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#19 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#53 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#72 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#31 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#43 My first mainframe experience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#13 From Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#37 Why File transfer through TSO IND$FILE is slower than TCP/IP FTP ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#1 3270 response & channel throughput
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

Remember some number of CTSS people went to 5th flr 545 tech sq and did Multics and others went to IBM science center (founded Feb1964) on the 4th flr and did cp40/cms and cp67/cms (later morphs into vm370/cms). Folklore is some number of the people working on Multics return to belllabs and do unix (supposedly simple multics). In any case both CMS and Unix trace common heritage back to CTSS.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

Past post with several old email from 79/80 apologizing to the (internal) RED editor author for the XEDIT "fiasco" .... XEDIT being released instead of RED ... RED was much more mature, had more function and was much faster (and the vm370 people *blaming* the RED editor author for RED having more function than XEDIT).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#26

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers   Personal
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 23 May 2014 12:04:43 -0400
rpw3@rpw3.org (Rob Warnock) writes:
As I have written multiple times elsewhere, in the *early* 1970s DCA in Atlanta made/sold communications front ends for PDP-10s [and DEC-20s and IBM 360s] using PDP-8s for the network processor. Among the features of the "Smart/Mux" was terminal protocol converter modules such as 2741-to-ASCII. In fact, even though the 2741 is possibly *the* example of a "half-duplex" terminal [e.g., the keyboard *locks* when you hit <Return>, and only unlocks when the host tells it to], our 2741-to-ASCII protocol converter (almost fully) supported the 2741 as a "full"-duplex ASCII terminal on the PDP-10 [or other ASCII hosts], even to the extent of allowing the user to use TECO and DDT with only minor inconvenience [mainly frequent typing of the <Attention> key to get the line turned around]. As I wrote back in 2009:

all the terminals required translate tables to/from ebcdic
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EBCDIC

... modulo 360 would have not required for tty/ascii if 360 turned out to have been 360 as originally planned:
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM
and
http://www.bobbemer.com/FATHEROF.HTM
http://www.bobbemer.com/HISTORY.HTM

2741 had different typeballs ... which could require different translate tables depending on typeball in use ... 2741 line code was tilt/rotate of the typeball ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_2741

so translation between ebcdic and 2741 was what characters were positioned where ... frequent alternate translate table as for apl typeball ... images of 2741 apl typeball here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#oldpicts

original cp67 delivered to the univ. (last week jan1968) had support for 1052 & 2741 (including dynamic terminal identification and switching the terminal type line-scanner in the terminal controller).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS

the univ. had some number of TTY/ascii terminals ... so I had to add ascii support ... including extending dynamic terminal type identification to tty (and switching terminal type line-scanner). I had played some games with one-byte arithmatic ... this is folklore somebody (at USL) making q&d change (to their cp67 system) to increase max. tty/ascii linesize (to something like 1200, i believe for a ascii plotter device at harvard)
http://www.multicians.org/thvv/360-67.html

incorrect length calculations resulted in cp67 crashing 27 times.

the dynamic terminal type support worked ok for hard-wired lines/termainals ... but I wanted to extend it to single dial-up phone number for all terminals (telco "hunt group"). the problem was that while the terminal type line scanner could be dynamically associated with every terminal controller port ... each port line speed was hard-wired (while 1052 & 2741 had same line speed, tty had different line speed).

this somewhat motivated univ. to start clone controller project (to support/include dynamic line speed recognition) ... reverse engineering 360 channel interface and building interface board for interdata/3 programmed to emulate 360 terminal controller. Later this morphs into cluster of interdatas in a box, interdata/4 handling the channel interface and multiple interdata/3s handling port (line scanner) interfaces. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

trivia ... one of the early bugs in the interdata code was overlooking that ibm terminal controller line-scanners placing leading bit in low order byte position ... so terminal bytes arriving in 360 memory were bit-reversed order character bytes (and 360 translate tables were appropriately constructed to handle the bit-reversed characters) ... to correctly emulate ibm terminal controllers ... the interdata then had to also reverse character bit order.

Interdata then were selling the clone controller implementation to IBM customers ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interdata

after P/E bought interdata, they were sold under the P/E logo. P/E then spun off its computer division in 1985 as Concurrent Computer Corporation.

For MTS, Michigan
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan_Terminal_System
did a "data concentrator" using pdp
http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/gallery/gallery7.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers   Personal
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 23 May 2014 13:14:17 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
A better comparison would be to the 3270, as the 2741 was definitely not a block mode peripheral. But then I'm not so sure about the 3270.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#24 Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

3270s were half-duplex ... 2741 locked but then unlocked. if you tried typing on 3270 at the moment screen was to write, the terminal would lock and you had to hit reset button to get it to unlock.

3277 had enough electronics in the head ... that a FIFO box was built ... you unplug the 3277 keyboard from the head, plugged in the fifo box and then plugged the keyboard into fifo box ... which masked keyboard typing. that and some other human factors that could be done to 3277 made it halfway usuable for interactive computing.

for the 3274/3278 ... they cost reduced manufacturing of the 3728 terminal by moving a lot of the electronics back into the controller ... eliminating all the human factors enhancements. it also drove up the protocol chatter on the coax ... making 3274/3278 a lot slower (than 3272/3278).

some recent posts on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#41 System Response
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#89 Real Programmers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#23 Three Reasons the Mainframe is in Trouble

past posts mentioning 3277 FIFO box
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#28 IBM S/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#69 System/1 ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#63 Does the word "mainframe" still have a meaning?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#23 IBM's mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#33 3270 protocol
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#44 3270 protocol
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#43 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#2 IBM 327x terminals and controllers (was Re: Itanium2 power
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#15 Mainframe Tape Drive Usage Metrics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#44 Mainframe Emulation Solutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#0 were dumb terminals actually so dumb???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#10 what's the difference between LF(Line Fee) and NL (New line) ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#34 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#59 ISPF Counter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#72 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#31 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#35 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#3 printer history Languages influenced by PL/1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#17 Tech Time Warp of the Week: The 50-Pound Portable PC, 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#25 Teletypewriter Model 33

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers   Personal
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 23 May 2014 15:39:04 -0400
"Stanley Daniel de Liver" <admin@127.0.0.1> writes:
Certainly; there was even a key&lock symbol to show that your page was being processed, and not to bang any keys until unlocked.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#24 Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#25 Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

problem was that if you were use to interactive computing ... there could be scenarios where the system would do screen write ... just as you were going to hit a key ... locking the keyboard and requiring hitting reset to unlock the keyboard. that was reason the 3277 FIFO box was developed. Unfortunately that solution went away when they moved so much of the electronics back into the controller for the 3278.

as in other recent references, we complained to the 3274/3278 product administrator ... who finally responded that 3278 wasn't designed for interactive computing ... but for data entry (electronic keypunch).

the 3272/3277 also had .086sec hardware response ... the change for 3274/3278 made it more like 1/2sec hardware responses. about the time 3274/3278 was introduced was the heyday of the human productivity studies showing 1/4sec or better was needed. there was no possible way 3274/3278 could achieve 1/4sec human response.

as an aside ... there were some number of internal installations claiming 1/4sec system response ... but coupled with .086sec 3272/3277 hardware response, it became 1/3sec seen by human. one of my hobbies was producing enhanced production operating systems for internal datacenters ... and I was shipping system that was getting .11 system response ... coupled with (channel attach) 3272/3277 .086sec resulted in .196sec response seen by human.

misc. past posts mentioning .11sec system response
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#5 Schedulers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#10 Virtual Memory (A return to the past?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#46 The god old days(???)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#4 IBM S/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#19 3270 protocol
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#48 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#6 IBM 327x terminals and controllers (was Re: Itanium2 power
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#51 windows office xp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#22 What is timesharing, anyway?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#30 Moribund TSO/E
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#42 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#72 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#32 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#14 Compressing the OODA-Loop - Removing the D (and mayby even an O)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#53 3270 Terminal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#43 My first mainframe experience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#15 Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#87 Just for a laugh... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#15 cp67, vm370, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#37 Why File transfer through TSO IND$FILE is slower than TCP/IP FTP ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#14 Tech Time Warp of the Week: The 50-Pound Portable PC, 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#23 Three Reasons the Mainframe is in Trouble

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Jon Stewart Disembowels SecTreas Geithner

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Jon Stewart Disembowels SecTreas Geithner
Date: 23 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#0 Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#9 Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject
related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#21 Thomas Piketty Is Right About the Past and Wrong About the Future

also Google+
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/HPjGp6Mn5it

Jon Stewart Disembowels SecTreas Geithner
http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2014-05-23/jon-stewart-disembowels-sectreas-geithner

Geithner Uses Voodoo Economics to Try to Rationalize Choosing Banks Over American Homeowners
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/05/geithner-uses-voodoo-economics-try-rationalize-choosing-banks-american-homeowners.html
Jon Stewart Eviscerates Tim Geithner
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/05/jon-stewart-eviscerates-tim-geithner.html

"All the Presidents' Bankers", pg114/loc 2738-39:
As The Nation put it, "You can lead a horse to water but you can not make him drink, and you can offer the banks limitless Federal Reserve credit, but you cannot make them lend."

... snip ....

above is regarding news/press after the crash of '29 during the great depression. Now Bernanke has been characterized as a student/scholar of the great depression and the fed's operation. However, he is quoted as saying that he had expected that after making ($30Trillion in free) money available to the wallstreet too big to fail, they would turn around and lend to main street; and he was surprised when they didn't (and despite the fact that they were suppose to relend to main street, and weren't, the FED still didn't stop the flow).

Similarly (again the great depression), "The Bankers Who Broke The World" pg439:
The two new measures combined -- the infusion of additional capital into the banking system and the injection of reserves -- allowed the Fed finally to pump money into the system on the scale required ... instead of lending out the money used the capital so injected to build up their own reserves.

... snip ...

$10T as of 2010
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2010/1201/Federal-Reserve-s-astounding-report-We-loaned-banks-trillions
$30T as of 2011
http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2011/12/bailout-total-29-616-trillion-dollars/

too big to fail operating just like they did in the 20s & 30s:

Bernanke Pushes for More Small Biz Loans
http://www.mainstreet.com/article/small-business/financing/bernanke-pushes-more-small-biz-loans
Round Two: Bernanke Faces More Grilling From Congress
http://www.cnbc.com/id/35542268/Round_Two_Bernanke_Faces_More_Grilling_From_Congress
Geithner, Bernanke have little in arsenal to fight new crisis
http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/geithner-bernanke-have-little-in-arsenal-to-fight-new-crisis/2011/08/12/gIQAFuFvFJ_story.html

posts mentioning Bernanke
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#bernanke
posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
posts mentioning Pecora Hearings (great depression senate hearings)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Does IBM CEO Rometty Understand Cloud?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Does IBM CEO Rometty Understand Cloud?
Date: 23 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
Does IBM CEO Rometty Understand Cloud?
http://seekingalpha.com/article/2233223-does-ibm-ceo-rometty-understand-cloud?uprof=46

Cloud Wars: Now Even the CIA Slams IBM's Technology
http://www.testosteronepit.com/home/2014/5/23/cloud-wars-now-even-the-cia-slams-ibms-technology.html
"The Trouble With IBM"
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-05-22/ibms-eps-target-unhelpful-amid-cloud-computing-challenges

Building hardware isn't the same as operating a service. As an undegraduate in the 60s, I was brought into Boeing Computer Services as one of its first employees ... it was consolidating all of Boeing dataprocessing into separate business unit (to better monetize the investment and a very early version of cloud computing).

During this period lots of existing mainframe software products were being developed at customer (or internal) datacenters; not in development groups which tended to be several levels removed from how computers were being used (jokes about HASP/JES, IMS, CICS, DB2, etc being transferred into IBM development groups for maintenance after having been originally developed in a real live, operational datacenters).

In the late 70s & early 80s, I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network (non-SNA larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late '85 or early '86 ... done by co-worker at the IBM cambridge science center). Folklore was that when the executive committee (chairman, ceo, pres, etc) was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.

During this period, Jim Gray (before he left), others and I would sit around friday nights trying to think up ways to entice middle management and top executives to use computers There was period where some management/executives would insist on terminals on their desks as status symbols ... but it would be turned on in the morning and it sit there all day burning the logon logo into the screen (in some rare cases, the PROFS menu screen) ... but it was their staffs doing the online computer use on their behalf.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Special characters for Passwords

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Special characters for Passwords
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 May 2014 07:40:49 -0700
PaulGBoulder@AIM.COM (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
I hate EBCDIC! USASCII code points are relatively stable, even outside the USA.

old standby ... EBCDIC was the biggest computer goof ever ... originally 360 was suppose to be ASCII machine
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM
and
http://www.bobbemer.com/FATHEROF.HTM
http://www.bobbemer.com/HISTORY.HTM

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Special characters for Passwords

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Special characters for Passwords
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 May 2014 08:00:42 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
The rationale for changing passwords is not that doing so makes brute-force attempts to determine their values more difficult.

It is that these password values may come to be known in one way or another and that changing them periodically eliminates the usefulness of these known passwords.

There are war stories, anecdotal evidence, that this is sometimes the case; but I know of no systematic study of the effectiveness of periodic-password-change rules. Much of the rationale for them is of a different kind: their enforcement demonstrates that the group responsible for security is 'pro-active', doing something.


The Man Who Invented The Computer Password Admits That It's Become A Nightmare
http://www.businessinsider.com/inventor-of-the-password-2014-5

back in the days of CTSS on ibm 7094. Then Corbato and some of the other CTSS people went to the 5th flr of 545 tech sq and did Multics. Others went to the IBM Science Center (founded Feb1964) on the 4th flr and did (virtual machine) cp40/cms, cp67/cms (which morphs into vm370/cms), internal network, invented GML in 1969 (a decade later morphs into SGML, and after another decade morphs into HTML) and lots of other stuff. some past posts mentioning 545tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

passwords are a form of shared-secrets for authentication, they are static data and subject to replay attacks (if information is ever exposed). Fixing would require authentication that isn't 1) shared-secret, 2) static/repeated, 3) and still unique

posts mentioning shared-secrets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#secrets
posts mentioning 3-factor authentication paradigm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#3factor

back in the 60s, somebody might have had only a single password. then came security departments that not only wanted them changed once a month (as countermeasure to replay attack) but also impossible to guess (as countermeasure to trivial brute force attack). The problem is now that an individual might have hundreds of impossible to guess shared-secrets that are changed monthly ... each institutional security organization operating as if they are the only entity that the individual has to authenticate with (but human factors start to break down as soon as there are a dozen).

disclaimer: in prior life my wife and I had dozens of (assigned) patents on the subject.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Target Results Hurt by Canada, Data Breach

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Target Results Hurt by Canada, Data Breach
Date: 24 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Target Results Hurt by Canada, Data Breach
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303980004579575641616763418

As I've periodically mentioned, I was somewhat involved in the cal. state legislation the end of the last century for data breach notification. What was found was that there was little or nothing being done. The issue is that institutions normally take security measures in self-protection ... however in the case of data breaches, the institutions weren't at risk; it was their customers and the public (so they had little self-interest). It was hoped that the publicity from the notifications might prompt corrective action.

In the period since the cal. state legislation was passed, several other states have now passed similar legislation. Also numerous bills have been introduced in congress (none so far passed), about evenly divided between those similar to cal's legislation and those that would (federally) preempt state legislation and eliminate requirement for most notification (sometimes crafted as requiring notification only when several pieces of personal information has been concurrently compromised ... even when the crooks only need a single piece of information to perform fraudulent financial transactions)

past posts mentioning data breach notification
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SEC probes Schwab, Merrill, for anti-money laundering violations - sources

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: SEC probes Schwab, Merrill, for anti-money laundering violations - sources
Date: 24 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
SEC probes Schwab, Merrill, for anti-money laundering violations - sources
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/21/us-sec-brokerages-investigation-idUSBREA4K15S20140521

I first started seeing references to the too big to fail being too big to prosecute and too big to jail ... in stories from 2010 time-frame when too big to fail were being fined for laundering money for drug cartels and terrorists (not being shutdown and executives thrown in jail as called for by law).

posts mentioning money laundering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering
posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Credit Suisse's Guilty Plea: The WSJ Uses the Right Adjective to Modify the Wrong Noun

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Credit Suisse's Guilty Plea: The WSJ Uses the Right Adjective to Modify the Wrong Noun
Date: 24 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Credit Suisse's Guilty Plea: The WSJ Uses the Right Adjective to Modify the Wrong Noun
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/credit-suisse-guilty-plea-wsj-laughable-defense.html

posts mentioning tax evasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion
posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Special characters for Passwords

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Special characters for Passwords
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 May 2014 13:08:56 -0700
charlesm@MCN.ORG (Charles Mills) writes:
I think there are two things that happen that contribute to phenomena like this:

1. There is a fallacy that I see a lot, particularly in public policy, that goes something like this: Security is a big problem. It won't help, but we have to DO SOMETHING about security, so let's have the passwords expire. I guess that is the same thing as John is saying in his (1) below.

2. Nobody wants to stand up in a staff meeting and argue for "less security," so the imposition of one more security requirement -- no matter how ineffective or lacking in cost effectiveness -- almost always carries the day.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#29 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#30 Special characters for Passwords

we periodically could win arguments with corporate security that monthly changes involving impossibly to guess passwords ... were also impossible to remember (basic limitation on human capability) and therefor they were forced to write them down (and as the years went on, one of only scores or hundreds).

security officers had to very carefully cherry-pick their arguments, for the most part totally ignoring reality and human capability (they could then blame it on the individual because some written rule was violated ... sort of like written requirement for a 9ft standing highjump).

then there is this password rule Corporate Directive parody dated 1April1984 ... I had received it Friday afternoon from a mainframe engineer in POK and redistributed it. Over the weekend somebody printed it and posted it to all the area corporate bulletin boards. Monday morning some number of people thought it was valid (even tho 1April was Sunday) .... "CORPORATE DIRECTIVE NUMBER 84-570471" in this past post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#52

It had been printed using corporate letterhead paper on 6670 (ibm copier 3s with computer connection that had been deployed to all departmental areas) and caused such an uproar that there was edict that all (blank) corporate letterhead paper had to be kept under lock&key.

As an aside, not too long later SJR did APA/Sherpa (aka "all points addressable" 6670 that company eventually started shipping as product) ... but would only require scan of some existing corporate letterhead ... no longer needed preprinted.

othere past posts mentioning corporate directive "password parody"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#53 April Fools Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#2 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#43 Early attempts at console humor?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#61 RFC 3092
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#31 Symbols vs letters as passphrase?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#11 Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#28 RSA SecurID product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#28 Password Complexity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#42 Passwords for bank sites - change or not?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#30 Does Public Key Authentication offer additional security over SSH/SFTP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#7 vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#6 Special characters in passwords was Re: RACF - Password rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#40 Special characters in passwords was Re: RACF - Password rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#42 Mixed Case Password on z/OS 1.7 and ACF 2 Version 8
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#27 The Complete April Fools' Day RFCs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#42 Password Rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#1 Does this count as 'computer' folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#14 The Art of Creating Strong Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#88 Original Thinking Is Hard, Where Good Ideas Come From
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#95 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#97 Just for a laugh ... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#3 Quitting Top IBM Salespeople Say They Are Leaving In Droves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#54 Yahoo Password Breach: 7 Lessons Learned - Security - Attacks/breaches - Informationweek
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#24 Does the IBM System z Mainframe rely on Security by Obscurity or is it Secure by Design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#72 One reason for monocase was Re: Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#22 I Need A Good Password

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Special characters for Passwords

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Special characters for Passwords
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 May 2014 13:24:28 -0700
jperryma@PACBELL.NET (Jon Perryman) writes:
Password expiration is still valid but for a completely different reason. Each person has passwords all over the internet (bank, credit cards, various websites, IBM, ...). The average person never changes most passwords. With password expiration, it's likely that the password will only match those never-changing passwords. If companies were willing to spend the money, then they would implement Securid (or a competitor) to provide machine generated passwords.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#29 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#30 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#34 Special characters for Passwords

one of the problems is that most of the token solutions are still institutional centric ... it only provides a single solution for a single password.

We spent quite a bit of research on what it would take to have a person-centric solution ... where a common mechanism would be acceptable by all institutions (including meeting the highest gov. security requirements). Purpose of unique shared-secret for every institution is countermeasure to cross-institution attacks ... so it couldn't be shared-secret based, couldn't be static data, and couldn't be subject to replay attacks.

There were a couple problems 1) no institional organizations supporting single person-centric solution 2) token vendors with business plans that still has every institution providing their own institutional token to every individual (looking at product of N-institutions times M-individuals ... instead of an individual with hundreds of passwords, they have hundreds of tokens).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 24 May 2014 18:01:21 -0400
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
The Cray farm in Trondheim had both VAX and IBM (4300?) front ends for editing and submission of jobs. This seemed like a normal choice for Cray installations at the time, they did very little development for this solution. Was yours similar? What other processors were there would impact operator work a lot.

I periodically tell the tale of "fixing" the mainframe tcp/ip (pathlength) support ... it was getting about 44kbytes/sec using full 3090 processor ... and I did the changes to support RFC1044 and in some tuning tests at cray research got channel speed sustained throughput between 4341 and cray (about 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). past posts mentioning 1044 support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

this is earlier email about doing benchmarks for llnl looking at getting 70 4341s for a compute farm:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email790220

other old 4300 email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Special characters for Passwords

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Special characters for Passwords
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 May 2014 15:37:53 -0700
mike.a.schwab@GMAIL.COM (Mike Schwab) writes:
Posted at http://www.ahajokes.com/com065.html with one character changed.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#34 Special characters for Passwords

yes, oops, finger slip in URL:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#52

and with respect to person-centric (although it was possible to deploy in an "institutional-centric" manner, one per institution)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#35 Special characters for Passwords

the assigned patents are in the financial industry. at one point some computer industry companies offerred to underwrite the total cost of deploying person-centric by the financial industry. The financial industry initially was receptive ... but then they started getting cold feet ... worried that the computer industry players, having paid for the deployment, might start wanting to take a percentage of payment fees ... and backed out.

a big part of the problem is that the financial industry has had a difficult time trying to figure out how to make money out of improved security; for decades the financial industry has heavily prorated payment fees that they charged merchants based on fraud rates (industry even being accused of making significant profit off those fraud prorated fees).

in a 2nd round, it was presented to the major e-commerce merchants (accounting for something like 70% of transactions) as "safe internet payments" which saw high acceptance ... the merchants expecting an order of magnitude reduction in payment fees with the elimination of fraud (they had been indoctrinated for decades that the payment fees were heavily prorated based on fraud). Then came the cognitive dissonance, the financial industry informing merchants that rather than order of magnitude reduction in payment fees with "safe internet payments", there would essentially be a surcharge on top of the highest rate they were already paying.

NACHA
https://www.nacha.org/

even did a pilot showing that it could be safely used for internet debit (in addition to credit). news & pilot results gone 404 ... but lives on at wayback machine (23July2001 item, with pointer to report of pilot results)
http://web.archive.org/web/20070706004855/http://internetcouncil.nacha.org/News/news.html

at the time, we weren't members of NACHA, so somebody submitted the proposal on our behalf.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/nacharfi.htm

demonstration that same exact operation for payments worked with RADIUS, KERBEROS and every other password-based authentication mechanism ... past posts about the radius implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#radius
and past posts about the kerberos implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#kerberos

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 24 May 2014 18:44:16 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Well, dBase II keeps tables in individual files.

Records are normally accessed by keys, not pointers, so it has that characteristic of a relational database - it's not a hierarchical database, like IMS or a CODASYL database or a navigational database, for that reason.

It was advertised as a relational database, but it didn't fully qualify.

Does that mean it isn't a database at all? Wikipedia calls it a navigational database management system influenced by relational concepts.


Jim Gray heavily influenced that transaction DBMS (regardless of the organizational characteristics) conform to ACID properties ... major force behind TPC & ACID:
http://www.tpc.org/information/who/gray.asp

while CODD (at SJR) is credited with originated relational ... there were some number of products shipped before the SQL implementation of System/R at SJR (on vm370 370/145) ... some past System/R posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

data management supposedly was for managing data separate from application implementation ... which expanded to having multiple different applications being access the same data ... eventually concurrently ... including ACID and locking properties.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

weird trivia

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: weird trivia
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 25 May 2014 10:24:26 -0400
Jon Elson <elson@pico-systems.com> writes:
The IBM 360 had a power on button and a power off button. I think the LINC had them, too. The VAX 11/780 had a 3-position key (off - standby - on). Many PDP-11 models also had a power key switch. My Allen-Bradley 7320 (16-bit mini used for industrial control) has control on and control off buttons. The Bendix G15 had the biggest power switch I remember, something like a 50 A 240 V double-pole breaker.

other 360 trivia ... the processor main panel button for power on would result in sequenced power on of all the other boxes ... controllers and devices.

as undergraduate ... the datacenter would be shutdown for the weekend ... and they would usually let me have the whole place from 8am sat. until 8am monday. sometimes when I would come in 8am sat, the 3rd shift operator had finished early, powered off the machines and left early. I would hit power on ... and sometimes the other boxes wouldn't come up. I would then have to power off ... go around to every box and switch it to "CE MODE" ... and then go back and power on the processor. Then go around to the individual boxes, individually power on each box and switch it from "CE MODE" to normal mode.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 25 May 2014 11:02:05 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Records are normally accessed by keys, not pointers, so it has that characteristic of a relational database - it's not a hierarchical database, like IMS or a CODASYL database or a navigational database, for that reason.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#38 Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

during the early system/r days (sjr bldg. 28, main san jose plant site, in the 80s, research moved up the hill to new almaden bldg and bldg 28 has since been plowed under), the IMS people (stl, down the road, i would frequently ride my bike between the two bldgs, stl now called silicon valley lab) would criticize system/r has doubling the disk space requirement and significantly increasing the disk i/os ... compared to similar application in IMS. The system/r people countered that IMS significantly increased the administration and maintenance workload.

IMS exposed record pointers as part of actual data ... and used by the application. System/R keys abstracted away pointers ... but the key records would double the amount of disk space ... and might require 4-5 disk i/os to transverse the key records ... however some amount of maintenance and sysadm work was eliminated.

In the 80s, disk capacity significantly increased and price/bit significantly dropped ... largely mitigating the disk space issue. At the same time, processor system memory significantly increased allowing caching of much of key space ... mitigating the extra I/O. Overall system costs also significantly dropped and the number of installations exploded ... demand for DBMS far exceeded the human resources required to support IMS ... RDBMS significantly reduced the human resource requirement. past posts mentioning system/r
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

at the same time I was doing some of the system/R stuff ... I also got sucked into a different kind of relational DBMS being implemented by Los Gatos VLSI tools group. It was based on Sowa's semantic network work ... who was at IBM at the time ... periodic reference to Sowa's comments on FS
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

basically each field was treated as key and enormous forest of tables was created ... it eliminated direct pointers (similar to RDBMS) but used "content addressable" as the abstraction. It had some of the performance advantages of IMS but with the reduced sysadm requirements of RDBMS. In some sense, System/R (& RDBMS) were optimized for financial transactions ... keys being account number and everything for the account collected in single record ... and all records have same, uniform characteristic.

However, complex data could be significantly faster in SNDBMS, the LSG VLSI group implementation could take 15mins for a complex chip design that would take DB2 two hrs running on the same hardware (even after DB2 traces had been taken and extensive DB2 optimization performed).

After leaving IBM, I've redone subsequent implementations from scratch several times ... and currently use it for the IETF RFC index
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm
and merged taxonomies & glossaries
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/index.html#glossary

the above are flat HTML files that have been generated from the repository information attempting to simulate the forest of relations using HREFs (for the first decade or so of major search engines, they appeared to use the files as daily regression test ... following the enormous number of HREFs, they could get a thousand or two hits every day from the search engine spiders).

other trivia ... old reference to doing RDBMS scaleup as part of HA/CMP cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

we were working with major open system RDBMS vendors ... that also had common source base for vax/cluster operation as well as other platforms. they tended to have list of things they would correct in vax/cluster implementation if they could start from scratch. I had extensive prior experience in loosely-coupled (mainframe "cluster") and was starting from scratch ... all I needed was to make the API semantics similar to vax/cluster (to simplify the RDBMS ports) ... but other than that, I was starting from clean slate for implementation.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

as I've periodically reference, within a couple weeks of the Jan1992 cluster scaleup meeting in Ellison's conference room, cluster scaleup was transferred, announced as supercomputer (for scientific and technical *ONLY*) and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

somewhat related past posts on DLM scaleup:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#64 distributed locking patents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#40 Disk drive behavior
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#66 KI-10 vs. IBM at Rutgers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#2 Block oriented I/O over IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#4 Block oriented I/O over IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#47 OT - Internet Explorer V6.0
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#5 OT - Internet Explorer V6.0
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#67 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#71 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#1 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#4 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#6 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#7 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#8 Avoiding JCL Space Abends
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#70 A few Z990 Gee-Wiz stats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#1 Hard disk architecture: are outer cylinders still faster than inner cylinders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#2 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#0 Specifying all biz rules in relational data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#5 Tera
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#10 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#70 CAS and LL/SC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#71 will there every be another commerically signficant new ISA?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#40 clusters vs shared-memory (was: Re: CAS and LL/SC (was Re: High Level Assembler for MVS & VM & VSE))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#55 Foreign key in Oracle Sql
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#32 the relational model of data objects *and* program objects
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#26 Crash detection by OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#42 Development as Configuration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#8 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#41 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#20 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#32 When Does Folklore Begin???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#33 When Does Folklore Begin???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#62 Greatest Software, System R
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#3 Why so little parallelism?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#42 Keep VM 24X7 365 days
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#50 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#61 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#19 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#24 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#55 Capacity and Relational Database
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#49 VLIW pre-history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#33 Google And IBM Take Aim At Shortage Of Distributed Computing Skills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#46 "Server" processors for numbercrunching?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#42 Newbie question about db normalization theory: redundant keys OK?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#43 distributed lock manager
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#69 How does ATTACH pass address of ECB to child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#81 Random thoughts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#70 Time to rewrite DBMS, says Ingres founder
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#56 performance of hardware dynamic scheduling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#91 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#18 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#63 Intel: an expensive many-core future is ahead of us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#71 Curiousity: largest parallel sysplex around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#3 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#40 "Larrabee" GPU design question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#43 "Larrabee" GPU design question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#26 Natural keys vs Aritficial Keys
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#36 Ingres claims massive database performance boost
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#67 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#39 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#84 A Faster Way to the Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#57 U.S. begins inquiry of IBM in mainframe market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#35 DB2 announces technology that trumps Oracle RAC and Exadata
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#32 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#66 SYSENTER/SYSEXIT_vs._SYSCALL/SYSRET
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#54 Unix systems and Serialization mechanism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#14 Age
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#82 Hashing for DISTINCT or GROUP BY in SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#23 zLinux OR Linux on zEnterprise Blade Extension???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#8 New job for mainframes: Cloud platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#28 NASA unplugs their last mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#53 history of Programming language and CPU in relation to each other
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#4 Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#86 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#87 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#19 z/OS is antique WAS: Aging Sysprogs = Aging Farmers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#44 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#73 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Special characters for Passwords

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Special characters for Passwords
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 25 May 2014 08:25:58 -0700
tony@HARMINC.NET (Tony Harminc) writes:
The typical challenge-response token from around 1999 looked like a small pocket calculator (and in many cases could run as one), and had a (single) DES engine in it. It could be programmed with a 32 or 64-bit key. The mainframe-based software would issue a challenge in some fairly convenient numeric or hex format, the user would enter it into the token on the calculator keyboard, the token would display a response on the screen that was the DES encryption of the challenge, also suitably formatted, the user would enter that into the logon screen, the mainframe software would do the same DES encryption, and if the result was the same you were in. Because the algorithms were published, anyone could support these tokens, and indeed we do in our software to this day, and have customers still using them 15 years later.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#29 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#30 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#34 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#35 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#37 Special characters for Passwords

the challenge-response scenario is still "institutional centric" having a shared-secret ... the challenge-response is obfuscated way of proving you know the secret.

Old post about visiting the EU company making the tokens in europe ... we stay a couple days ... and then CEO drives us down to Brussels for an EU FINREAD (standard meeting) ... and then get flt of Dusseldorf.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#57 Internet banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#60 PKI/Digital signature doesn't work

past posts referencing FINREAD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#finread

had a booth in 1999 world-wide, annual retail banking show (BAI) ... using prototype done with relative standard token programmed to emulate operation ... industry press release
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/ansiepay.htm#x959bai

a little mainframe tie-in ... the ceo of one of the companies in the press release ... was former head of PC division ... and before that head of POK mainframe.

However, got a custom chip designed done at new Infineon (gov. agency certified) security fab in Dresdon. In the late 90s I would joke that I would take a $500 milspec chip, aggressive cost reduce by 2-3 orders of magnitude while increasing the integrity.

I also ask to do presentation at Intel Developer's conference in session on assurance in the TCPA track ... reference gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

guy running TCPA was sitting in the front row, I quiped that it was nice to see that the TPM was starting to look more like the chip I designed. He quiped back that I didn't have committee of 200 people helping me with the design.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Special characters for Passwords

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Special characters for Passwords
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 25 May 2014 11:40:49 -0700
jcewing@ACM.ORG (Joel C. Ewing) writes:
The RSA device that we used for remote access was user-specific and clock-synced. To access the corporate VPN you had to supply your network userid, and the user-specific pseudo-random numeric password displayed by your RSA card. The pseudo-random password changed every minute with an indication of how much time was left before the next change. The process may have had a little tolerance to allow for typing across the change boundary, but it wasn't much. Ours seemed pretty good about staying in sync. After getting into VPN, getting into specific servers or mainframe typically required additional userid and user password.

RSA originally was company for kind of public key encryption (licensing the technology and provided the "BSAFE" library implementation) ... and, in fact ... a former member of the ibm cambridge science center, served as its CEO for a time. Then the company making the Secure-ID token bought RSA and changed the name of the secure-id token to the RSA token.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SecurID
and now division of EMC
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSA_%28security_firm%29

a couple recent posts mentioning BSAFE:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#15 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?

some old mainframe crypto related email (from the 80s)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#crytpo

trivia ... one of the people from a vendor I worked with at IBM in the 80s ... implemented some software for their personal use ... and then introduced it as VPN at an early 90s IETF (internet) standards meeting in san jose. The IPSEC people objected ... eventually referring to VPN as "lightweight" IPSEC (of course that allowed the VPN people to refer to IPSEC as "heavyweight").

posts mentioning science center at 545 tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

other posts in this thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#29 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#30 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#34 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#35 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#37 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#41 Special characters for Passwords

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 25 May 2014 16:19:53 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
Ah, that. It seems a little late to undo, but I suppose if the Basques are still resentful of the Indo-Aryan invasion 5,000 years ago, anything's possible.

after concluded (I'm pontificating about GLBA at 1:03:30 into video)
http://www.isoc-dc.org/2014/05/confidentiality-2020-can-we-keep-secrets-any-more/

I got into discussion with Brin about the two roosevelts. I had recently finished "The War Lovers: Roosevelt, Lodge, Hearst, and the Rush to Empire, 1898" and referred to pg136/1686-88:
It is also true that Roosevelt and Lodge themselves came fairly late to a coherent foreign policy. While they shared a strong sense of manifest destiny for their "race" from at least the early 1880s, it was only during the 1890s that the two Harvard men imbibed enough of the theories of Alfred Thayer Mahan to formulate fully articulated expansionist policies.

... snip ...

"War Lovers" also has reference to Roosevelt appoligizing for introducing the Germans and Japanese to Mahan. pg71/loc866-67:
The kaiser ordered The Influence of Sea Power on History placed in the wardroom of every ship in Germany's High Seas Fleet. The Japanese adapted it as a text at their naval academy.

... snip ...

there has been some increase in Mahan recently amoung the Boyd crowd ... especially since one of the people recently published
http://www.usni.org/store/books/history/21st-century-mahan

although nearly all the original is available on Gutenberg and wayback

misc. past posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
Date: 25 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#77 SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry

New York Times' New Editor Buries Important Story on Private Equity Fee Shenanigans on Holiday Weekend
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/new-york-times-new-editor-buries-important-story-private-equity-fee-shenanigans-holiday-weekend.html
The Deal's Done. But Not the Fees.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/25/business/the-deals-done-but-not-the-fees.html
Wall Street Journal Exposes Possible Grifting by Private Equity Kingpin KKR and KKR Capstone
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/wall-street-journal-exposes-possible-grifting-private-equity-kingpin-kkr-and-kkr-capstone.htm
KKR Error Raises Question: What Cash Should Go to Investors? Private-Equity Firm KKR Isn't Sharing Certain Fees Because It Doesn't See Unit as an Affiliate
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303749904579576171785616910?KEYWORDS=KKR&mg=reno64-wsj

private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

To Forgive Design: Understanding Failure

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: To Forgive Design: Understanding Failure
Date: 25 May 2014
Blog: Facebook
To Forgive Design: Understanding Failure
http://www.amazon.com/Forgive-Design-Understanding-Failure-ebook/dp/B00838XLJI/

During stimulus funding there was interview w/civil engineering professor that because of lack of infrastructure funding(for last 30yrs), there were lack of jobs, which resulted in big cut in univ. civil engineering programs. With the stimulus funding for infrastructure they had to hire Chinese civil engineering companies

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#91 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#44 Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#11 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#43 Where are all the old tech workers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#47 Where are all the old tech workers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#63 The Economist's Take on Financial Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#67 Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#30 24/7/365 appropriateness was Re: IBMLink outages in 2012
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#48 Owl: China Swamps US Across the Board -- Made in China Computer Chips Have Back Doors, 45 Other "Ways & Means" Sucking Blood from US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#31 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#77 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#6 Good article. Friday discussion type
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#36 Race Against the Machine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#40 Core characteristics of resilience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#29 Jedi Knights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#3 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#48 What Makes a bridge Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Jon Stewart Disembowels SecTreas Geithner

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Jon Stewart Disembowels SecTreas Geithner
Date: 25 May 2014
Blog: Google+
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#27 Jon Stewart Disembowels SecTreas Geithner

Geithner's Stress Test Failure
http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-05-23/geithner-s-stress-test-failureï--¿
Geithner Uses Voodoo Economics to Try to Rationalize Choosing Banks Over American Homeowners
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/05/geithner-uses-voodoo-economics-try-rationalize-choosing-banks-american-homeowners.html
The (Other) Truth About The Financial Crisis: 10 "Geithner-Sized" Myths Exposed
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-25/other-truth-about-financial-crisis-10-geithner-sized-myths-exposedï--¿

other posts mentioning Geithner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#8 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#30 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#80 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#2 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#0 Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#9 Tim Geithner Redux - Here's the what American Bankers Association has to say on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#21 Thomas Piketty Is Right About the Past and Wrong About the Future

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Barclays Manipulated Gold as Soon as It Stopped Manipulating Libor

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Barclays Manipulated Gold as Soon as It Stopped Manipulating Libor
Date: 25 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Barclays Manipulated Gold as Soon as It Stopped Manipulating Libor
http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-05-23/barclays-manipulated-gold-as-soon-as-it-stopped-manipulating-libor

past posts mentioning Gold fix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#16 Precious Metals Manipulation Worse Than Libor Scandal, German Regulator Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#7 N.Y. Barclays Libor Traders Said to Face U.K. Charges

posts mentioning libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#libor

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Pentagon Is Playing Games With Its $570-Billion Budget

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Pentagon Is Playing Games With Its $570-Billion Budget
Date: 25 May 2014
Blog: Boyd and Beyond
The Pentagon Is Playing Games With Its $570-Billion Budget; Cutting cheap, efficient weapons to make way for much pricier ones
https://medium.com/war-is-boring/e93d0a33f4a6

Boyd had a story from Vietnam related to subthread. Before Vietnam he was asked to review latest Air Force air-to-air missile ... the demos showed it hitting every time; Boyd reviews and says it will hit less than 10% of the time. Roll forward to Vietnam and Boyd proves to be correct. At one point the Air Force general in Vietnam grounds all planes and have them converted to (Navy) sidewinder which had significant better hit rate. The commander last three months before being called on the carpet back in the pentagon for major transgression ... reducing Air Force budget (less Air Force missiles and better in air-to-air combat) and also increasing Navy budget (people in Pentagon priorities were almost totally unrelated to conduct of Vietnam conflict).

other recent pogo articles by winslow

Essay: Don Vandergriff on "The Myth of Mission Command"
http://www.pogo.org/our-work/straus-military-reform-project/military-reform/2014/essay-don-vandergriff-on-the-myth-of-mission-command.html
An Inadequate Defense Budget? Compared to Whom? Compared to When?
http://www.pogo.org/our-work/straus-military-reform-project/defense-budget/2014/an-inadequate-defense-budget.html
New F-35 Claim: Lower O&S Estimate More than Offsets Higher Acquisition Cost
http://www.pogo.org/our-work/straus-military-reform-project/weapons/2014/new-f-35-claim-lower-os-estimate-more-than-offsets-higher-acquisition-cost.html

Boyd posts and references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is end of mainframe near ?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is end of mainframe near ?
Date: 25 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
the thread drifted into IBM supporting mainframe technology as long as it draws in revenue ... as discussed repeatedly earlier in the thread 1qtr2014 sales numbers appear to be a small fraction of the peak sales numbers of the 80s.

there has been discussions of current installs ... but w/o reported numbers, they are just guesses. I didn't find the actual recent numbers ... just 1qtr2014 sales were down 40% from 1qtr2013 ... however I eventually found 1qtr/2013 numbers were $800m ... which puts it at $480M or 14 max configured ec12 equivalent machines (@33M) or 56 machines on an annualized basis (for the last decade, numbers appeared to be around 100-110 max configured equivalent machines per annum ... aka around $4B-$5B sales/yr instead of $2B/yr). the reference was if annual sales continue at (inflation adjusted) small percentage of 80s sales, then over time, total number of installations could tend to similar percentage.

Since other major platforms are investing more per year in fabs and chip designs ... than sales of mainframes ... I raised the possibility that mainframe processors move to simulation on those platforms ... similar to what has happened with other mainframe components (at least channels & disks and various other I/O) and analogous to 360 microcoded mainframes

Actual processor sales possibly might be larger number of smaller configured machines (but that doesn't change the aggregate revenue available for investment). However, as I've periodically referenced the top financial datacenters have tended to purchase large numbers of max. configured machines ... and have accounted for significant percentage of total annual sales (their aggregate processing demands are several times the largest processor IBM builds ... so they would tend to optimize for TCO)

In 1984, Jim Gray (I worked with at san jose research)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Gray_%28computer_scientist%29

did studies that showed hardware had gotten so reliable that other factors were starting to dominate system availability ... one of the reports (on how things fail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

We were then doing IBM's high availability product and got in argument with Jim regarding replicated non-mainframe components for availability (at ACM SIGOPS conference held every other year) ... he was at DEC at the time so reflected DEC's position. Later he was at m'soft, he had to get up on the stage with their CEO and taut open system availability (minor revenge).

When I was out marketing HA/CMP, I coined the terms disaster survivability and geographic survivability ... and was also asked to write a section for the corporate continuous availability strategy ... however it got pulled when both rochester (as/400) and POK (mainframe) complained (that they couldn't meet the requirements).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

recent posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#8 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#12 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#20 Is end of mainframe near ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 26 May 2014 10:03:41 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#43 Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe

for unrelated Hawaii topic drift:

Astronomers steer Hawaii's Keck telescopes from Australia
http://phys.org/news/2014-05-astronomers-hawaii-keck-telescopes-australia.html

back when it was still called berkeley 10m, I was brought in because thye wanted to do remote viewing ... back when they were in transition from film to CCD ... testing 200x200 ccd (40K pel) at lick observatory (east of san jose). they wanted to avoid taking NSF money because that would give NSF control of the observatory schedule ... eventually they managed to get grant from Keck foundation.

I was doing HSDT project and putting in T1 and faster speed links and starting to work with NSF about connecting the NSF supercomputer centers. some old NSF email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
past posts mentioning NSF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet
past posts mentioning HSDT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

some old 10m email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#email830803b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#email830804
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#email830804c
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#email830822
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#email830830
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#email841121
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#email841121
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#email860519

misc. past 10m posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#73 how old are you guys
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#7 CCD technology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#8 CCD technology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#9 CCD technology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#13 Today's mainframe--anything to new?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005l.html#9 Jack Kilby dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#28 MVCIN instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#12 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#19 NSFNET (long post warning)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#19 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#20 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#50 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#31 old tapes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#30 What do YOU call the # sign?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#80 A Super-Efficient Light Bulb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#82 ATMs by the Numbers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#85 ATMs by the Numbers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#55 TV Big Bang 10/12/09
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#60 TV Big Bang 10/12/09
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#24 Program Work Method Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#49 vm/370 3081
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#58 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#9 Hawaii board OKs plan for giant telescope
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#115 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#10 Slackware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#86 OT: Physics question and Star Trek
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#55 360/20, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#8 We're About to Lose Net Neutrality -- And the Internet as We Know It
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#76 Royal Pardon For Turing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Has the last fighter pilot been born?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Has the last fighter pilot been born?
Date: 26 May 2014
Blog: Disciples of Boyd's Strategy
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#22 Has the last fighter pilot been born?

ELP on F22 as air-to-air ... but lacking some features and with other problems (but at least competitive with adversary, something that can't be said for F-35)
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/2014/05/f-22-perspective.html

There have been various comments about (f22 and others) there being long line of incremental improvements (or simply changes) to existing paradigms ... not taking into account any sort of paradigm change. swarms are some sense paradigm change ... although they might be considered applying overwhelming resources at some point (but of different kind ... some might claim that it can level the playing field dealing with foes that place different value on human life ... but that gets into a totally different kind of discussion).

for topic drift ... there is periodic joke that nearly all IBM major mainframe software apps were developed in the field ... and only much later transferred to corporate "development groups" for maintenance (and minor incremental changes, sort of implication that official development groups were primarily for preserving the status quo)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
Date: 26 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#77 SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#44 SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry

The Private Equity Limited Partnership Agreement Release: The Industry's Snowden Moment
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/private-equity-limited-partnership-agreement-release-industrys-snowden-moment.html
A Warm Welcome to Our New Private Equity Readers
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/welcome-new-private-equity-readers.html
Someone Posted A Bunch Of Private Equity 'Trade Secrets' That The Industry Wants To Keep Under Wraps
http://www.businessinsider.com/private-equity-lpas-leaked-2014-5

posts mentioning private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is end of mainframe near ?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is end of mainframe near ?
Date: 27 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
China Wants Banks To Remove High-End IBM Servers In Spy Dispute
http://www.businessinsider.com/china-wants-banks-to-remove-high-end-ibm-servers-in-spy-dispute-2014-5
China ponders ban on IBM servers
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/27/china_ponders_ban_on_ibm_servers/
China pushing banks to remove IBM servers in spy dispute - Bloomberg
http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/05/27/us-ibm-china-idINKBN0E70GG20140527
China Said to Study IBM Servers for Bank Security Risks
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-05-27/china-said-to-push-banks-to-remove-ibm-servers-in-spy-dispute.html

recent posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#8 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#12 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#20 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#49 Is end of mainframe near ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Has the last fighter pilot been born?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Has the last fighter pilot been born?
Date: 27 May 2014
Blog: Disciples of Boyd's Strategy
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#22 Has the last fighter pilot been born?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#51 Has the last fighter pilot been born?

paradigm example; some time ago, we where called into the largest airline reservation system and asked to look at the 10 impossible things they couldn't do. I then went away, coded a new implementation from scratch and came back after 2months with something that did everything including all ten impossible things.

it turns out the ten impossible things were primarily because they were using the same paradigm implementation that was originated more than 30yrs previously. Largely because of lack of computer capability at the time, they used a database that had possible ways of flying from origin to destination (non-stops, directs, single connection, two connections) that required/had nearly 1000 people involved in the manual creation, care and feeding of that database.

i had recently come off a effort doing chip physical layout application ... figure out optimal position of all transistors and connections in a chip. it turns out that at the time, there were slightly over 4000 airports with scheduled flights and less than 500,000 scheduled flight segments in the world (subset was used in the manual process to create the route database, and more than two connections required manual effort by the reservation agent) ... but with slight trimming, it was possible to load all of the information directly into memory (all airports and flt segments from the original file for the whole world) ... and dynamically find all possible flt segments between origin & destination ... 1) it eliminated the 1000 people manual effort (which was the primary bottlneck resulting in the 10 impossible things), 2) could find all possible ways from origin to destination, including arbitrary number of connections, and 3) ran 100 times faster.

It no longer needed a half dozen of the largest configured IBM mainframes ... but would run on a few large workstations (and capable of handling all route searches for all reservations for all scheduled airlines in the world). There was also a lot of additional information on the original scheduled airline master file that I could include (that was eliminated in the manual database building process). In any case, their ten impossible things were all addressed easily with a paradigm change.

For other topic drift, I may have offended somebody yesterday ... was at a pool party in Annapolis and did a little blathering about Boyd, Winslow, Chuck, acquisitions, etc. Then one of the people at the table (academy graduate) mentioned that he spent most of his career in acquisitions and testing ... and was currently at the Pentagon in the SECDEF's office for acquisitions.

Some US industries had been restructured so that a large part of revenue was not booked as part of actual operations ... but in a separate business unit that was largely computerized. The result was that the operations break even or loose money but the computerized part makes profit ... as does the parent company (even with actual operations loosing money). Automobile moved profit to loans (financial mostly done with computers), airlines moved profit to the reservations systems (US companies increasingly heavily involved in "financial engineering"). At the time I did airline res. system work ... the airline operations was loosing money, but the reservation operations was making significant profit ... resulting in the parent company clearing overall profit.

In any case, the executive that brought us in ... finally said that he hadn't actually wanted us to solve the ten impossible things (his compensation was somewhat proportional to the 1000 people reporting to him, which were no longer necessary) ... he just wanted to be able to tell the board that they had us working on it (for the next 5yrs) ... turns out one of the board members had known me many years earlier when he was at IBM.

For other drift ... at one point my wife did stint as chief architect for AMADEUS (european res system based on old Eastern Airline System One) ... however she backed x.25 connectivity ... and the SNA forces got her replaced ... it didn't do them any good since AMADEUS went with x.25 anyway.

And more recently as financial system was crashing there was some news articles that it was all the fault of computers mis-calculating risk .... however it then came out that the business people were forcing the risk managers to fiddle the inputs until it produced the desired results (garbage-in, garbage-out); then some call for making risk managers independent.

somewhat having done the work on e-commerce and co-authored some financial industry standards, in the late 90s we were asked into NSCC (before it merged with DTC to form DTCC) to improve the integrity of trading transactions. We worked on it and then got a call that it was being suspended; a side-effect of the integrity work would have greatly increased transparency and visibility (antithesis of wallstreet culture)

In the congressional Madoff hearings, they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get the SEC to do something about Madoff (SEC's hands were forced when Madoff turned himself in). They asked him if new regulations were needed, he responded that while new regulations might be needed, much more important was transparency and visibility.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

This is before big onslaught of HFT, but implies that fraudulent behavior was common, but they had nothing to fear from the SEC.
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

much of HFT is now being used to further obfuscate fraudulent activities

Note about the same time as the work for NSCC ... we were also asked to look at improving the integrity of supporting documents in securitized mortgage instruments. Securitized mortage instruments had been used during the S&L mess to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (but there was limited market). Start of the century, the industry finds that they could pay the rating agencies to give triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A ... from testimony in congressional hearing into the role that the rating agencies played in the recent economic mess). It turns out that triple-A ratings trumps supporting documents and they could start doing no-documentation (no-down, interest-only, liar) loans; with no supporting documentation there was no longer an issue of their integrity. However, from the law of unintended consequences ... the lack of supporting documentation then results in the robo-signing scandal ... assembly-line fabrication of fraudulent documents for foreclosures.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

recent posts mentioning HFT:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#54 Pensions, was Re: Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#82 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#89 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#28 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#29 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#43 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#56 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#65 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#7 N.Y. Barclays Libor Traders Said to Face U.K. Charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#93 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#18 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#60 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#72 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#3 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#20 HFT, computer trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#25 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#41 System Response
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#70 Obama Administration Launches Plan To Make An "Internet ID" A Reality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#1 HFT is harmful, say US market participants

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

a long way from IBM 1620 System Summary Manual

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: a long way from IBM 1620 System Summary  Manual
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 27 May 2014 22:36:42 -0400
hancock4 writes:
But aren't most of those facilities handled only by IBMers internally in developing operating systems and such? Most application programmers don't have to worry about linkage stack, various generations of virtual memory, etc.

Further, as I understand it, Z series philosophy has been always to maintain backward compatibility. So, if someone chooses to simply ignore the new features and remain with the old in application programming, they're free to do in almost all situations. I dare say any exceptions would be very rare.

Some features mentioned in the list date from S/360 and are _good_ features, designed to maintain integrity, so that bad code, hardware problems, or addressing problems don't screw up other programs running simultaneously on the machine.


there has been long running/winded discussion in linkedin mainframe ... bits and pieces here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#67 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#74 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#75 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#81 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#92 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#8 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#12 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#20 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#49 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#53 Is end of mainframe near ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

China Wants Banks To Remove High-End IBM Servers Amid Spy Dispute

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: China Wants Banks To Remove High-End IBM Servers Amid Spy Dispute
Date: 27 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
China Wants Banks To Remove High-End IBM Servers Amid Spy Dispute
http://www.businessinsider.com/china-wants-banks-to-remove-high-end-ibm-servers-in-spy-dispute-2014-5

China ponders ban on IBM servers
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/27/china_ponders_ban_on_ibm_servers/
China pushing banks to remove IBM servers in spy dispute - Bloomberg
http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/05/27/us-ibm-china-idINKBN0E70GG20140527
China Said to Study IBM Servers for Bank Security Risks
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-05-27/china-said-to-push-banks-to-remove-ibm-servers-in-spy-dispute.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Interesting and somewhat disturbing article about IBM in BusinessWeek. What is your opinion?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Interesting and somewhat disturbing article about IBM in BusinessWeek. What is your opinion?
Date: 27 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
The Trouble With IBM
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-05-22/ibms-eps-target-unhelpful-amid-cloud-computing-challenges

Building hardware isn't the same as operating a service. As an undergraduate in the 60s, I was brought into Boeing Computer Services as one of its first employees ... it was consolidating all of Boeing dataprocessing into separate business unit (to better monetize the investment and a very early version of cloud computing). I thought Renton was possibly the largest datacenter in the world, that summer 360/65s were arriving faster than they could be installed, pieces of 360/65s were constantly staged in the hallways around the machine room .... claims of something like $300M (60s dollars) in IBM gear (about $2B 2014 dollars, note 1qtr2014 ibm mainframe sales works out to little less than $2B/year). For disaster scenario, Renton was then being replicated at the new 747 plant up in Everett.

During this period lots of existing mainframe software products were being developed at customer (or internal) datacenters; not in development groups which tended to be several levels removed from how computers were being used (jokes about HASP/JES, IMS, CICS, DB2, etc being transferred into IBM development groups for maintenance after having been originally developed in a real live, operational datacenters).

In the late 70s & early 80s, I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network (non-SNA larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late '85 or early '86 ... done by co-worker at the IBM cambridge science center).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

Folklore was that when the executive committee (chairman, ceo, pres, etc) was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

During this period, Jim Gray (before he left), others and I would sit around friday nights trying to think up ways to entice middle management and top executives to use computers There was period where some management/executives would insist on terminals on their desks as status symbols ... but it would be turned on on in the morning and it sit there all day burning the logon logo into the screen (in some rare cases, the PROFS menu screen) ... but it was their staffs doing the online computer use on their behalf.

other recent reports mentioning IBM's 1qtr2014 results
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#75 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#78 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#49 Is end of mainframe near ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Credit Suisse, BNP Paribas at Risk of Criminal Charges Over Taxes, Business With Banned Nations

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Credit Suisse, BNP Paribas at Risk of Criminal Charges Over Taxes, Business With Banned Nations
Date: 27 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Credit Suisse, BNP Paribas at Risk of Criminal Charges Over Taxes, Business With Banned Nations
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-30/credit-suisse-bnp-paribas-charges-said-to-be-considered.html

tax evasion posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

Criminal Charges Against Banks Risk Sparking Crisis
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-05-01/criminal-charges-against-banks-risk-sparking-crisis.html
Since When Does Refusing to Put Fraudulent Banks into Receivership Help the Economy?
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/bill-black-since-refusing-put-fraudulent-banks-receivership-help-economy.html

from above:
At a meeting last September, a top federal regulator vowed not to interfere if Mr. Bharara obtained a guilty plea from JPMorgan Chase over its ties to Bernard L. Madoff, according to the lawyers and records of the meeting. But the regulator, Thomas J. Curry, a frequent critic of Wall Street, warned that federal law might require him to reconsider JPMorgan's charter if the bank was convicted of a crime.

... snip ...

Why Did the Justice Department Kill the Madoff Subpoena Against JPMorgan?
http://wallstreetonparade.com/2013/12/why-did-the-justice-department-kill-the-madoff-subpoena-against-jpmorgan/

madoff posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

Too Big to Jail Continues: DOJ May Charge Two Banks with Criminal Acts, But Not Hold Them Criminally Accountable
http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/too-big-to-jail-continues-doj-may-charge-two-banks-with-criminal-acts-but-not-hold-them-criminally-accountable

from above:
That last paragraph is devastatingly revealing. The Department of Justice might make an agreement with banks in which they would plead guilty to criminal activity without, it appears, holding them criminally responsible beyond fines and perhaps some temporary restrictions.

... snip ...

too big to fail, too big to jail, too big to prosecute
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

In Bed with Wall Street: The Conspiracy Crippling Our Global Economy
http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2014-05-04/bed-wall-street

from above:
Galbraith methodically detailed the manner in which a control fraud -- when a trusted person in a position of responsibility subverts the system/company for personal gain -- develops, flourishes, perpetuates, and ultimately fails. The failure of the fraud, though, belies the fact that many of the perpetrators walk away filthy rich. The fraud itself and the injustice running throughout the system are predicated on a failure of the rule of law

... snip ...

Too Big to Jail? Credit Suisse's Sweetheart Deal by RALPH NADER
http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/05/26/big-credit-suisses-sweetheart-deal/

from above:
1. The bank retained its permits and licenses to remain fully operational in the United States. 2. Top management and directors emerged unscathed and were allowed to keep their lucrative positions. 3. State and federal regulators, including the SEC and Federal Reserve, agreed not to take related actions against the bank. 4. Credit Suisse does not have to give the Justice Department and the IRS the names of some 22,000 U.S. customers who engaged in these schemes, citing prohibitive Swiss law, which tough U.S. officials could have challenged with a waiver demand.

.... snip ...

2009 articles were that IRS after swiss for 52,000 wealthy americans for tax evasion (which involved between $400B and $510B in unpaid taxes).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
Date: 29 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#77 SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#44 SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#52 SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry

Private Equity Limited Partners Have Done A Lousy Job of Protecting Themselves
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/private-equity-limited-partners-done-lousy-job-protecting-interests.html
Media Starting to Wake Up to Private Equity Grifting
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/media-starting-wake-private-equity-grifting.html
SEC exams find bad behavior at variety of firms, not just 'fringe' shops
http://www.pehub.com/2014/05/sec-exams-find-bad-behavior-at-variety-of-firms-not-just-fringe-shops/
The New York Times' New Editor Buries Important Story on Private Equity Fee Shenanigans on Holiday Weekend
http://truth-out.org/news/item/23984-new-york-times-new-editor-buries-important-story-on-private-equity-fee-shenanigans-on-holiday-weekend
The Surprising Information that Private Equity Limited Partners Don't Get
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/surprising-missing-sections-private-equity-limited-partnership-agreements.html

private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Time that Senior Board members were held responsible for Criminal Actitivites of their Companies

From: lynn@garlimic.com
Subject: Time that Senior Board members were held responsible for Criminal Actitivites of their Companies
Date: 29 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Fire the CEO and Watch The Scandals Stop Overnight
http://compliancex.com/fire-the-ceo-and-watch-the-scandals-stop-overnight/

Remember that was the claim for Sarbanes-Oxley ... that senior members (and auditors) would guarantee to do jail time ... but it required SEC doing something. Possibly because even GAO didn't think SEC was doing anything, GAO started doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings (even showing increase after SOX passes ... and nobody doing jail time).

posts mentioning Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes.oxley
posts mentioning Enron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
posts mentioning whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Association Of Certified Fraud Examiners Release 2014 Report On Fraud

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From: lynn@garlimic.com
Subject: Association Of Certified Fraud Examiners Release 2014 Report On Fraud
Date: 29 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Association Of Certified Fraud Examiners Release 2014 Report On Fraud
http://www.forbes.com/sites/walterpavlo/2014/05/21/association-of-certified-fraud-examiners-release-2014-report-on-fraud/

During debate over passing Sarbanes-Oxley ... there was lots of discussion that the significant increase in audit requirements would prevent future Enrons and Worldcoms along with executives (and auditors) guaranteed to do jail time. However, it required SEC to do something; possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started do reports of public company fraudulent financial filings, even showing increase after SOX passes (and nobody doing jail time). There were references to the whistleblower provisions added at the end, more of an after thought (but some jokes that it might be the only effective part, the audit requirements more of a gift from congress to the audit industry).

posts mentioning sarbanes-oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes.oxley
posts mentioning enron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
posts mentioning financial reporting fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud
posts mentioning whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

The congressional Madoff hearings included the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff. Included in his testimony was that tips turn up 13 times more fraud than audits (over 50%) and that SEC didn't have a tip hotline (but did have a 1-800 number for companies to complain about audits)

posts mentioning madoff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

towards the end of internet bubble, we got a threat regarding our criticism of some technology that happened to be involved in an upcoming IPO. The person delivering the threat said that it was nothing personal, for the investment bankers it was purely business, our technology criticism was predicted to possibly have a 10% downside on an expected $2B the investment bankers were expecting to clear. We went to law enforcement agency about it. They said yes, investment bankers are like that ... they mentioned that many involved in the Internet IPO mills (formula process behind the internet bubble, preferably new IPO eventually fails, leaving the field open for the next round of IPOs) had previously walked away clean from the S&L mess ("left no fingerprints") and were predicted to move into mortgages next.

along the way there is also
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

posts mentioning private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

some past posts mentioining "IPO mills"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#38 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#50 Bubble? What Bubble?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#26 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#76 Crowdsourcing Diplomacy

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Interesting and somewhat disturbing article about IBM in BusinessWeek. What is your opinion?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Interesting and somewhat disturbing article about IBM in BusinessWeek. What is your opinion?
Date: 29 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#57 Interesting and somewhat disturbing article about IBM in BusinessWeek. What is your opinion?

some cloud numbers: CHARTS: Look How Astoundingly Cheap Cloud Computing Has Become
http://www.businessinsider.com/astoundingly-cheap-cloud-computing-2014-5

A lot of the stuff that IBM has viewed as profit items ... Amazon has viewed as cost/overhead items ... doing everything possibly to minimize those costs ... to a large extent their cloud operation was developed for their internal operation ... and services then offered externally for free or at cost ... as part of helping maintain that operation.

I mentioned upthread that Boeing had done something analogous when it reorganized all of its dataprocessing into BCS (in the 60s, including offering services to non-Boeing customers) ... possibly pure coincidence it is the same city.

Taking the 1qtr2014 IBM mainframe processor revenue and assuming it stays the same for the remaining 3qtrs (doesn't continue decline) ... total 2014 will be the same as the claimed (inflation adjusted) value of the IBM 360s in just the (1960s) Renton datacenter.

A pure cloud services play has to cover its operation & profit purely from services it sells and would seem to be at a competitive disadvantage with a company that uses an enormous part of the cloud for its own internal operation and is only selling cloud services externally as sideline.

recent posts mentioning cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#23 Scary Sysprogs and educating those 'kids'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#94 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#97 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#4 IBM Plans Big Spending for the Cloud ($1.2B)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#5 IBM Plans Big Spending for the Cloud ($1.2B)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#14 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#16 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#27 IBM sells x86 server business to Levono
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#35 OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#47 Resistance to Java
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#72 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#97 Where does the term Wild Duck come from?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#22 US Federal Reserve pushes ahead with Faster Payments planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#35 World Wide Web turns 25 years old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#36 World Wide Web turns 25 years old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#52 [CM] Ten recollections about the early WWW and Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#106 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#108 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#4 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#8 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#10 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#11 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#12 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#13 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#19 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#21 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#23 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#77 Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#22 Complete 360 and 370 systems found
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#36 IBM Historic computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#40 IBM 360/370 hardware unearthed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#53 IBM hopes new chip can turn the tables on Intel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#67 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#75 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#78 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#80 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#81 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#90 A Drone Could Be the Ultimate Dogfighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#92 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#20 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#28 Does IBM CEO Rometty Understand Cloud?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Costs of core

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Costs of core
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 29 May 2014 13:14:12 -0700
zedgarhoover@GMAIL.COM (zMan) writes:
I remember my father telling me that core -- REAL memory, a MAN'S memory (yeah, yeah, sexist) -- was $1/byte. Obviously that would have changed by the time it all went solid-state, but does anyone remember whether this was correct or not?

originally $1/bit
http://www.computerhistory.org/revolution/memory-storage/8/253

magnetic-core
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic-core_memory
By the late 1950s industrial plants had been set up in the Far East to build core. Inside, hundreds of workers strung cores for low pay. This lowered the cost of core to the point where it became largely universal as main memory by the early 1960s, replacing both inexpensive low-performance drum memory and costly high-performance systems using vacuum tubes, and later transistors, as memory. The cost of core memory declined sharply over the lifetime of the technology: costs began at roughly US$1.00 per bit and dropped to roughly US$0.01 per bit. Core was replaced by integrated semiconductor RAM chips in the 1970s.

... snip ...

say from about $10/byte to 10cents/byte ... so would have been around $1/byte sometime in that period ... a mbyte of 360/67 (same as 360/65, may have been around a million (except it was in the era that ibm rented/leased, not sold)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System/360_Model_67

a little drift, ref from above,
https://1a9f2076-a-62cb3a1a-s-sites.googlegroups.com/site/michiganterminalsystem/documentation/documents/IBM360-67RefCard.pdf
I still have 360/67 "blue card" ... except it is "stamped" with the name of former coworker and one of the inventors of GML (at the science center in 1969):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/folds.jpg

While an undergraduate ... I had been brought in as one of the first employees of BCS, boeing consolidating its dataprocessing into a separate business unit ... helping to monetize its investment, sort of early cloud computing (including being able to market services to non-boeing entities). that summer 360/65s were arriving at the renton datacenter faster than they could be installed ... pieces of 360/65 constantly being staged in the hallways around the machine room. claims was there was something like $300m of 360s in the renton datacenter (or $2B 2014 inflation adjusted dollars)

as an aside, total 1qtr2014 mainframe processor sales works out to a little less than $2B/annum.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HFT is harmful, say US market participants

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: HFT is harmful, say US market participants
Date: 29 May 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#1 HFT is harmful, say US market participants

Watch As An HFT Algo "Trades" German Bunds
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-29/bobler-watch-hft-algo-trades-german-bunds
Someone Decided To Buy $1 Billion eMinis In 1 Second At The All Time High
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-29/someone-decided-buy-1-billion-eminis-1-second-all-time-high

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is end of mainframe near ?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is end of mainframe near ?
Date: 30 May 2014
Blog: IBMers
Articles are that they have their own chip alternative to i86&ARM and their own operating system (some articles imply they might be significant clones) ... this being opportunity for them to increase domestic market share.

One of the scenarios is that more i86 server chips ship directly to cloud operators that do server assemblers at 1/3rd cost of brand name vendors ... (than ship to the brand name vendors like IBM, IBM, Dell, etc) ... increasing the commoditizing of the server business and likely motivation for IBM to unload its i86 server business (to Lenovo). There have been a couple articles that HP has taken alternative path by teaming up with FOXCONN to reduce cost of large volume servers (for cloud market) ... also IBM unloading its i86 server business provides opportunity for HP (and its partnership with FOXCONN)

There is some penetration of ARM chips (originally developed for greater energy efficiency to extend battery life, laptops) into the cloud server business ... the scenario being that system costs have so drastically dropped that energy costs are much greater percentage of total cost of a large cloud megadatacenters (maybe ten times ARM chips in same physical footprint for same total processing BIPS rate but at lower total energy/BIPS costs).

Intel attempting to cover the bets:

SoC Shootout: x86 vs. ARM
http://www.notebookcheck.net/SoC-Shootout-x86-vs-ARM.99496.0.html
Intel Partners With ARM Chip Maker Rockchip on Tablet Products
http://www.eweek.com/mobile/intel-partners-with-arm-chip-maker-rockchip-on-tablet-products.html

and then some cloud numbers: CHARTS: Look How Astoundingly Cheap Cloud Computing Has Become
http://www.businessinsider.com/astoundingly-cheap-cloud-computing-2014-5

different cost/benefit threshold for different applications. saw it with the introduction of IBM 4341 35yrs ago ... customers ordering them for datacenter computer farms ... more aggregate compute, less flr space & resources, lower costs than 3033 ... also corporations ordering them hundreds at a time for placing out in departmental areas ... sort of the leading edge of distributed computing tsunami. at one point head of pok was so threatened that he had the internal allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component cut in half. However by mid-80s, the entry/mid range was starting to move to workstations & large PCs. some old 4341 email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

also saw it with the uptake of relational DBMS ... which drastically cut the human care&feeding compared to 60s DBMS technologies (wasn't just human costs, but lack of high skill levels). past posts mentioning original sql/relational implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

There was a similar but different scenario in the mid/late 90s, payment fees represented 40-60% of the bottom line of US banks ... the prospect of micropayments would increase transaction volumes that it would totally swamp the mainframe bankends. The only technology that had capacity to handle the projected micropayment volumes (and cost/transaction) was technology on telco non-mainframe bankends, developed for handling call record volumes. Telcos would take-over the micropayment business and then move up the value stream and take over the rest of the payment business. The projected micropayments uptake has yet to takeoff ... although the predictions (telcos taking over the payment business) have resurfaced with the latest generation of smartphones.

The banks are worried that the telcos will takeover the payment business (and half their bottom line) ... and the bank mainframe backends are major remaining source of mainframe market.

recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#2 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#8 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#12 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#20 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#49 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#53 Is end of mainframe near ?

recent posts mentioning payment fees:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#77 In a Cyber Breach, Who Pays, Banks or Retailers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#20 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#40 Missed Alarms and 40 Million Stolen Credit Card Numbers: How Target Blew It
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#15 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#17 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#37 Special characters for Passwords

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 30 May 2014 13:59:37 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Nonsense; we have a long history of gunboat diplomacy in South and Central America. People have long memories when they're on the receiving end.

It's possible that there's some jealousy involved, but sloth? No way.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#43 Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe

mentions Mahan helping (teddy) Roosevelt and Lodge solidify their concepts of empire.

Then there is this account of resulting policies "War Is a Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

more recent is Perkins and "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessions_of_an_Economic_Hit_Man

which coincides with this period from "All the Presidents' Bankers" pg265/5982-84:
Arguably, if JFK or RFK had lived and retained the mantra of economic equality or self-sufficiency in Latin America rather than a free-for-all profit grab accompanied by military alignments, the third world debt crisis, which enabled bankers to use the federal government to support private speculation (the harbinger of more such maneuvers to follow), might never have occurred.

pg327/loc7323-25:
In April 1981, Clausen handed Bank of America, with its festering debt problems, to his protégé, Sam Armacost, and headed off to run the World Bank. Under Clausen, the World Bank would pressure the third world to adopt structural adjustment programs that would destabilize the region for decades, causing widespread economic decay.

... snip ...

overlaps with increasing policy of "perpetual war", past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 30 May 2014 14:05:46 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
I can't tell you about the assemblers, but Fortran G and Fortran H were definitely not from the same code base. Fortran G was designed using an innovative technique (for the time) by Digitek for IBM. Fortran H, the optimizing compiler, was written internally by IBM employees.

and the "Q" enhancements to Fortran H were done by the guy at palo alto science center that had done the APL microcode assist for 370/145. a couple past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#1 WATFOR's Silver Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#6 a history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#22 Why these original FORTRAN quirks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#28 floating point, was history of RPG, Fortran
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#13 IBM 5100 First Portable Computer commercial 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#87 Gee... I wonder if I qualify for "old geek"?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 30 May 2014 14:37:03 -0400
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
Iraq is still a work in progress. We got rid of a brutal dictator who killed tens of thousands of his own people. Sine we left they have had two fair democratic elections, which they hadn't had in half a century. Some people there are still blowing each other up, though less than a few years ago. I'd give it a C+ so far.

"team b" .. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#team.b
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_B

has the head of CIA rejecting their military analysis ... who is then replaced with somebody that will go along with "team b" analysis justifying huge increase in military expenditure ... for military industrial complex ... some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

then "team b" are supporting Iraq, even possibly w/WMDs, in the iran/iraq war
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_War
and US support
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war

note that the VP ... denies knowledge of what is going on because he has been the point person for the administration financial deregulation
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair

resulting in S&L mess with members of family involved, including
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan

All the Presidents' Bankers, pg334/loc7490-02:
In November 1983, after convening more than forty meetings with industry groups to get their reactions to the bill, Bush's Working Group on Financial Institutions Reform submitted its report to the Council of Economic Advisers.

... snip ...

then as president there is desert storm:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_War

"Long Strange Journey" has sat. photo recon analyst reporting that Iraq is mounting forces for invasion of Kuwait, administration descredits him and says that Sadam has told them he would do no such thing. However, when he later reports that Iraq is mounting forces for invasion of Saudia Arabia, there starts to be some action.

Then members of "team b" and and another member of family, in this century fabricating justification for another invasion ... part of it is WMDs. From the law of unintended consequences, the invaders are initially told to bypass ammo dumps looking for the (non-existant) WMDs, when they go back, a million metric tons has disappeared. Later you have large artillery shells showing up in IEDs ... even taking out M1 Abrams. This has loosing so many main battle tanks that they start carefully scounting the route just before taking Abrams out.
http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-Killing-Our-ebook/dp/B007VBBS9I/

claims are that increase in violence has Iraq heading for possible disintegration/anarchy.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraqi_insurgency_%28Iraq_War%29

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 30 May 2014 14:55:17 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-Killing-Our-ebook/dp/B007VBBS9I/

claims are that increase in violence has Iraq heading for possible disintegration/anarchy.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraqi_insurgency_%28Iraq_War%29


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#68 Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn

note Baqubah book covers through 2008 and claims worse than Falujah ... but doesn't get the same coverage because the administration had said things are much better (disclaimer I have son-in-law that was in Fallujah 2004-2005 and Baqubah 2007-2008). Periodically there are references to US press not covering what is really going on there.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 30 May 2014 15:38:42 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#43 Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#66 Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#68 Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#69 Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn

"President's Bankers" has the head of Chase friends with Shah of Iran and has led a consortium that has made lots of loans to the country. Iran disposes the Shah as brutal dictator. Then Iran notifies Chase they want to make $4M interest payment on large loan that has come due, Chase ignores it and declares the loan in default and freezes Iranian accounts. This is about the time that it appears that head of Chase has managed to get Shah permanent residency in the US (despite Iran wanting him back). Things are then in downward spiral.

Note that in the early 50s, Iran's democratic elected gov is overthrown, largely orchistrated by Kermit Roosevelt (Teddy's grandson) ... because the new gov. was nationalizing the oil fields ... and puts the Shah in place.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammad_Reza_Pahlavi
part of the Shah's program ... nearly all trained by Norman Schwarzkopf (Sr.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAVAK
and
http://www.ibtimes.com/irans-feared-savak-norman-schwarzkopfs-father-had-greater-impact-middle-east-affairs-976502

When the Iranian brutal dictator is disposed, US backs another brutal dictator in Iraq to fight a war with them.

more "perpetual war", past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 30 May 2014 19:00:37 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Looking at the right post, I saw you said it was released as Forttran HX, but a search turned nothing up about that compiler.

And then I remembered that I *had* heard of Fortran H Extended.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#67 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

this is sc28-6852-1 Fortran H Extended, June 1972
http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/pdf/ibm/360/fortran/SC28-6852-1_OS_FORTRAN_H_Pgmr_Jun72.pdf

the Q work, was early 80s ("XXXX" is person responsible for Q ... and apl microcode assist for 370/145) ... at the time of this email, the Q enhancements had been released as "IUP" opt=3 enhancement to FORTHX.
Date: 03/22/82 10:50:12 From: wheeler

re: fortran; XXXX told me several months ago about the German (really Hitachi) fortran . . . at that time he said it was at least as good optimizer as his FORTRANQ (FORTHX opt=3 IUP). I asked some people in YKT . . . they said that it was better (possibly much better than XXXX's . . . more work went into it). I heard a rumour that SHARE might possibly recommend the Hitachi fortran for users instead of FORTRAN VS (make a policy statement out of it).

I have copy of SLAC VMS/CMS comparison if you are interested.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 31 May 2014 16:18:27 -0400
After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://spectrum.ieee.org/view-from-the-valley/at-work/tech-careers/after-the-sun-microsystems-sets-the-real-stories-come-out

from above:
The IBM 360

The very first Sun workstations delivered to a major customer in May 1982 didn't run Unix; instead, they were used as IBM 360 terminal emulators.


... snip ...

predating that ... before they had formed a company, the group had come to IBM about producing the workstation. A meeting was set up at Palo Alto Science Center ... and people from San Jose Research, Yorktown Research and group in Boca (working on yet unannounced product) were invited. After the presentation, all three group recommended not producing the workstation (in part because all three groups felt they were doing something better).

some past ref
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#4a
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#222
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#74
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#30
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#5
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#23
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#2

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 31 May 2014 20:13:18 -0400
despen@verizon.net (Dan.Espen) writes:
Of course, we had a bunch of those desktop AIX systems. Quirky unix. What was with those Smit guys? Smit was different, but not better.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#72 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

that was none of them ... the sjr was "925" office ... had multiple 68ks, the ykt group was working with 3 rivers machines, and the boca group was "acorn" (later announced as ibm/pc).

there was the ykt 801 group that was working with opd on the displaywriter followon with romp processor and cp.r. when that was canceled they decided to retarget the machine to the unix workstation market ... and hired the the company that had done the at&t port for pc/ix to do the port to romp ... which becomes aix for the pc/rt. past posts mentioning 801, romp, rios, iliad, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

note palo alto was working on 370 port of BSD ... but it got redirected to pc/rt as AOS (alternative to aix) ... which would be a little closer.

palo alto also worked with ucla on locus which came out as aix/370 and aix/386 (aix/370 later became aix/esa).

another post mentioning 925
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#58 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?

post mentioning 3rivers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#39 PC/mainframe browser(s) was Re: 360/20, was 1132 printer history

and posts mentioning acorn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#79 Coulda, Woulda, Shoudda moments?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#31 diffence between itanium and alpha
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#9 IBM says AMD dead in 5yrs ... -- Microsoft Monopoly vs. IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#19 PC history, was PDP10 and RISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#16 unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#24 What ever happened to Tandem and NonStop OS ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#27 What ever happened to Tandem and NonStop OS ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#8 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#48 Hey! Keep Your Hands Out Of My Abstraction Layer!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#45 "25th Anniversary of the Personal Computer"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#41 Device Authentication - The answer to attacks lauched using stolen passwords?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#29 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#31 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#44 Is computer history taugh now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#5 Is computer history taugh now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#35 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#24 What if the computers went back to the '70s too?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#25 What if the computers went back to the '70s too?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2014 09:47:20 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
under the 370, OS VS VM/370 Assembler

cp67/cms & then vm370/cms used OS 360/370 assembler with simulation of os system services and cms macro libraries.

I've periodically pontificated long and hard about all the problems that I had with os/360 convention "relocatable adcons" (address constants) when I did paged mapped filesystem. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcons
cms paged map filesystem work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

os/360 convention had program address constants somewhat spread throughout executable image ... when the executable image was fetch into (originally) real storage ... there was appended control information that swizzled all the address constants to correspond with the loaded address.

memory mapping didn't require that the executable image to be preloaded to start execution ... and also would allow the same exact image on disk to be "shared" concurrently in multiple different virtual address spaces w/o requiring the image to be at the same exact virtual address (in the different virtual address spaces).

tss/360 had convention that didn't require preloading executable image (to swizzle the address constants) and allowing sharing in different virtual address spaces w/o restricting to same virtual address.

to fully leverage all the cms filesystem features for executable images ... I had to fiddle the code to eliminate the os/360 address constant convention (making it more like tss/360).

old email about migrating from cp67/cms to vm370/cms including paged map support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

above also refers to csc/vm ... one of my hobbies was providing enhanced production operating systems to internal datacenters. as internal datacenters (that were on cp67/cms) had moved to vm370 ... and increased use of vm370 was occuring in the corporation the internal cp67/cms distribution dropped off ... but shot up again after I started shipping csc/vm. At one point, I got to jibe the 5th flr (multics) people ... that I was directly shipping/supporting more csc/vm installations than the total number of multics installations (that ever existed) ... including their own internal systems not on following list (note some number of the following locations also had multiple systems)
http://www.multicians.org/sites.html

posts mentioning 545 tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 1 Jun 2014 07:16:46 -0700
harris152@GMAIL.COM (Graham Harris) writes:
I recall Storagetek talking about RAIT around a decade ago. Not sure if anything came of it in the mainframe space. The concept seems to be 'out there' on other platforms.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#64 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#65 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#16 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape

note that cyclotomics was instrumental in reed-solomon error correcting for cdrom standard ... was being used for communication before started showing up in computer magnetic disk and other magnetic media.

when I was doing HSDT project inside IBM ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

... had number of meetings with cyclotomics ... also one of the people that got assigned to HSDT (inside IBM) had been reed's graduate student at caltech/jpl and had done a lot of the work on reed-solomon (he had been undergraduate at MIT ... and even remembered taking MIT class from my wife's father)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reed%E2%80%93Solomon_error_correction

during that period, cyclotomics was acquired by kodak (Berlekamp was one of the cyclotomics founders) ... old email announcement of cyclotomics talk at stanford
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#email860414

Error Correction with Reed-Solomon
http://www.drdobbs.com/testing/error-correction-with-reed-solomon/240157266

from above:
Reed-Solomon might well be the most ubiquitously implemented algorithm: Barcodes use it; every CD, DVD, RAID6, and digital tape device uses it; so do digital TV and DSL. Even in deep space, Reed-Solomon toils away. Here's how it works its magic.

... snip ...

for little drift storagetek was acquired by sun which has since been acquired by oracle:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#72 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#73 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

references:

After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://spectrum.ieee.org/view-from-the-valley/at-work/tech-careers/after-the-sun-microsystems-sets-the-real-stories-come-out

from above:
The IBM 360

The very first Sun workstations delivered to a major customer in May 1982 didn't run Unix; instead, they were used as IBM 360 terminal emulators.


... snip ...

Storagetek had earlier acquired "Network Systems" ... that I had also done quite a bit of work with during HSDT ... "Network Systems" had been founded by Thorton ... who along with Cray had been responsible for 6600 at CDC.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Did these tech and telecom companies assess the risk and return with respect to Anti-Money Laundering challenges?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Did these tech and telecom companies assess the risk and return with respect to Anti-Money Laundering challenges?
Date: 01 June 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
How Wal-Mart and Google could steal young customers from traditional banks
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/05/27/how-wal-mart-and-google-could-steal-young-customers-from-traditional-banks/

Note that the rhetoric on the floor of congress regarding GLBA (bank modernization act) was that the primary purpose was if you already had a banking charter, you got to keep it, but if you didn't already have a banking charter, you couldn't get one ... specifically for preventing new competition moving into banking (and calling out both walmart and m'soft) ... of course GLBA is now better known for adding in repeal of Glass-Steagall (it also added in an "opt-out" privacy sharing to preempt the Cal. State "opt-in" privacy sharing that was in progress). posts mentioning Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

Concurrently in the late 90s, there was lots of angst that the telcos (or other entities leveraging new technologies) would take over the payment business (accounting for 40-60% of US bank bottom line). The specific fear was the possible rise of micropayments ... volumes which would totally swamp the industry backend computers. The only backends that could handle the anticipated micropayment volumes were the telco backends developed to handle call record volumes ... telcos would then move up the value stream from micropayments and take over the rest of the payment business. However, the rise of micropayments has yet to happen ... but the newest generation of smartphones has resulted in the prospect being raised again.

Note that a decade ago Walmart was about to acquire an Utah ILC (as work around GLBA) ... that would effectively allow it to move their POS merchant interchange fees in-house. Walmart is supposedly 25-30% of US POS transactions and Chase was their merchant bank. The big national banks (too big to fail) sponsored a publicity campaign to get community banks to object to Walmart acquiring the Utah ILC (because it might impact community banking business ... but the real motivation was loss of Chase merchant interchange fees). posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

As part of the bailout, the federal reserve was giving bank charters to some of the wallstreet investment banks (so they could take advantage of fed's money) ... but theoretically should have been precluded by GLBA.

past posts mentioning Utah ILC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#42 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#47 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#58 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#12 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#25 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#19 Does anyone know of merchants who have successfully bypassed interchange costs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#77 Financial Regulatory Reform - elimination of loophole allowing special purpose institutions outside Bank Holding Company (BHC) oversigh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#28 Why Asian companies struggle to manage global workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#20 Royal Pardon For Turing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Spacewar Oral History Research Project

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Spacewar Oral History Research Project
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2014 12:34:27 -0400
Devin Monnens <dmonnens@gmail.com> writes:
I am Devin Monnens, a historian in Florida specializing in early computer games. I am working with a colleague on a paper regarding Spacewar! to be presented at a conference this summer. It's basically tracking the distribution and rate of spreading of Spacewar! across mini-computer platforms during the '60s and '70s.

As a final part of the research process, we're reaching out to everyone in hopes of increasing the sample amount by finding people that played or coded versions of the game in the '60s and '70s. If that fits you, please take a few minutes to fill out this questionnaire. It'll help a lot! Also, please feel free to distribute this to wherever else you think might reach the relevant people.

http://ataribook.com/book/spacewar-questionnaire/

Note I have already been digging through the archives here for Spacewar topics. There is a large timeline I am working on that shows all documented versions.


former coworker
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks
at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

had ported version from pdp1 to 1130/2250 (combo referred to a 2250-4) in the 60s. above references that the person that had created the original was just upstairs in the same bldg.

2250
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_2250
1130
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_1130

my kids would play it during the mid-70s ... the 2250 keyboard was divided in half for two-player controls.

other trivia, ed was also responsible for the corporate internal network (larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late 85/86)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
... and the technology was what was used for the corporate sponsored univ. network (for a time also larger than arpanet/internet).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Did these tech and telecom companies assess the risk and return with respect to Anti-Money Laundering challenges?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Did these tech and telecom companies assess the risk and return with respect to Anti-Money Laundering challenges?
Date: 01 June 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#76 Did these tech and telecom companies assess the risk and return with respect to Anti-Money Laundering challenges?

for other drift, TARP was somewhat a facade only $700B having been appropriated:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troubled_Asset_Relief_Program

end of 2008, just the four largest too big to fail were still holding $5.2T off-book
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home
after over $27T (trillion) done during the bubble
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

As part of the Fed's bailout program behind the scene (and motivation for giving bank charters to the wallstreet investment banks)... $10T as of 2010
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2010/1201/Federal-Reserve-s-astounding-report-We-loaned-banks-trillions
$30T as of 2011
http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2011/12/bailout-total-29-616-trillion-dollars/

Bernanke has been quoted as saying he expected the too big to fail would lend to main street, but instead they were buying treasuries and enriching themselves ... and said he (Bernanke) had no way of forcing them to lend to main street (although he didn't cut back on the Fed funds). Now Bernanke has been characterized as scholar of the great depression. From "The Bankers Who Broke The World" pg439:
The two new measures combined -- the infusion of additional capital into the banking system and the injection of reserves -- allowed the Fed finally to pump money into the system on the scale required ... instead of lending out the money used the capital so injected to build up their own reserves.

... snip ...

and "All the Presidents' Bankers", pg114/loc2738-39:
As The Nation put it, "You can lead a horse to water but you can not make him drink, and you can offer the banks limitless Federal Reserve credit, but you cannot make them lend."

... snip ....

i.e. too big to fail haven't changed their stripes. some past items Bernanke Pushes for More Small Biz Loans
http://www.mainstreet.com/article/small-business/financing/bernanke-pushes-more-small-biz-loans
Round Two: Bernanke Faces More Grilling From Congress
http://www.cnbc.com/id/35542268/Round_Two_Bernanke_Faces_More_Grilling_From_Congress
Geithner, Bernanke have little in arsenal to fight new crisis
http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/geithner-bernanke-have-little-in-arsenal-to-fight-new-crisis/2011/08/12/gIQAFuFvFJ_story.html

Just to clarify the quotes from "The Bankers Who Broke The World" and "All the Presidents' Bankers" are both about the Great Depression ... and should have been known by a student/scholar of the Great Depression and head of the fed.

posts mentioning Bernanke
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Bernanke
posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
posts mentioning Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 1 Jun 2014 16:00:34 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#75 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape.

when I got to play disk enginneer in bldgs 14&15 ... some old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk
got to work some with person that got original RAID patent
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT - Quantum Teleportation Feat Brings Ultrafast Computer Networks Step Closer To Reality

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: OT - Quantum Teleportation Feat Brings Ultrafast Computer Networks Step Closer To Reality
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 1 Jun 2014 20:28:20 -0700
ibm-main@TPG.COM.AU (Shane Ginnane) writes:
Not surprisingly, since they very earliest reports of such successes, there were murmurings that a large proportion of the fundamental research had been done/financed by organisations closely aligned to the former employer of a certain Mr Edward Snowden.

when Gerstner left CEO of IBM ... he went to head up large private equity company ... which bought the employer of Mr Edward Snowden. That company had a contract with gov. agency ... the agency congress had put on probation and not allowed to manage its own projects because of history of problems.
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

which may just been excuse to further privatize the gov. operations ... aka 70% of the budget and over half the people (gov. agencies can't lobby and donate to congress but private companies that get gov. contracts for doing the same work, can)
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
ref to Snowden's employer
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington

private equity companies have been increasingly extracting every thing possible from the companies they buy and putting the operations under intense pressure to do whatever necessary to generate revenue. older article on the subject:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

more recent SEC official describes widespread lawbreaking in the private equity industy
http://www.sec.gov/News/Speech/Detail/Speech/1370541735361#.U2rbM2Bdqcd

which kicked off whole series of pieces over the past month ... just a small sample

SEC Official: Over Half Of All Private Equity Audits Revealed Crimes
http://news.firedoglake.com/2014/05/09/sec-official-over-half-of-all-private-equity-audits-revealed-crimes/
SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/sec-official-describes-widespread-lawbreaking-material-weakness-controls-private-equity-industry.html
New York Times' New Editor Buries Important Story on Private Equity Fee Shenanigans on Holiday Weekend
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/new-york-times-new-editor-buries-important-story-private-equity-fee-shenanigans-holiday-weekend.html
The Deal's Done. But Not the Fees.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/25/business/the-deals-done-but-not-the-fees.html

posts mentioning Gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
posts mentioning private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

weird power trivia

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: weird power trivia
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2014 23:58:30 -0400
rpw3@rpw3.org (Rob Warnock) writes:
Captains worry about tactics; colonels worry about strategy; generals worry about logistics.

Also:

http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/navy/log_quotes_navsup.pdf
Logistics Quotations Posted by Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) ... "Amateurs think about tactics, but professionals think about logistics." -- General Robert H. Barrow, USMC (Commandant of the Marine Corps) noted in 1980


some of the Boyd people recently pushed (re)reading Wylie ... recently made available as ebook www.amazon.com/Military-Strategy-General-Theory-Control-ebook/dp/B00J1JRHDO/

Military Strategy: A General Theory of Power Control (Jr, Joseph Caldwell Wylie) loc695-97:
To illustrate what is meant by this I would suggest that a primary fault in the last war in Europe was that we brilliantly fought and implemented what turned out to be an obscure, contradictory, and finally nonexistent strategic end.

... snip ...

from the naval institute
http://www.usni.org/store/forthcoming/military-strategy

intro ... Military Strategy: loc24-26
Rear Admiral J. C. Wylie was the first serving naval officer since Mahan and Luce to become known for his writings on strategy and theory. Military Strategy is a reaction to questions raised in the 1950s during the debate on unification of the U.S. armed forces.

... snip ...

recent Mahan refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#40 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#38 Can America Win Wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#75 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#43 Revamped PDP-11 in Honolulu or maybe Santa Fe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#66 Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn

past Boyd posts & web URLs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

I've mentioned before that when Gray was commandant of the Marine Corp, he leveraged Boyd for makeover of the corp ... and also instrumental in Marine Corps hosting Boyd conferences at the Quantico Marine Corp University ... and although Boyd was air force col and largely responsible (along with his acolytes) for the F16, F18, A10 and significant redesign of the F15 ... it was the Marine Corps that was at Arlington and his effects went Marine Corps library in Quantico.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Costs of core

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Costs of core
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 2 Jun 2014 05:50:45 -0700
R.Skorupka@BREMULTIBANK.COM.PL (R.S.) writes:
Let me rephrase: Memory redundancy is not unique to mainframes. It can be mirroring as well. Mirroring consumes more memory than RAIM, but non mainframe memory is dozen times cheaper, so it's still not so bad.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#63 Costs of core

similar to disks ... real CKD DASD hasn't been manufactured for decades ... just simulated on industry standard disks (at significant price premium)

past posts mentioning CKD, multi-track search, FBA, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#64 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#65 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#16 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#75 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#79 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Costs of core

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Costs of core
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 2 Jun 2014 07:19:29 -0700
Kees.Vernooij@KLM.COM (Vernooij, CP - KLM , SPLXM) writes:
I still remember the early 80's, on a 3031/3033 or so I think, when IBM decided to sell memory in 1MB units only. We needed 0.5 MB expansion for the next year and my manager was very angry with IBM about the unnecessary waste of money because of this new policy. So 1 MB was a substantial investment at that time.

303x (along with 3081) was q&d projects kicked off after FS imploded.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

3031 was 158 engine with just 370 microcode and the integrated channel microcode moved to a 2nd 158 engine called "channel director"; 3032 was 168-3 with new covers and configured to work with external "channel director", 3033 was 168-3 logic remapped to chips that were 20% faster (also had more circuits per chip, some late logic rework to increase use of onchip logic, increased 3033 to 1.5times 168-3).

MVS in 3033 timeframe was increasingly enormous bloat ... but the amount of system real storage approaching 16mbyte and amount of virtual address space approaching 16mbyte (even with each application getting its own 16mbyte virtual address space, MVS requirement was approaching 16mbyte).

to address the real storage bloat, a hack was done to have >16mbyte real storage even tho 370 didn't support >16mbyte real storage addressing. IDALs introduced with 370 was 32bit field for i/o transfer addresses, it was leveraged for doing i/o to real addresses >16mbyte. The 370 page table entry was 16bits, 12bit page number, 2 defined bits, and 2 undefined bits. The 2 undefined bits were co-opted to prefix the page number forming 14bit page number (allowing to generate up to 64mbyte addressing). While instruction addressing was still 24bit/16mbyte, virtual addresses could be translated into 26bit/64mbyte real addresses.

OS/360 heritage has enormously ingrained pointer passing API paradigm. With everything in single same address (OS/360 real storage and VS2/SVS) that wasn't a problem. Moving to VS2/MVS with different 16mbyte virtual address space for each application represented enormous problem/opportunity. It started out with image of the MVS kernel taking up half of each 16mbyte application virtual address space (8mbyte, with application and kernel in same virtual address space can use pointer passing API for kernel calls to access application parameters).

That left the problem of various MVS subsystems that moved into their own separate virtual address space. To address applications calling subsystem, the common segment area (1mbyte CSA) was defined in each virtual address space for parameters used in subsystem calls (leaving 7mbytes for applications). However as systems size grew (with 3033), CSA size had to grow (proportional to both number subsystems and concurrently executing applications) ... becoming common system area (multiple one mbyte segments). Later in 3033 time-frame, CSA was 5-6mbytes at many customers (leaving 2-3mbytes address space for applications), threatening to become 8mbytes (leaving nothing for applications).

all the problems contributed to the attack of the vm/4341s ... a cluster of vm/4341s had more aggregate processing than 3033 at lower cost, lower environmental and floor space. Also 4341 channels were faster & more efficient than the 303x channel director (158 engine running integrated channel microcode). I've mentioned before that the head of POK trying to fight off the Endicott 4341s, got the corporate allocation of a critical 4341 manufacturing component cut in half. Places like LLNL were doing benchmarks looking for 70 4341s for datacenter compute farm ... the leading edge of cluster supercomputers. Large corporations were also ordering hundreds of 4341s at a time, placing them out in departmental areas ... the leading edge of the distributed computing tsunami. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

MVS was locked out of the exploding distributed computing market. The 3380 was high-end CKD DASD ... however the only mid-range disks were FBA (3310 & 3370) appropriate for placing out in departmental areas (non-datacenter environment, converted departmental supply & conference rooms). Eventually they did come out with 3375 (CKD simulated on 3370) to try and provide MVS an entry into this market. However, MVS system tended to require 10-30 people for care&feeding ... which scaled poorly to hundreds of distributed departmental computers (IPL and run with little or no human intervention).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

real vs. emulated CKD

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: real vs. emulated CKD
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 2 Jun 2014 07:59:40 -0700
dasdbill2@COMCAST.NET (DASDBILL2) writes:
I know it has been "decades" since IBM manufactured its last real CKD controller, but what was the exact date when the last new one was shipped?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#82 Costs of core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#83 Costs of core

depends on how you differentiate CKD and FBA ... 3380 was already moving to fixed-block cells (track space calculations have 3380 rounding up to cell size). part of this is driven by increasingly sophisticated error correcting code technology being on fixed size blocks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#75 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape.

fba-512 has been standard since the 70s with 3310s & 3370s ... but currently is move to fba-4096 ... as part of error correcting technology.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_sector

the above has IBM sizes in 512, 1024, 2048, & 4096 in the 70s. The enhanced CMS filesystem introduced formating block size option ... but on 3310s & 3370s ... used multiples of 512byte physical blocks.

however, industry standard transition to 4096 starting in 2007 continuing through Jan2011. IBM article on subject:
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-4kb-sector-disks/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Costs of core

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Costs of core
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 2 Jun 2014 09:51:59 -0700
eells@US.IBM.COM (John Eells) writes:
It's certainly true that running the first large MVS system required a significant number of people (operators, production control, system programmers, etc.). However, the second through *n*th had far lesser incremental cost. I was a sysprog during this period and we supported 30-34 MVS systems (depending on the year) plus several VM systems with perhaps 3 people per MVS system overall.

I know of at least one customer who ran a one-person system programming shop at the time, too.

Also, because a substantial fraction of system programmer time was devoted to debugging at the time, I rather suspect the average ratio (whatever that might be) has improved markedly.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#83 Costs of core

CP67 & VM370 took some time to get to unattended operation.

Big first push was in the 60s with CP67 and being able to offer 7x24 online availability ... system costs were recovered by billing and leaving system up 7x24 when (initially) there was very low useage ... was big transition ... part of it was reducing total cost of operation as much as possible ... automatic ipl w/o human intervention, lots of other stuff w/o human interventiona.

This was also in the period that machines were leased/rented with charges based on the system meter (which ran whenever processor and/or any channel was busy). An early gimick was special CCW so that things were reading for incoming characters ... but the channel wasn't classified as busy (so system meter would stop if there wasn't actually any activity). One of the characteristics of the system meter was all activity had to be quiet for at least 400ms before it actually stopped. Note that long after systems had converted from lease to sales ... and system meter was important ... MVS still had an internal system task that woke up every 400ms (to make sure that system meter never stopped).

There was a problem as more and more services moved into virtual machines (common terminology now calls it virtual applicance, but then was called service virtual machines) ... that even if the system auto re-ipl'ed w/o human intervention ... there was increasing need to have the services running virtually automatically come up.

I was doing lots of performance enhancements and turning at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

and developed automatic processes including automatically bringing up running operational virtual machines (automatically re-ipl between each benchmark, even in some cases re-ipl totally different systems). All during the FS period,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

I continued to work on 360/370 stuff ... even periodically ridiculing the FS stuff (which wasn't exactly a career enhancing activity). Then with failure of FS and mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipelines .... not just 3033&3081 but software ... which contributed to decision to release in products various pieces of stuff I was doing during the period. some old email about moving bunch of stuff from cp67 base to vm370 and discussion of various pieces.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

above mentions csc/vm ... one of my hobbies was providing enhanced production operating systems to internal datacenters. Another piece was "autolog" ... which I had originally used for automated benchmarking ... but internally was increasingly used to automatically bring up service virtual machines ... and was included in vm370 release3 for that purpose. There was also a bunch of my integrity stuff picked up for release3 ... that eliminated all sorts of system failures.

Then it was decided to pickup other pieces for release as the "Resource Manager" (initially with release3 plc9, aka nineth monthly update). Note that the 23jun69 unbundling announcement there was start charging for software, but they managed to make the case that kernel software should still be free.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

However, the lack of 370 products during the FS period is credited with giving the clone processors market foothold. Coming out of the FS failure, it was decided to start transition to charging for kernel software ... and my resource manager was selected as the guinea pig as separately charged for component. Also as part of the release, I had over 2000 (automated) benchmarks that took 3months elapsed time ... usually carefully selected configurations and workloads to validate correct operation. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#benchmark

after I transferred from science center to San Jose research, the internal distribution csc/vm morphed into sjr/vm. I also got sucked into doing significant upgrade for the disk engineering and development labs. They were operating pre-scheduled, stand-alone testing on numerous mainframe around the clock, 7x24. At one point they had tried MVS for concurrent testing ... but found it had 15min MTBF in that environment. I offered to rewrite I/O supervisor to make it bullet proof and never fail ... so that they could do on-demand concurrent testing ... significantly improving productivity. Afterwards, I would increasingly be dragged into playing disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

I was also doing DBMS stuff ... Bank of america was early adopter of the original sql/relational implementation System/R (that had been done at vm370 370/145 at san jose research) on 60 vm/4341s. Old email proding me that I needed to further improve (reduce) the care&feeding for large number of distributed vm/4341s. old email as Jim was leaving IBM for tandem, he was palming a bunch of stuff on me, working with BofA, consulting to the STL IMS group, etc.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801016
earlier email from Jim about BofA (& 60 4341s)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#email800311
posts mentioning original sql/relational system/r
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

4300s were selling against DEC VAX machines in the low&mid range market. they sold about the same number in market involved small numbers of machines ... big difference was large corporations ordering hundreds of 4300s at a time. old post with a decade of VAX sales sliced&diced by model, year, US/non-us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0

as can be seen in the above, by the mid-80s, low&mid range market was starting to shift (to workstations and large PCs).

At the time, MVS in this market wasn't even close for consideration. SHARE was doing studies/reports comparing the amount of human effort supporting vm/4341 compared to vax/vms ... recent post with old email about fortran Q (initially went out as iup opt=3 for FORTHX) ... but also references SLAC having done one of the (for SHARE) VMS/CMS comparisions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#email820322
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#71

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2014 13:39:11 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Well, virtual memory on the Model 67, which was present on the 370, seemed to work well enough. But since you're referring to address constants in programs, it seems as though you're saying the 360 base-displacement addressing is inferior to the x86 model of having a code segment, a data segment, an extra segment, and so on.

The x86 was better off in having 16-bit displacements instead of 12-bit displacements, but otherwise the scheme of having base registers is more general and flexible, so I think I disagree with you, but I'm not sure that I understand you.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#74 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

OS/360 convention for address constants ... especially between differently compiled programs were done at load time. The address constants could be somewhat randomly distributed throughout the executable program. OS/360 had an appended ESD (external/entry system directory) & RLD (releocatable location directory) giving the location of an address constant within the program and what the value of the address should actually be pointed to. Part of the program loading process would be to run through all the appended ESD&RLD information and appropriately swizzle the values in the address constants (embedded in the program image). During execution, typical programming would load values from the address constants into a register (for use in base-displacement instruction operation). some discussion here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OS/360_Object_File_Format

In any case, the executable image in memory would be different from the image on disk (couldn't do a straight-forward memory map between processor storage and file storage ... because the address constants first had to be swizzled). Also since the swizzling of the address constants was unique to where the executable image was loaded ... it wasn't possible to have same executable image occupy different virtual address spaces at different virtual addresses.

TSS/360 had the appended ESD and the address constant together, spearate from the program image. Executable code would reference loading address constant from this separate area ... which could be different place in different virtual address spaces. As a result it was possible to do straight-forward memory map between what is in processor store and what is in filesysteme store ... w/o having to do anything to the executable image itself (at the time the image is memory mapped, the separate collected address constants are loaded and adjusted as needed).

mmap posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap
adcon posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

this has some discussion of "position independent code" ... however in the os/360 paradigm ... there can be an enormous number of address constants in the program image that have to be fixed/established as part of the program loading process ... which then fixes the address/position of the executable image
https://www.cs.rutgers.edu/~pxk/416/notes/09-memory.html

note that the trivial 360/370 programming environment is the simple program that does


         BALR 12,0
Using *.12

aka it dynamically establishes the address value in register 12 and all subsequent instruction base+displacement are generated using the displacement from the BALR instruction. however, for more complex programs where there is lots of linkage between separately compiled programs (including subroutine libraries), there are things like

        L     15,=V(library-routine)
BALR  14,15

where the "V" address constant is a value embedded in the executable image of the program and swizzled by the program loader to provide the absolute location of the referenced address.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

real vs. emulated CKD

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: real vs. emulated CKD
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2014 14:00:59 -0400
RPommier@SFGMEMBERS.COM (Pommier, Rex) writes:
While I don't know when the 3390s last rolled off the assembly line, I believe they were all SLEDs. After that came the short-lived 9340/9345 subsystem which had a different track length than the 3390 (built on 5 1/4 inch drives), then the RAMAC II devices which might be what you're thinking of. These things emulated the 3990/3390 SLEDs on (I believe) 3 1/2 inch SCSI drives, packed 4 in a drawer in either a RAID1 or RAID5 configuration.

I don't know how they compared to the 3390s performance-wise, but we replaced a bunch of 3380-Es with a combination of the 9340s and RAMAC IIs and they ran circles around the 3380s, not to mention taking up a LOT less floor space! :-)


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#82 Costs of core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#83 Costs of core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#84 Costs of core

this ibm-main post (from last summer) says last ckd (3390) rolled off 1993
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/bit.listserv.ibm-main/zAUn9kAkykU
which would go along with this
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3390.html

note however, 3380 & 3390 were increasingly becoming fixed "cell" in large part because of the error correcting technology ... while still striving to simulate ckd ... before switching over to using straight industry standard fixed-block disks ... with higher level ckd simulation (i.e. 3375/3370)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2014 14:34:03 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
PSECT, or some other mechanism?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#74 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#86 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

so I just simply started with changing inline assembler code ... somewhat analogous to tss/360 convention.

CMS convention is to linkedit program modules to fixed address and generate ("MODULE") executable image ... with all the address constants bound to the linkedit fixed images.

I wanted to be able to do memory map of CMS modules at any arbitrary virtual address (and even share the same executable memory mapped image in different virtual address spaces at different virtual addresses).

so standard os/360 position independent code is


BALR  12,0
BASE    EQUAL *
USING BASE.12

where the executable image doesn't change but the address space specific registers can have different values.

the problem is with the os/360 convention for separately compiled components


L      15,=V(LibraryRoutine)
       BALR   14,15

where the library routine is swizzled to a fixed, position dependent address. I cheated by doing (having fixed high byte in 12)

LR     15,12
       A      15,=V(LibraryRoutine - BASE)
BALR   14,15

The CMS program linker will have brought in the library routine and did fixed =V(LibraryRoutine - BASE) to be the (relative) displacement of the location between "BASE" and "LibraryRoutine". Then the executable module file would be generated ... but it would no longer contained any fixed, location specific addresses ... they would all be relative.

CMS had a separate API problem. Standard CMS calling convention for anything was:


LA    1,parameters (including name of routine being called)
SVC   202
        DC    AL4(ErrorReturn)

If there was no error, the return was to the svc interrupt address +4. If there was an error, and the first byte at the svc interrupt address was zero, it would assume an error exit, load the address and branch to that location. The AL4 error return was optional, if the first byte at the svc interrupt address wasn't zero, it would assume no error exit and take a system default action (but not return to the program).

a lot of programs defaulted to


SVC   202
       DC    AL4(*+4)

and then inline code tested register return value for non-zero. Attempting to catch and handle any error was dependent on having a location/position dependent address constant.

Introduced was CMS convention


      SVC    202
DC     Al4(-1)

was return to svc interrupt address +4, ignoring any error ... and inline code could test for error (negative one is absolute value so is just ignored by link editor).

mmap posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap
adcon posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2014 14:59:44 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
If there was no error, the return was to the svc interrupt address +4. If there was an error, and the first byte at the svc interrupt address was zero, it would assume an error exit, load the address and branch to that location. The AL4 error return was optional, if the first byte at the svc interrupt address wasn't zero, it would assume no error exit and take a system default action (but not return to the program).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#67 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#71 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#74 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#86 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#88 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

oops, slight correction in explanation, standard cms was:

If there was no error & first byte was zero at svc interrupt address, it would return to interrupt address +4. If there was an error and the first byte at the interrupt address was zero, it would assume an address, load the value and branch to that location.

If there was no error & first byte was non-zero at svc interrupt address, it would return to that address. If there was an error, and first byte was non-zero at svc interrupt address, it would take system default error action ... and not return to the program.

change to CMS was to put -1 ... so if the 4bytes at the interrupt address was all "FFFFFFFF" it would return to interrupt address plus four, regardless of error or no-error.

the problem was in the standard cms calling convention ... the addresses would all be absolute, position specific for where the executable image "MODULE" was generated ... I needed the MODULE to be position independent with no position dependent embedded addresses.

reference to the current CMS module formats; old CMS standard GENMOD, and three MVS compatible formats
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/zvm/v6r1/topic/com.ibm.zvm.v610.dmsl0/binexe.htm

this details current cms calling and svc202 only works from below 16mbyte
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/zvm/v5r4/topic/com.ibm.zvm.v54.dmsa6/hcsd3b0015.htm

example of cms svc 202 call
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/zvm/v5r4/topic/com.ibm.zvm.v54.dmsa6/hcsd3b00142.htm

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2014 15:43:10 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
I have downloaded some manuals on TSS/360 from Bitsavers now. I mistakenly thought that one would have to use an SVC every time one loaded a value into a base register on that system, since one would have to turn off interrupts to do that - when a program got swapped, the values in the base registers would be changed, if software was being used to relocate programs while they were executing.

Also, I see that TSS/360 required some very limited special hardware; not a 360/67 style DAT box, but the first 4K of memory got swapped with some other part of address space.

So I will need to check some more on this. But since it was TSS/360 and not TSS/370, the larger XA and ESA memory models - I'm well aware that what I was talking about was from the early 24-bit addressing days - wouldn't apply. Although I did see a reference to BASR instead of BALR in a TSS/360 manual already.

My understanding is that one normally does BALR 15,0 at the entry point, and uses GR 15 as an "emergency" base register until the real base registers can be loaded with suitable values, using the L instruction. Even if the program is only 4K long. But I'm thinking of the S-type calling convention only.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#67 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#71 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#74 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#86 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#88 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#89 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

I think you are possibly looking at the multiprocessor "prefix" register description.

interrupts in 360 are processor specific ... with the address of the interrupt being stored in page zero. if there are multiple processors running ... they need "unique" hardware page zeros ... one for each processor ... so processor specific interrupts being stored don't overlay each other.

see 360/67 function characteristic
http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/pdf/ibm/360/funcChar/GA27-2719-2_360-67_funcChar.pdf

pg8&13, references (multiprocessor) prefixing in standard 360principles of operation (notes that prefix pages have to be within 1st 72kbytes of physical storage). quick look in a22-6821-6 has prefix reference in pg 18 & 125 ... manually set values

370 enhanced the multiprocessor prefix. in 360, the real page zero was "lost". In 370, in addition to set&store the prefix register, if a processor addressed the page specified in its prefix register ... it would be reverse translated to the real (unique) page zero (instead of the processor specific page zero specified by the prefix register). The idea was that the real page zero could then be used for processors to share information across the whole complex.

360/67 provided for 24bit real addressing ... but had options for both 24bit virtual and 32bit virtual addressing. while 370 eventually announced virtual memory support, it was limited to 24bit.

here is current description of prefixing
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/DZ9ZR003/3.7?SHELF=DZ9ZBK03&DT=20040504121320

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2014 21:48:21 -0400
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
The hardware assumed all addresses were relative to the start of the corresponding segment. System z partly takes care of this with relative addressing. The other part was that the segment information included the page table, rather than the page table being a separate entity. Preassignment is how VM handles DCSSs, as I said, and basically how windoze and OS/2 handle DLLs, although in those cases the address is assigned when the DLL is first loaded and everyone uses that.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#67 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#71 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#74 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#86 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#88 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#89 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#90 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

old email about moving bunch of code from cp67 to vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

including cms page mapped filesystem, changes to lots of cms code to reside in r/o protected "shared segments", and segments could be loaded at arbitrary addresses.

the failure of the FS project
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

and the mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines (both hardware & software, ... during FS, 370 efforts were being killed off and/or suspended) which contributed to releasing bits and pieces of stuff during the FS period (I also would periodically ridicule FS efforts, which possibly wasn't exactly career enhancing activity).

a small subset of the shared segment work was included and released in vm370 release 3 as DCSS (w/o the page mapped filesystem work). it is possible to see extraneous bits and pieces that went in with DCSS ... including some of the adcon hacks ... which weren't actually required since the the rest of the support was being included.

long-winded old post that repeats much of the adcon stuff and subset of the support was picked up and shipped as DCSS in release3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#23 command line switches [Re: [REALLY OT!] Overuse of symbolic

another hack i did was put svc$202, err$202, and br14$202 into cms nucon ... which was only needed for a adcon hack ... but wasn't required for the DCSS subset, but happened to leak through anyway, even tho it wasn't actually needed.

the dc al4(-1) becomes al4(1) ... first byte is zero, treated as error return address, but if needed for real error return, is recognized as invalid address ... and return to +4 is made instead.

in the DCSS subset implementation ... rather than anything in a cms filesystem is useable ... it required kernel table created as part of system build (changes required re-ipl). then special privilege was required to save virtual memory storage range to defined DCSS.

mmap posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap
adcon posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

as an aside ... a recent post in ibm-main mailing list mentioning bits & pieces of csc/vm was picked up and shipped in vm370 release 3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#85 Costs of core

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2014 09:21:36 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
The time-sharing system without DAT was APL\360. It ran as a single job typically started from DOS with its own terminal monitor. Each APL workspace was the same size, and I believe all of the internal pointers were relative, so the monitor could swap out a workspace and swap it back in later somewhere else.

apl\360 workspaces were typically 16kbytes and whole workspace swapped out & in as single unit. apl\360 also implemented its own dispatch/tasking and other services to minimize its use of os/360 system services ... which tended to be very heavyweight on high overhead (lots of subsystems evolved during the period that included attempting to avoid using os/360 system services as little as possible ... including things like HASP and CICS).

science center ported apl\360 to cms for cms\apl ... and all the extraneous suff (swapping, multitasking, etc) besides the actual interpreter was discarded. cms\apl also added API for system services ... like file i/o read/write (things totally lacking in apl\360) and opened up workspaces to virtual address space size ... enabling a whole variety of real world applications.

one of the issues in transition from integral swapping environment to large demand paging was apl\360 storage management ... every assignment involved allocating new storage. typical workspace operation would start with everything compacted at one end of the workspace and quickly use all available space in the workspace ... when it had exhausted all workspace storage ... it would do garbage collection, compacting everything again. regardless the amount of actual storage required for an application ... any execution would repeatedly touch/use every available location in workspace. this had little impact in integral managed swapping ... but would easily put a large demand paged workspace into page thrashing.

one of the first real changes for cms\apl was redo storage management and garbage collection to improve locality of reference/use for demand page environment.

cambridge ran its cp67 as service and even allowed non-employees from univ. in the boston area to use the system (including students). once cms\apl was up and running, some of the business people in corporate hdqtrs (Armonk) starting using the system remotely for business modeling ... and the loaded the holiest of holy corporate resources on the cambridge system (all the detailed customer information). This implied an extremely high level of assurance, integrity and security ... not allowing all the non-employees and student access to the holiest corporate information.

posts mentioning science center (4th flr, 545 tech sq)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
posts mentioning apl (&/or one of the largest apl users HONE)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

and for other drift, posts mentioning CICS (&/or BDAM)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#cics

posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#67 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#71 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#74 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#86 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#88 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#89 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#90 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#91 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Costs of core

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Costs of core
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 3 Jun 2014 06:48:19 -0700
lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler) writes:
There was a problem as more and more services moved into virtual machines (common terminology now calls it virtual applicance, but then was called service virtual machines) ... that even if the system auto re-ipl'ed w/o human intervention ... there was increasing need to have the services running virtually automatically come up.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#85 Costs of core

another part of the rise of the service virtual machines was SPM. cp67 had message mechanism to send instant/text message between users. SPM (special message) was originally developed for cp67 at the IBM Pisa science center ... and quickly was used for service virtual machines.

user-to-user and system-to-user messages could be redirected to software running in the service virtual machine ... implementing all sorts of automated operations under program control.

one of the original service virtual machines was vnet/rscs ... basis for the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late '85 or early '86)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
done by former coworker at the science center
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks
as well as the technology used for the corporate sponsored univ. network (also for a period larger than arpanet/intenet) ... which is where ibm-main originated
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

SPM allowed authorized users to send messages to RSCS/VNET and be interpreted as commands. RSCS/VNET also leveraged SPM to allow user-to-user messages across the network (message sent to local RSCS/VNET then forwarded to users on different machines).

SPM was also used by the author of REXX to implement a multi-user client/server spacewar game ... spacewar server anywhere in the network, with clients communicating with the server (even leveraging RSCS/VNET forwarding to have spacewar communities across the network). The client interface was standard 3270 screen, keyboard commands and space map on the screen. A problem arose, the client/server interface was simple enough that several users wrote "bot" players ... that started to dominate all games. Eventually the server was modified that non-linearly increased power use as the interval between client commands dropped below typical human reaction time (somewhat leveling the playing field)

SPM was the standard mechanism, leveraging the user-to-user message mechanism to implement all sorts of automated software services and automated operator.

on of the problems was high resistance to releasing it to customers. A radical subset of SPM was released as IUCV ... and then a different subset as SMSG (however both IUCV plus SMSG combined was still a subset of full SPM).

other recent posts mentioning service virtual machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#1 Application development paradigms [was: RE: Learning Rexx]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#2 Application development paradigms [was: RE: Learning Rexx]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#18 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#49 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Financialization Has Run Amok

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Why Financialization Has Run Amok
Date: 03 June 2014
Blog: IBMers
Why Financialization Has Run Amok
http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2014/06/03/why-financialization-has-run-amok/

from above:
My article last Friday, "Why IBM Is In Decline," described how a cabal of senior IBM executives and the managers of some big investment firms got together and devised a five-year scheme--IBM's Roadmap 2015--for increasing IBM's earnings per share--and their own compensation--through measures that are not only increasing earnings per share but also steadily crippling IBM's ability to innovate and compete in a rapidly changing marketplace. As revenues decline, while earnings per share increase through relentless cost-cutting and clever "financial engineering," the rot within IBM continues.

... snip ...

refs: "Why IBMS Is In Decline"
http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2014/05/30/why-ibm-is-in-decline/
refs: "The Trouble With IBM"
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-05-22/ibms-eps-target-unhelpful-amid-cloud-computing-challenges

a couple financial posts from over in (closed linkedin) financial crime risk, fraud and security:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#61 Association Of Certified Fraud Examiners Release 2014 Report On Fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#78 Did these tech and telecom companies assess the risk and return with respect to Anti-Money Laundering challenges?

for other drift, TARP was somewhat a facade only $700B having been appropriated:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troubled_Asset_Relief_Program

end of 2008, just the four largest too big to fail were still holding $5.2T off-book
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home
after over $27T (trillion) done during the bubble
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

The claim is that skimming, fees, & commissions on that $27+T routed through wallstreet during the bubble resulted in wallstreet tripling in size (as percent of GDP).

As part of the Fed's bailout program behind the scene (and motivation for giving bank charters to the wallstreet investment banks)... $10T as of 2010
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2010/1201/Federal-Reserve-s-astounding-report-We-loaned-banks-trillions
$30T as of 2011
http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2011/12/bailout-total-29-616-trillion-dollars/

Bernanke has been quoted as saying he expected the too big to fail would lend to main street, but instead they were buying treasuries and enriching themselves ... and said he (Bernanke) had no way of forcing them to lend to main street (although he didn't cut back on the Fed funds). Now Bernanke has been characterized as scholar of the great depression. From "The Bankers Who Broke The World" pg439:
The two new measures combined -- the infusion of additional capital into the banking system and the injection of reserves -- allowed the Fed finally to pump money into the system on the scale required ... instead of lending out the money used the capital so injected to build up their own reserves.

... snip ...

and "All the Presidents' Bankers", pg114/loc 2738-39:
As The Nation put it, "You can lead a horse to water but you can not make him drink, and you can offer the banks limitless Federal Reserve credit, but you cannot make them lend."

... snip ....

i.e. too big to fail haven't changed their stripes. some past items Bernanke Pushes for More Small Biz Loans
http://www.mainstreet.com/article/small-business/financing/bernanke-pushes-more-small-biz-loans
Round Two: Bernanke Faces More Grilling From Congress
http://www.cnbc.com/id/35542268/Round_Two_Bernanke_Faces_More_Grilling_From_Congress
Geithner, Bernanke have little in arsenal to fight new crisis
http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/geithner-bernanke-have-little-in-arsenal-to-fight-new-crisis/2011/08/12/gIQAFuFvFJ_story.html

Just to clarify the quotes from "The Bankers Who Broke The World" and "All the Presidents' Bankers" are both about the Great Depression ... and should have been known by a student/scholar of the Great Depression and head of the fed.

towards the end of internet bubble, we got a threat regarding our criticism of some technology that happened to be involved in an upcoming IPO. The person delivering the threat said that it was nothing personal, for the investment bankers it was purely business, our technology criticism was predicted to possibly have a 10% downside on an expected $2B the investment bankers were expecting to clear. We went to law enforcement agency about it. They said yes, investment bankers are like that ... they mentioned that many involved in the Internet IPO mills (formula process behind the internet bubble, preferably new IPO eventually fails, leaving the field open for the next round of IPOs) had previously walked away clean from the S&L mess ("left no fingerprints") and were predicted to move into mortgages next.

along the way there was also
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
posts mentioning Bernanke
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#bernanke

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2014 19:26:31 -0400
Joy Beeson <jbeeson@invalid.net.invalid> writes:
Consider keeping a family in clean clothes when you fill the washing machine with water carried in buckets from the hand pump. And nearly everything that comes off the line must be sprinkled, rolled up in an oilcloth-lined basket, covered with a damp towel, and ironed on the following day. Even after we got electricity and running water, laundry took two full days every week.

ground water was too hard ... had couple 50gal barrels at corners to collect rain water for washing.

old post with picture of me at 8, rain water barrels are out of picture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#18 Scholars needed to build a computer history bibliography

washing machine was moved into middle of front yard ... water just had to be carried from the rain barrels to the washing machine.

other posts mentioning doing wash in the yard with water from the rain barrels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#41 The 8008
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#45 The 8008
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#28 What do YOU call the # sign?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#62 Formerly common things

that summer, learned to drive 38 chevy truck, starter motor pedel on the floor, all gears required double-clutch (no synchro-mesh), pictures in these posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#59 wrt code first, document later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#41 If there had been no MS-DOS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#19 Working while young
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#39 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#13 Looking for a real Fortran-66 compatible PC compiler (CP/M or DOSor Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#108 Apple's China Manufacturing blasted

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2014 21:03:18 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
I think that two different definitions of 'relocatable' are in play here.

Even without base registers, code is normally relocatable as long as all addresses that need to be shifted are identified to the loader. That's normally what "relocatable" means: the program can be relocated once when it's read in to memory the first time from disk, magnetic tape, an object deck, or paper tape.

Being able to be relocated after the fact... well, I've described a way that could work, but I was told that TSS did *not* need special programs with a special hack, since it required DAT hardware.

I guess I'm still missing something, and a lesser hack was needed.


there is two part issue:

1) memory mapping ... just sets up the dat tables to reflect executable image pages in the filesystem ... doesn't require prefetching. swizzling address constants requires the program loader to prefetch all the pages that contain address constants, which alters the pages ... which means that they each modified page requires a new allocated page on disk. eliminating that whole process can be enormously more efficient.

2) sharing executable images concurrently in different virtual address spaces ... at different virtual address locations. for the same exact executable image that had position specific addresses ... they would have to be shared at the same address. also if the executable image wasn't useable until virtual pages with addresses needed to be swizzled were processed ... then concurrent useage couldn't be shared until after some privileged system process had prefetch the page for the first time.

there was a virtual address space per process (not per executable image) with potentially multiple concurrent different executable images (application/program) in each process-specific virtual address space.

different processes may have loaded executable images (into the process specific virtual address space) in different sequences ... which can create impossible scenarios for position dependent shared executable images ... if each executable image required single system-wide, globally unique position. say four different program/application executable images A, B, C and D. and two different processes XX and YY.

XX loads shared executable image A at location 100000 and shared executable image B at location 200000. YY loads shared executable image C at its location 100000 and shared executable image D at location D at its location 200000. XX process then wants to load shared executable image C at 300000 ... but if the shared executable image is position dependent bound at location 100000 (by process YY), the XX is unable to load shared executable image at 300000 (and have it run correctly).

s/38 got around the problem by having a 48bit virtual address space, everytime any object was created (executable, data, etc) in the filesystem, it was assigned a global system unique virtual address. when any process access a file, it was mapped to its globally unique, system-wide virtual address (the 48bit virtual address space was larger than any possible expected filesystem).

with only 24bit virtual address space, it wasn't possible to pre-assign a globally unique virtual address for every object in the filesystem. even with 32bit virtual address space (4gigabyte) ... there were still a lot of filesystems that exceeded the ability to pre-assign a globally unique virtual address for every object in the filesystem.

a page mapped filesystem, that memory maps filesystem objects (aka files) to virtual address space location ... and a virtual address space per process with multiple filesystem objects mapped concurrently in the same address space ... then with only 24bit or 32bit virtual address spaces ... the virtual address space address location has to be mapped dynamically at allocation time.

if the system supports dynamic concurrent sharing of the same filesystem object in different virtual address spaces ... where filesystem object locations are dynamically assigned at access time ... it is possible to get into deadlock situation where different processes require the same object at different positions (if some of the objects have position specific location).

posts mentioning memory mapped filesystems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap
posts mentioning execution objects with location dependent address constants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

past posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#67 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#71 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#74 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#86 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#88 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#89 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#90 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#91 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#92 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2014 21:35:36 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
s/38 got around the problem by having a 48bit virtual address space, everytime any object was created (executable, data, etc) in the filesystem, it was assigned a global system unique virtual address. when any process access a file, it was mapped to its globally unique, system-wide virtual address (the 48bit virtual address space was larger than any possible expected filesystem).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#96 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

as undergraduate I made lots of enhancements to cp67 ... lots of pathlength optimization ... some of it referenced in piece of fall SHARE presentation previously posted
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18 CP/67 & OS MFT14
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#20 CP/67 & OS MFT14

I also redid page replacement algorithm ... for global LRU and clock-like replacement ... this came up in the early 80s when a co-worker of Jims at Tandem was trying to get his Phd on global LRU and clock replacement ... and somebody that had a lot of vested interest in local LRU replacement was trying to block awarding the Phd. Jim asked if I could weigh in since there were side-by-side comparison of CP67 with local & global LRU replacement algorithms.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#46 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
Jim had brought it up at Dec81 SIGOPS but it took nearly a year to get management approval to send response
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email821019

even tho it involved work before being an IBM employee ... as I've mentioned it presumably was because they thought it was part of punishment because they blamed me for online computer conferencing on the internal network (and not because they were taken sides in the academic dispute). some posts on page replacement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#clock

The IBM SE on the univ. account was also working with TSS/360 at the same time I was playing with cp67. We both did a synthetic benchmark of fortran program, edit, compile and execute. The cp67/cms benchmark had 35 CMS synthetic users with better response than equivalent TSS/360 benchmark with four synthetic users. A big part of it was enormous inefficiencies in the tss/360 implementation of page mapped filesystem (single level store)

Now part of the Future System effort was also a paged map filesystem implementation ... not all that different from tss/360 (and they hadn't actually learned anything). I've claimed that when I was doing paged map filesystem for cms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

a lot of it was what I learned about not what to do from TSS/360 ... also contributed to my periodically ridiculing the FS effort (not exactly career enhancing) and claiming what I already had running was better than the blue sky stuff they were dreaming about.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

now part of the FS folklore is various people from FS retreated to Rochester and did the System/38 ... including page mapped filesystem ... not that the enormous performance penalty of the implementation wasn't a factor in the market that System/38 sold into (trivia: my brother was regional apple rep ... and figured out how to remotely dial into the S/38 used to run apple ... to get manufacturing and delivery schedules).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System/38
other FS info
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

While the mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines (after FS imploded) contributed to decision to ship some of my stuff in standard product releases, however, the bad rep that page mapped filesystem possibly was reason that my cms paged mapped filesystem wasn't included for product distribution (even though I could show it was faster than tss/360 implementation ... but also had 3times the throughput of the standard cms filesystem ... for moderately filesystem intensive applications).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
Date: 04 June 2014
Blog: IBMers
and a.f.c.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#72 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#73 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://spectrum.ieee.org/view-from-the-valley/at-work/tech-careers/after-the-sun-microsystems-sets-the-real-stories-come-out

from above:
The IBM 360

The very first Sun workstations delivered to a major customer in May 1982 didn't run Unix; instead, they were used as IBM 360 terminal emulators.


.... snip ...

predating that ... before they had formed a company, the group had come to IBM about producing the workstation. I meeting was set up at Palo Alto Science Center ... and people from San Jose Research, Yorktown Research and group in Boca (working on yet unannounced product) were invited. After the presentation, all three group recommended not producing the workstation (in part because all three groups felt they were doing something better).

I also referenced in a thread in the ibm-main mailing list
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topicsearchin/bit.listserv.ibm-main/reed-solomon/bit.listserv.ibm-main/lWH74nghxRs

Storagetek (STK) had bought a company that I had worked with in the early 80s on internal IBM project I called HSDT. We were supposed to get $20m from NSF to connect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget and some other things happened. When NSF finally released RFP, internal politics prevented us from bidding. Director of NSF tried to help ... but that just made the internal politics worse (NSF RFP was in large part based on work we had been doing with NSF and internally with HSDT). SUN then buys STK (maker of lots of IBM mainframe disk & tape products) before Oracle buys SUN. posts mentioning HSDT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

The interconnect of the NSF supercomputer centers morphs into the NSFNET backbone as the regional networks connect to the supercomputer centers ... which is the precursor to the modern internet.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/
misc. old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

A couple of us were the first to get IBM email addresses on our business card. This has reference to the original email gateway between the IBM internal network and the arpanet/internet (before the cutover from arpanet host/IMP protocol to internetworking protocol):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/internet.htm

Then a ruling came down from IBM that business cards were for customer contact only ... and if IBM customer couldn't contact via the information, then it shouldn't be on the business card (i.e. take internal email address off the card). We then asked why there had been long-time tradition to have both external phone number *AND* tieline number of business cards. In any case, we removed the internal email address from the card (and tieline number) and left the email gateway address.

One of the issues with PROFs was that they had *borrowed* a very early, pre-release version of internal VMSG for the email client. Later when the VMSG author offered the PROFs group a vastly upgraded version of VMSG, they tried to get him fired (the PROFs group claiming that they had done the email client themselves). When the VMSG author demonstrated that every PROFs email in the world carried his initials in a non-displayed field, everything quieted down. After that, the VMSG author only shared the VMSG source with me and one other person. old email referencing VMSG
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmsg

Prior to 23Jun1969 unbundling announcements, SEs tended to get their training/apprentice as part of large team on customer site. With unbundling, there was issue with having apprentice SEs onsite at customer and not charging for their time. To address the training, they came up with the HONE systems ... branch office online access to virtual machine CP67 systems where they could work with operating systems in virtual machines. posts mentioning unbundling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

The Cambridge Science Center besides having done CP67/CMS (which later morphs into VM370/CMS), they also did a port of APL360 to CMS for CMSAPL. HONE started also offering CMSAPL sales&marketing support applications and pretty soon those came to dominate all HONE activity. posts mentioning hone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

There also started to be numerous HONE clones around the world. As an aside, one of my hobbies was supplying enhanced production operating systems for internal datacenters including HONE ... and they would periodically ask me to help with deploying HONE clone. One of the first was when EMEA hdqtrs moved from Westchester to Paris ... and I was asked to go over as part of its HONE deployment.

Some of my old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html
some HONE specific email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#hone

While HONE did a lot to disguise that it was really cp67/cms (later vm370/cms) ... some HONE users would realize that CMS was available including things like email. In Aug1976, TYMSHARE started providing its CMS-based online computer conferencing system to (IBM customer user group) SHARE for free ... archives here:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare
and some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare

and I got a process setup where TYMSHARE would send me regular tapes of all VMSHARE files to deploy on IBM internal machines, including HONE systems (one of my biggest problems was objections by IBM lawyers that customer information would contaminate internal IBM employees). A couple of my example HONE-related emails are various SEs from around the world asking about VMSHARE information.

Note a lot of my stuff that I had archived from my undergraduate days and when I was at the Cambridge Science Center ... were on tapes in the Almaden datacenter tape library ... during a period when they had an operational problem and were mounting random tapes as scratch (I lost all triple replicated copies of archived information).

NOTE: original email implementation had been done on the MIT (IBM 7094-based) CTSS. Then some of the CTSS people went to the 5th flr 545tech sq and did Multics. Other of the CTSS people went to the IBM science center (established feb1964) on the 4th flr and did (virtual machine) cp40/cms which later morphs into cp67/CMS (and later morphs into vm370/cms). posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

GML was invented at cambridge science center in 1969, a decade later it morphs into SGML and after another decade, it morphs into HTML at CERN
http://infomesh.net/html/history/early/

image of front of my 360/67 "blue card" (fanfold card) ... I got from the "M" in GML (coworker at science center) ... image also has VMSHARE fanfold card
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/folds.jpg

other triva ... in the mid-70s, the US HONE datacenters were consolidated in silicon valley ... not far from SLAC a heavy vm370/cms user (which also sponsored the the monthly BAYBUNCH user group meetings) also not far from TYMSHARE (providing cms-based online comupter conferencing VMSHARE to SHARE).
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml

when FACEBOOK first moved to silicon valley, it was into a new building built next door to the old US HONE datacenter (before FACEBOOK moves into the old SUN campus it acquires from Oracle).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2014 10:29:51 -0400
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
Trouble was they were trying to make an architecture and OS that could be used for all machine sizes. Unfortunaterly, this was not possible, although it did cover a very wide range. The bottom end had to be broken off and the middle and top end machines had to suffer some consequences. The word length was just too short and hardware was just to expensive.

Did the designers even think about hardware memory remapping?


the straight 360 stuff was single (real-storage) address space ... no thought that there might be virtual memory and multiple virtual address spaces ... where shared executable images might be loaded concurrently in different address spaces at different addresses.

however, virtual memory stuff was at least from the transition of ctss

to 360 at the science center (formed feb1964)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

in conjunction with some hudson valley engineers. From Melinda's history
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/
One of the first jobs for the staff of the new Center was to put together IBM's proposal to Project MAC. In the process, they brought in many of IBM's finest engineers to work with them to specify a machine that would meet Project MAC's requirements, including address translation. They were delighted to discover that one of the lead S/360 designers, Gerry Blaauw, had already done a preliminary design for address translation on System/360.(15) Address translation had not been incorporated into the basic System/360 design, however, because it was considered to add too much risk to what was already a very risky undertaking.

The machine that IBM proposed to Project MAC was a S/360 that had been modified to include the "Blaauw Box". This machine was also bid to Bell Labs at about the same time. It was never built, however, because both MIT and Bell Labs chose another vendor. MIT's stated reason for rejecting IBM's bid was that it wanted a processor that was a main-line product, so that others could readily acquire a machine on which to run Multics. It was generally believed, however, that displeasure with IBM's attitude toward time-sharing was a factor in Project MAC's decision.


... snip ...

Some of the CTSS had gone to Project MAC on the 5th flr (of 545 tech sq) and others had gone to the science center on the 4th flr. Project MAC then does Multics with GE machine. Trivia ... Mutlics just had its 50th anniversary May28&29 (yesterday, Frankston posted several pictures on google+)

CTSS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System
Multics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics

Melinda details that science center went ahead trying to get 360/50 to make hardware modifications for virtual memory. However all the spare 360/50s were going to the FAA ATC project, so they had to settle for a 360/40 and initially does cp40/cms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt

which morphs into cp67/cms when 360/67 becomes available. With regard to "mainline" product, I don't think there was all that much difference between the total number of 360/67 machines and the total number of GE Multics machines (and of course, number of 370s with virtual memory were many times greater).

Mainline 360 was scrambling to get all sorts of things done and had to make lots of compromises ... including the biggest computer goof ever
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM
also Brook's "Mythical Man Month"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mythical_Man-Month

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2014 14:44:36 -0400
Greymaus <greymausg@mail.com> writes:
I was reading that the Russians have ordered 2 ships from France, which the US wants France not to deliver...

latest is that france is going to deliver them in retaliation for fining a french bank $10B for helping americans with tax evasion ... and possibly subject to criminal prosecution ... when much worse have been done by US too big to fail and only gotten relatively minor slap on the hands

France Responds To US BNP Fine, Will Train Hundreds Of Russian Seamen To Operate French-Made Warship
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-06-04/france-responds-us-bnp-fine-will-train-hundreds-russian-seamen-operate-french-made-w

IRS had also been slapping the hands of swiss banks and finally got

77,000 foreign banks to share tax info with IRS
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/77000-foreign-banks-share-tax-info-irs

but above was closely followed by articles about House working on cutting IRS funding for tax evasion and repeal FATCA.

Something similar went on in 2009/2010 when IRS said it was going after 52,000 wealthy americans that owed $400B in unpaid taxes (tax evasion using swiss banks) and reports were that the House was working on bill to cut IRS funding for tax evasion.

note that not long after too big to fail started appearing that gov. was doing everything possible to keep the institutions afloat, there started also being articles mentioning too big to prosecute and too big to jail for illegal acts, tax evasion, fraudulent reporting, money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists, etc.

posts mentioning too big to fail, too big to prosecute, too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

recent posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#72 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#73 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#98 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

for a little more (too big to fail) drift ... discussion on how wallstreet allowed to run amok has extended to IBM (closed linkedin IBMers group)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#94 Why Financialization Has Run Amok

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Costs of core

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Costs of core
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 4 Jun 2014 12:17:32 -0700
zedgarhoover@GMAIL.COM (zMan) writes:
Heck, your PHONE has more memory, storage, and cores than most mainframes in the last century. And certainly more memory than existed on the PLANET when most of us started in this business...

20yrs ago we were brought into the largest airline res system to look at the 10 impossible things that they couldn't do ... they had dozen or so largest mainframes dedicated to the task.

turns out the paradigm was left over from the 60s when computer resources were radically different ... and as result had to make numerous trade-offs (which hadn't changed in 30yrs).

I realized that I could completely change the paradigm, make it run several times faster, handle all requests for every passenger & airline in the world and also do all ten impossible things ... I came back with the new implementation (& new paradigm that did everything) 2months later.

turns out ten rs6000/580s would handle the whole world ... ten yrs later a cellphone chip had more processing power then those ten 580s.

recent posts mentioning airline res:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#20 Write Inhibit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#10 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#54 Has the last fighter pilot been born?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2014 18:13:54 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
I forget if this was a standard 370 feature, or if you needed a 138 or 148 in order to do it. Ah: DAT was standard on the 115 and 125, but the 135 and the 145 had to be turned into a 135 II (not a full 138) and a 145 II respectively to get it. So it didn't start out as standard on the 370, but it quickly became standard.

135&145 would have DAT ... just needed a new floppy disk load to turn it on.

there was pentagon paper type event inside IBM when before DAT had been announced, document describing 370 virtual memory leaked to industry press. it kicked off witch hunt to find the source ... it got to point where they believed it came from somebody in the vm370 group ... but couldn't be sure. however, all internal copying machines were retrofitted with serial numbers that would appear on copies ... example here (almost 15yrs later)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

some number of customers said that they had guessed it anyway ... although it required new floppy disk to activate it ... the machines had been shipped with front panel light rollers that had bit labeled "xlate"
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP3145.html
a little closer up image here (search engine will find more)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System/370

the rollers on the side provided lables for the lights.

the problem was that 155 & 165 required real hardware (not just floppy disk) that turned them into 155-II and 164-II. The announcement of DAT was being gated by getting the 165 DAT hardare developed and working

138/148 was new technology provided more memory and lots more microcode space. low&mid range was starting to see competition from the clone makers ... especially outside the US ... so they wanted to come up with IBM added value. Internal code name for 138/148 was virgil/tully and I was asked to help endicott developed vm370 microcode assist for the machines. They said that there was 6kbytes of microcode space for moving 370 code into microcode ... on about 1-for-1 byte running ten times faster (6kbytes of 370 code moved to 6kbytes of microcode running ten times faster). this is some work done measuring where vm370 kernel spent the most time.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21

top 6kbytes of vm370 kernel instructions accounted for 79.55% of kernel time ... translated/moved to microcode ran 10times faster.

this talks about original justification that convinced top executives to put virtual memory on all 370s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73

mvt had storage allocation/management problem. real storage was divided into multiple (contiguous storage) initiator "regions" for executing applications ... however mvt storage management was such that only about 25% of region was activelly used. OS/VS2 SVS ... basically MVT running in single 16mbyte virtual address space (not too unlike running MVT in a 16mbyte virtual machine under cp67) ... being able to get 16 initiators running in 1mbyte real storage

previous post in thread, referring to Melinda's history that virtual memory was rejected for all 360s because it was deemed too risky on an effort that was already considered very risky.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#99 IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

and previous posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#67 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#71 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#74 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#86 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#88 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#89 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#90 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#91 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#92 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#96 IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#97 IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2014 10:12:08 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
In addition to an add-on High-Speed Multiply feature, the model 168 could also have a 3062 attached processor added. Unlike connecting two 168s together in a parallel sysplex, the 3062 used the same memory as the main 168, but it executed many instructions faster.

158 & 168 mainframes came in two-processor tightly-coupled multiprocessor that shared memory ... similar to the 360/65 multiprocessor. however, they were full symmetrical multiprocessor just sharing memory ... not sharing i/o ... each processor continued to have dedicated I/O channels and simulated shared i/o but relying on multi-tail control units (capable of connecting to multiple channels) configured at the same addresses.

360/67 not only had 24bit & 32bit virtual addressing ... but multiprocessor shared memory also supported shared i/o channels (all processors could address all channels) ... more than 24bit address and shared channels disappeared in 370 and didn't reappear until the early 80s with 3081 (in 370xa mode).

some past posts mentioning multiprocessor (and/or compare&swap instruction, invented by charlie at the science center doing fine-grain multiprocessor locking, instruction name is from charlie initials "CAS")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

360s & 370s also supported loosely-coupled multiprocessing ... no shared memory ... but shared i/o configurations ... again multi-tailed control units connecting to multiple channels ... but in loosely-coupled configuration the channels connected to different processors (not sharing memory).

disclaimer, long ago and far way my wife was con'ed into going to POK to be in charge of loosely-coupled architecture. While there she created peer-coupled shared data architecture ... which saw little uptake (except for IMS hotstandby) until sysplex and parallel sysplex ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

because of little uptake (and battles with the communication group trying to force her into using SNA for loosely-coupled operation), she didn't remain long in the position.

158&168 also offerred "attached processor" multiprocessor configuration. ... two processor shared memory ... but only one processor having attached I/O channels ... the 2nd processor was purely for computation and had to queue i/o requests for execution on the processor with channels. Note all two-processor 158&168 shared memory configurations ran both processors at .9 times the single single processor clock rate (allowing for some of the overhead of the cross-cache protocol chatter ... for maintaining memory consistency). As a result both two processor configuration (standard with both processor having channel and "attached processor" with only one processor having channels) were hardware rated at 1.8times a single processor (add-in multiprocessor software overhead and throughput tended to be 1.5 times a single processor or less).

this references 3033 available in two-processor shared memory configurations ... both with channels or "attached" processor ... only one having channels.
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/3033/3033_TR01.html

note that 303x effort was part of the mad rush kicked off after failure of FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

they took the integrated channel microcode from 158 and created 303x channel director ... a 158 microcode engine with integrated microcode and w/o 370 microcode. a 3031 was a 158 microcode engine with 370 microcode and a 2nd 158 microcode engine with integrated microcode (and w/o 370 microcode). A 3032 was 168-3 with new covers and configured to use 303x channel director. A 3033 started out as 168-3 design using 20% faster chips. A 3033 attached-processor is two shared-memory processors with only one processor configured with channel directors
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/3033/3033_TR01.html

note that since standard 158 has integrated channel microcode ... a 158 "attached processor" actually had all full channel capability, just didn't have channel cables connected.

It was possible to get dasd configurations with 8-tail connecting to eight different channels. I've mentioned that HONE (virtual machine based), world-wide online sales&marketing support system had its US HONE datacenters consolidated in silicon valley in the mid-70s. Most of the applications were implemented in APL and were compute intensive. Over time, the consolidated evolved into having the maximum number of two-processor "attached processor" 168s sharing the same DASD. The vm370 system was enhanced to "single-system image" (largest single system image complex at the time) to support load-balancing connections across the complex (and failure recovery fall-over) ... of course that support never got released to customers. some past posts mentioning HONE (&/or APL)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

recent posts mentioning APL &/or HONE:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#92 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#98 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out

past post "From the annals of release no software befores its time" about z/VM releases cluster support (mainframe single-system-image) 30yrs after it was running at HONE.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#43 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time

in the early 80s, the consolidated silicon valley US HONE datacenter was replicated in Dallas and then a 3rd in Boulder for disaster survivability (load-balancing and failover between the sites) ... after an earthquake in silicon valley ... which also kicked off seismic retrofit engineering of bldgs. on the IBM san jose plant site, San Jose Research had a shell built around the (occupied) existing bldg ... and ties connected to the new shell ... used to help support the existing bldg.

Trivia ... HONE single-system image deployment with multiple attached processors started before VM370 released multiprocessor and attached processor support ... so I wrote them some (one of my hobbies was supporting internal datacenters with enhanced systems, HONE had been longtime customer back to CP67 days). I had a test 158 attached processor to work with. Because of workload characteristics I was able to do some hacks that resulted in greater than two times the throughput of single processor ... even though the hardware was only 1.8 times. I was able to offset the .9 processor slowdown and multiprocessor software overhead with same games with improved cache hit rates (increased processor throughput because of fewer cache misses offset the additional multiprocessor overhead & processor slowdown).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A lifetime ban on lobbying for lawmakers?

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: A lifetime ban on lobbying for lawmakers?
Date: 05 June 2014
Blog: Facebook
A lifetime ban on lobbying for lawmakers?
http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-action/house/208104-bill-would-bar-lawmakers-from-becoming-lobbyists-for-life

A little over decade ago CBS had item that freddie mac had more lobbiests on its roles than employees ... story was that every departing member of congress (major staffer, spouse, etc) was automatically offered $20k/annum retainer. There is also story line motivating congress to increase privatizing of gov (70% of the budget and over half people in intelligence has been privatized) ... gov. agencies can't lobby, but private companies with gov. contracts can ... even some claims that congress expects kickback of 5% of appropriations (hiring lobbying companies quote 10% of the appropriations that they have to split with congress).

some mention in Success Of Failure references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

60mins program part-d that a single sentence added at the last minute that precluded competitive bidding. they showed drugs under part-d were three times the cost of identical from VA (that allows competitive bidding). GAO/comptroller general later was saying it would eventually come to swamp all other budget items (long term $40T gift to the drug industry). The 18 primary republican members and staffers responsible afterwards resigned and found to all be on drug industry payroll.

posts mentioning part-d
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#medicare.part-d
posts mentioning comptroller general
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

It was the first major legislation after congress allowed fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002 (required spending not exceed tax revenue). 2010 CBO report was that in the period, tax revenue had been cut by $6T at the same time spending was increased by $6T (for $12T budget gap) ... otherwise, baseline budget had all federal debt retired by 2010. A little over $2T of the $6T spending increase went to DOD, $1+T for the two wars and they couldn't account for where the other $1+T went.

posts mentioning fiscal responsibility act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2014 13:14:07 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
158&168 also offerred "attached processor" multiprocessor configuration. ... two processor shared memory ... but only one processor having attached I/O channels ... the 2nd processor was purely for computation and had to queue i/o requests for execution on the processor with channels. Note all two-processor 158&168 shared memory configurations ran both processors at .9 times the single single processor clock rate (allowing for some of the overhead of the cross-cache protocol chatter ... for maintaining memory consistency). As a result both two processor configuration (standard with both processor having channel and "attached processor" with only one processor having channels) were hardware rated at 1.8times a single processor (add-in multiprocessor software overhead and throughput tended to be 1.5 times a single processor or less).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#103 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

because of increasingly bloated pathlength, MVS multiprocessor support was tended throughtput that was 1.2-1.3 times single processor ... so I thought it was pretty neat by managing sequence of things improving cache hit ratios even being able to hit greater than 2times throughput of single processor.

some amount of the stuff actually shipped when vm370 got around to officially shipping multiprocessor support to customers.

this is reacent long-winded recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#85 Costs of core

referencing 23jun1969 unbundling included starting to charge for (application) software but managed to make the case that kernel software should still be free.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

then the dearth of 370 (hardware&software) products during the FS period is credited with given clone processors market foothold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

then in the wake of the failure of FS, there was made rush to get products back into the 370 pipelines ... which included decision to release some of the stuff I had been doing all through the FS period.

The rise of clone processors also motivated start of transition to charging for kernel software ... and it was decided some amount of my performance changes as separate kernel product, guinea pig for starting to charge for kernel software (much of it I had originally done as undergraduate for cp67, but was dropped in the simplification morph from cp67 to vm370)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

the initial guidelines were new software not directly involved in hardware support (device drivers, multiprocessing support, etc) would still be free, but would start to charge for everything else.

the problem for deciding to release multiprocessor (both standard and attached) support for vm370 would be that it would have to be "free". However, I had included a lot of stuff that multiprocessor support was dependent on in my charged for "resource manager". To resolve the problem, 90% of the code from the resource manager was moved out of the charged for product into the free "base" (w/o changing the price of the charged for resource manager).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

Later in the 80s, the transitioned to charging for *all* kernel software and they renamed vm370 to vm/sp as part of that transition.

However, there was a new issue cropped up. With 308x, IBM had transitioned to no longer producing single processor 370 products. The IBM ACP/TPF didn't have multiprocessor support and there was fear that all the IBM ACP/TPF customers would migrate to clone vendors that were still producing more powerful single processor machines.

As an interim stopgap horrible things were done to the multiprocessor support inside the VM/SP kernel to optimize throughput for a single large ACP/TPF running in virtual machine ... which significantly degraded throughput for all other multiprocessor customers.

IBM tried to somewhat to mask the horrible things done by improving some other areas of vm/sp to partially compensate ... primarily in how 3270 terminal I/O was done ... but there was some number of large customers that were purely ascii terminals ... that really felt the painful change in degraded throughput. I had done some stuff for improving terminal i/o operation to improve overall throughput that wasn't necessarily 3270 specific and got called in about trying to mollify some of these large customers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#57 any 70's era supercomputers that ran as slow as today's supercomputers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#35 diffence between itanium and alpha
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#11 what's the difference between LF(Line Fee) and NL (New line) ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#0 Why so little parallelism?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#0 tty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#14 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#24 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#25 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#37 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?

Eventually IBM game out with the single processor 3083 (a 3081 with one of the processors removed, the issue was they kept processor0 which was at the top of the box, simply removing the 2nd processor1 would have left the box dangerously top-heavy, so they also had to do some twiddling to move processor0 to the middle of the box). past posts mentioning 3083:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#70 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#79 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#23 Item on TPF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#78 IBM to announce new MF's this year
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#16 Sabre Talk Information?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#19 zLinux OR Linux on zEnterprise Blade Extension???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#49 vm/370 3081
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#43 Sabre; The First Online Reservation System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#49 Dyadic vs AP: Was "CPU utilization/forecasting"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#77 program coding pads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#84 'smttter IBMdroids
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#115 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#71 Help with elementary CPU speed question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#59 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#90 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#28 I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#37 AT&T Holmdel Computer Center films, 1973 Unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#11 Relative price of S/370 AP and MP systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#56 Early !BM multiprocessors (renamed from Curiosity: TCB mapping macro name - why IKJTCB?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#21 Complete 360 and 370 systems found
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#49 Beyond the EC12

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2014 19:24:01 -0400
"Charles Richmond" <numerist@aquaporin4.com> writes:
What about WYLBUR??? aThat is the text editing and job submission system that was used on an IBM 370/155 at the university that I attended. The line editor had some powerful commands. There was an interactive "EXEC" scripting language used mostly for utility editing jobs.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#56 Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#63 Costs of core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#90 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#98 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#99 IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#102 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#103 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

lots of 360/67s were sold to univ. to run tss/360 (although the science center had done cp40 on modified 360/40 which morphed into cp67 when 360/67 came available) ... when tss/360 had troubles becoming production ... some number just dropped back to using them for os/360 in 360/65 mode, others installed cp67, and some developed their own virtual memory systems. Michigan developed MTS for 360/67
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan_Terminal_System
and Stanford developed orvyl/wylbur for 360/67
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ORVYL_and_WYLBUR

later WYLBUR was ported to MVS.

past posts mentioning orvyl/wylbur
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#0 TSS/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#50 Wylbur?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#42 S/360 undocumented instructions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#21 TSO alternative
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#20 REXX still going strong after 25 years
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#39 System/360 40th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#4 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#32 HASP/ASP JES/JES2/JES3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#4 Mainframe vs. xSeries
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#43 MTS, Emacs, and... WYLBUR?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#3 MTS, Emacs, and... WYLBUR?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#7 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#31 Wylbur and Paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#33 Wylbur and Paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#36 Wylbur and Paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#39 Wylbur and Paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#43 Wylbur and CRBE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#62 nouns and adjectives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#78 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#74 Best IEFACTRT (off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#52 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#57 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#82 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#9 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#79 history of RPG and other languages, was search engine history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#82 history of RPG and other languages, was search engine history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#41 someone smarter than Dave Cutler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#67 Article says mainframe most cost-efficient platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#11 TSO region size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#42 Which non-IBM software products (from ISVs) have been most significant to the mainframe's success?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#6 IBM 360 display and Stanford Big Iron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#73 Speed of Old Hard Disks - adcons
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#86 Utility of find single set bit instruction?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#41 Colossal Cave Adventure in PL/I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#44 Colossal Cave Adventure in PL/I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#56 Drum Memory with small Core Memory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#73 Wylbur, Orvyl, Milton, CRBE/CRJE were all used (and sometimes liked) in the past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#75 Wylbur, Orvyl, Milton, CRBE/CRJE were all used (and sometimes liked) in the past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#78 Wylbur, Orvyl, Milton, CRBE/CRJE were all used (and sometimes liked) in the past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#49 My first mainframe experience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#63 Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation (Cambridge skunkworks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#19 From Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#61 Hybrid computing -- from mainframe to virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#25 VM370 40yr anniv, CP67 44yr anniv
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#73 PDP-10 system calls, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#68 Should you support or abandon the 3270 as a User Interface?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#63 The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#76 DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#20 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#25 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#71 assembler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#23 [OT ] Mainframe memories

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The SEC's Mary Jo White Punts on High Frequency Trading and Abandons Securities Act of 1934

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The SEC's Mary Jo White Punts on High Frequency Trading and Abandons Securities Act of 1934
Date: 06 June 2014
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/PjYuXcKn6G8

The SEC's Mary Jo White Punts on High Frequency Trading and Abandons Securities Act of 1934
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/06/secs-mary-jo-white-punts-high-frequency-trading-abandons-securities-act-1934.html

High Frequency Trading and Finance's Race to Irrelevance
http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/06/high-frequency-trading-and-finances-race-to-irrelevance/
WASHINGTON: SEC chief is open to curbs on high-speed traders
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2014/06/05/229540/sec-chief-is-open-to-curbs-on.html
High-Speed Trading Rules Coming From SEC, White Says
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-05/high-speed-trading-rules-coming-from-sec-white-says.html
High Frequency Trading and Finance's Race To Irrelevance
http://yro-beta.slashdot.org/story/14/06/05/1945221/high-frequency-trading-and-finances-race-to-irrelevanceï--¿

some past posts mentioning high speed/frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#36 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#43 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#44 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#13 Study links ultrafast machine trading with risk of crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#86 The Dangers of High-Frequency Trading; Wall Street's Speed Freaks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#22 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#73 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#84 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#31 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#32 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#37 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#66 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#85 Study: One in Five Firms Misrepresent Earnings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#22 Four Signs Your Awesome Investment May Actually Be A Ponzi Scheme
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#39 History--punched card transmission over telegraph lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#38 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#42 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#44 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#7 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#25 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#29 Destructive Destruction? An Ecological Study of High Frequency Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#41 Computer Simulations Reveal Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#75 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#67 The End Of 'Orderly And Fair Markets'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#30 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#49 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#59 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#93 High Frequency Terrorism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#40 The Wall Street Code: HFT Whisteblower Haim Bodek on Algorithmic Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#84 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#65 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#64 Wells Fargo made up on-demand foreclosure papers plan: court filing charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#93 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#100 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#18 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#60 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#71 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#72 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#3 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#20 HFT, computer trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#41 System Response
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#1 HFT is harmful, say US market participants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#54 Has the last fighter pilot been born?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#64 HFT is harmful, say US market participants

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Xanadu, The World's Most Delayed Software, Is Finally Released After 54 Years In The Making

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Xanadu, The World's Most Delayed Software, Is Finally Released After 54 Years In The Making
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2014 10:10:08 -0400
Xanadu, The World's Most Delayed Software, Is Finally Released After 54 Years In The Making
http://www.businessinsider.com/xanadu-released-2014-6

you would at least run into Nelson and other xanadu people (sometimes demos)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Xanadu

at Hackers
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hackers_Conference

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SEC Caught Dark Pool and High Speed Traders Doing Bad Stuff

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: SEC Caught Dark Pool and High Speed Traders Doing Bad Stuff
Date: 07 June 2014
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
SEC Caught Dark Pool and High Speed Traders Doing Bad Stuff
http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-06-06/sec-caught-dark-pool-and-high-speed-traders-doing-bad-stuff

Fast money: the battle against the high frequency traders; A 'flash crash' can knock a trillion dollars off the stock market in minutes as elite traders fleece the little guys. So why aren't the regulators stepping in? We talk to the legendary lawyer preparing for an epic showdown
http://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/jun/07/inside-murky-world-high-frequency-trading

slightly predates the onslaught of HFT ... but says wallstreet illegal activity had nothing to fear from SEC ... A lot of HFT can be taken as obfuscation of illegal activity and further confusing SEC
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

The SEC's Mary Jo White Punts on High Frequency Trading and Abandons Securities Act of 1934
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/06/secs-mary-jo-white-punts-high-frequency-trading-abandons-securities-act-1934.html

other recent posts mentioning HFT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#54 Pensions, was Re: Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#82 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#84 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#89 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#28 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#29 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#43 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#56 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#65 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#7 N.Y. Barclays Libor Traders Said to Face U.K. Charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#64 Wells Fargo made up on-demand foreclosure papers plan: court filing charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#93 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#100 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#18 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#60 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#71 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#72 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#3 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#20 HFT, computer trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#25 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#41 System Response
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#70 Obama Administration Launches Plan To Make An "Internet ID" A Reality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#1 HFT is harmful, say US market participants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#54 Has the last fighter pilot been born?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#64 HFT is harmful, say US market participants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#107 The SEC's Mary Jo White Punts on High Frequency Trading and Abandons Securities Act of 1934

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

weird power trivia

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: weird power trivia
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2014 18:04:51 -0400
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
The majority of cranes in the large container ports are half-automatic, some driver needs to position the crane and lift; and engage the autopilot which then picks out container after container and reassemble them somewhere else.

The major manual work is loading/unloading of trucks. It takes only two people; one near the truck and one crane operator to run the crane.

But such a team easily load/unload several hundred trucks in a day.

The streamlining of container transport is so great that the US three letter agencies have had to fit in to the commercial operation, instead of the other way around.


everything container
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2012/10/04/pentagon-late-fees/1613881/

and

Russian Missile System Masquerading as Innocent Cargo Container
http://www.defensenews.com/article/20140416/DEFREG03/304160021/Russian-Missile-System-Masquerading-Innocent-Cargo-Container

Google admits data center podification
http://www.channelregister.co.uk/2009/04/02/google_data_center_revealed/

Famously, Brewster Kahle and the Internet Archive publicly pitched the container idea in the fall of 2003, and that December, Google filed for a patent describing a modular data center of its own. According to Kahle and a well-known 2005 expose from Robert X. Cringely, Google co-founder Larry Page was in the audience for one Internet Archive pitch a little more than a month before the patent filing.

... snip ...

Brewster has pitched at Hackers at times when Larry was there.

other drift

Google Runs All Software In Containers
http://www.enterprisetech.com/2014/05/28/google-runs-software-containers/
Everything at Google Runs in Containers
http://www.infoq.com/news/2014/06/everything-google-containers

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Decline and Fall of IBM

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Decline and Fall of IBM
Date: 08 June 2014
Blog: Facebook
also Google+
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/L3ZAYTtirzv

The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.cringely.com/2014/06/04/decline-fall-ibm/

Similar (from 20yrs ago): The rise and fall of IBM
http://www.ecole.org/en/seances/CM07

other recent: Why Financialization Has Run Amok
http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2014/06/03/why-financialization-has-run-amok/

from above:
My article last Friday, "Why IBM Is In Decline," described how a cabal of senior IBM executives and the managers of some big investment firms got together and devised a five-year scheme--IBM's Roadmap 2015--for increasing IBM's earnings per share--and their own compensation--through measures that are not only increasing earnings per share but also steadily crippling IBM's ability to innovate and compete in a rapidly changing marketplace. As revenues decline, while earnings per share increase through relentless cost-cutting and clever "financial engineering," the rot within IBM continues.

... snip ...

refs: "Why IBM Is In Decline"
http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2014/05/30/why-ibm-is-in-decline/
refs: "The Trouble With IBM"
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-05-22/ibms-eps-target-unhelpful-amid-cloud-computing-challenges

older "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America" pg464/loc9995-10000:
IBM was not the born-again growth machine trumpeted by the mob of Wall Street momo traders. It was actually a stock buyback contraption on steroids. During the five years ending in fiscal 2011, the company spent a staggering $67 billion repurchasing its own shares, a figure that was equal to 100 percent of its net income.

pg465/10014-17:
Total shareholder distributions, including dividends, amounted to $82 billion, or 122 percent, of net income over this five-year period. Likewise, during the last five years IBM spent less on capital investment than its depreciation and amortization charges, and also shrank its constant dollar spending for research and development by nearly 2 percent annually.

... snip ...

New IBM Buyback Plan Is For Over 10 Percent Of Its Stock
http://247wallst.com/technology-3/2013/10/29/new-ibm-buyback-plan-is-for-over-10-percent-of-its-stock/

from above:
The company has represented that its dividends and share repurchases have come to a total of over $159 billion since 2000.

... snip ...

IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-01-21/ibm-asian-revenues-crash-adjusted-earnings-beat-tax-rate-fudge-debt-rises-20-fund-st

and another area is employee retirement
http://www.amazon.com/Retirement-Heist-Companies-American-ebook/dp/B003QMLC6K
some ibm specific:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

from above:
IBM couldn't just pull the plug on the subsidy, because pension law doesn't allow a company to take away a benefit a person has already earned or take away a pension right or feature the company has granted. "So we had to design something different," Sauvigne said. Enter Louis V. Gerstner Jr., IBM's new president. He'd headed RJR Nabisco in 1993 when it faced a similar dilemma: how to reduce pensions and remove the retirement subsidy without obviously violating the law or provoking an employee backlash. Gerstner and IBM turned to Watson Wyatt, the same consulting firm that had helped Nabisco solve its pension problem.

... snip ...

Gerstner wins the competition to be the next CEO of Amex, the looser leaves and takes his protege with him. AMEX is in competition with KKR for private-equity takeover of RJR:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

KKR wins but runs into trouble and hires Gerstner away to turn it around. IBM goes into the red and is reorganized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

the board hires Gerstner to reverse the breakup and resurrect the company. after Gerstner leaves IBM, he goes on to head up another large private-equity company (that is involved in the recent intelligence mess involving Snowden).

posts mentioning Gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerster
posts mentioning private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970






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