List of Archived Posts

2015 Newsgroup Postings (09/26 - 12/31)

How Corporate America Invented Christian America; Inside one reverend's big business-backed 1940s crusade to make the country conservative again
FALSE: Reverse PIN Panic Code
More "ageing mainframe" (bad) press
PROFS & GML
Decimal point character and billions
Decimal point character and billions
1954 RAMAC Prototype
Rarely enforced SEC rules may give green light to earnings manipulation
Self-service PC
Decimal point character and billions
the legacy of Seymour Cray
the legacy of Seymour Cray
Did 1st EMV transaction
the legacy of Seymour Cray
Paying CEOs fat bonuses for stock performance doesn't work
Corrupt From Top to Bottom
Modern computer brochures; military security; then and now ?
the legacy of Seymour Cray
the legacy of Seymour Cray
Bernanke: Some Wall Street executives should've gone to jail over financial crisis
the legacy of Seymour Cray
the legacy of Seymour Cray
rationality
It A "Liquidity Mirage": New York Fed Finally Grasps How Broken The Market Is Due To HFTs
the legacy of Seymour Cray
Hillary Clinton's Glass-Steagall
Putin's Great Crime: He Defends His Allies and Attacks His Enemies
the legacy of Seymour Cray
rationality
Ernst & Young Confronts Madoff's Specter in Trial Over Audits
Whistleblower Employed By Federal Whistleblower Protection Program Fired For Blowing The Whistle
Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down
(External):Re: IBM
The wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan were lost before they began, not on the battlefields
The Sad Symbolism of Captured U.S. Military Hardware
high level language idea
high level language idea
Marine distress system
high level language idea
high level language idea
high level language idea
high level language idea
Relational Databases Lack Relationships
Are we just running in place?
rationality
rationality
rationality
rationality
Protecting Social Security from the Thieves in the Night
rationality
rationality
rationality
rationality
rationality
rationality
rationality
rationality
Gene Amhdahl Dies at 92
IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
rationality
Compiler
IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
[CM] Coding with dad on the Dragon 32
[CM] Coding with dad on the Dragon 32
Economic Mess
IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
R.I.P. Gene Amdahl, pioneer in mainframe computing
rationality
Department of Defense Head Ashton Carter Enlists Silicon Valley to Transform the Military
Miniskirts and mainframes
IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Miniskirts and mainframes
Were you at SHARE in Seattle? Watch your credit card statements!
Were you at SHARE in Seattle? Watch your credit card statements!
IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Clear up this C9 business (I hope)
The Global Financial Crisis: Analysis and Policy Implications
New Smoking Gun: U.S. and UK KNEW Saddam Did NOT Possess WMDs
Corruption Is as Bad in the US as in Developing Countries
IBM Automatic (COBOL) Binary Optimizer Now Availabile
IBM Automatic (COBOL) Binary Optimizer Now Availabile
IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
disARMed
First Single-Chip Out-of-Order Microprocessor?
Old HASP
Maneuver breaks out
What's Worked in Computer Science
First Single-Chip Out-of-Order Microprocessor?
History--did relay logic (e.g. crossbar switch) need air conditioning?
Happy Dec-10 Day!!!
OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
Systems thinking--still in short supply
book "1984"--modern privacy
Systems thinking--still in short supply
Administrators and moderators of alt.folklore.computers Google
OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
Systems thinking--still in short supply
OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
This new 'skyscraper' chip could make computers run 1,000 times faster
Accounting industry and SEC hobble America's audit watchdog
Median Age of US Managers
DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z
DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z
DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z
25 Years: How the Web began
25 Years: How the Web began
25 Years: How the Web began
Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
Between CISC and RISC
The Source, was: 25 Years: How the Web began
Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
25 Years: How the Web began
25 Years: How the Web began
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
IBM retirement fund
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

How Corporate America Invented Christian America; Inside one reverend's big business-backed 1940s crusade to make the country conservative again

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: How Corporate America Invented Christian America; Inside one reverend's big business-backed 1940s crusade to make the country conservative again.
Date: 26 Sep 2015
Blog: Facebook
How Corporate America Invented Christian America; Inside one reverend's big business-backed 1940s crusade to make the country conservative again.
http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/04/corporate-america-invented-religious-right-conservative-roosevelt-princeton-117030.html

Corporate America had gotten such a bad reputation with WW1 war profiteering, crash of '29, depression and supporting Nazi/Hitler ... that they decided to launch a major propaganda campaign to remake their image:
In December 1940, as America was emerging from the Great Depression, more than 5,000 industrialists from across the nation made their yearly pilgrimage to the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City, convening for the annual meeting of the National Association of Manufacturers.

... snip ...

Note earlier the same year, June1940, Germany had a victory celebration at the Waldorf-Astoria with major corporations. Lots of them were there to hear how to do business with the Nazi's, Intrepid: loc1901-4:
One prominent figure at the German victory celebration was Torkild Rieber, of Texaco, whose tankers eluded the British blockade. The company had already been warned, at Roosevelt's instigation, about violations of the Neutrality Law. But Rieber had set up an elaborate scheme for shipping oil and petroleum products through neutral ports in South America. With the Germans now preparing to turn the English Channel into what Churchill thought would become "river of blood," other industrialists were eager to learn from Texaco how to do more business with Hitler.

... snip ...

John Foster Dulles played major role in rebuilding Germany's economy and military during 20s&30s. The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War,

loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc873-79:
Sullivan & Cromwell floated the first American bonds issued by the giant German steelmaker and arms manufacturer Krupp A.G., extended I.G. Farben's global reach, and fought successfully to block Canada's effort to restrict the export of steel to German arms makers.

loc905-7:
Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism

... snip ...

From the law of unintended consequences ... when the 1943 US Strategic Bombing program needed location of military & industrial targets in Germany, it got them from wallstreet.

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

FALSE: Reverse PIN Panic Code

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: FALSE: Reverse PIN Panic Code
Date: 26 Sep 2015
Blog: Facebook
FALSE: Reverse PIN Panic Code
http://www.snopes.com/business/bank/pinalert.asp

disclaimer: I use to have wing in los gatos lab ... offices and labs ... where early ATM machines were done (before my time there)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_3624
also administered magstripe standard (also before my time there)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_stripe_card
more about PINs
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_identification_number
including this flaw
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_identification_number#Implementation_flaws

more disclaimer: I've been somewhat in battle with EMV (chip showing up on payment cards) since EMV was originally defined. About the same time EMV was originally done in the mid-90s, I did chip design that had *NONE* of the vulnerabilities and exploits of EMV (was significantly more secure and cost significantly less). There was large EMV pilot done in the US at the turn of the century that was later described as billions of dollars were spent to prove chips are less secure than magstripe. I tried to warn about the shortcomings ... but they went ahead anyway ... afterwards all evidence appeared to disappear w/o a trace ... and speculation that it would be a long time before it was tried in the US again (it is now 15years later) ... letting all the bugs to be worked out in other countries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMV

posts mentioning Yes Card
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

Did get a pilot done by NACHA and the debit networks (about the same time) .... but in the aftermath of the EMV failure there was wholesale pullback from all chips in the US. NACHA/debit network results (July 23, 2001) ... gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20070706004855/http://internetcouncil.nacha.org/News/news.html

Old post about booth & press release at the 1999 BAI (whorld-wide retail banking) show
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#217
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#224

some more references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

More "ageing mainframe" (bad) press

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: More "ageing mainframe" (bad) press.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 27 Sep 2015 10:14:45 -0700
vbcoen@GMAIL.COM (Vince Coen) writes:
I think the stats on migration failures show that many fail regardless of the target migration mainly is that they over estimate project time, and quality of the target systems being used in place of m/f.

Taking a straight view the mainframe is slow compared to running on servers on a instruction throughput basis.

What they miss however is the data through put specs compared to mainframes where the m/f still wins hands down.

I have tried (just for my self) to build a 8 core PC with separate Sata controllers for each 15000 rpm drive to match up with m/f performance but apart from the high costs of each controller there is still the speed or lack of it of going from the controllers to the application because of bottle necks in the data bus.

I have not seen any PC/server design mobo that gets around this problem and until they do - the mainframe is still "the man" for data processing in bulk.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#94 HP being sued, not by IBM.....yet!

Lots of migration failures are trying to make any change at all.

A simple scenario is the financial industry spent billions of dollars in the 90s to move from "aging" (mainframe) overnight batch settlement to straight-through processing using large numbers of parallel "killer micros". A major source of failure was wide-spread use of industry parallelization libraries ... that had 100 times the overhead of cobol batch. I pointed it out at the time, but was completely ignored ... the toy demos looked so neat. It wasn't until they tried to deploy that they ran into the scaleup problems (the 100 times parallelization overhead total swamped the anticipated throughput increases using large number of "killer micros" for straight-through processing).

In the meantime there has been enormous amount of work by the industry (including IBM) on RDBMS parallizing efficiencies. A RDBMS-based straight-through processing implementation done more recently easily demonstration all of the original objectives from the 90s ... but the financial industry claimed that it would be at least be another decade before they were ready to try again (lots of executives still bore the scars from the 90s failures and had become risk adverse).

In 2009, non-mainframe IBM was touting some of these RDBMS parallelization scaleup efficiencies. I somewhat ridiculed them ... "From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time" ... since I had been working on it 20yrs earlier (and got shutdown, being told I was not allowed to work on anything with more than four processors).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#43 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#46 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time

Also, in 1980 I got sucked into to do channel extender for STL that was moving 300 people from the IMS group to off-site bldg. The channel extender work did lots of optimization to eliminate the enormous channel protocol chatter latency over the extended link ... resulting in no appearant difference between local and remote operation. The vendor then tried to get IBM approval for release of my support ... but there was group in POK working on some serial stuff (and were afraid if it was in the market, it would make releasing their stuff more difficult) and managed to get approval blocked. Their stuff is final released a decade later, when it is already obsolete (as ESCON with ES/9000). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

In 1988, I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they have, which quickly morphs into fibre-channel standard (including lots of stuff that I had done from 1980). Later some of the POK engineers define a heavy weight protocol for fibre-channel that drastically reduces the native throughput which is eventually released as FICON. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

The latest published numbers I have from IBM is peak I/O benchmark for z196 that used 104 FICON (running over 104 fibre-channel) to get 2M IOPS. At the same time there was a fibre-channel announced for e5-2600 blade that claimed over million IOPS (two such fibre-channel has greater native throughput than 104 FICON running over 104 fibre-channel).

In addition, there hasn't been any real CKD manufactured for decades, CKD is simulated on industry standard fixed-block disks. It is possible to have high-performance server blades running native fibre-channel with native fixed-block disks that eliminates the enormous FICON and CKD simulation inefficiencies.

Related z196 I/O throughput number is all 14 SAPs running at 100% busy peaks at 2.2M SSCH/sec ... however, they recommend that SAPs are limited to 75% or 1.5M SSCH/sec.

I have yet to see equivalent numbers published for EC12 or z13. EC12 press has been that z196 @ 50BIPS processing to EC12 @ 75BIPS processing (50% more processing) only claims 30% more I/O throughput. z13 quote has been 30% more processing than EC12 (with 40% more processors than EC12).

Note that while fibre-channel wasn't originally designed for mainframe ... but for non-mainframe server configurations (that tend to run a few thousand), SATA is design point for the $500-$800 PCs. The are a lot of throughput differences between the consumer $500-$800 PCs and the non-mainframe server blades that are done for more heavy duty processing.

recent posts mentioning e5-2600:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#35 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#36 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#39 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#46 Why on Earth Is IBM Still Making Mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#78 Is there an Inventory of the Inalled Mainframe Systems Worldwide
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#82 Is there an Inventory of the Installed Mainframe Systems Worldwide
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#29 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#30 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#93 HONE Shutdown
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#39 Remember 3277?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#14 Clone Controllers and Channel Extenders
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#0 What are some of your thoughts on future of mainframe in terms of Big Data?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#5 Can you have a robust IT system that needs experts to run it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#35 Moving to the Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#93 Miniskirts and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#19 Linux Foundation Launches Open Mainframe Project
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#42 20 Things Incoming College Freshmen Will Never Understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#93 HP being sued, not by IBM.....yet!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#96 TCP joke

past posts mentioning overnight batch & straight-though processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#40 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#31 Quote from comp.object
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#15 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#36 Future of System/360 architecture?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#19 Distributed Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#21 Distributed Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#37 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#44 Distributed Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#61 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#19 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#27 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#64 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#69 Controlling COBOL DDs named SYSOUT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#72 whats the world going to do when all the baby boomers retire
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#81 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#74 Too much change opens up financial fault lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#30 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#31 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#73 Price of CPU seconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#87 Berkeley researcher describes parallel path
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#89 Berkeley researcher describes parallel path
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#55 performance of hardware dynamic scheduling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#50 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#56 Long running Batch programs keep IMS databases offline
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#26 What is the biggest IT myth of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#30 Automation is still not accepted to streamline the business processes... why organizations are not accepting newer technolgies?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#7 If you had a massively parallel computing architecture, what unsolved problem would you set out to solve?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#87 Cleaning Up Spaghetti Code vs. Getting Rid of It
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#43 Business process re-engineering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#14 Legacy clearing threat to OTC derivatives warns State Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#55 Cobol hits 50 and keeps counting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#1 z/Journal Does it Again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#2 z/Journal Does it Again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#21 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#23 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX? (Are settlements a good argument for overnight batch COBOL ?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#26 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#30 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#38 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#43 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX? (Are settlements a good argument for overnight batch COBOL ?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#57 IBM halves mainframe Linux engine prices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#81 A Faster Way to the Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#13 UK issues Turning apology (and about time, too)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#81 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#57 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#67 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#35 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#47 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#77 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#16 How long for IBM System/360 architecture and its descendants?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#19 STEM crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#77 Madoff Whistleblower Book
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#56 Handling multicore CPUs; what the competition is thinking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#37 16:32 far pointers in OpenWatcom C/C++
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#47 COBOL - no longer being taught - is a problem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#78 Software that breaks computer hardware( was:IBM 029 service manual )
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#41 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#3 Assembler programs was Re: Delete all members of a PDS that is allocated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#14 Age
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#13 Is the ATM still the banking industry's single greatest innovation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#37 A Bright Future for Big Iron?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#71 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#48 WikiLeaks' Wall Street Bombshell
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#19 zLinux OR Linux on zEnterprise Blade Extension???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#42 Looking for a real Fortran-66 compatible PC compiler (CP/M or DOSor Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#35 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#15 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#19 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#91 Mainframe Fresher
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#93 Itanium at ISSCC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#32 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#5 Home prices may drop another 25%, Shiller predicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#8 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#25 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#52 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#15 Is the SEC Covering Up Wall Street Crimes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#70 New IBM Redbooks residency experience in Poughkeepsie, NY
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#71 Don't Dump the Volcker Rule Just Because It's Not Perfect
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#1 Banks Awash in Cash, Which Isn't Good News
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#10 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#23 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#9 John R. Opel, RIP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#79 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#8 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#12 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#49 No internet in 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#13 Study links ultrafast machine trading with risk of crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#25 Goldman Sachs P.R. Chief's Accidental Exit Interview
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#49 US payments system failing to meet the needs of the digital economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#0 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#24 Time to competency for new software language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#69 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#77 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#19 X86 server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#31 X86 server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#47 I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#18 System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#24 System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#42 COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#30 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#42 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#49 Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#35 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#80 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#29 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#81 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#83 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#22 US Federal Reserve pushes ahead with Faster Payments planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#90 Why do bank IT systems keep failing ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#10 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#78 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#38 Meet Cobol's hard core fans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#76 This Was the Very First Website In the US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#71 Decimation of the valuation of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#119 Holy Grail for parallel programming language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#170 IBM Continues To Crumble
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#78 Is there an Inventory of the Inalled Mainframe Systems Worldwide
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#65 A New Performance Model ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

PROFS & GML

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: PROFS & GML
Date: 27 Sep 2015
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#98 PROFS & GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#99 PROFS & GML

crypto trivia, later became involved in link encryptor board that would do multiple megabytes/sec and built for less than $100. At first the corporate crypto product people said that it significantly weakened DES. It took me 3months to figure out how to explain to them that rather than weakening DES, it significantly increased DES strength. It turned out to be a hollow victory ... got told I could make as many as I wanted, but there was only one possible user... they would all have to be sent to address in Maryland. It was when I first realized that there are three kinds of crypto: 1) the kind they don't care about, 2) the kind you can't do, and 3) the kind you can only do for them.

Part of HSDT was 4.5m satellite dishes at Los Gatos, Yorktown and Austin ... and then did tail-circuits over the Collins Digital Radio microwave that ran between Bldg.12 and bldg. 29 in Los Gatos. Old email to me (copying several other people).
19 June 1985, 14:55:51 PDT To: wheeler

Re: 1.544 mbps transmission from SJ b/40 to b/29 via microwave

We have facilities in place to carry 1.544 all of the way from b/40 to b/29. However, format is DS-1, not some kind of clock and data interface such as V.35 or 449.

One conversion possibility would be to use the little Coastcomm multiplexes (<$12 K/pr) with a single v.35 or 449 (either one) at 1.536 mbps. The remaining 8 kbps is standard 193rd bit D3 framing which in this case would allow encryption of the link. If you'd like, I'll send you a copy of the data sheet on the interface card.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

other crypto trivia ... in 1984 did software DES benchmarking on 3081 ... got about 150kbytes/sec ... needed both 3081 processors dedicated to get 300kbytes/sec sustained or about the equivalent of full-duplex T1 ... whcih was why needed dedicated link encryptors .... old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#email841115

other crypto related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#crypto

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Decimal point character and billions

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Decimal point character and billions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Sep 2015 10:13:54 -0700
JimP <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:
Republicans have been cutting school budgets for years. Illiteracy is on the rise.

all sorts of budgets have been cut &/or diverted for decades.

1990 census reported that half the 18yr olds were funtionally illiterate (and things have continued to decline since then).

budget director in the 80s, reported that they increased SS payments so they could use it for military spending w/o having to say they increased income taxes (however, at some point in the future, income taxes will have to be increased to replenish the SS trust fund; unless they come up with gimmick to cut SS payments).

Volcker talking to civil engineering professor about money has been diverted from infrastructure spending for so long ... there aren't jobs, lack of jobs, students stop taking classes, w/o students, univ. start shutting down programs and dropping professors ... Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President pg290
http://www.amazon.com/Confidence-Men-Washington-Education-ebook/dp/B0089LOKKS
Well, I said, 'The trouble with the United States recently is we spent several decades not producing many civil engineers and producing a huge number of financial engineers. And the result is s**tty bridges and a s**tty financial system!'

... snip ...

recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#48 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

there were stories about stimulus shovel-ready projects having to hire chinese civil engineering companies (there weren't a lot since many states were also siphoning off the funds for other purposes ... but state employee pension funds have also been looted in several ways) Estimates are that there is a couple trillion deficit in diverted infrastructure maintenance spending over the last few decades, that needs to be made up (total state employee pension fund shortfall is approaching similar amount).

Trivial case was that part of charges PUC allowed major california utility company was for brush clearing ... keeping it away from power lines ... preventing fires. A brush fire that burned some property started investigation that found the CEO was diverting infrastructure funds to his "bonus". Cal. energy market was also heavily involved in the ENRON fraud. posts mentioning ENRON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

Another way of looting gov. spending is outsourcing to for-profit operations .... including one of the presidential candidate platform items is eliminating for-profit prisons ... which has gotten especially egregious. a couple recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#85 prices, was Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#27 OT: efforts to repeal strict public safety laws

the biggest TBTF fines (tens of billions) from the economic mess is for fraudulent foreclosures ... the money was to be turned over to entities that would use it for aiding the foreclosure victims ... for-profit companies were set up by former bank regulators for the purpose ... who seemed to have siphoned off quite a bit of the funds.

TBTF posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

some recent foreclosure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#17 Cromnibus cartoon
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#48 The 17 Equations That Changed The Course Of History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#0 S&L Crisis and Economic Mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#5 Swiss Leaks lifts the veil on a secretive banking system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#8 Shoot Bank Of America Now---The Case For Super Glass-Steagall Is Overwhelming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#20 $2 Billion City Of Tampa Pension Story Major Media Missed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#22 Two New Papers Say Big Finance Sectors Hurt Growth and Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#24 What were the complaints of binary code programmers that not accept Assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#49 Global Fragility and the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#53 Servicers in DOJ s Crosshairs Following JPM Robo-Signing Settlement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#88 How Wall Street captured Washington's effort to rein in banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#5 7 years on from crisis, $150 billion in bank fines and penalties
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#72 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#95 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#4 Jeb: George W. Bush is a top foreign policy adviser
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#27 Federal Subsidies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#37 LIBOR: History's Largest Financial Crime that the WSJ and NYT Would Like You to Forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#67 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#25 After 6 Years Of QE, And A $4.5 Trillion Balance Sheet, St. Louis Fed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#56 The long, slow death of the rule of law in America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#65 Michael Hudson's New Book: Wall Street Parasites Have Devoured Their Hosts -- Your Retirement Plan and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#70 AIG freezes defined-benefit pension plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#73 Economists' Tribal Thinking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#81 Now the DOJ Admits They Got it Wrong

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Decimal point character and billions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Decimal point character and billions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 29 Sep 2015 08:45:10 -0700
"Sam Thatch" <st342@gmail.com> writes:
Only if you use a completely silly definition of functionally illiterate. I just don't believe that half of 18yr olds in 1990 could not read a street sign which says that a particular street is one way and had to ask someone else to read that for them, or to tell them what the label on a DVD was saying the DVD movie title was etc and had to ask someone in the video store to read it for them.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#4 Decimal point character and billions

functionally illiterate was dealing with modern life that was getting increasingly complex, tax forms, contracts, financial agreements, mortgages, etc.

there were articles at the time about various institutions trying to rewrite language to 3rd/4th grade level for adults/workers, foreign auto makers (putting in plants in the US) were requiring junior college degree in order to get workers that had high school education.,

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#45 How will current AI/robot stories play when AIs are real?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#28 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#45 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#55 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#33 [IBM-MAIN] NY Times editorial on white collar jobs going
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#42 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#18 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#18 Low Bar for High School Students Threatens Tech Sector
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#48 Mozilla v Firefox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#43 Academic priorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#20 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#63 DEC's Hudson fab
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#7 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#24 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#79 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#31 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#51 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#80 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#85 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#10 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#30 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#34 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#42 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#68 Poll: oldest computer thing you still use
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#21 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#22 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#31 EZPass: Yes, Big Brother IS Watching You!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#29 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#39 competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#5 Republican accomplishments and Hoover
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#55 Can outsourcing be stopped?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#20 Five great technological revolutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#43 Larrabee delayed: anyone know what's happening?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#38 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#80 Chinese and Indian Entrepreneurs Are Eating America's Lunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#48 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#36 The Next Convergence: The Future of Economic Growth in a Multispeed World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#18 Great Brian Arthur article on the Second Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#125 UC-Berkeley and other 'public Ivies' in fiscal peril
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#75 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#18 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#36 Race Against the Machine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#32 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

1954 RAMAC Prototype

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: 1954 RAMAC Prototype
Date: 29 Sep 2015
Blog: Facebook
Late 80s, senior disk engineer got talk scheduled at the annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference supposedly on 3174 performance ... but opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was the communication group had corporate strategic ownership of everything that crossed the datacenter walls and were fiercely fighting off distributed computing and client/server, trying to preserve their dumb (emulated) terminal paradigm and install base. The disk division was seeing the results of data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come with a number of solutions, but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group. Note a few short years later the company goes into the red and was being re-org'ed into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company .. and the disk division is no more
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

Bldg 14&15 machine rooms, were running round the clock, pre-scheduled, stand-alone mainframe development device testing. At one point they had tried to use MVS for testing multiple concurrent devices ... but MVS had 15min MTBF in that environment. I offered to rewrite operating system input/output supervisor to make it absolutely bullet proof and never fail ... so they could do any number of concurrent, on-demand testing ... greatly improving productivity (I was officially research in bldg. 28 ... but they let me wander around silicon valley).

Then because they we all running under my software, I would periodically be called in for any problem to diagnose (most of which turned out not be mine). They then started insisting that I start sitting in on conference calls with POK channel engineers. I asked where was all their own people. They said that the interface issues with POK channel people use to be handled by their senior disk engineers ... but so many had left for startups in silicon valley.

some past posts getting to play disk engineer in bldgs 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

trivia: later I wrote an internal (only) report on the effort and happen to mention the MVS 15min MTBF .... I was told that brought the wrath of the MVS group down on my head, 1st trying to get me fired, and then doing whatever they could to make my time at IBM unpleasant (apparently part of it was what they were reporting up their executive chain didn't always correspond with reality). As an aside, this is later old email just before 3380s shipped to customers ... FE had 57 simulated 3380 error regression test and in all cases, MVS was failing requiring re-IPL ... and in 2/3rds of the cases, there was no indication of what caused the failure:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#email801015

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Rarely enforced SEC rules may give green light to earnings manipulation

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Rarely enforced SEC rules may give green light to earnings manipulation
Date: 29 Aug 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/+LynnWheeler/posts/WyiMVfGYpYe

Rarely enforced SEC rules may give green light to earnings manipulation
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/past-enforcement-suggests-proposed-clawback-rules-lack-teeth-2015-09-28

Sarbanes-Oxley claims that it would guarantee executives (and auditors) did jail time for fraudulent financial filings. GAO started doing reports of fraudulent financial filings (even showing increase after SOX goes into effect) and nobody doing jailtime. This included inflated fraudulent financial filings (as part of increasing executive bonuses) and later restatements.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-06-678
In 2002, GAO reported that the number of restatement announcements due to financial reporting fraud and/or accounting errors grew significantly between January 1997 and June 2002, negatively impacting the restating companies' market capitalization by billions of dollars. GAO was asked to update key aspects of its 2002 report (GAO-03-138).

...
As was the case in the 2002 report, a significant portion of SEC's enforcement activities involved accounting- and auditing-related issues. Enforcement cases involving financial fraud- and issuer-reporting issues ranged from about 23 percent of total actions taken to almost 30 percent in 2005.

... snip ...

financial reporting fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud
sarbanes-oxley posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Self-service PC

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Self-service PC
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 30 Sep 2015 11:10:46 -0700
charlesm@MCN.ORG (Charles Mills) writes:
Agreed. I did an HR systems evaluation a few years back (why is a coder evaluating HR systems? Don't ask.) and all were big on "self-service," by which they meant if an employee, for example, wanted to know how many vacation days s/he had in the bank, s/he did not have to call HR, s/he just signed onto the HR system with a Web browser (and with "role-based authority" much lower than an HR person) and looked.

20yrs ago it was webifying callcenter menu screens ... had to have computerized-based authentication front-end and restricting access to information just for the authenticated entity. it has been 20yrs of reducing callcenter use (not having real person at the other end).

slight topic drift ... 20yrs ago, consumer dailup online banking operations were making presentations at financial conferences on motivation for moving to the internet; primarily development&support costs for proprietary modem drivers (at the time >60 drivers were typical) and dialup infrastructure, enormous support costs associated with serial-port modems, etc ... all gets offloaded to ISP. Note at the same time, the commercial dialup online banking operations were saying that they would *NEVER* move to the internet because of a long list of exploits and vulnerabilities (many that presist to this day) ... as an aside, the commercial dialup online banking operations have subsequently moved to the internet anyway.

self-service PCs in the past were typically associated with "kiosk", library, etc, public PCs that anybody can walk up to (like store machines looking for stock &/or price check) ... as opposed to the webifying callcenter operations.

I had some number of meetings with the NIST rbac people in the 90s
http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/SNS/rbac/

at the time, it was much more oriented towards simplifying security office handing out fine-grain access ... and codifying multi-party operations as countermeasure to insider threats (no single person had sufficient authority to complete any high-value operation).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Decimal point character and billions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Decimal point character and billions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 01 Oct 2015 08:56:05 -0700
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
That's the thing, "illiterate" doesnt' have to mean "lacking intelligence". There's an assumption that someone is a failure, when it may be the situation that's the failure. So they can get by, and live sometimes quite successfully, by putting a lot of effort into hiding the fact that they can't read, and creating workarounds to not being able to read.

five levels
https://www.ets.org/literacy/scores/
Minimum Proficiency

Individuals performing at Level 3 are able to integrate information from relatively long or dense text or from documents. They are considered to possess the minimum level of literacy skills to function successfully in today's society.


... level 1&2 account for almost half the population ... level 3 minimum functionally literate ... which results in level 1&2 being described as functionally illiterate.

past posts mentioning literate/illiterate:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#45 How will current AI/robot stories play when AIs are real?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#28 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#45 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#55 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#33 [IBM-MAIN] NY Times editorial on white collar jobs going
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#42 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#18 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#18 Low Bar for High School Students Threatens Tech Sector
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#48 Mozilla v Firefox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#43 Academic priorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#20 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#63 DEC's Hudson fab
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#7 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#24 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#79 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#31 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#51 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#80 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#82 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#85 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#10 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#30 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#34 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#42 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#5 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#68 Poll: oldest computer thing you still use
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#21 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#22 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#31 EZPass: Yes, Big Brother IS Watching You!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#29 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#39 competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#5 Republican accomplishments and Hoover
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#55 Can outsourcing be stopped?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#20 Five great technological revolutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#43 Larrabee delayed: anyone know what's happening?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#38 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#80 Chinese and Indian Entrepreneurs Are Eating America's Lunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#48 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#36 The Next Convergence: The Future of Economic Growth in a Multispeed World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#18 Great Brian Arthur article on the Second Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#125 UC-Berkeley and other 'public Ivies' in fiscal peril
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#75 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#18 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#36 Race Against the Machine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#32 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#5 Decimal point character and billions

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

the legacy of Seymour Cray

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: the legacy of Seymour Cray
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers, comp.misc
Date: Fri, 02 Oct 2015 17:47:07 -0700
RS Wood <rsw@therandymon.com> writes:
Before Steve Jobs, there was Seymour Cray – father of the supercomputer and regarded as something close to a God in the circles he moved in. Jobs' Apple Computer is reputed to have bought one of Seymour's massive machines back in the day: a Cray, to design the brand-new Macintosh personal computer.

former co-worker at IBM, left and for a time in the mid-80s had job programming the Cray for Apple. It had a cray 100mbyte channel attached high resolution display ... used to simulate screens & response times (studying human factors).

other trivia ... former co-worker was also member of san jose astronomy club and told stories of lucas bringing early starwar drafts for the members to review.

more trivia ... my brother was regional apple marketing rep (largest conus physical area region) and i would sometimes get invited to business dinners and even argue macintosh design with mac engineers (before it was announced).

and ... George Michael ... periodically referred to as grandfather of supercomputing
http://archive.computerhistory.org/resources/access/text/2012/10/102702236-05-01-acc.pdf

for other drift ... past refs to thorton ... cray & thorton did cdc6600
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#11 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#27 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#80 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#75 non-IBM: SONY new tape storage - 185 Terabytes on a tape

and past refs. to Chen ... did x-mp & y-mp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#68 CM-5 Thinking Machines, Supercomputers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#70 CM-5 Thinking Machines, Supercomputers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#42 Looking for Software/Documentation for an Opus 32032 Card
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#57 Another light on the map going out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#19 Worst case scenario?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#9 Is no one reading the article?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#12 Steve Chen Making China's Supercomputer Grid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#38 Wanted: info on old Unisys boxen
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#1 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#4 Migration from Mainframe to othre platforms - the othe bell?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#5 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#7 IBM in Talks to Buy Sun
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#29 Justice Department probing allegations of abuse by IBM in mainframe computer market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#55 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#58 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#5 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#42 Larrabee delayed: anyone know what's happening?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#59 Problem with XP scheduler?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#71 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#42 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#68 Entry point for a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#70 Entry point for a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#47 Nonlinear systems and nonlocal supercomputing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#48 Nonlinear systems and nonlocal supercomputing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#61 IBM to announce new MF's this year
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#24 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#7 IBM Watson's Ancestors: A Look at Supercomputers of the Past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#79 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#13 AMC proposes 1980s computer TV series Halt & Catch Fire
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#65 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#50 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#71 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#72 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#18 Miniskirts and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#74 100 boxes of computer books on the wall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

the legacy of Seymour Cray

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: the legacy of Seymour Cray
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers, comp.misc
Date: Sat, 03 Oct 2015 08:47:09 -0700
"Joe Morris" <j.c.morris@verizon.net> writes:
The museum is free and open to the public, and while it's at the NSA it's an uncontrolled area outside the security perimeter, with a big sign just inside the front door reminding visitors to put their badges away. Just be sure to follow the directions to get there; a wrong turn would put you into the NSA security entry queue.

The building isn't particularly large, so the exhibits represent only a part of what the museum owns, but the staff there is familiar with a lot of what isn't being displayed.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#10 the legacy of Seymour Cray

folklore is that it use to be motel ... but because listening devices were constantly being found that they took it over ... turning into museum.
http://cryptologicfoundation.org/visit/museum/museum_history.html

they also have IBM Harvest display
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_7950_Harvest

the 1st time I visited, they had MLS (multi-level security) display (next to STK tape library) ... i tried to con them into letting me have copy of the MLS video ... I had some thot of doing voice over parody of MLS.

Google has been doing something wierd recently (coming back with nothing found) ... i tried search on the nsa museum folklore and it came back with nothing found. I tried the same search on other search engines ... and they came back with with loads of NSA related references ... including the above that i cited.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Did 1st EMV transaction

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Did 1st EMV transaction
Date: 03 Oct 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/+LynnWheeler/posts/8hWX3sFXFxL

Did my 1st EMV transaction today ... and it is at least as slow as the original spec. 20-some years ago ... which was one of the reasons I got asked to do chip/protocol much more secure and higher integrity than EMV that was low power and superfast that could meet contactless transit turnstyle requirements. Reference to demo/booth at 1999 worldwide retail banking show
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#217
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#224

chipcard & protocol refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

There was large scale US Pilot of EMV at the turn of the century ... but it was in the Yes Card period .... which then went ahead and did anyway despite warnings. In the aftermath all evidence of the pilot appeared to disappear w/o a trace and there was speculation that it would be a long time before it was tried again in the US (letting bugs be worked out in other jurisdictions). At the bottom of this trip report (gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine) there is discussion of Yes Card at cartes2002:
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

There was also presentation about the exploits by federal LEO at ATM Integrity Taskforce meeting prompting somebody in the audience to exclaim that "they" managed to spend billions of collars to prove chipcards are less secure than magstripe

past posts mentioning Yes Card:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

the legacy of Seymour Cray

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: the legacy of Seymour Cray
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 03 Oct 2015 13:51:54 -0700
hancock4 writes:
In his memoir, Tom Watson wrote about his frustration that CDC beat IBM to the market with a powerful high end computer. Watson said that later he realized that such high end computers were specialty items, like expensive limited edition high performance sports cars, and that IBM should focus more on the conventional market.

As we know, IBM lost serious money on STRETCH, although the R&D for STRETCH contributed greatly to later IBM work. I wonder if IBM's other high end machines, like the 85, 91, 95, and 195, also lost money due to a limited customer base of those wanting fast floating point arithmetic. Due to limited demand, my guess is that those high end machines were largely hand-built.

The IBM S/360 history generally does not tell how many machines of each model were sold, nor cost and revenues of them. On the other hand, the R&D for the high end machines may have contributed toward later developments, as did STRETCH. (However, some may have pushed SLT to the limit, which was replaced by monolithic circuits.)


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#10 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#11 the legacy of Seymour Cray

ACS END
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html
As the quote above indicates, the ACS-1 design was very much an out-of-the-ordinary design for IBM in the latter part of the 1960s. In his book, Data Processing Technology and Economics, Montgomery Phister, Jr., reports that as of 1968:

Of the 26,000 IBM computer systems in use, 16,000 were S/360 models (that is, over 60%). [Fig. 1.311.2]

Of the general-purpose systems having the largest fraction of total installed value, the IBM S/360 Model 30 was ranked first with 12% (rising to 17% in 1969). The S/360 Model 40 was ranked second with 11% (rising to almost 15% in 1970). [Figs. 2.10.4 and 2.10.5]

Of the number of operations per second in use, the IBM S/360 Model 65 ranked first with 23%. The Univac 1108 ranked second with slightly over 14%, and the CDC 6600 ranked third with 10%. [Figs. 2.10.6 and 2.10.7]


... snip ...

I mentioned while still undergraduate, summer of '69 i was brought into Boeing to help with setting up Boeing Computer Services (BCS) ... consolidate all data processing in independent business unit to better monetize the investment (a little like cloud computing today).

At the time, I thot the renton datacenter was possibly largest in the world ... all that summer, 360/65s were arriving in renton faster than they could be installed. Claim was Renton datacenter had something like $300M (in '69 dollars) of IBM equipment.

Later I would sponsor John Boyd briefings at IBM. His biography has him in charge of spook base about the time I was at Boeing ... supposedly was a $2.5B "windfall" for IBM (nearly ten times Renton datacenter). Old spook base ref (gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine).
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

Boyd posts & refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

Data processing technology and economics
https://books.google.com/books/about/Data_processing_technology_and_economics.html?id=MwMpAQAAMAAJ

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Paying CEOs fat bonuses for stock performance doesn't work

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Paying CEOs fat bonuses for stock performance doesn't work
Date: 03 Oct 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/+LynnWheeler/posts/VVy3zyiU4hU

Paying CEOs fat bonuses for stock performance doesn't work -- Cornell study
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/surprise--paying-ceos-for-stock-performance-doesn-t-help-companies--cornell-183854141.html
Paying CEOs fat bonuses for stock performance doesn't work
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/surprise--paying-ceos-for-stock-performance-doesn-t-help-companies--cornell-183854141.html
ICS_Brief_on_TSR_092915.pdf

who doesn't it work for?

past posts mentioning 400:1 ceo compensation ratio
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#73 Should The CEO Have the Lowest Pay In Senior Management?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#24 To: Graymouse -- Ireland and the EU, What in the H... is all this about?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#76 lack of information accuracy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#71 Cormpany sponsored insurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#25 Taxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#33 Taxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#53 Are family businesses unfair competition?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#93 What do you think are the top characteristics of a good/effective leader in an organization? Do you feel these characteristics are learned or innate to an individual?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#2 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#58 Traditional Approach Won't Take Businesses Far Places
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#14 realtors (and GM, too!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#17 realtors (and GM, too!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#61 The vanishing CEO bonus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#5 Greed - If greed was the cause of the global meltdown then why does the biz community appoint those who so easily succumb to its temptations?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#41 Executive pay: time for a trim?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#44 Executive pay: time for a trim?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#50 Greed Is
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#80 Are reckless risks a natural fallout of "excessive" executive compensation ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#25 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#41 The subject is authoritarian tendencies in corporate management, and how they are related to political culture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#3 Congress Set to Approve Pay Cap of $500,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#73 Most 'leaders' do not 'lead' and the majority of 'managers' do not 'manage'. Why is this?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#2 CEO pay sinks - Wall Street Journal/Hay Group survey results just released
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#44 What TARP means for the future of executive pay
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#37 Young Developers Get Old Mainframers' Jobs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#48 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#8 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#39 Agile Workforce
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#33 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#62 Dodd-Frank Act Makes CEO-Worker Pay Gap Subject to Disclosure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#67 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#22 60 Minutes News Report:Unemployed for over 99 weeks!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#59 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#71 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#10 OODA in highly stochastic environments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#80 Chinese and Indian Entrepreneurs Are Eating America's Lunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#53 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#13 The Seven Habits of Pointy-Haired Bosses
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#69 Who was the Greatest IBM President and CEO of the last century?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#28 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#147 The Myth of Work-Life Balance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#25 You may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#26 What's your favorite quote on "accountability"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#12 Sun Tzu, Boyd, strategy and extensions of same
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#19 "Buffett Tax" and truth in numbers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#26 Strategy subsumes culture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#31 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#43 Where are all the old tech workers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#44 What's the most interesting thing you do in your non-work life?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#90 IBM Doing Some Restructuring?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#16 IBM cuts more than 1,000 U.S. Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#91 The Fractal Organization: Creating sustainable organizations with the Viable System Model
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#77 Vampire Squid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#73 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#81 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#84 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#3 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#31 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#32 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#41 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#36 Race Against the Machine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#40 Core characteristics of resilience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#87 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#65 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#64 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#33 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#28 Flag bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#50 IBM Furloughs U.S. Hardware Employees to Reduce Costs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#51 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#14 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#15 Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#29 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#81 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#33 Power grid groans, blackouts roll through L.A. area as heat wave nears peak
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#61 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#61 Decimation of the valuation of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#80 Here's how a retired submarine captain would save IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#23 What were the complaints of binary code programmers that not accept Assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#17 There's No Such Thing as Corporate DNA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Corrupt From Top to Bottom

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Corrupt From Top to Bottom
Date: 03 Oct 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/+LynnWheeler/posts/cm4vLsNBXge

3Oct1993

Corrupt From Top to Bottom
http://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/03/books/corrupt-from-top-to-bottom.html?pagewanted=1

... and 22yrs later

McCain Blasts Navy Carrier Procurement Program as a 'Debacle'
http://www.seapowermagazine.org/stories/20151001-mccain.html

recent posts mentioning "corrupt from top to bottom"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#76 Pentagon remains stubbornly unable to account for its billions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#17 There's No Such Thing as Corporate DNA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#78 New hard drive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#84 New hard drive

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Modern computer brochures; military security; then and now ?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Modern computer brochures; military security;  then and now ?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 05 Oct 2015 12:00:28 -0700
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
For some things, the military and/or governments expect multiple sources. They don't want to rely on a single source. So there's that. A lot of semiconductors were second sourced, including microprocessors.

major uptic of outsorcing and no-bid contracts last decade ... not just military industrial complex ... but also other agencies.

How Private Contractors Have Created a Shadow NSA; A new cybersecurity elite moves between government and private practice, taking state secrets with them (also references oil rig company that was transformed into one of the largest defense contractors after former SECDEF and future VP becomes CEO, including no-bid contracts in Iraq)
http://www.thenation.com/article/how-private-contractors-have-created-shadow-nsa/

along with spreading Success Of Failure culture ... immediate success is far less revenue compared to re-occuring revenue for repeated failures (sometimes serves up blank page on 1st click and may have to reload/reclick)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
Success Of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

Head of IBM in the 90s, had been involved in the privaty-equity industry, and after leaving IBM goes to head up one of the largest private equity companies ... which then does LBO (private equity) take-over of company that employs Snowden
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower. They're not going away any time soon unless the CIA and NSA want to start over and with some off-the-shelf laptops, networked by the Geek Squad from Best Buy. Security clearances used to be a government function too, but are now a profit center for various private-equity subsidiaries.

... snip ...

private-equity victim companies are frequently under heavy pressure to turn revenue every way possible ... the private-equity, for-profit companies doing outsourced security clearances ... were just filling out the paperwork ... not bothering to do the (expensive) background checks.

former head of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private-equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private-equity

MIC also has for a long time, convention of egregiously low-balling contracts ... and then when true costs become known ... they claim it would drastically affect national security to start over.

Corrupt From Top to Bottom
http://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/03/books/corrupt-from-top-to-bottom.html?pagewanted=1
... review of Burton's book
http://www.amazon.com/Pentagon-Wars-Reformers-Challenge-Guard/dp/B00HXY969W/
HBO movie was based on burton's book:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pentagon_Wars
current weapon program examples are that DOD acquisition is still corrupt from top to bottom.

Burton one of Boyd acolytes ... Boyd posts & refs (I use to sponsor Boyr's briefings at IBM)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

posts mentioning military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military-industrial-complex

This goes into locking in congressional votes for DOD weapons program (in this case F22) ... which includes parceling out bits & pieces to every congressional district ... significantly impacting manufacturing quality
http://nypost.com/2009/07/17/cant-fly-wont-die/

but then they allowed the F22 "to die" when they managed to replace it with the much more expensive F35 weapons program (using the same methodology).

and from the navy
http://www.seapowermagazine.org/stories/20151001-mccain.html

Reference to private-equity operations (also) having major Iraq contractor ... as well as the OPM contractor
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas/

perpetual war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

the legacy of Seymour Cray

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: the legacy of Seymour Cray
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 05 Oct 2015 18:43:06 -0700
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
They did eventually recode it, long before anyone came out with anything remotely resembling the Raspberry Pi.

I guess IBM didn't want to make a newer version of the 9020 using 370-style monolithic technology, or the Federal Government didn't want to pay for one.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#10 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#11 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#13 the legacy of Seymour Cray

when we were doing HA/CMP ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

IBM bid triple-redundant rs/6000 running custom software. application implementors were told that they didn't have to worry about outages &/or failures and recovery ... because system software would mask all (FAA hardware) failures.

turns out that review of FAA failure modes found some number at the application/business (flight control) level ... wasn't simple matter of low-level hardware outages ... but more complex FAA operational .... which required rework of the application level design and implementation ... which never completed.

before leaving ibm in 1992, we would periodically visit the technical assistant to Federal System Division president ... he was doing double duty as TA 1st shift, and spent 2nd shift programming ADA for the FAA effort.

from 1993

Flying In Place: The Faa's Air Control Fiasco
http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/stories/1993-04-25/flying-in-place-the-faas-air-control-fiasco

That FAA effort was just one of growing list of failed gov. dataprocessing modernization efforts.

misc posts mentioning FAA & (failed) gov. dataprocessing modernization efforts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#16 Why are Mainframe Computers really still in use at all?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#14 Cost of patching "unsustainable"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#52 US Air computers delay psgrs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#43 Flying Was: Fission products
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#45 IBM--disposition of clock business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#29 Check out Computer glitch to cause flight delays across U.S. - MarketWatch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#31 Check out Computer glitch to cause flight delays across U.S. - MarketWatch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#89 FAA air traffic facility consolidation effort already late
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#42 Simulated PDP-11 Blinkenlight front panel for SimH
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#74 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#76 A Little More on the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#56 Early !BM multiprocessors (renamed from Curiosity: TCB mapping macro name - why IKJTCB?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#59 A-10

increasingly part of growing Success Of Failure culture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

the legacy of Seymour Cray

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: the legacy of Seymour Cray
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 05 Oct 2015 22:32:28 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
from 1993

Flying In Place: The Faa's Air Control Fiasco
http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/stories/1993-04-25/flying-in-place-the-faas-air-control-fiasco


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#10 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#11 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#13 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#17 the legacy of Seymour Cray

last item in the (1993) Fiasco timeline:
1993

IBM says the system will not be complete until well after 2000.


... snip ...

IBM goes into the red in 1992 and was being reorganized into the 13 Baby Blues in preparation for breaking up the company. While the board brought in a new CEO to resurrect the company and reverse the breakup ... posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

there were still major changes. The Federal Systems Division (which was responsible for the FAA modernization contract) was sold off to Loral
http://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/14/business/ibm-to-sell-its-military-unit-to-loral.html
Mr. Schwartz also said he regarded Federal Systems' air-traffic control software as a "hidden asset." Federal Systems is currently leading an overhaul of the F.A.A. system, a project plagued by cost overruns. Indeed, as the I.B.M.-Loral deal was being announced yesterday, the F.A.A.'s chief, David Hinson, ordered a review of the overhaul project.

The new air-traffic control system, whose cost was estimated at $2.5 billion when it was planned in 1983, is now expected to cost more than $5 billion. But Mr. Schwartz predicted that the Federal Systems technology would not only satisfy the F.A.A. but also find markets abroad.


... snip ...

Status of FAA's Modernization Program RCED-94-167FS: Published: Apr 15, 1994.
http://www.gao.gov/products/RCED-94-167FS
Status of FAA's Modernization Program RCED-95-175FS: Published: May 26, 1995.
http://www.gao.gov/products/RCED-95-175FS
Status of FAA's Modernization Program RCED-99-25: Published: Dec 3, 1998
http://www.gao.gov/products/RCED-99-25

2012

ATC Program Costs, Schedules Unreliable, GAO Says
http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/air-transport/2012-02-23/atc-program-costs-schedules-unreliable-gao-says
Fifteen of the 30 ATC programs have experienced delays ranging from two months at the low end to more than 14 years for Waas. Completion targets for Eram, considered a NextGen "backbone" system, now specify August 2014, nearly four years late.

FAA "NextGen" modernization
http://www.fiercegovernmentit.com/story/transformational-faa-modernization-programs-slipping-schedule/2012-04-25

2013

What's keeping FAA's NextGen air traffic control on the runway?
http://gcn.com/articles/2013/07/22/faa-next-generation-air-transportation-system.aspx
Ten years into the program, new technology for the Federal Aviation Administration's Next Generation Air Transportation System is gradually coming online. But non-technical issues are delaying many of the promised benefits and creating skepticism in the airline industry.

2014

Air Traffic Control System: Selected Stakeholders' Perspectives on Operations, Modernization, and Structure GAO-14-770: Published: Sep 12, 2014.
http://gao.gov/products/GAO-14-770

Next Generation Air Transportation System
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Next_Generation_Air_Transportation_System

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Bernanke: Some Wall Street executives should've gone to jail over financial crisis

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Bernanke: Some Wall Street executives should've gone to jail over financial crisis
Date: 05 Oct 2015
Blog: Facebook
Bernanke: Some Wall Street executives should've gone to jail over financial crisis
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-bernanke-jail-20151005-story.html
Ben Bernanke: More execs should have gone to jail for causing Great Recession
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2015/10/04/ben-bernanke-execs-jail-great-recession-federal-reserve/72959402/

This may be pure obfuscation and misdirection ... since he was major part of it at the time. There have been recent claims that statute of limitation has now expired for many of the crimes ... so it is "safe" to make all sort of claims. In the middle of too big to fail (too big to prosecute and too big to jail). he was behind most of the bailout (and fought long legal battle to prevent disclosing what was really going on). There was only $700B appropriated for TARP supposedly to buy TBTF toxic assets ... but just the four largest TBTF were still holding $5.2T "off-book" at the end of 2008. It was the FED that was providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds (estimate that TBTF are clearing $300B/annum) and buying trillions in the off-book toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar.

too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Shortly after the FED was forced to public disclose what it was doing, Bernanke had press conference where he said that he had expected that the TBTF would use the ZIRP funds to help mainstreet, but when they didn't he had no way to force them (but that didn't stop the flow of ZIRP funds). Note also, presumably Bernanke was chosen in part because he was a depression era scholar ... where the FED had tried something similar with the same results (so Bernanke should have had no expectations that they would do anything differently).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#bernanke

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

the legacy of Seymour Cray

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: the legacy of Seymour Cray
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 06 Oct 2015 17:32:25 -0700
hancock4 writes:
I think the 370 clone vendors, e.g. Amdahl, Hitachi, etc, sold a fair amount of machines. My guess the problem was economies of scale, making production costs high. Also, I think once the clones came out, IBM had fully unbundled, so one still had to buy system software regardless of who made the hardware. The book by Campbell-Kelly says IBM makes a lot of money from renting CICS, for example.

2012 numbers was only about 4% of IBM revenue was from mainframe processors ... but mainframe division accounted for total 25% of IBM revenue (and 40% of profit) ... mainframe software and services.

processor revenue seems to have dropped off since then ... but software and services continue to be quite big part of revenue.

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#47 I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#25 System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#44 Under what circumstances would it be a mistake to migrate applications/workload off the mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#58 What is holding back cloud adoption?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#9 Is Microsoft becoming folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#10 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#5 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#15 A Private life?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#60 Why Intel can't retire X86
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#4 Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#35 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#37 Where Does the Cloud Cover the Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#7 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#79 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#59 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#86 IBM unveils new "mainframe for the rest of us"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#53 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#31 model numbers; was re: World's worst programming environment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#71 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#97 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#33 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#78 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#170 IBM Continues To Crumble

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

the legacy of Seymour Cray

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: the legacy of Seymour Cray
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 08 Oct 2015 12:51:52 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Students had the lowest priority in running jobs; administrative and research work took predecence.

Commuter students were at a disadvantage as they needed to run their jobs during the day when the machine was busiest. Resident students would come back in the evening when the machine was less busy.

I believe Mr. Wheeler indicated they discovered that the overhead in setting up a simple student job was much longer than the job itself, and very inefficient when tons of students were running jobs. I think he said he did an OS modification to resolve that. Some classes 'batched' student jobs together as multiple job sets in a single job which improved efficiency.

One of the difficulties back then was waiting for your printout to be removed from the printer and delivered to your bin. A university computer room could have a large multidue of bins and many jobs, keeping the print operator very busy. It was frustrating to know your job had printed, but was waiting for the print operator to deliver it.

At our university, each student was given a budget to run their jobs; if you ran too many jobs to get your homework done, you ran out of money, and that was a problem. Again, resident students had an advantage over commuters in that they could do their work during evening or weekend shifts when rates were lower.


360/65 (actually 360/67 running w/o virtual memory turned on) with os/360 MFT ... using standard 3step Fort G compile, linkedit & go ... started out well over a minute elapsed time ... had run in less than second on 709 with IBSYS tape-to-tape.

Adding HASP cut 3step FORTGCLG to a little over half minute. I then did a "SYSGEN" where I took apart the STAGE2 output from STAGE1 system ... and very carfully reorganized everything so that execution order would carefully place files & PDS members optimizing 2314 arm seek motion & PDS member multi-track search ... cutting time to 12.9 seconds (for null RETURN/END fortrans compile link-edit & go ... effectively all 3-step scheduler processing overhead) ... nearly three times speedup.

old post with part of presentation/data from fall '68 SHARE meeting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18 CP/67 & OS MFT14

above also includes timing for running the os/360 job stream under (virtual machine) cp/67 after I had rewrote large sections and cut CP67 overhead from 856-322=534seconds to 435-322=113seconds (some parts of CP67, I did nearly 100 times speedup).

It wasn't until we installed WATFOR at the univ. that student job times got better than 709 elapsed time. WATFOR was single step fortran compile&execute that would batch whole sequence of student jobs in one OS/360 execution (more analogous to 709 IBSYS tape-to-tape monitor). Typically, would wait until accumulated a card tray of student jobs and then place OS/360 WATFOR control cards on the front and run it as single OS/360 job step. Typical student job had nearly null execution time so nearly all was compile time ... I have some vague memory that WATFOR compiled at 20,000 statements/cpu-min on 360/65.

Standard os/360 one-step scheduler was 11-12 seconds elapsed time. My carefull sysgem file & PDS member placement reduced that to approx. 4.3seconds elapsed time. A typical WATFOR run was 30-50 student jobs and 2000-3000 cards or 6-9 seconds ... combined with 4.3seconds one-step schedular overhead then was 10.3-13.3 seconds elapsed for 30-50 jobs ... i.e. .2-.5secs per ... finally beating 709 IBSYS tape-to-tape.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 08 Oct 2015 13:21:06 -0700
simon@twoplaces.co.uk (Simon Turner) writes:
A friend claims that there's no such thing as pure altruism: people who do apparently altruistic things are doing it for their own benefit, either because of the warm glow it gives them, or because at some level they will indirectly benefit from their act. I'm not sure I agree, but it's an interesting idea.

there have been some recent studies trying to differentiate what dominates in natural selection ... individual survival (selfishness) or group survival (altruism).

some of this was investigations in the aftermath of economic mess last decade that wallstreet attracts high percentage of sociopaths that view everybody else as prey/victims ... and frequently also tend to lack sense of consequences for their actions (behavior to achieve immediate advantage ... reguardless of what may follow later).

for a long time economics assumed that people would make rational choices ... but that has been increasingly debunked
https://hbr.org/2009/07/the-end-of-rational-economics

related have been claims that cheating on tests and falsified items in resumes was relatively rare for the baby boomer generation ... but as nearly inverted for millennials .... it is rare to find a millennial resume that hasn't had "enhancements".
http://national.deseretnews.com/article/3879/Are-millennials-programed-to-cheat.html

past posts mentioning sociopaths:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#77 Madoff Whistleblower Book
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#59 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#24 AMERICA IS BROKEN, WHAT NOW?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#30 Have you ever wondered why some people seem to get rich easily
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#80 How Pursuit of Profits Kills Innovation and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#4 The Myth of Work-Life Balance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#30 Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#16 Interview of Mr. John Reed regarding banking fixing the game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#99 New theory of moral behavior may explain recent ethical lapses in banking industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#1 Spontaneous conduction: The music man with no written plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#91 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#16 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#84 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#53 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#14 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#53 Retirement Savings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#76 Crowdsourcing Diplomacy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#1 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#1 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#39 Sale receipt--obligatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#37 Income Inequality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#15 Banking Culture Encourages Dishonesty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#15 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

It A "Liquidity Mirage": New York Fed Finally Grasps How Broken The Market Is Due To HFTs

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: It A "Liquidity Mirage": New York Fed Finally Grasps How Broken The Market Is Due To HFTs
Date: 09 Oct 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/+LynnWheeler/posts/A6S26kbuCFb

It A "Liquidity Mirage": New York Fed Finally Grasps How Broken The Market Is Due To HFTs
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-10-09/it-liquidity-mirage-new-york-fed-finally-grasps-how-broken-market-due-hfts

at the congressional Madoff hearings they had the person that tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff (SEC's hands were forced when Madoff turned himself in). TV business programs tried to get him for interview ... but all they got was his lawyer. The lawyer made reference that the person didn't want to appear in public ... that one of the scenarios why SEC never bothered to anything about Madoff for over a decade was that Madoff was involved with violent criminal elements that also controlled SEC ... and he was afraid that they might want retribution for his attempts to shutdown the operation. A year later on a book tour, the person was available for public interviews and asked about his not appearing in public a year earlier. He referenced that he had changed his mind, that Madoff had possibly swindled some violent criminal elements and turned himself in looking for government protection (but there was no explanation regarding SEC's inaction).

This is a article referencing a Cramer interview during that period where Madoff was active, implying criminal violations were wide-spread but nobody on wallstreet had anything to fear from SEC.
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

The head of SEC last decade is #4 on times list of those responsible for the economic mess:
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877323,00.html

posts memntioning Madoff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

recent HFT refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#58 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#26 What were the complaints of binary code programmers that not accept Assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#36 IBM CEO Rometty gets bonus despite company's woes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#17 Robots have been running the US stock market, and the government is finally taking control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#28 Bernie Sanders Proposes A Bill To Break Up The 'Too Big To Exist' Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#78 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 Do we REALLY NEED all this regulatory oversight?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#53 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#46 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#47 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#48 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#53 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#66 Michael Hudson's New Book: Wall Street Parasites Have Devoured Their Hosts -- Your Retirement Plan and the U.S. Economy

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

the legacy of Seymour Cray

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: the legacy of Seymour Cray
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2015 18:08:27 -0700
Jon Elson <elson@pico-systems.com> writes:
I will say that the way IBM did disk I/O was WAY more efficient than any other system I was familiar with at the time. Records were read off the disk (or tape) directly into the user's buffer, not copied several times during record unpacking from an OS buffer to the user's buffer.

IBM allowed channel programs to be built by application library ... and read/written directly into application address space ... either directly in application buffers or in buffers managed in application space managed by library code running in application space.

However, original 360 design point was very limited real storage ... so trade-off was to do lots of stuff with index on disks and multi-track search (trading off real storage for index versus i/o channel for sequential index search) ... aka CKD dasd.

However, by mid-70s this trade-off started to flip ... significant increase in real storage and i/o capacity was becoming major bottleneck. VTOC was disk volume directory of files. Multi-track search would serially scan VTOC for file entry to be opened/used ... VTOC entry contained file location on disk (and other misc. information). VTOC scan could involve serveral disk revolutions ... tieing up disk, controller and channel (not being able to use for any other purpose).

The other major use was for "PDS" libraries ... nearly all executables and several other uses. A standard PDS library could involve a 2-3 cylinder directory. A multi-track search would sequentially scan all tracks until desired PDS member entry was found.

I've periodically mention getting called into datacenter for large national retailer that was experiencing significant performance degradation with their store online transaction system under heavy load. They had several 370/168-3 and large shared CKD 3330 DASD pool dedicated to running store online transactions under MVS . All the national experts had been called in before resorting to calling me. I was brought into class room where all the tables were covered with foot high stacks of performance reports. After about 30 mins I started to notice correlation that the aggregate I/O activity across all the 168-3 processors for a specific volume was peaking at 7 I/Os per second at peak load ... which was a little unusual since 3330 was nominal considered to have throughput of 30-40 I/Os per second.

It turned out that 3330 contained the PDS online transaction library for all 168 systems and all stores. It had 3cyl PDS library directory ... and each transaction required reading the library directory to find the transaction and then load it. On the avg. PDS search is 1.5 cylinders ... or for 3330 that is one multi-track search of 19cylenders taking 19 revolutions at 3600RPM taking .317seconds elapsed time ... followed by multi-track search of 9.5 cylinders taking 9.5 revolutions or .158 seconds ... each transaction requires avg. of .475 seconds just to find the location of the transaction executable to be loaded (during which time the device, controller and channel is busy and can't be used for anything else). The actual load takes around .03 seconds ... but with the PDS lookup time, the whole complex was limited to a maximum of two transactions per second ... across all systems and for all stores in the country.

The resolution was to split the online executable library into three different parts (so avg. PDS lookup is around 9.5 tracks instead of 28.5 tracks) .... and then replicate the library so there is unique copy for each 168-3 system. That up the transaction (load) rate to 10-15 transaction per system and 40-60 per second for the whole complex.

The IBM disk division did fixed-block (FBA) disks starting in the late 70s (3310 & 3370) ... but I was told by the MVS people that even if I provided them with fully tested & integrated MVS FBA support, I would still need an incremental $26M profit (for documentation and education) ... basically $200M-$300M new disk sales ... they then qualified it by saying customers were buying disks as fast as they could be made ... and if there was FBA support, customers would just switch from buying CKD disks to same amount of FBA disks. However, part of FBA support includes moving off the enormously expensive mid-60s multi-track search design. As an aside, no real CKD devices have been made for decades, being simulated on industry standard fixed-block disks. Some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

Aother problem is that channel program use "real addresses" but with os/360 move to MVS ... the application library building channel programs is now running in virtual address space and all the resulting channel programs are built with virtual addresses. Standard OS/360 & MVS convention passes the address of the channel program in EXCP/SVC0 supervisor call. With OS/360 move to virtual address, the EXCP process now has to build a copy of the passed channel program substituting real addresses for the virtual addresses. This turns out to be the same exact process that (virtual machine) CP67 had to do for running guest operating systems in virtual address space. It turns out the person doing the OS/360 initial prototype move to virtual memory, borrowed the CP67 "CCWTRANS" routine and crafted into the side of EXCP processing.

past posts mentioning (CP67) CCWTRANS:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#68 Mainframe operating systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#34 What level of computer is needed for a computer to Love?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#18 Linux IA-64 interrupts [was Re: Itanium benchmarks ...]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#37 IBM OS Timeline?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#38 IBM OS Timeline?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#36 History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#39 VAX, M68K complex instructions (was Re: Did Intel Bite Off More Than It Can Chew?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#61 GE 625/635 Reference + Smart Hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#70 hone acronym (cross post)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#65 The problem with installable operating systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#67 The problem with installable operating systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#62 PLX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#0 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#13 Page Table - per OS/Process
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#27 Microkernels are not "all or nothing". Re: Multics Concepts For
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004.html#18 virtual-machine theory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#59 real multi-tasking, multi-programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#0 IBM 360 memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#50 Chained I/O's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#16 computer industry scenairo before the invention of the PC?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#26 PCIe as a chip-to-chip interconnect
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#54 CKD Disks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#57 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#23 360 DIAGNOSE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#49 The mid-seventies SHARE survey
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#50 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#45 Moving assembler programs above the line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#47 Moving assembler programs above the line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#18 address space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#41 Instruction Set Enhancement Idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#25 MVCIN instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#7 2nd level install - duplicate volsers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#31 Is VIO mandatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#38 Is VIO mandatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#25 Multiple address spaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#5 3380-3390 Conversion - DISAPPOINTMENT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#33 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#5 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#27 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#27 oops
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#39 REAL memory column in SDSF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#19 Cycles per ASM instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#27 IBM S/360 series operating systems history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#46 FBA rant
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#0 FBA rant
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#6 IBM S/360 series operating systems history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#33 Historical curiosity question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#34 Historical curiosity question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#26 user level TCP implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#35 IBM obsoleting mainframe hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#41 Virtual Storage implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#69 GETMAIN/FREEMAIN and virtual storage backing up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#70 GETMAIN/FREEMAIN and virtual storage backing up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#72 A question for the Wheelers - Diagnose instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#2 Real storage usage - a quick question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#41 Age of IBM VM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#83 IBM mainframe history, was Floating-point myths
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#45 authoritative IEFBR14 reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#68 EXCP access methos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#69 EXCP access methos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#7 Future architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#50 Old XDS Sigma stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#31 TOPS-10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#56 Computer History Museum
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#59 Why do IBMers think disks are 'Direct Access'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#73 Operating Systems for Virtual Machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#52 Hercules; more information requested
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#61 Evolution of Floating Point
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#52 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#42 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#60 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#18 What was the historical price of a P/390?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#21 QUIKCELL Doc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#45 PROP instead of POPS, PoO, et al
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#9 EXTERNAL: Re: Problem with an edit command in tso
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#37 CKD DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#79 Speed of Old Hard Disks - adcons
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#90 Two terrific writers .. are going to write a book
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#72 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#44 junking CKD; was "Social Security Confronts IT Obsolescence"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#45 segments and sharing, was 68000 assembly language programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#15 Any candidates for best acronyms?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#92 Question regarding PSW correction after translation exceptions on old IBM hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#115 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#17 5 Byte Device Addresses?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#55 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#73 PDP-10 system calls, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#2 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#19 How to get a tape's DSCB
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#21 8-bit bytes and byte-addressed machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#42 history of Programming language and CPU in relation to each
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#30 Regarding Time Sharing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#4 Query for IBM Systems Magazine website article on z/OS community
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#51 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#85 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#47 Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#73 Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#47 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#18 A Brief History of Cloud Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#84 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamationmade30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#12 "hexadecimal"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#54 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#59 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#40 OS/360

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Hillary Clinton's Glass-Steagall

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Hillary Clinton's Glass-Steagall
Date: 10 Oct 2015
Blog: Facebook
Hillary Clinton's Glass-Steagall
http://robertreich.org/post/124114229225

The folklore at the time was the president was going to veto GLBA. President of AMEX was in competition to be the next CEO of AMEX and wins. The looser leaves and takes their protegee to Baltimore, acquiring what was described as loan sharking business. They make some number of other acquisitions, eventually acquiring Citi in violation of Glass-Steagall. Greenspan gives them an exemption while they lobby congress for repeal of Glass-Steagall. They enlist several in DC, including the secretary of treasury (and former head of G-S). GLBA initially passes along party lines (54-44) ... but with prospect of Clinton veto ... they go back and add provisions needed to get veto-proof vote (90-8)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramm%E2%80%93Leach%E2%80%93Bliley_Act

After the sec. of treasury (and former head of G-S) has done his part, he resigns and joins Citi as what was described at the time as co-CEO.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Rubin

Other trivia, initially on the floor of congress, the primary purpose of GLBA was described as keeping new competition out of banking, "if you already have a bank charter you get to keep it, if you don't already have a bank charter you can't get one", especially mentioning entities that would use technology to significantly increase efficiency) before they start adding other provisions, including repeal of Glass-Steagall.

#2 on times list of those responsible for economic mess, GLBA and (with his wife) preventing derivatives from being regulated (originally described as gift to ENRON, his wife spends short stint as CFTC chair, but soon as it passes, she resigns and joins ENRON board and on the audit committee)
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

Disclaimer: Jan2009, I'm asked to HTML'ize the Pecora Hearings (30s Senate hearings into crash of '29, resulted in criminal convictions and Glass-Steagall) with lots of internal cross-links and URLs between what happened this time and what happened then (reference that maybe the new congress would have appetite to do something). I work on it for a time and then get a call saying that it wouldn't needed after all (reference to enormous piles of wallstreet money totally burying Washington DC).

glass-steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
enron posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild were office bldgs in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots). In the late 90s, I was asked to look at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures. Then loan originators were securitizing loans&mortgages and paying for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds, claim is it accounts for 30% loss in funds and trillions shortfall for pensions), largely enabling being able to do over $27T 2001-2008
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

In the wake of ENRON, congress passes Sarbanes-Oxley claiming that it would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives and auditors responsible for fraudulent financial filings, do jail time. however it requires SEC to do something. Possibly because even GAO doesn't believe SEC is doing anything, it starts doing reports of fraudulent financial filings, even showing uptic after Sarbanes-Oxley goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime). Less well known, SOX also has provision for SEC to do something about rating agencies (played the pivotal role in the economic mess). #4 on times list of those responsible for economic mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

If being able to pay for triple-A, eliminating any concern about loan quality wasn't bad enough .. They start designing toxic CDOs to fail, pay for triple-A, sell to their victim customers, and then take out derivative CDS gambling bets that they would fail (creating enormous demand for bad loans ... change from just not caring about loan quality). The sec. of treasury last decade (also former head of G-S) then pushes for TARP funds supposedly to bail out TBTF by buying toxic assets. However only $700B is appropriated and just the four largest TBTF where holding $5.2T "off-book" the end of 2008.

The largest holder of the CDS gambling bets was AIG and was negotiating to pay of at 50cents on the dollar, when the sec. of treasury steps in, forces AIG to sign document that they can't sue those making the gambling bets and take TARP funds to pay off at 100cents on the dollar. The largest recipient of TARP funds is AIG and the largest recipient of face-value payoffs is the TBTF formally headed by sec. of treasury.

Note also in the testimony at the Oct2008 congressional hearings into the role that the rating agencies played, they also said that the rating agency business model became misaligned and incented to do the wrong thing when they switched from buyers paying for the rating (as accurate as possible in the interest of the buyer) to the seller paying for the rating (rating becomes whatever the seller is willing to pay for) ... that regulation becomes enormously more difficult when the business is motivated to do the wrong thing.

sarbanes-oxley posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
too big to fail (too big to prosecute and too big to jail) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

Things started with SEC failing to do anything about the rating agencies ... and sellers no longer needed to care about loan quality because they could pay for triple-A and sell of every loan as fast as they could make them. Then things got enormously worse because CFTC wasn't allowed to regulate gambling derivatives/CDS ... They would design securitized mortgages to fail (requiring enormous numbers of bad mortgages), pay for triple-A, sell to their victim customers, and then take out derivative/CDS gambling bets that they would fail. Then sec. of treasury steps in blocks taken legal action against those running the CDS gambling scam

However repeal of Glass-Steagall was important for 1) banks play in the high risk games and then 2) the pure high risk investment banks also getting the (real) bailouts, 3) enables too big to fail, too big to prosecute, too big to jail. The FEDs fought hard, long legal battle to prevent public disclosure of what they were doing behind the scenes ... tens of trillions in ZIRP funds and buying trillions in offbook toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar. TBTF to have FED bailout required banking charters ... repeal of Glass-Steagall allowed existing regulated banks to play in the high risk activities ... but still get bailout when the high risk stuff goes belly up ... four largest TBTF playing high risk (holding $5.2T toxic assets end of 2008) were Citi, JPMorgan/Chase, Wells Fargo and BofA. However as part of bailout, FED hands out banking charters to the pure high risk investment banks (like G-S) making them also eligible for FED feeding trough (in theory this should have violated the original purpose of GLBA .. which later added repeal of Glass-Steagall).

Same person primarily responsible for GLBA and repeal of Glass-Steagall ... Then is responsible (along with his wife) with blocking CFTC from regulating the gambling derivatives/CDS ... which is where AIG comes in

Glass-Steagall prevented "safe", regulated, federally backed depository institutions from engaging in risky activity. Repeal of Glass-Steagall allowed them to get into enormously risky gambling activities ... where they get to keep the winnings ... but the tax payers are on the hook for the losses.

The four largest TBTF engaged in the risky gambling activity were Citi, JPGMorgan/Chase, Wells Fargo, and BofA. FED Chairman (1st greenspan and then bernanke) allowed them to carry their risky gambling (would have been fraudulent under glass-steagall) "off the books". End of 2008 just those four were still carrying $5.2T in toxic assets "off-book" ... of the total $27+T done 2001-2008. The summer and fall of 2008, several tens of billions in these toxic assets had gone for 22cents on the dollar. If the TBTF had been forced to bring their risky gambling off-book toxic assets back onto the books, they would have been declared insolvent and forced to be liquidated.

Repeal of Glass-Steagall allowing the big regulated financial institutions to play .... enormously increased the amount of activity ... possibly by order of magnitude (major portion of the over $27T done 2001-2008). They would have been the first to crash if it wasn't for them being allowed to carry the activity "off the books" (just the four largest still with $5.2T end of 2008) ... and FED backing them up. The other guys were doing tens of billions not trillions.

I think Lehman was playing with something like $50B that it was moving off books .... compared to over $1.2T-$1.5T for each of the four largest TBTF ... aka each of the four largest TBTF were still in it to 25-30 times that of Lehman at the end of 2008

Minor note ... two different uses of "G-S" ... one for glass-steagall ... and another for "Goldman Sachs" ... former head of Goldman Sachs was secretary of treasury and major player getting Glass Steagall repealed ... initially on behalf of CITI. Another former head of Goldman Sachs was secretary of treasury and major force behind TARP ... and forcing AIG to take TARP funds to pay off gambling CDS at face value. Gave rise to the joke that dept. of treasury had become Goldman Sachs branch office in washington dc.

Lehman Fraudulently Cooked Its Books, Accounting Giant Ernst & Young Helped, Geithner and Bernanke Winked and Slapped Them on the Back
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2010/03/lehman-fraudulently-cooked-its-books-accounting-giant-ernst-young-helped-geithner-and-bernanke-winked-and-slapped-them-on-the-back.html
Against this backdrop, Lehman turned to Repo 105 transactions to temporarily remove $50 billion of assets from its balance sheet at first and second quarter ends in 2008 so that it could report significantly lower net leverage numbers than reality.

... snip ...

Four largest TBTF "banks" still carrying $5.2T "off-book" end of 2008 ... over 100 times that of Lehman ... allowed to play by different rules
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home

VP (& former replacement CIA director) ... claims no knowledge of such activities
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

Later a son, presides over the economic mess, 70 times larger than S&L crisis. In the S&L crises there were 30,000 criminal referrals and 1,000 criminal convictions ... there have been *ZERO* criminal referrals/convictions for the economic mess (proportionally, there should have been 70,000 criminal convictions). If the economic mess had been limited to 1/100th as big, it would have only been slightly over half the problem of the S&L crisis.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Putin's Great Crime: He Defends His Allies and Attacks His Enemies

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Putin's Great Crime: He Defends His Allies and Attacks His Enemies
Date: 10 Oct 2015
Blog: Facebook
Putin's Great Crime: He Defends His Allies and Attacks His Enemies
http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/193990/putins-great-crime-syria

When the secretary of treasury helps CEO of CITI to get the ball rolling to repeal Glass-Steagall and then resigns to join CITI, he is replaced by one of his protegees ... who also shows up here ... is Harvard responsible for the rise of Putin?:

John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html
How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html
Russian Military Politics and Russia's 2010 Defense Doctrine
http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1050

....

John Foster Dulles played major role in rebuilding Germany's economy and military during 20s&30s. The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War,

loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc873-79:
Sullivan & Cromwell floated the first American bonds issued by the giant German steelmaker and arms manufacturer Krupp A.G., extended I.G. Farben's global reach, and fought successfully to block Canada's effort to restrict the export of steel to German arms makers.

loc905-7:
Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism

From the law of unintended consequences ... when the 1943 US Strategic Bombing program needed location of military & industrial targets in Germany, it got them from wallstreet.

reference to June 1940 victory celebration held at Waldorf Astoria in NYC, Intrepid loc1925-29:
One prominent figure at the German victory celebration was Torkild Rieber, of Texaco, whose tankers eluded the British blockade. The company had already been warned, at Roosevelt's instigation, about violations of the Neutrality Law. But Rieber had set up an elaborate scheme for shipping oil and petroleum products through neutral ports in South America. With the Germans now preparing to turn the English Channel into what Churchill thought would become "a river of blood," other industrialists were eager to learn from Texaco how to do more business with Hitler.

Later the same year in Dec 1940, US corporations have a conference at Waldorf Astoria in NYC, where they decide to launch a major propaganda campaign because corporations had gotten such a bad reputation from WW1 profiteering, crash of '29, the depression and supporting the Nazis and Hitler.

You Think the NSA Is Bad? Meet Former CIA Director Allen Dulles. In a new book, David Talbot makes the case that the CIA head under Eisenhower and Kennedy may have been a psychopath.
http://www.motherjones.com/media/2015/10/book-review-devils-chessboard-david-talbot

too big to fail, too big to prosecute, too big to jail posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

the legacy of Seymour Cray

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: the legacy of Seymour Cray
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2015 12:18:29 -0700
hancock4 writes:
To produce a report requiring complex selection and calculations, it often helps to use COBOL to do the hairy stuff, and then a 4GL (e.g. Easytrieve et al) to knock the report. The 4GL saves the burden of hand coding columns, headers, footers, etc., indeed, if the basic data has been assembled into a file, the 4GL program can be very brief. Saves a lot of time.

National CSS was one of the original online (virtual machine) CP67 service bureaus spinoff from the science center ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

NCSS starts off with 4GL RAMIS ... but then develops proprietary Nomad in reaction to competition from other online vm/cms service bureaus (like Tymshare)

various claims/examples that 4GL can do in one statement that might take 100 statements in COBOL.

RAMIS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramis_software

Nomad
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomad_software
early development
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomad_software#Early_development
also mentions original sql/relational implementation done at SJR on (virtual machine) vm370 ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

FOCUS ... followon to RAMIS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOCUS

other reference to FOCUS & Tymshare
http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/information-builders-inc-history/

past posts mentioning 4gl, ramis, nomad, focus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#64 Hercules and System/390 - do we need it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#69 Hercules and System/390 - do we need it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#56 10 choices that were critical to the Net's success
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#15 CA-RAMIS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#17 CA-RAMIS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#28 OT What movies have taught us about Computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#15 two pi, four phase, 370 clone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#58 atomic memory-operation question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#10 What is timesharing, anyway?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#48 Who said DAT?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#33 MAD Programming Language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#12 Dreaming About Redesigning SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#15 Dreaming About Redesigning SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#3 Hyperthreading vs. SMP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004.html#1 Saturation Design Point
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#15 Pre-relational, post-relational, 1968 CODASYL "Survey of Data Base Systems"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#52 Losing colonies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#44 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#33 IBM 3705 and UC.5
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#35 PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#37 PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#8 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#12 Special characters in passwords was Re: RACF - Password rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#37 Quote from comp.object
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#17 Newbie question on table design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#38 It's No Secret: VMware to Develop Secure Systems for NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#87 CompUSA to Close after Jan. 1st 2008
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#66 Computer History Museum
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#40 Gone but not forgotten: 10 operating systems the world left behind
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#54 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#55 Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#58 Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#21 What non-IBM software products have been most significant to the mainframe's success
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#26 Global Sourcing with Cloud Computing and Virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#63 VMSHARE Archives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#55 Maybe off topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#69 "Best" versus "worst" programming language you've used?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#1 Deja Cloud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#60 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#51 From Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#84 Time to competency for new software language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#30 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#57 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#16 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#62 Google F1 was: Re: MongoDB
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#77 Bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#32 Speed of computers--wave equation for the copper atom? (curiosity)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#101 Flat (VSAM or other) files still in use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#40 How Larry Ellison Became The Fifth Richest Man In The World By Using IBM's Idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#74 Ancient computers in use today

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2015 11:41:33 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
for a long time economics assumed that people would make rational choices ... but that has been increasingly debunked
https://hbr.org/2009/07/the-end-of-rational-economics


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#22 rationality

Key member of Swedish Academy of Sciences calls for immediate suspension of the "Nobel Prize for Economics"
https://rwer.wordpress.com/2015/10/11/key-member-of-swedish-academy-of-sciences-calls-for-immediate-suspension-of-the-nobel-prize-for-economics/
The Prize in contravention of the spirit of Nobel's will

Can contribute to increased corruption. Multiple independent research shows that those who study economics are more prone to corruption.


... snip ...

Lazy econ critiques
http://noahpinionblog.blogspot.com/2015/10/lazy-econ-critiques.html

Economists' Tribal Thinking
http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/09/economists-tribal-thinking/403075/
Economics Has a Math Problem
http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2015-09-01/economics-has-a-math-problem

When things were crashing, there were articles about it was all because of faulty (risk management) math ... turns out misdirection and obfuscation; risk managers were reporting that business executives were forcing them to approve deals ... and a call to make risk dept. immune from business executive pressure.

How Wall Street Lied to Its Computers
http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/09/18/how-wall-streets-quants-lied-to-their-computers/
Subprime = Triple-A ratings? or 'How to Lie with Statistics'
http://www.stockwizard.eu/triple.html?page=4

2007 reference to 2005 article explaining how their lies weren't even good math

How Conventional CDO Analytics Missed the Mark
http://www.bobsguide.com/guide/news/2007/Dec/20/Kamakura_Releases_Study:_How_Conventional_CDO_Analytics_Missed_the_Mark.html

The next were reports of consultant hired by wallstreet that was recommending that they tie up all the prominent economists, hire them, put them on retainers, give large grants to univ. depts., etc. ... in order to bias their public views

How Economists Contributed to the Financial Crisis
http://www.forbes.com/sites/johntharvey/2012/02/06/economics-crisis/

too big to fail (too big to prosecute and too big to jail) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

"Inside Job" references how leading economists were captured similar to the capture of the regulatory agencies.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inside_Job_(2010_film)
"Economists and the Powerful: Convenient Theories, Distorted Facts, Ample Rewards" goes into the capture of economists in more detail
http://www.amazon.com/Economists-Powerful-Convenient-Distorted-ebook/dp/B009K44OW2

loc72-74:
"Only through having been caught so blatantly with their noses in the troughs (e.g. the 2011 Academy Award -- winning documentary Inside Job) has the American Economic Association finally been forced to adopt an ethical code, and that code is weak and incomplete compared with other disciplines."

loc957-62:
The AEA was pushed into action by a damning research report into the systematic concealment of conflicts of interest by top financial economists and by a letter from three hundred economists who urged the association to come up with a code of ethics. Epstein and Carrick-Hagenbarth (2010) have shown that many highly influential financial economists in the US hold roles in the private financial sector, from serving on boards to owning the respective companies. Many of these have written on financial regulation in the media or in scholarly papers. Very rarely have they disclosed their affiliations to the financial industry in their writing or in their testimony in front of Congress, thus concealing a potential conflict of interest.

Securitized mortgages (CDOs) had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild were office bldgs in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots. In the late 90s, I was asked to look at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures. Then loan originators were securitizing loans&mortgages (CDOs) and paying for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds, claim is it accounts for 30% loss in funds and trillions shortfall for pensions), largely enabling being able to do over $27T 2001-2008
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

It wasn't good math, but in addition, it was based on the underlying fabricated "triple-A" ratings

John Foster Dulles played major role in rebuilding Germany's economy and military during 20s&30s. The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War, loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc873-79:
Sullivan & Cromwell floated the first American bonds issued by the giant German steelmaker and arms manufacturer Krupp A.G., extended I.G. Farben's global reach, and fought successfully to block Canada's effort to restrict the export of steel to German arms makers.

loc905-7:
Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism

and How Bush's grandfather helped Hitler's rise to power
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/sep/25/usa.secondworldwar

From the law of unintended consequences ... when the 1943 US Strategic Bombing program needed location of military & industrial targets in Germany, it got them from wallstreet.

June1940, Germany had a victory celebration at the Waldorf-Astoria in NYC with major corporations. Lots of them were there to hear how to do business with the Nazi's, Intrepid: loc1901-4:
One prominent figure at the German victory celebration was Torkild Rieber, of Texaco, whose tankers eluded the British blockade. The company had already been warned, at Roosevelt's instigation, about violations of the Neutrality Law. But Rieber had set up an elaborate scheme for shipping oil and petroleum products through neutral ports in South America. With the Germans now preparing to turn the English Channel into what Churchill thought would become "river of blood," other industrialists were eager to learn from Texaco how to do more business with Hitler.

Dec1940, 5,000 industrialists from across the nation have annual meeting at Waldorf-Astoria in NYC. They had gotton such a bad reputation with WW1 war profiteering, crash of '29, the depression, supporting Hitler and Nazis, etc ... they decide to launch major propaganda campaign.

former CIA director and then VP claims he didn't know anything about
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260
more recent:
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/12/jeb-bush-forest-gump-financial-improprieties.html

then last decade, another son presides over the economic mess, 70 times larger than the S&L crises.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ernst & Young Confronts Madoff's Specter in Trial Over Audits

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Ernst & Young Confronts Madoff's Specter in Trial Over Audits
Date: 15 Oct 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/+LynnWheeler/posts/ZfDqYDy2rCX

Ernst & Young Confronts Madoff's Specter in Trial Over Audits
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-10-14/ernst-young-confronts-madoff-s-specter-in-trial-over-audits

Congressional Madoff hearings had the person that tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff (SEC hands were forced when Madoff turned himself in). At the time of the hearing, TV news constantly tried to get him for interviews ... but he sent a lawyer instead (something about being worried about possible retribution from people behind influencing SEC to not do anything)

Madoff posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

Note also, rhetoric in congress for Sarbanes-Oxley was that it would guarantee that executives (and auditors) did jail time ... but it required that SEC do something. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of fraudulent financial filings, even showing increases in numbers of fraudulent filings after Sarbanes-Oxley goes into effect (and nobody doing jail time).

Sarbanes-Oxley posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
fraudulent financial filing posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

A year after the Madoff congressional hearings, the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something ... was on book tour and interviewed. He said he had changed his mind (rather than Madoff working with criminal elements that controlled SEC), he decided that Madoff may have defrauded some criminal elements ... and turned himself in seeking gov. protection (but then couldn't account for why SEC wasn't doing anything).

I've seen references to some people felt so badly about what happened to Andersen in the wake of Enron ... that provisions in SOX was to give an enormous gift to the audit industry ... significantly increasing the audit requirements that businesses would have to pay for .... but there was never any intention to enforce any legal action. Besides GAO reports of fraudulent financial filings continuing & increasing after SOX goes into effect ... there is stuff like:
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/big-4-audit-firms-play-big-role-offshore-murk

Enron posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
tax evasion posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

more trivia ... in late 90s, about the same time I was asked to look at improving the integrity of securitized mortgage supporting documents ... as countermeasure to use of securitizing obfuscating fraud ... securitized mortgage (toxic CDOs) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

I was also asked into NSCC (before merger with DTC that formed DTCC) to look at improving the integrity of exchange trading transactions. I worked on it for awhile and then got another call to come in. They said the work was being suspended because a side-effect of the integrity work would have greatly increased transparency and visibility ... which is antithetical to wallstreet culture ... including something about possibly 30% of transactions might need to be disavowed also requiring plausible deniability. Decade later in the Madoff congressional hearings, the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff, also raises the issue of transparency and visibility. DTCC ref:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depository_Trust_%26_Clearing_Corporation
and regarding controversy over naked short selling

... and this reference ... wallstreet has nothing to fear from the SEC
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Whistleblower Employed By Federal Whistleblower Protection Program Fired For Blowing The Whistle

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Whistleblower Employed By Federal Whistleblower Protection Program Fired For Blowing The Whistle
Date: 15 Oct 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/+LynnWheeler/posts/CGcWeC6SU1D

Whistleblower Employed By Federal Whistleblower Protection Program Fired For Blowing The Whistle
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-10-15/whistleblower-employed-federal-whistleblower-protection-program-fired-blowing-whistl

Federal Whistleblower Investigator Fired After Blowing the Whistle on His Own Agency
http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Federal-Whistleblower-Investigator-Fired-After-Blowing-the-Whistle-on-His-Own-Agency-332240782.html

whistleblower posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down
Date: 15 Oct 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/+LynnWheeler/posts/3KoiEkZcTTH

Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down
https://theintercept.com/2015/10/13/talk-of-criminally-prosecuting-corporations-up-actual-prosecutions-down

too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Prosecution of White Collar Crime Hits 20-Year Low
http://www.alternet.org/news-amp-politics/prosecution-white-collar-crime-hits-20-year-low
DOJ Must Prove Commitment to Ending 'Too Big to Jail'
http://www.americanbanker.com/bankthink/doj-must-prove-commitment-to-ending-too-big-to-jail-1076671-1.html
New DOJ Corporate Crime Policy Will Impact Contracting
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2015/09/new-doj-corporate-crime-policy.html
If the Justice Dept Wants to Punish Corporate Crooks, Here's How
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2015/09/if-the-justice-dept-wants-to-punish-corporate-crooks-heres-how.html
New Justice Department Rules Aim to Prosecute Executives in Corporate Crime
http://time.com/4028775/justice-department-corporate-crime/

posts mentioning deferred prosecution:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#10 Instead of focusing on big fines, law enforcement should seek long prison terms for the responsible executives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#80 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#23 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#44 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 Do we REALLY NEED all this regulatory oversight?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#37 LIBOR: History's Largest Financial Crime that the WSJ and NYT Would Like You to Forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#57 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#61 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

(External):Re: IBM

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: (External):Re: IBM
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 17 Oct 2015 14:49:13 -0700
cfmpublic@NS.SYMPATICO.CA (Clark Morris) writes:
Actually allowing any country to review code is to open an exposure. On the other hand all users have at least some need to verify that code is not exposing them. For those users with high security needs and a large enough budget, having all software in house maybe using open source software as a starting base can make sense. I believed back in the 1970s and 80s that one of the best places to put a spy was in the IBM software creation and distribution system. These comments apply to all countries. It would be interesting to find out which countries and entities are reviewing source code from the various vendors. I believe that Snowden supporters are naive if they believe that other major and not so major countries are not engaged in much the same activities as those he accused the United States NSA and other agencies of committing. If IBM is allowing the Chinese government to review the code, I will guarantee that other governments are also reviewing the code. In addition we know that at least some ISV's have access to at least some of the code under non-disclosure agreements. I leave to you who are citizens of various countries to determine how concerned you should be.

a lot of this is consequence of significant publicity in the past couple years about US gov. agencies putting backdoors in many products from US companies. In many parts of the world, US companies are now faced with proving that their products don't have backdoors.

There is the folklore from the early 80s about certain gov. agency asking IBM if it could guarantee that all the source IBM provided for the POK favorite son operating system exactly corresponded to all the code they were actually running. Supposedly a large taskforce spent significant amount of money investigating the issue and concluded that it wasn't practical (almost impossible to identify exactly all the corresponding source that went with all the running porducts that a customer had installed).

It use to be all source was available ... it was only in the 80s that started having the OCO-wars ... with IBM moving to no longer making source available.

Long ago and far away, litigation results in the 23Jun1969 Unbundling announce ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

charging for (application) software, SE services, maintenance, etc ... however the company made the case that operating system software should still be free.

Then "Future System" was started in the early 70s as countermeasure to clone controllers (totally different from 370, with tightly integrated controllers having exceedingly complex protocol). Internal politics started killing off 370 products. Then the lack of 370 products during this period is credited with giving clone processor makers a market foothold. I continued to work on 360 & 370 stuff during this period, even periodically ridiculing the FS efforts (not exactly career enhancing activity). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

Then when "Future System" imploded, there was a mad rush to get products back into the 370 pipeline. This contributed to selecting several of the things that I had been doing for release to customers. Part of the stuff was dynamic adaptive resource management (dating back to when I was undergraduate in the 60s) was selected to be a separate kernel component and the guinea pig for starting to charge for operating system/kernel software (in large part because of the rise of clone processors ... which was because of the lack of 370 products during the FS period) ... on the path to charging for all software ... and then stopping making source code available. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

...

AMEX is in competition with KKR to do private equity LBO take-over of RJR. KKR wins, but runs into trouble and hires away the president of AMEX to turn it around.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

IBM has gone into the red and was being reorganized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company. The board then hires the former president of AMEX to resurrect IBM and reverse the breakup.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
Some of the some techniques used at RJR are then used at IBM:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

The former president of AMEX then leaves IBM and becomes head of another major private equity company ... which then does a private equity LBO of the company that employs Snowden. Last decade there is enormous uptic of outsourcing to for-profit companies ... especially those under the thumb of private-equity owners with enormous political clout. Majority of the intelligence budget and over half the people are now with for-profit companies.
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower. They're not going away any time soon unless the CIA and NSA want to start over and with some off-the-shelf laptops, networked by the Geek Squad from Best Buy. Security clearances used to be a government function too, but are now a profit center for various private-equity subsidiaries.

... snip ...

comparison of private-equity LBOs to house flipping, except the loan for the purchase goes on the victim company's books ... and stays with it even after flipping. They can even sell a victim company for less than they paid and still walk away with boat loads of money. Victim companies are under intense pressure to make money to service the debt and they account for over half corporate defaults (the companies being paid for security clearances were found to be doing the paperwork ... but not actually doing the security checking).
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

another ... "OPM Contractor's Parent Firm Has a Troubled History"
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas/

and ... "How Private Contractors Have Created a Shadow NSA; A new cybersecurity elite moves between government and private practice, taking state secrets with them" (also references oil rig company that was transformed into one of the largest defense contractors after former SECDEF and future VP becomes CEO, including no-bid contracts in Iraq)
http://www.thenation.com/article/how-private-contractors-have-created-shadow-nsa/
there was enormous uptic in outsourcing to for-profit companies last decade, above includes references to some of the events around the spreading Success Of Failure culture by the for-profit beltway bandits (make more money off series of failures)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
(note sometimes clicking govexec serves up a blank page and you have to repeat the click) some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

There has been a lot written about the failure of gov. whistleblower provisions ... rather than protecting the whistleblowers ... it sets them up for prosecution. The Success Of Failure scenario has long time senior people reporting problems to the responsible group in congress ... and then getting charged under the same statute that was used to charge Snowden. The whistleblower provisions are for employees only (not for the exploding number of contractors like Snowden) ... and it didn't protect them either. Other trivia, in the wake of the Success Of Failure scandal, congress put the agency on probation and not allowed to manage its own projects (however, that may have just been a ploy to further outsource to for-profit companies). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

More trivia, IC-ARDA (since renamed IARPA) released an unclassified BAA around the first of the century ... that basically said that none of the tools they had did what was needed ... which turns out to correspond to a lot of what was exposed in the later Success Of Failure scandal.

Member: Mainframe Hall of Fame
http://www.Enterprisesystemsmedia.com/mainframe-hall-of-fame
Original Member of Knights of VM
http://www2.marist.edu/~mvmua/knights.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan were lost before they began, not on the battlefields

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan were lost before they began, not on the battlefields
Date: 18 Oct 2015
Blog: Facebook
The wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan were lost before they began, not on the battlefields, where the United States won every tactical engagement, but at the strategic level of war.
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/war_stories/2015/10/the_american_military_is_bad_at_teaching_others_how_to_fight.html

depends on what is considered "tactical".

loc1577-79:
The Iraqi army's cohesion in the face of a determined offensive by a small force of irregulars can be measured in hours. When a few hundred Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militiamen attacked Mosul, for example, the 30,000-man Iraqi army garrison there fled, shedding their uniforms and equipment as they ran.6

loc1693-95:
The ARVN that the United States created collapsed in 6 weeks, and the Iraqi Army that the United States created collapsed in 6 hours because they had neither a national sense of country nor a government--in Saigon or Baghdad--that its soldiers believed was worth dying for.

loc2127-29:
After 13 years and a trillion dollars spent,22 security is so bad in the capital city that the flag-furling ceremony for Operation ENDURING FREEDOM had to be held in secret at an undisclosed location in Kabul out of concern that the ceremony would be attacked by the Taliban.23

loc2319-21:
In 1993, McNamara addressed the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. As Bruce Nussbaum notes, McNamara told the audience: he had made a mistake. The protesters had been right all along. The war was unwinnable from the start. The domino theory was ridiculous. Nationalism had been confused with communism. There had never been a serious threat to U.S. security.75

loc2372-75:
The most outspoken critics of America's military, like Lieutenant General Herbert McMaster,85 retired Colonel Andrew Bacevich,86 and former Marine Lieutenant Colonel Frank Hoffman, have criticized the military establishment, or the officer corps, for not standing up to civilian leaders, for being too willing to try to get the job done, or for being, in Hoffman's harsh words, "yes men."

... snip ...

As aside, McNamara was LeMay's staff planning and analyzing the WW2 fire bombing of German and Japanese cities. In the 2003 documentary The Fog of War, McNamara recalled the firebombing of Tokyo on March 9, 1945:
In that single night, we burned to death a hundred thousand Japanese civilians in Tokyo--men, women, and children. After the war, General LeMay said to McNamara: If we'd lost the war we'd all have been prosecuted as war criminals.

my son-in-law 1st tour was Fallujah 2004-2005 then 2nd tour was Baqubah 2007-2008, described as worse than Fallujah, in part because the enemy made use of what they had learned in Fallujah (administration was claiming that things had got a lot better so Baqubah didn't get the coverage that Fallujah got)
http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-Killing-Our-Way-ebook/dp/B007VBBS9I/

loc5243-54:
I was overwhelmed at the amount of destruction that surrounded me. The sterile yard was about 150 meters wide by about 100 meters deep, and it was packed full of destroyed vehicles (words can't describe what I saw)

... and
I saw other Bradleys and M1 Abrams main battle tanks, the pride of the 1st Cavalry Division--vehicles that, if back at Fort Hood, would be parked meticulously on line, tarps tied tight, gun barrels lined up, track line spotless, not so much as a drop of oil on the white cement. What I saw that day was row after row of mangled tan steel as if in a junkyard that belonged to Satan himself.

... snip ...

Saddam learned from Iraq1 not to be easy targets for US air power ... just melt away. Then from the law of unintended consequences, for Iraq2, they were told to bypass ammo dumps looking for WMDs ... when they get around to going back, more than a million metric tons have evaporated. They then start seeing large artillery shell IEDs, even taking out Abrams
http://www.amazon.com/Fiasco-American-Military-Adventure-ebook/dp/B004IATD6U/

last decade, cousin of white house chief of staff Card ... was dealing with the Iraqis at the UN and was given evidence that WMDs had been decommissioned, provides information to cousin Card, Powell and some number of others, then gets locked up in military hospital
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

they eventually find the decommissioned WMDs tracing back to US in the 80s ... that information is classified for decade
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html?_r=0

corporate representatives approach former eastern bloc countries and tell them if they vote for invasion of iraq in the UN, they will get approval to join NATO and directed appropriation USAID (that can only be used for buying modern arms from US military-industrial complex).
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA/

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Sad Symbolism of Captured U.S. Military Hardware

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Sad Symbolism of Captured U.S. Military Hardware
Date: 19 Oct 2015
Blog: Facebook
The Sad Symbolism of Captured U.S. Military Hardware
http://warisboring.com/articles/the-sad-symbolism-of-captured-u-s-military-hardware/

Why Is the American Military So Bad at Teaching Others How to Fight? The task goes far beyond what U.S. soldiers are trained to teach.
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/war_stories/2015/10/the_american_military_is_bad_at_teaching_others_how_to_fight.html

The Strategic Lessons Unlearned from Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan: Why the ANSF Will Not Hold, and the Implications for the U.S. Army in Afghanistan
https://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1269

loc1577-79:
The Iraqi army's cohesion in the face of a determined offensive by a small force of irregulars can be measured in hours. When a few hundred Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militiamen attacked Mosul, for example, the 30,000-man Iraqi army garrison there fled, shedding their uniforms and equipment as they ran.6

loc1693-95:
The ARVN that the United States created collapsed in 6 weeks, and the Iraqi Army that the United States created collapsed in 6 hours because they had neither a national sense of country nor a government--in Saigon or Baghdad--that its soldiers believed was worth dying for.

... snip ...

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

high level language idea

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: high level language idea
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2015 13:35:16 -0700
hancock4 writes:
I think better compilers didn't become widely available until the later 1960s.

I don't know the quality of IBM's first S/360 COBOL and FORTRAN compilers. But I speculate it may have been poor since IBM was under tremendous pressure to get that stuff out the door, and, early machines tended to be small. At our 360-40 site, the free D COBOL was poor; we used purchased F COBOL.

I don't know about Fortran, but in college they used the WATFIV product, supposedly for better diagnostics. I don't know what Fortran a researcher would use who had serious number crunching to do and machine time was a consideration.


lots of referernces
http://www.softwarepreservation.org/projects/FORTRAN/

other reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fortran
watfor/watfiv referrence
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WATFIV

IBM 360 Fortran G ... was the regular compiler, IBM 360 Fortran H was much larger and high performance/optimizing compiler. 360 Fortran G & H (& HX) documents
http://bitsavers.informatik.uni-stuttgart.de/pdf/ibm/360/fortran/

The person that did the 370/145 APL microcode assist at the Palo Alto Science Center also did internal FortranQ ... which then released as enhancement to Fortran HX. This has section that discusses some differences between FORT-H (extended) and FORT-H (aka fortran q, enhanced) .... also example application count for Fort-G, Fort-H (extended), and Fort-H (enhnaced)
http://www.cs.rice.edu/~keith/512/2011/Lectures/L02FortranH-1up.pdf

some past posts mention fortran q
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#1 WATFOR's Silver Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#6 a history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#22 Why these original FORTRAN quirks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#28 floating point, was history of RPG, Fortran
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#71 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#85 Costs of core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#52 The Stack Depth

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

high level language idea

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: high level language idea
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2015 15:31:49 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Did H level cost more to lease? Was it commonly used?

(I wish I saved my college printouts, so I could look to see what they used.)


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#35 high level language idea

H-level cost more after IBM started charging software, 23jun1969 unbundling announce ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

H&HX did optimization ... see reference comparing extended & enhanced optimization differences ... that reference also has some discussion about improvement in optimization becoming as good as human assembler coding ...

PG 13&24 has comparison of G1, H-extended, H-enhanced efficiency (not exactly the original 360 G&H ... but gets somewhat the idea) gives aggregate operation for plasma physics code (integer, floag, control & others), pg24: G1: 84.125M operations, H-extended 18.575M operations, H-enhanced 12.058M operations.

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Marine distress system

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Marine distress system
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2015 19:17:38 -0700
I was sitting at coffee shop yesterday morning, the next table had four men and one was explaining the marine distress system. A ship signals distress and all ships in the world receive it ... and receivers have limited time interval to respond (cancel or acknowledge), before their system retransmits the signal. He claimed that a sinking ship distress transmission near australia a month ago, is still being retransmitted. He said that it is an ancient MS/DOS based system and almost impossible to change. He said that some ships turn off their receiver because there is also required paper work that has to be filled out for each signal that is received.

this doesn't go into that level of detail ...

Global Maritime Distress and Safety System
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Maritime_Distress_Safety_System
digital selective calling
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Selective_Calling

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

high level language idea

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: high level language idea
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 23 Oct 2015 11:20:52 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
it was all open-source. No need to reverse-engineer anything. As late as MVS/XA I had a VSAM open exit where the call location had to be gleaned by looking at the fiche and disassembling the PL/S module, although it started out as a straightforward source update in MVS/370.

I think JES2, or most of it, is still distributed as source, because so many users had so many different mods. Out JES guy had tons and knew the jes code i side and out.


I've periodically mentioned that litigation resulted in 23June1969 unbundle, starting to charge for (application) software, SE services, maint., etc. ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

however, the company manage to make the case that kernel (operating system) software should still be free. Somewhat because of the clone processor makers get market foothold during the FS period (because of lack of 370 products) ... some past FS posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

there is a decision to transition to start charging for (new) kernel software ... there is period during the late 70s and early 80s, where parts of kernel were free and other parts were charged for ... you can see this in the hercules simulator project that has the latest "free" software. Eventually transition is made to charging for all software ... about the same time as the OCO-wars (object code only ... no longer shipping source). computerworld article from google books
https://books.google.com/books?id=hSBrPSYgjI4C&pg=PT58&lpg=PT58&dq=oco-wars+ibm&source=bl&ots=yBMaklHV-x&sig=P8_h7-FSQOnbM0-TQO0OzK_UwaM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CD4Q6AEwBWoVChMIuqDXn5nZyAIVxDqICh1zSAWR#v=onepage&q=oco-wars%20ibm&f=false

part of JES2 folklore is that they did all their source maintenance using vm370/cms (originally cp67/cms) multi-level update infrastructure ... and then had to go thru conversion to the MVS-based system for release. misc. past posts mentioning HASP, JES2, NJE, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#hasp

misc. past posts mentioning OCO-wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#57 IPCS Standard Print Service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#34 Not Your Dad's Mainframe: Little Iron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#14 SEQUENCE NUMBERS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#15 Data Areas Manuals to be dropped
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#15 Patents, Copyrights, Profits, Flex and Hercules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#6 Open z/Architecture or Not
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#8 Open z/Architecture or Not
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#42 VM/370 Release 6 Waterloo tape (CIA MODS)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#45 dynamic allocation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#72 Linux versioning file system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#0 Timeline: The evolution of online communities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#20 If you don't have access to a mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#48 Timeline: 40 Years Of Unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#7 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#49 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#17 Personal use z/OS machines was Re: Multiprise 3k for personal Use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#19 Personal use z/OS machines was Re: Multiprise 3k for personal Use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#20 Personal use z/OS machines was Re: Multiprise 3k for personal Use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#22 Personal use z/OS machines was Re: Multiprise 3k for personal Use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#30 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#65 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#67 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#1 Honoree pedigrees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#15 Age
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#30 Philosophy: curiousity question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#87 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#56 The real cost of outsourcing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#75 pdp8 to PC- have we lost our way?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#7 Do you remember back to June 23, 1969 when IBM unbundled
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#17 Got to remembering... the really old geeks (like me) cut their teeth on Unit Record
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#33 Data Areas?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#58 An approach to Dump formatting of Control Blocks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#20 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#30 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#31 How smart do you need to be to be really good with Assembler?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#79 Slackware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#62 Any cool anecdotes IBM 40yrs of VM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#63 Is it possible to hack mainframe system??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#26 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#66 model numbers; was re: World's worst programming environment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#55 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#45 the nonsuckage of source, was MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#19 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#5 "F[R]eebie" software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#35 BBC News - Microsoft fixes '19-year-old' bug with emergency patch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#84 a bit of hope? What was old is new again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#85 a bit of hope? What was old is new again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#19 What were the complaints of binary code programmers that not accept Assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#14 3033 & 3081 question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#48 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#59 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#32 (External):Re: IBM

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

high level language idea

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: high level language idea
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 27 Oct 2015 08:30:09 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Keeping PTFs applied and up to date was a busy task for system programmers at a large installation. They had to be reviewed to see if the contents were relevant to the particular installation. Sometimes they had to be loaded when the machine was idle and then re-IPL'd. They had to be carefully tracked and loaded in the proper order.

also regression tests ... PTFs could introduce failures &/or incompatibilities ... like "fixes" for JCL that had side-effect that would result in production jobs to stop running.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

high level language idea

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: high level language idea
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 27 Oct 2015 09:11:49 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
also regression tests ... PTFs could introduce failures &/or incompatibilities ... like "fixes" for JCL that had side-effect that would result in production jobs to stop running.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#39 high level language idea

another side-effect ... over time, PTFs could significantly degrade the performance of my system.

When I did sysgen, I tore apart sysgen2 output of sysgen1 and re-organized lots of the sequence to carefully place files and PDS library members on disk to optimize arm seek motion (& PDS multi-track search member lookup) ... which got nearly 3 times throughput improvement on fortgclg student jobs.

PTFs would typically "replace" one or more PDS library members. "Replace" is something of misnomer ... it would insert new member at the end of the library and null out the member being replaced ... destroying careful physical ordering on disk. After six months of PTFs, my carefully generated system could loose half or more of the performance optimization (enough PTFs might also use up max. space that had been pre-allocated for PDS library file).

old post with part of 60s SHARE presentation I made on system optimization that I did as undergraduate. Most of it is about significant rewrites of (virtual machine) cp67 system code to cut simulation pathlengths ... benchmarking os/360 fortgclg in virtual machine. Part of the post also discusses the optimizations that I did for os/360.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18 CP/67 & OS MFT14

recent posts mentioning fortran
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#21 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#35 high level language idea

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

high level language idea

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: high level language idea
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 28 Oct 2015 08:04:38 -0700
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
I assume you did this optimization of arm movement manually. Too bad you didn't automate the process into something you could pass on to customers.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#35 high level language idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#36 high level language idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#38 high level language idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#39 high level language idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#40 high level language idea

started with re-arrainging cards in a card tray ... stage2 was over thousand cards ... mostly based on my understanding of os/360 internals. then got a load trace ... for PDS library member names ... and reorganizing cards got more sophisticated.

a decade later ... at SJR ... did modification of VM370 to collect arm movement data ... both VM370 operations and activity of virtual machines. It was initially used in cache simulator ... looking at types of caching and caching strategies. One of the things it showed that most efficient use of fixed amount of electronic cache was global cache rather than partitioned into controller or device level caches.

The work also found that emerging cache technology started to take care of highest use common system data ... and physical location clustering started to focus on collections of application data that tended to be used together in bursty sequences ... as in daily, weekly, monthly intervals. Also highlighted differentiating between high re-use data patterns and purely sequential use data patterns where caching provided little benefit (and caching sequential use data could degrade throughput by replacing repeated high-use data).

There was work on doing efficient real-time reduction of the data ... so it might be used by systems for allocation strategies as well as supporting dynamic moving data for better throughput.

about the same time there was a different internally developed program MDREORG that relied on standard VM370 PER collected information. It was used by (internal) installations moving from 3330&3350 to 3380 configurations. It would define load balancing across 3380 drives and ordering within 3380 drives to optimize throughput. One of the things it showed, if you completely filled a fewer number of 3380 drives from 3350 drive configuration, there would be worse performance. The throughput break-even was filling 3380 drive 80% full of data from 3350 configuration (which was still cheaper than 3350 configuration). For better performance needed to have 3380 at less than 80% full of data from 3350 configuration (and leaving the rest of the space empty or using for very infrequently used data).

semi-related ... posts mentioning getting to play disk engineer in bldgs. 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk
and posts mentioning multi-track search/CKD versus fixed-block/FBA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dask

some past refs about using monitoring/trace information for improving throughput
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#35 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#3 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#65 Crippleware: hardware examples
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#18 How to analyze a volume's access by dataset
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#70 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#71 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#47 nested LRU schemes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#11 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

semi-related, ... late 70s & early 80s, I was making comments that relative system throughput of disks was significantly declining ... by the early 80s, the relative system throughput of disks were an order of magnitude less than the mid/late 60s (when I was doing the careful os/360 sysgens) ... aka processors got 40-50 times faster, disks got 3-5 times faster.

at one point, disk division executives took exception to the statements and assigned the division performance organization to refute them. After several weeks, the came back and effectively said that I had slightly understated the problem. They then respin it into SHARE presentation on how to configure disks for improving throughput. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#18 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#46 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#3 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#68 DASD Response Time (on antique 3390?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#5 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#9 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#88 CPU time differences for the same job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#71 308x Processors - was "Mainframe articles"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#7 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#34 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#52 Hercules; more information requested
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#67 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#1 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#70 25 reasons why hardware is still hot at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#31 Wax ON Wax OFF -- Tuning VSAM considerations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#32 OS idling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#33 History of Hard-coded Offsets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#18 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#30 IBM Historic computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#35 CKD DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#61 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#1 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#59 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#5 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#32 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#73 Tape vs DASD - Speed/time/CPU utilization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#39 A bit of IBM System 360 nostalgia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#62 ISO documentation of IBM 3375, 3380 and 3390 track format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#72 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#49 Mac at 30: A love/hate relationship from the support front
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#90 What's the difference between doing performance in a mainframe environment versus doing in others
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#87 Death of spinning disk?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#0 Miniskirts and mainframes

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Relational Databases Lack Relationships

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Relational Databases Lack Relationships
Newsgroups: comp.databases.theory
Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2015 09:47:56 -0700
Eric <eric@deptj.eu> writes:
Aside from needing to find out what on earth they mean by "semi-structured" and "ad-hoc, exceptional relationships", has anyone ever heard, from any other source, that codifying paper forms and tabular structures is what relational databases were designed to do?

I got roped into doing doing part of the implementation for original sql/relational ... Codd's office was floor above mine.

they were somewhat competing with IMS for efficient financial transactions (as early adopter) and table optimization allowed single record to be fetched using account number index, that contained all the fields for performing financial transactions.

The IMS group still criticized the implementation as requiring twice the disk space (for the table index) as IMS with its direct record pointers ... and 4-5 the disk I/Os (doing index lookup). The counter was that IMS required significant manual maintenance to go through and update all the exposed record pointers anytime there was even trivial, minor change in layout. To some extent the trade-offs inverted in the 80s when cost of disk space enormously dropped and size of memories significantly increased ... allowing significant amount of index caching (reducing physical disk i/os). One of the original customer joint studies/pilots was with large financial institution.

The next generation "official" DBMS was called EAGLE. With the corporation preoccupied with EAGLE, we were able to do technology transfer to Endicott and get it released as SQL/DS. Later when EAGLE implodes, they ask how long could it would take to make it availble ... which is eventually released as DB2.

At the same time, I got sucked into doing another implementation that directly instantiated all relationships (done fpr internal chip design tools group) ... every field effectively became separate indexed record and every relationship became separate indexed record. It could require 7-10 times the disk space as the original sql/implementation and significant more disk i/os (access index for a field, then read the field, then access the indexes for all its possible relationships, read the relationships, and then access all the indexes for each field for each relationship and then read all those fields.)

For really large amounts of complex data ... there was cross-over where table joins became more expensive/overhead than directly instantiating all fields and relationships (with forest of indexes)

past posts mentioning original sql/relationship
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Are we just running in place?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Are we just running in place?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2015 12:21:30 -0700
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Well, heck. It was written by IBM. They had the source and the internal documentation for their System/360 operating systems at their elbows. They knew how this stuff was done, and they tripped over the problems before Bill Gates or Richard Stallman, for that matter, were out of knee pants.

So it would be highly surprising were anything else the case.


there was the joke that some of the os/360 kingston MFT people went to Boca and attempted to re-implement MFT for the Series/1 ... released RPS ... big, kludgy, overweight. Folklore is that EDX was originally done by some physics summer interns at IBM San Jose Research.

OS/2 was lighter weight ... but by that time the machines were larger and more powerful than peachtree (used in series/1).

In 60s as undergraduate, I had done dynamic adaptive resource management for (virtual machine) cp67 ... which was picked up and shipped in standard product. In the (simplification) morph from cp67 to vm370 ... almost all of my changes were dropped (as well as other stuff).

After graduation, I had gone to IBM cambridge science center and continued to work on cp67 and then ported bunch of stuff to vm370 (all through the Future System period, even periodically ridiculing FS activity). some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

science center posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
FS posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

charlie had invented compare&swap (name chosen because "CAS" are his initials) instruction when he was doing fine-grain multiprocessing cp67 locking. the attempt to include compare&swap instruction in 370 was initially rebuffed (the POK favorite son operating system people said that test&set instruction was more than satisfactory). The 370 architecture owners said that to justify compare&swap for 370, we would have to come up with uses other than kernel multiprocessor support. Thus was born the high-performance application multithreaded (multiprogramming) uses (whether running on multiprocessor or not), examples continue to appear in appendix of principles of operation (so useful, compare&swap or similar semantics started to appear in other platforms for high-performance DBMS multithreading).

some compare&swap and/or SMP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

with the failure of FS, there was mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipeline ... which contributed to including a lot of stuff I had been working on in customer releases. Some of it went into the next "free" vm370 release ("3"). A bunch of stuff was decided to be the guinea pig for starting to charge for kernel software ... a lot of resource management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare
and bunch of paging infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#clock

as the "Resource Manager". However, it included a bunch of stuff done for structuring kernel for multiprocessor support (w/o actual turning on multiprocessor support).

Then for vm370 release 4, it was decided to ship multiprocessor support. At the time, the guidelines for kernel software charging was that "old" software was still free, and software directly in hardware support had to be free (charged-for kernel software was "add-on"). The problem was that nearly 90% of the lines-of-code in the charged-for resource manager was required for multiprocessor support. For vm370 release 4 multiprocessor support, a little slight of hand magically moved nearly 90% of the resource manager into the "free" software base ... while not changing the price of the charged-for resource manager.

Sometime later ... the OS/2 development people contact vm370 group about how to do resource management. They forward the request to me ... old email:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#email871124
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#email871204
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#email871204b

reference to boca decided to not use the much superior cp/86 ... but decided instead to start to use their own OS/2 project
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#46 pc/370

cp/86 originally started out as the software running on the PC processor to handle service requests from modified VM370 running on the (68k implemented) 370 processor.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 01 Nov 2015 13:59:43 -0800
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
I don't have the slightest reason to believe the problem has been *fixed*. There is one less name on Wall Street, the one allowed to fail. Other than that, the same cast of characters who caused the recent problems, instead of being in prison, are left free to organize new, and even more complex, methods that will likely result in a second failure. Too big to fail is still true. Of course its only been, what, seven years, since the failure?

A big component of the '29 failure was banks investing loose money, that wasn't theirs, in the stock market. Fortunately, those banks failed and disappeared. In the recent fiasco, they [1] are still there and dispensing huge bonuses to undeserving people. The undeserving people are those who can make the right guesses about the future a few times in a row and have the right contacts.


Lehman Fraudulently Cooked Its Books, Accounting Giant Ernst & Young Helped, Geithner and Bernanke Winked and Slapped Them on the Back
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2010/03/lehman-fraudulently-cooked-its-books-accounting-giant-ernst-young-helped-geithner-and-bernanke-winked-and-slapped-them-on-the-back.html

from above:
Against this backdrop, Lehman turned to Repo 105 transactions to temporarily remove $50 billion of assets from its balance sheet at first and second quarter ends in 2008 so that it could report significantly lower net leverage numbers than reality.

... snip ...

Four largest TBTF "banks" still carrying $5.2T "off-book" end of 2008 ... over 100 times that of Lehman ... allowed to play by different rules
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home

posts mentioning too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

VP (& former replacement CIA director) ... claims no knowledge of such activities
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

Later a son, presides over the economic mess, 70 times larger than S&L crisis. In the S&L crises there were 30,000 criminal referrals and 1,000 criminal convictions ... there have been *ZERO* criminal referrals/convictions for the economic mess (proportionally, there should have been 70,000 criminal convictions). If the economic mess had been limited to 1/100th as big, it would have only been slightly over half the problem of the S&L crisis.

other ...

Lehman's Gift To Jeb Bush For Funneling Pension Money: A $1.3 Million Consulting "Job"
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-08-19/lehmans-gift-jeb-bush-funneling-pension-money-13-million-consulting-job

Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild were office bldgs in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots). In the late 90s, I was asked to look at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures. Then loan originators were securitizing loans&mortgages and paying for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds, claim is it accounts for 30% loss in funds and trillions shortfall for pensions), largely enabling being able to do over $27T 2001-2008
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

posts mentioning (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

If that wasn't enough, paying for triple-A ratings enabled them to create securitized mortgages designed to fail, pay for the triple-A rating and sell off to their customer/victims and then take out CDS gambling bets that they would fail (creating enormous demand for dodgy mortgages). Later the largest holder of the CDS gambling bets was AIG ... who was negotiating to payoff at 50-60 cents on the dollar when the sec. of treasury steps in, forces them to sign a document that they can't sue those making the CDS gambling bets and to take TARP funds to payoff at face value (AIG is the largest recipient of TARP funds and the firm formally headed by the sec. of treasury is the largest recipient of face-value payoffs).

Treasury Department Claims Paulson Never Officially Discussed AIG Bailout
http://shadowproof.com/2015/09/02/treasury-department-claims-paulson-never-officially-discussed-aig-bailout/

Disclaimer: Jan2009 I was asked to HTML'ize the Pecora hearings (30s senate hearings into crash of '29) with lots of internal hrefs and URLs between what happened then and what happened this time (comments that the new congress might have appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call that it won't be needed after all (reference to enormous piles of wallstreet money totally burying DC). Loans and mortgages were being laundered through wallstreet as triple-A rated, securitized instruments largely using real estate market for the speculation bubble scam. The crash of '29 used the stock market for the speculation bubble scam (from Pecora testimony):
BROKERS' LOANS AND INDUSTRIAL DEPRESSION

For the purpose of making it perfectly clear that the present industrial depression was due to the inflation of credit on brokers' loans, as obtained from the Bureau of Research of the Federal Reserve Board, the figures show that the inflation of credit for speculative purposes on stock exchanges were responsible directly for a rise in the average of quotations of the stocks from sixty in 1922 to 225 in 1929 to 35 in 1932 and that the change in the value of such Stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange went through the same identical changes in almost identical percentages.


... snip ...

posts mentioning Pecora Hearings &/or Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

While the TARP funds was facade that they were to be used to buy off-book toxic assets ... with only $700B, they could have barely made a dent in the problem

The FEDs fought long, hard, legal battle to prevent public disclosure of what they were doing behind the scenes ... tens of trillions in ZIRP funds (claims that TBTF have been making $300B/annum off ZIRP funds) and buying trillions in offbook toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar. After loosing the legal battle, Bernanke has press conference where he said that he had expected the TBTF to use the ZIRP funds to aid mainstreet, but when they didn't he had no way to force them (but that didn't stop the ZIRP funds). Note the Fed chairman was supposedly selected in part because he was depression scholar. However, the Fed had tried something similar after the crash of 29 and wall street had behaved the same way ... so there should have been *NO* expectation that they would behave differently this time.

posts mentioning Bernanke (and/or other Fed. chairman)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#bernanke

By comparison, TBTF have been fined a total of $300B in "deferred prosecution" since the economic mess (not limited to the economic mess illegal activity, but also manipulating LIBOR, Forex, and other commodities, money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists, ROBO-signing mills for fabricating documents for illegal foreclosures, etc). The joke is that the $300B in fines is so small compared to the illegal profits that it is just viewed as cost of TBTF doing illegal business (especially with no threat of jail time).

posts mentioning LIBOR
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#libor

recent posts mentioning "deferred prosecution":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#80 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#23 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#44 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 Do we REALLY NEED all this regulatory oversight?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#37 LIBOR: History's Largest Financial Crime that the WSJ and NYT Would Like You to Forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#57 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#61 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#31 Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Nov 2015 10:43:26 -0800
Morten Reistad <first@last.name.invalid> writes:
It was the Glass-Steagall act (really just 4 provisions in the Banking act of 1933) (GS1933) that at least plugged the multiplier of the crash that had made the 1929 crash som bad. This worked until the Gramm-Leach-Bliley of 1999 (GLB1999) removed the two crucial provisions of the GS1933. Signed by William Jefferson Clinton.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#44 rationality

rhetoric on the floor of congress (initially) was that the purpose of GLBA was to prevent new banking competition (especially competitors with new technology that would make banking significantly more efficient and competitive) ... if you already have banking charter, you get to keep it, if you don't already have a banking charter you can't get one. They then start adding other favors ... repeal of Glass-Steagall and "opt-out" personal information sharing. Folklore is that president initially was going to veto GLBA ... which passes pretty much along party lines (54-44), then they go back and bring the other party on board and it passes with veto proof 90-8 and the president signs it. It was supposedly explained to him that wallstreet had lobbied the majority party in congress to the tune of $125M, but had also lobbied his party in congress to the tune of $115M (and congress "owed" it to wallstreet).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramm%E2%80%93Leach%E2%80%93Bliley_Act

President of AMEX is in competition to be next CEO and wins. The looser takes their protege and leaves, going to Baltimore and takes over what is described as a loan sharking business, They then make several other acquisitions, eventually acquiring CITIBANK in violation of Glass-Steagall, Greenspan gives them an exemption while they lobby congress for repeal of Glass-Steagall (enabling too big to fail). They enlist several others ... including Gramm, #2 on times list responsible for the economic mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

and secretary of treasury (and former chairman of Goldman Sachs). Once GLBA is on its way to final vote, the secretary of treasury resigns and joins Citigroup as what was described at the time as co-CEO. The protege leaves and becomes chairman of JPMorgan/Chase

glass-steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
Greenspan & other Fed Chairman posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#greenspan
#3 on times list responsibile for economic mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877331,00.html
too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Gramm and his wife also responsible for CFTC modernization act preventing regulation of over the counter derivatives ... originally described as gift to ENRON

The head of CFTC proposes regulating derivatives and is quickly replaced with Gramm's wife while he gets provision added that prevents the regulation. She then resigns and joins ENRON board and on the financial audit committee. ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild were office bldgs in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots). In the late 90s, I was asked to look at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures. Then loan originators were securitizing loans&mortgages and paying for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds, claim is it accounts for 30% loss in funds and trillions shortfall for pensions), largely enabling being able to do over $27T 2001-2008
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

If that wasn't enough, they also start packaging securitized loans/mortgages designed to fail, pay for triple-A, sell to their victim customers, and then take out (over the counter derivative) CDS gambling bets they would fail (creating enormous demand for dodgy loans & mortgages). Largest holder of CDS gambling bets was AIG and was negotiating to pay off at 50-60cents on the dollar, when the secretary of treasury (also a former chairman of Goldman Sachs) steps in and forces them to sign a document that they can't sue those making the gambling bets and to take TARP funds to payoff at 100cents on the dollar. The largest recipient of TARP funds was AIG and the largest recipient of face-value payoffs was TBTF formerly headed by sec-of-treasury.

In the wake of ENRON, congress passes Sarbanes-Oxley claiming that it would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives and auditors responsible for fraudulent financial filings, do jail time. however it requires SEC to do something. Possibly because even GAO doesn't believe SEC is doing anything, it starts doing reports of fraudulent financial filings, even showing uptic after Sarbanes-Oxley goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime). Less well known, SOX also has provision for SEC to do something about rating agencies (played the pivotal role in the economic mess). #4 on times list of those responsible for economic mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html
Sarbanes-Oxley posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
fraudulent financial filing posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

and of course, in the congressional Madoff hearings, they had the person that tried unsuccesfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

other trivia, AMEX was in competition with KKR for private equity LBO of RJR. KKR won, but when they ran into trouble, they hired president of AMEX away to turn it around
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco
Then the IBM board hires former president of AMEX to resurrect the company and reverse the breakup, using some of the same techniques used at RJR:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

The former president of AMEX leaves IBM and becomes head of another large private equity company ... which among other things does take-over of company that will employee Snowden.

Gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private-equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

In the early 90s (about the time IBM is going into the red), AMEX does spin-off of much of its dataprocessing (mostly mainframes) in what was the largest IPO up until that time, as First Data. 15yrs later KKR does a private-equity take-over of First Data in what was described as the largest LBO up until that time (or 2nd largest, depending on how you date the take-over). Recently KKR does (re-)IPO of First Data.

Private-equity take-overs have been described similar to house flipping, except the loan to buy the company goes on the company's books and goes with the company when it is sold (it is even possible to sell a company for less than they paid and still walk away with boat loads of money). Also, the companies are under intense pressure to service the debt load and over half of "corporate defaults have been companies either owned at one time or still owned by private equity firms"
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

in the LBO, First Data went from $2B debt load to more than $22B debt load.
http://digitaltransactions.net/news/story/Strategies_-First-Data-After-the-LBO

First Data Prices Its IPO At $16 Per Share, Raising $2.56 Billion
http://techcrunch.com/2015/10/14/first-data-prices-its-ipo-at-16-per-share-raising-2-56-billion/

The company has slowly expanding revenues, and steep debt. At current tip, the company has an unadjusted total load of $21.16 billion. First Data will be using the $2.56 billion proceeds from the initial public offering to pay down some of its long-term debt.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Nov 2015 10:46:26 -0800
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
I think the Fed has stopped printing money so the reaction to the problem they were trying to "stop" will happen in the next few years.

FED is still providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds. Lots of references that periodic comments by FED chairman that they will stop ZIRP funds, is just HYPE ... claim that FED has backed itself into corner with nearly decade of ZIRP funds and doesn't know what to do now.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Nov 2015 11:10:06 -0800
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
Who gets to pay zero rate interest? Not me. Credit cards still charge interest. Mortgages still charge interest. Business loans still charge interest (if the company can get one). Government bonds pay you a tiny amount of interest (near zero). So I suspect that only the banks get the zero interest rate.

ZIRP reference:
http://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/031815/what-zero-interestrate-policy-zirp.asp

Bernanke fought hard battle in the courts to prevent disclosure what he was doing behind the scenes with the tens of trillions in ZIRP funds. After the FED was finally forced to make public what they were doing, Bernanke told the press that he thought that the TBTF would use the ZIRP funds to lend to mainstreet, but when they didn't, he had no way to force them (but he also didn't stop the ZIRP funds)

Note supposedly one of the reasons Bernanke was chosen as new chair of the FED was because he was a depression era scholar. However, the FED had tried something similar in the 30s and wallstreet had reacted similarly ... so there was no reason that Bernanke should have expected them to do anything different this time.

Bernanke (and other FED chairman) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#bernanke
TBTF (too big to prosecute, too big to jail) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Lehman Fraudulently Cooked Its Books, Accounting Giant Ernst & Young Helped, Geithner and Bernanke Winked and Slapped Them on the Back
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2010/03/lehman-fraudulently-cooked-its-books-accounting-giant-ernst-young-helped-geithner-and-bernanke-winked-and-slapped-them-on-the-back.html
Against this backdrop, Lehman turned to Repo 105 transactions to temporarily remove $50 billion of assets from its balance sheet at first and second quarter ends in 2008 so that it could report significantly lower net leverage numbers than reality.

....

Four largest TBTF "banks" still carrying $5.2T "off-book" end of 2008 ... over 100 times that of Lehman ... allowed to play by different rules
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home

Repeal of Glass-Steagall allowed regulated depository institutions to combine with other institutions where they winked at extremely risky & questionable behavior. That significantly increased the size of institutions as well as put the depository institutions at risk of behavior of these other operations.

glass-steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

The result was not only the rise of too big to fail ... but eventually expanded into too big to prosecute and too big to jail. They effectively felt they could engage of all sorts of illegal activity with impunity ... with only penalty is relatively small fines and "deferred prosecution" ... so far a total of $300B in fines which is relatively minor compared to the size of their illegal profits.

Trivia: The original purpose of GLBA (now better known for repeal of Glass-Steagall) was to prevent other institutions from getting banking charters. As part of the FED ZIRP fund bailout, they were giving banking charters to some of the large risky investment institutions (which should have been violation of GLBA) that didn't already have one ... making them eligigble for ZIRP funds.

recent posts mentioning "deferred prosecution":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#80 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#23 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#44 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 Do we REALLY NEED all this regulatory oversight?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#37 LIBOR: History's Largest Financial Crime that the WSJ and NYT Would Like You to Forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#57 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#61 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#31 Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#44 rationality

recent posts mentioning ZIRP funds:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#17 Cromnibus cartoon
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#28 Bernie Sanders Proposes A Bill To Break Up The 'Too Big To Exist' Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#69 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#70 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#76 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#41 Poor People Caused The Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#43 Poor People Caused The Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#44 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#82 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#93 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#96 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#16 Interactive Data Corp taps banks for sale or IPO -sources
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#27 Federal Subsidies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#53 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#16 Federal Deficits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#20 After 6 Years Of QE, And A $4.5 Trillion Balance Sheet, St. Louis Fed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#25 After 6 Years Of QE, And A $4.5 Trillion Balance Sheet, St. Louis Fed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#49 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#50 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#56 The long, slow death of the rule of law in America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#57 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#65 Michael Hudson's New Book: Wall Street Parasites Have Devoured Their Hosts -- Your Retirement Plan and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#70 AIG freezes defined-benefit pension plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#81 Now the DOJ Admits They Got it Wrong
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#86 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#19 Bernanke: Some Wall Street executives should've gone to jail over financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#25 Hillary Clinton's Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#44 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#46 rationality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Protecting Social Security from the Thieves in the Night

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Protecting Social Security from the Thieves in the Night
Date: 02 Nov 2015
Blog: Facebook
Protecting Social Security from the Thieves in the Night
https://www.facebook.com/senatormikelee/videos/1028817943816565/

2010 CBO report that after congress allows PAYGO to expire in 2002 (spending can't exceed revenue, had all federal debt payed off by 2010)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAYGO

then tax revenue was cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap (compared to PAYGO financial responsible baseline budget). By the middle of last decade, comptroller general was including in speeches that nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmetic for how badly they were savaging the budget.

financial responsibility act:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

Joke is that congress is the most corrupt institution on earth, selling trillions in tax loopholes for billions. Debt now has exploded to over $18T ... with nearly half trillion in debt payments ... most of that is TBTF using ZIRP funds (from federal reserve) getting around $300B/annum; $2.8T from the SS Trust Fund, over a trillion each to China and Japan ... and a few others. Eliminating many of the tax loopholes from after PAYGO expires gets trillion/annum to balance the budget (but then congress is out the billions in graft and corruption). However they need additional trillion/year in tax revenue, half trillion for the debt payments and paying off the debt at half trillion/annum (would take 36years).

too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Baby boomer (bubble) generation is four times as large as the previous generation and twice as large as the following generation. As long as baby boomers are working, there was more money going into the SS Trust Fund than being paid out in benefits (building reserve for baby boomers' retirement). However, congress has been "borrowing" the money in SS Trust Fund to pay for other things. As baby boomers retire ... the amount paid into the SS Trust Fund will significantly drop and benefits significantly increase. This will require that congress raise taxes on the following generation to pay back the amount that has been looted from the trust fund ... in order to pay back the missing money (currently $2.8T) from the trust fund. The betting is that congress will radically reduce or eliminate SS benefits instead ... so that the missing money won't have to be replaced (via increased taxes on the following generation, increasingly being spun as old people taking from the young ... when it is actually having the young replace the congressional financial manipulation).

Congress has also been looting infrastructure maintenance & upkeep to pay for other things .... claims another $2T in deferred infrastructure spending ... which will also require increasing taxes on the following generation to cover that deficit.

There is $1T/annum short fall via tax loopholes after PAYGO expires. There is also nearly $1T/annum to clear the deficit mostly created after PAYGO expires. There is nearly another $1T/annum to cover things like SS Trust Fund, deferred infrastructure spending, and other things. That is nearly $3T/annum in taxes just to fix the congressional financial manipulation that has been going on. The 2014 federal budget was $3T, so that requires $6T in taxes, half to cover balanced federal spending and half to cover past congressional financial manipulation.

Trivia: The congressional party in power during the 90s played major role in PAYGO and balanced budget. Last decade it was a completely different party, however with the same name that allowed PAYGO to expire, responsible for the enormous graft & corruption in tax loopholes and huge deficit.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAYGO

The party with that name was also responsible for Medicare Part-D (billed as enormous gift to drug industry)... the first major legislation after PAYGO is allowed to expire. CBS 60mins does expose of the 18 members of the party (staffers and member of congress responsible for getting it passed). After it passes, all 18 have resigned and on drug industry payroll.

medicare part-d posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#medicare.part-d

Middle of last decade, the comptroller general was including in speeches that nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmetic (for how badly they were savaging the budget). He was also claiming that part-d comes to be a long-term $40T item, totally swamping all other budget items.

comptroller general post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

Since turn of century, local Washington DC news will periodically refer to congress as Kabuki Theater (term will sometimes even leak into national news) ... that what is seen publicly has little to do with what is really going on (apparent conflict between the parties is distraction for the public) ... speculation is whether there is actually more than or or two honest members in congress.

kabuki theater posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Nov 2015 12:21:59 -0800
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
I would expect to hear about little old ladies, widows, who expected to live on interest for the rest of their lives but can't. I don't see those stories. Of course they never could, even in the past, if you factor in inflation and taxes. But they *thought* they could. Which was, kind of, the point, or at least *a* point

2016, social security benefits may go up 1% or less, because there is "no inflation". However some retirees supposedly getting their monthly medicare premium (automatically dedicated from social security) go up by as much as three times. rents in various parts of the country has been increasing 10-15%. Various claims that gov. is cooking the inflation books

Why The Consumer Price Index Is Controversial
http://www.investopedia.com/articles/07/consumerpriceindex.asp

Lies, Damned Lies, & Inflation Statistics
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-07-19/lies-damned-lies-inflation-statistics
• Ground Beef - 10.1% • Roast Beef - 11.8% • Steak - 11.1% • Eggs - 21.8% • Chicken - 3.7% • Coffee - 3.4% • Sugar - 4.2% • Candy - 4.6% • Snacks - 3.5% • Salt & Seasonings - 5.3% • Food Away From Home - 3.0%

... and ...
There is so much wrong with the BLS data, I don't know where to start. The rental market has been on fire since 2012. Builders are erecting apartments at a breakneck pace. Independent, non-captured, neutral real estate organizations show rents surging to all time highs, growing by 5.1% on an annual basis. Real rents in the real world have grown by 14% since 2012. The BLS says they've grown by 9%. Who do you believe?

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Nov 2015 12:46:07 -0800
Bloomberg just broadcast interview with (nobel winner) Stiglitz saying ZIRP funds haven't helped the economy ... that the real problem is that workers wages/income isn't going up ... so people don't have the money to spend ... and w/o public spending money the economy is were it is

this goes along with this past article about inequality significantly rising since 1980 ... productivity increasing ... but worker compensation remained flat (effectively the difference going into pocket of .1%)
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html
from this article
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

part of it is periodic observation that ratio of top executive compensation has exploded to 400:1, after having been 20:1 and 10:1 in most of the rest of the world

poster child
http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/jun/25/ceo-pay-america-up-average-employees-salary-down

had been protege of person competing for next CEO of amex ... when that person looses to the president of amex, they go to baltimore taking over what is described as loan sharking business. they then make some number of other acquisititions, eventually acquiring citibank in violoation of glass-steagall. Greenspan gives them an exemption while they lobby congress for repeal.

glass-steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
president of amex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

past posts mentioning Stiglitz
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#7 Are Ctibank's services and products so vital to global economy than no other banks can substitute it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#9 HSBC is expected to announce a profit, which is good, what did they do differently?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#16 The Formula That Killed Wall Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#30 I need insight on the Stock Market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#64 Should AIG executives be allowed to keep the bonuses they were contractually obligated to be paid?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#77 Who first mentioned Credit Crunch?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#31 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#35 US banking Changes- TARP Proposl
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#38 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#8 The True Cost of 9/11 -- Includes 18 Veteran Suicides a Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#17 Washington's Cult of Continuous Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#34 Scotland, was Re: Solving the Floating-Point Goldilocks Problem!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#62 The true cost of 9/11: Trillions and trillions wasted on wars, a fiscal catastrophe, and a weaker America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#66 Predator GE: We Bring Bad Things to Life
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#75 Fed Report: Mortgage Mess NOT an Inside Job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#77 Vampire Squid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#84 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#88 Defense acquisitions are broken and no one cares
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#91 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#7 Adult Supervision
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#14 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#80 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#1 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#3 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#10 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#19 SnOODAn: Boyd, Snowden, and Resilience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#21 Is there a connection between your strategic and tactical assertions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#36 Race Against the Machine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#38 Four Signs Your Awesome Investment May Actually Be A Ponzi Scheme
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#39 History--punched card transmission over telegraph lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#40 Core characteristics of resilience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#87 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#7 More Evidence Wall Street is Overpaid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#10 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#13 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#53 CALCULATORS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#71 Is orientation always because what has been observed? What are your 'direct' experiences?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#64 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#3 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#37 Income Inequality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#39 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#17 Cromnibus cartoon
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#14 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Nov 2015 13:25:13 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Bloomberg just broadcast interview with (nobel winner) Stiglitz saying ZIRP funds haven't helped the economy ... that the real problem is that workers wages/income isn't going up ... so people don't have the money to spend ... and w/o public spending money the economy is were it is

more recent articles on this

The disappearing middle class is threatening major retailers
http://www.businessinsider.com/the-disappearing-middle-class-is-threatening-major-retailers-2015-10
The Mystery of the Vanishing Pay Raise
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/01/sunday-review/the-mystery-of-the-vanishing-pay-raise.html?_r=0

posts mentioning inequality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

and ...

Wall Street Financial Engineering At Work---How Valeant Got Vaporized
http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/wall-street-financial-engineering-a-work-how-valeant-got-vaporized/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 02 Nov 2015 18:07:35 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#52 rationality

and some more ...

5 Charts That Show How the Middle Class Is Disappearing
http://billmoyers.com/2015/01/26/middle-class/
Middle-Class Betrayal? Why Working Hard Is No Longer Enough in America
http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/in-plain-sight/middle-class-betrayal-why-working-hard-no-longer-enough-america-n291741
Disappearing middle class jobs
http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2015/03/08/247-wall-st-disappearing-middle-class-jobs/24512843/
10 Disappearing Middle Class Jobs - 24/7 Wall St.
http://247wallst.com/special-report/2015/03/06/10-disappearing-middle-class-jobs/
Middle-class neighborhoods: They're disappearing.
http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2015/03/24/middle_class_neighborhoods_they_re_disappearing.html
Who Are the Middle Class, and Are They Disappearing?
http://www.cheatsheet.com/politics/who-makes-up-the-middle-class-and-are-they-here-to-stay.html/?a=viewall
Disappearing Middle Class
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/disappearing-middle-class/
America's disappearing middle class
http://economy.money.cnn.com/2014/01/28/middle-class/
Middle Class in America: Is it Disappearing?
http://fortune.com/2015/10/15/middle-class-income/
Here's where middle-class jobs are vanishing the fastest
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2013/08/27/heres-where-middle-class-jobs-are-vanishing-the-fastest/
The Disappearing Middle Class :: The Market Oracle :: Financial Markets Analysis & Forecasting Free Website
http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article52253.html
How screwed is America's middle class, anyway?
http://fortune.com/2015/10/15/middle-class-income/
The Middle Class Is Still Disappearing Despite The Recovery
http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2013/11/18/2961231/middle-class-disappearing-recovery/
Bill Maher's excellent commentary on America's disappearing middle class
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/04/05/1289834/-Bill-Maher-s-excellent-commentary-on-America-s-disappearing-middle-class
Income Inequality Is Ravaging America's Middle Class
http://economyincrisis.org/content/income-inequality-is-ravaging-americas-middle-class
U.S. Middle Class `Absolutely Disappearing': Parker
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/b/6d9fcb42-3ed3-4816-b329-b8891ead5736

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 03 Nov 2015 09:09:44 -0800
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
So we are seven years into this experiment to see if zero interest rates can get us out of a recession. So we are in about 1936 in comparison to the depression of 1929. That one eased up in 1940 or so when Hitler started mixing it up in Europe.

Google says credit card rates are almost 18% which seems unnecessarily high to me. The Federal Reserve Board is probably using the only tools they have to inject money into the economy. But I wonder if this is the best way. As I understand it the FRB it is a little (subjectively) government in and of itself and *they* have decided there is a problem, what the problem is, and how to fix it.

I wonder what plan B is?


as an aside ... besides the other TBTF illegal activities, fabricating CDOs with triple-A ratings, CDOs with triple-A ratings designed to fail for fixed CDS gambling bets, robo-signing mills for illegal foreclosures, manipulating LIBOR, Forex, commodity markets, money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists, aiding the 1% with offshoring and tax evasion, etc ... they are also be found using some of their ZIRP funds backing payday lender fronts ... getting equivalent of hundreds of percent interest rate.

too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo
posts mentioning LIBOR
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#libor
money laundering posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering
tax evasion posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

a couple past posts mentioning payday lenders:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#19 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#37 Sale receipt--obligatory?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 10 Nov 2015 22:49:30 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
I would agree, but most people who know say that the current system is a delicate balance between what people pay in and what they get out. If you raise the income limit and don't raise the top benefit people will see the system less as an insurance system (which is the way it was sold originally) and more of a welfare system. This would decrease the support for SS and lead to other programs down the road.

At least raising the retirement age has some logic that could be used to sell it, since fewer people are dying in their 60s and more in their 80s these days.


Baby boomer (bubble) generation is four times as large as the previous generation and twice as large as the following generation. As long as baby boomers are working, there was more money going into the SS Trust Fund than being paid out in benefits (building reserve for baby boomers' retirement). However, congress has been "borrowing" the money in SS Trust Fund to pay for other things. As baby boomers retire ... the amount paid into the SS Trust Fund will significantly drop and benefits significantly increase (more going out than coming in). This will require that congress raise taxes on the following generation to pay back the amount that has been looted from the trust fund ... in order to pay back the missing money (currently $2.8T) from the trust fund.

Some in congress will propose all sorts of alternatives ... so that the missing money won't have to be replaced (via increased taxes on the following generation, increasingly being spun as old people taking from the young ... when it is actually having the young replace the congressional financial manipulation). There is actually two parts, increased new taxes: 1) replace the funds looted from the Trust Fund to cover the baby boomer benefits 2) pay for spending that had previously been covered by looting the Trust Fund.

This has (mythical) Trust Fund good until 2034 ... but that is based on the $2.8T actually exists somewhere ... as opposed to have to be raised by increasing taxes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_Trust_Fund

Looking at it from different point of view, throwing paygo under the bus in 2002 allowed $6T reduction in tax revenue and $6T increase in spending (CBO report 2003-2009; total Federal debt has now exploded to $18T with interest pushing half trillion) ... and the economic mess with over $27T in securitized loans (because of lack of regulation) can be viewed as somewhat independent activity (happening concurrently)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAYGO

fiscal responsibility act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

Need to cut spending by around $1T/annum and eliminate the tax loopholes sold to wealthy and corporations increasing taxes by $1T/annum ... returning to PAYGO fiscal responsible balance budget (before congress dropped PAYGO and went crazy selling tax loopholes and increasing spending in 2002). However, it also needs increasing taxes by approx. another $.5T/annum to cover the debt interest payments and increasing taxes by approx $.5T/annum for paying off the exploded debt (@$.5T/annum take 36yrs to clear). Total increase in taxes then is $2T/year (combination of eliminating the tax loopholes sold to wealthy and corporations, paying off tax debt created after dropping PAYGO, and interest payments on the tax debt).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 11 Nov 2015 07:46:25 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Looking at it from different point of view, throwing paygo under the bus in 2002 allowed $6T reduction in tax revenue and $6T increase in spending (CBO report 2003-2009; total Federal debt has now exploded to $18T with interest pushing half trillion) ... and the economic mess with over $27T in securitized loans (because of lack of regulation) can be viewed as somewhat independent activity (happening concurrently)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAYGO


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#54 rationality

the majority party in congress in the 90s was major factor behind PAYGO ... then a completely different party using the same name in 2002 threw PAYGO under the bus and savaged the budget.

fiscal responsibility act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 11 Nov 2015 13:53:37 -0800
Greymaus <mausg@mail.com> writes:
Back in the '70s, I think, there was a rule that people dealing with the Stock Market were limited to something like 1% actual cash, until Friday night when everything had to be paid for. Dim memory of what happened to a person I knew.

Griftopia has chapter on CFTC with rule that people playing in commodities had to have significant position because speculators created wild irrational price swings. Then there were 19 secret letters that went to specific speculators which resulted in wild irrational price swings (they would bet on going up and then push things up ... and then bet on things going down and then push things down) ... including huge spike in oil (& gasoline) summer of 2008. Later member of congress published the summer of 2008 transactions showing those responsible ... somehow they then got the press to criticize him for violating corporate privacy (misdirection away from the speculators) some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#griftopia

Securitized mortgages (CDOs) had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild were office bldgs in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots. In the late 90s, I was asked to look at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures. Then loan originators were securitizing loans&mortgages (CDOs) and paying for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds, claim is it accounts for 30% loss in funds and trillions shortfall for pensions), largely enabling being able to do over $27T 2001-2008
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

some toxic CDO posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

earlier, #2 on times list of those responsible for economic mess, GLBA, repeal glass-steagall, etc.
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

head of CFTC proposes regulating CDS gambling bets, is quickly replaced with "#2's" wife while "#2" gets law passed preventing regulating CDS gambling bets (originally called gift to ENRON), wife then resigns and joins ENRON's board and member of financial audit committee, some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

glass-steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
repeal enables too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

If triple-A rated toxic CDOs weren't bad enough, they then start creating securitized mortgages designed to fail, pay for the triple-A rating and sell off to their customer/victims and then take out CDS gambling bets that they would fail (creating enormous demand for dodgy mortgages). Later the largest holder of the CDS gambling bets was AIG ... who was negotiating to payoff at 50-60 cents on the dollar when the sec. of treasury steps in, forces them to sign a document that they can't sue those making the CDS gambling bets and to take TARP funds to payoff at face value (AIG is the largest recipient of TARP funds and the firm formally headed by the sec. of treasury is the largest recipient of face-value payoffs, which also happened to be one of the major commodity speculators referenced by griftopia).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Gene Amhdahl Dies at 92

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Gene Amhdahl Dies at 92
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Nov 2015 18:55:43 -0800
starsoul@MINDSPRING.COM (Lizette Koehler) writes:
Gene Amdahl, who helped IBM usher in general-purpose computers in the 1960s and challenged the company's dominance a decade later with his eponymous machines, has died. He was 92. He died on Nov. 10 at Vi at Palo Alto, a continuing care retirement community in Palo Alto, California, his wife Marian Amdahl said in a telephone interview. The cause was pneumonia, and he had Alzheimer's disease for about five years.

end of ACS, Amdahl shutdown ACS-360
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

ACS was shutdown after ibm management decided it would advance state of the art too fast and they could loose control of the market. Talks about ACS features that finally show up in ES/9000 more than two decades later. Also references multithreading patents. I had gotten sucked into a project that was looking at multithreading 370/195 ... which never shipped.

Early 70s, there was FS project that was completely different than 360&370 and was going to completely replace 360/370 ... and internal politics was shutting down 370 efforts. Lack of 370 products during this period is credited with giving clone processors market foothold.
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/fs.html

some past FS posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lnn/submain.html#futuresys

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 12 Nov 2015 20:06:26 -0800
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
So, despite System i currently being made up of Power PC chips, IBM may be planning a comeback for this technology... in the future. After all, we're not in the Future yet - no flying cars!

Circa 1980, IBM was going to move multitude of internal microprocessors to 801/risc Iliad chips ... 370 low & mid-range, as/400 (follow-on to s/38), numerous control processors, etc. For what ever reason these projects floundered ... and fell back to traditional CISC, there was quick&dirty effort to do CISC chip for as/400.

There was also 801/risc ROMP chip that was going to be used for follow-on to displaywriter ... and the project was canceled. They then looked around and decided to retarget it to the unix workstation market ... which required some changes to the chip. They then hire the company that had done the AT&T unix port for PC/IX ... to do one for ROMP ... which is announced as AIX as PC/RT. RIOS chipset was then done for follow-on to PC/RT as RS/6000. Part of 801/risc was no provision for cache consistency ... typical related for multiprocessor operation. RS/6000 was large power hungry five chip set. some poast 801, risc, iliad, romp, rios, power/pc, etc posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

A joint effort with Motorola & Apple was created to do single chip 801/risc, that also supported cache concistency ... sort of using motorola 88k cache consistency technology. The executive we reported directly on our HA/CMP product, then went over to head up this new organization.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIM_alliance

Rochester was involved with 64-bit version ... to finally move to 801/risc
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PowerPC_600#PowerPC_630

... a decade after the earlier effort failed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System_i

with
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_RS64#Cobra_and_Muskie

above mentions IBM SP ... we were doing cluster scaleup as part of ha/cmp ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

some old email ... both commercial and numerica/scientifc scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

discussion in Ellison conference room Jan1992 on HA/CMP (commercial) scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

over the next couple weeks, scaleup was transferred, announced as supercomputer and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors.

press

17Feb1992 article cluster scaleup announced for " scientific and technical ONLY " (part of the issue was mainframe DB2 people complained if I was allowed to go ahead with the RDBMS stuff, it would be at least five years ahead of what they were doing).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1

11May1992 article that national lab interest caught IBM by "surprise" (even though I had been working with them off & on ... going back to late 70s where they were looking at large computer cluster farm of 4341s)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 12 Nov 2015 22:44:32 -0800
Mike Hore <mike_horeREM@OVE.invalid.aapt.net.au> writes:
Sort of true, though Frank Soltis' books make it clear that he had some of the ideas before he was called into the FS effort, then he refined his ideas on single-level store, then after he was kicked out for interesting political reasons he further developed these ideas in the S/38 design. So there was some crossover but the truth was a bit complicated. So I don't think I'm disagreeing, just adding some detail.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#58 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

some more future system here
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/fs.html

much of single-level store came from tss/360 (with some academic literature from the period).

tss/360 had performance issue that things page faulted single 4k block at a time and application was disable/non-runnable during the page fault.

at the univ. we got to work with tss/360 and cp/67 both on univ. 360/67 on weekends. spring of 1968 ... the IBM SE working with tss/360 and I (working with cp/67) did interactive fortran edit, compile and execute benchmark ... tss/360 running four simulated users had worse throughput and interactive response than cp67/cms did with 35 users.

I continued to work on 360 (& then 370) stuff all during the FS period, even periodically ridiculing their activities. One of the things I did was paged mapped filesystem for CMS ... which I've characterized as having learned all the things not to do from tss/360. I got something like three times the throughput on moderate file i/o intensive benchmarks than the standard CMS filesystem. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

Throughput issue with TSS/360-like synchronous page fault wasn't a problem in the S/38 (low-end) market. Also S/38 has been characterized as simplifying things compared to FS ... one of the things it did was scatter block allocate across all connected disk drives. As a result the complete filesystem had to be backed up as single entity ... and any single disk failure ... required the whole system to be restored as integral operation.

One of the people that I got to work with when playing disk engineer in bldg 14&15, got the original disk raid patent in the 70s. some past posts playing disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

because single disk failure was so traumatic for s/38, it became one of the first products that shipped raid support.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID

was back in bay area last weekend and went by the old plant site, bldg14 was one of the only bldgs from that era still standing ... rest is strip mall and apartments.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 13 Nov 2015 10:32:43 -0800
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
Well, there you go. It's like buying a Hi_Fi setup, you can spend a huge amount of money but that one is only 20% better than the one that is 1,000 times cheaper.

IMO the Humvee and the F-35 are poster boys for a government run amok. Eisenhower warned us about the military industrial complex , and it happened.

I found the price for a Humvee, $220,000 for the current armored, kind of, ones. I wasn't able to find the price of a WW II jeep but I would be astonished if it was more than $1,000. It looks like my guess of 50:1 was too high considering inflation.

search: <how much does a humvee cost>


the original Humvee went out w/o armor. soldiers in the field were then welding all sorts of non-approved stuff, then approved uparmored vehicles were few and late. original $70k, uparmor package $146k
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humvee

but relatively ineffective against IEDs ... coveted were MRAP vehicles
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MRAP

the Iraq war is poster child for gov. run amok ,,, from recent discussion in military group

8 Of The Worst Military Leaders In History
https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/8-of-the-worst-militaryleaders-in-history.html

The other factor is you get no-bid contracts outsourced to certain for-profit companies (made in response to Rumsfield quote: "You go to war with the Army you have, not the Army you want")

chief of staff replaces CIA director that would go along with Team B analysis https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_B

chief of staff (74-75) then becomes SECDEF 75-77, and then SECDEF again 2001-2006
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Rumsfeld
when chief of staff becomes SECDEF, is replaced by assistant, assistant then is SECDEF 89-93 and VP 2001-2009
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Cheney
another "Team B"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Wolfowitz

team b posts http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#team.b

Iraq justification supposedly based on WMDs

last decade, cousin of white house chief of staff Card ... was dealing with the Iraqis at the UN and was given evidence that WMDs had been decommissioned, provides informatoin to cousin Card, Powell and others, then gets locked up in military hospital .... "EXTREME PREJUDICE-- The Terrifying Story of the Patriot Act and the Cover Ups of 9/11 and Iraq"
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

they find the decommissioned WMDs tracing back to US in the 80s
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war
in the iran/iraq war
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_War

... but it gets classified for a decade.
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html?_r=0

How Private Contractors Have Created a Shadow NSA; A new cybersecurity elite moves between government and private practice, taking state secrets with them (also references oil rig company that was transformed into one of the largest defense contractors after former SECDEF and future VP becomes CEO, including no-bid contracts in Iraq)
http://www.thenation.com/article/how-private-contractors-have-created-shadow-nsa/

there was recent article about paid tens of billions including how the company got paid for each convoy that went out ... and they were sending out empty convoys and convoys sent out with little or no escort through hostile country. search: cheney halliburton criminal

vp in the 80s (and former cia director that approved "team b" analysis) claims he knew nothing about:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

Later a son, presides over the economic mess, 70 times larger than S&L crisis. relatively minor contribution

Lehman's Gift To Jeb Bush For Funneling Pension Money: A $1.3 Million Consulting "Job"
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-08-19/lehmans-gift-jeb-bush-funneling-pension-money-13-million-consulting-job

mentions process to preserve F22 program no matter how bad, even making things worse
http://nypost.com/2009/07/17/cant-fly-wont-die/

then F22 was replaced with larger & more profitable F35 program ... continuing same process.

posts mentioning military-industrial complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Compiler

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Compiler
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 13 Nov 2015 11:03:22 -0800
0000000433f07816-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UA.EDU (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
Well, yes. Something about core competency. Spend programming resource on an optimizing compiler which can produce object code faster, better, cheaper than redundant effort by human programmers. And the next generation ISA can be exploited merely by recompiling, not recoding.

modern compilers will have detailed knowledge of ISA and lots of programming tricks/optimizations/techniques done by the very best assembler programmers (compiler state-of-the-art is typically considered having reached this point for most things at least by the late 80s).

One of the issues is C language has some ill defined & ambiguous features that inhibits better optimization (that is possible in some better defined languages).

minor reference (not only optimization issues but also bugs)
http://www.ghs.com/products/misrac.html
This flexibility comes at a cost however. Ambiguities in the C language, along with certain syntaxes, consistently trip up even the best programmers and result in bugs. For software developers, this means a large amount of unexpected time spent finding bugs. For managers, this often means the single largest risk to their project.

... snip ...

The original mainframe TCP/IP product was done in pascal/vs ... and didn't have many of the programming bugs that have been epidemic in C language implementations.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 13 Nov 2015 17:20:22 -0800
Mike Hore <mike_horeREM@OVE.invalid.aapt.net.au> writes:
Thanks for all that interesting stuff about performance.

It's also interesting that Bob Evans in his memoirs thought that the whole existence of the then GSD was a "strategic blunder" because it led to the development of systems that weren't 360/370 compatible. He cites tne loss of the midrange market share as going from 65% in 1970 to less than 20% in 1980.

It's hard to ague with the figures, but I guess Frank Soltis and the Rochester people might argue that

(a) They knew their small-business customers much better than the rest of the organisation, who were big-business oriented, and just didn't get it as far as small businesses were concerned.

(b) The whole reason the Rochester people were kicked off the FS project was that the DoJ was threatening the breakup of IBM, which would have led to GSD becoming a separate company in competition with IBM, and they would have had to develop their own systems anyway.

(c) Very aguably, the drop in market share might have happened anyway, as the whole field was changing rapidly.

Who was right? Maybe an exam question for a course on computer history??


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#58 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#59 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

as mentioned in past discussions about low&midrange 370 (4300s) and DEC in the same market ... PCs and workstations started to take-over the market by mid-80s (which also applies to the GSD market, also one of the reasons why previously mentioned displaywriter followon was canceled).

past discussions were that 4300s sold about the same as DEC into that market ... in single or small number unit orders. The big 4300 difference was large corporate orders of hundreds at a time. Start late 70s there was big explosion in 4300 sales ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

There was anticipation that the 4361/4381 (follow-on to 4331/4341) would continue to see the explosion in sales, but by that time the market was moving to large PCs and workstations ... also hitting s/32, s/34, s/36 (as/400 initially was combined followon to both s/36 & s/38)

Old reference to decade of DEC sale numbers, sliced&diced by year, model, US/non-US:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0 Computers in Science Fiction

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] Coding with dad on the Dragon 32

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] Coding with dad on the Dragon 32
Newsgroups: comp.misc, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 14 Nov 2015 10:15:50 -0800
Morten Reistad <first@last.name.invalid> writes:
The OSF/1 designers nevers saw the possibility to have multiple personalites. These have a bad reputation after the "unix" retrofits for VMS(Eunice?), Primos (Primix), etc, but if this were designed in from the start, like AIX paritally has.

OSF/1 could have been both a multics-like OS and have a unix top layer, but with some hypervisor-like functions for the extra functionality that is unknown to the unix api and ui.

QNX has done this, with a "just another unix" interface and a "real QNX" interface.

Well, perhaps some OSF/1 designers did.


the politics I saw was that it was response to AT&T/SUN tieup
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_wars
While this decision was applauded by customers and the trade press, certain other Unix licensees feared Sun would be unduly advantaged. They formed the Open Software Foundation (OSF) in 1988. The same year, AT&T and another group of licensees responded by forming UNIX International (UI). Technical issues soon took a back seat to vicious and public commercial competition between the two "open" versions of Unix, with X/Open holding the middle ground. A 1990 study of various Unix versions' reliability found that on each version, between a quarter and a third of operating system utilities could be made to crash by fuzzing; the researchers attributed this, in part, to the "race for features, power, and performance" resulting from BSD-System V rivalry, which left developers little time to worry about reliability.[2]

....

there was focus on picking up technologies from unix work-alikes ... stuff from UCB (BSD), MIT (x-windows), CMU (MACH, Andrew), UCLA (LOCUS), etc.

IBM Palo Alto Science Center had been working with UCB to do port to mainframe 370 ... when they got redirected to do the port to the PC/RT (which came out as AOS, alternative to AIX).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

They had also been working with UCLA on LOCUS ... and they eventually did ports to both 370 & 386 ... which was released as AIX/370 & AIX/386.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LOCUS_%28operating_system%29
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locus_Computing_Corporation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] Coding with dad on the Dragon 32

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] Coding with dad on the Dragon 32
Newsgroups: comp.misc, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 14 Nov 2015 10:53:59 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#63 [CM] Coding with dad on the Dragon 32

more OSF (and other) topic drift & trivia: I remember one OSF meeting where the official DEC rep I knew from the 70s and had been at the science center and vm370 development group.

the science center ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

had done (virtual machine) cp67. As the cp67/cms group grew, it split off from the science center (on 4th flr, multics was on 5th flr) and took over the IBM Boston Programming center (on the 3rd flr). As the group expanded ... especially with work on cp67 morph to vm370 ... they moved out to the vacant former SBC bldg in Burlington Mall.

During the FS period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

lots of groups were directed to refocus on FS stuff and suspend 370 activity. When FS imploded, there was mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines. As part of that, the head of POK eventually convinced corporate to kill the vm370 product, shutdown the Burlington Mall group and move everybody to POK to work on MVS/XA (or otherwise MVS/XA wouldn't ship on time some 6-7 years later).

They weren't going to tell the VM370 people until the last minute to minimize the number that could escape the move to POK, however the information managed to leak and some number managed to escape (there was joke that head of POK was one of the largest contributors to DEC VMS, some others showed up at Prime). There was also a witch hunt for the source of the leak ... fortunately for me, nobody gave up the source.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Economic Mess

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Economic Mess
Date: 14 Nov, 2015
Blog: Facebook
Securitized mortgages (CDOs) had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild were office bldgs in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots. In the late 90s, I was asked to look at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures. Then loan originators were securitizing loans&mortgages (CDOs) and paying for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds, claim is it accounts for 30% loss in funds and trillions shortfall for pensions), largely enabling being able to do over $27T 2001-2008
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

toxic CDO posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

Lehman Fraudulently Cooked Its Books, Accounting Giant Ernst & Young Helped, Geithner and Bernanke Winked and Slapped Them on the Back
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2010/03/lehman-fraudulently-cooked-its-books-accounting-giant-ernst-young-helped-geithner-and-bernanke-winked-and-slapped-them-on-the-back.html
Against this backdrop, Lehman turned to Repo 105 transactions to temporarily remove $50 billion of assets from its balance sheet at first and second quarter ends in 2008 so that it could report significantly lower net leverage numbers than reality.

... snip ...

However, four largest TBTF "banks" were still carrying $5.2T "off-book" end of 2008 ... over 100 times that of Lehman ... allowed to play by different rules
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home

If triple-A rated toxic CDOs weren't bad enough, they had started creating securitized mortgages designed to fail, pay for the triple-A rating and sell off to their customer/victims and then take out CDS gambling bets that they would fail (creating enormous demand for dodgy mortgages). Later the largest holder of the CDS gambling bets was AIG ... who was negotiating to payoff at 50-60 cents on the dollar when the sec. of treasury steps in, forces them to sign a document that they can't sue those making the CDS gambling bets and to take TARP funds to payoff at face value (AIG is the largest recipient of TARP funds and the firm formally headed by the sec. of treasury is the largest recipient of face-value payoffs, which also happened to be one of the major commodity speculators referenced by griftopia).

earlier, #2 on times list of those responsible for economic mess, GLBA, repeal glass-steagall (enabling too big to fail, too big to prosecute, too big to jail), etc.
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

and along with his wife, blocking CFTC regulating CDS gambling bets ... originally described as gift to ENRON. When head of CFTC proposed regulating CDS gambling bets, was replaced by wife of #2, while he got law passed preventing regulating CDS gambling bets, she then resigned and joined ENRON board and on the financial audit committee.

some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
glass-steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
repeal enables too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Rhetoric in congress regarding Sarbanes-Oxley was that it would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives and auditors did jail time for fraudulent financial filings. However it required SEC to do something. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of fraudulent financial filings, even showing increase after SOX goes into effect (and nobody doing jail time). It turns out that SOX also had provision for SEC to do something about the rating agencies (which played pivotal role in the economic mess) ... but little seemed to have been done there either.

past posts mentioning Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
past posts mentioning financial reporting fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

Other trivia, in Congressional Madoff hearing, they had testimony from person that tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff (SEC hands were forced when Madoff turned himself in). recent item ... Ernst & Young Loses Trial for Not Vetting Madoff-Tied Audits
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-11-13/ernst-young-loses-jury-trial-over-madoff-linked-audits

past posts mentioning madoff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

Congress asked the person if new regulations were required. He said that while new regulations might be required, much more important was transparency and visibility (since SEC wasn't enforcing the existing regulations). The current scenario when they do something is fine & "deferred prosecution" ... so far the TBTF have total $300B of fines since the economic mess. However, that $300B isn't just for the fraudulent CDOs and CDSs, but also manipulating LIBOR & FOREX markets, manipulating gold, oil and other commodities, money laundering for terrorists and drug cartels, fraudulent foreclosures, etc. Given the trillions involved, the $300B is just being viewed as cost of criminal business by the TBTF.

posts mentioning LIBOR
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#libor
posts mentioning money laundering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering

recent posts mentioning "deferred prosecution":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#80 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#23 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#44 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 Do we REALLY NEED all this regulatory oversight?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#37 LIBOR: History's Largest Financial Crime that the WSJ and NYT Would Like You to Forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#57 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#61 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#31 Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#44 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#47 rationality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 15 Nov 2015 09:07:52 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
We ran our administrative stuff on a remote IBM mainframe using CICS. We wanted email, conferencing, and the ability to run some stuff for profs and students.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#58 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#59 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#62 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

my brother was regional marketing rep for Apple in the mid-80s (largest physical area in CONUS) ... one of the things he figured was dialing in remotely to the hdqtrs S/38 that had inventories, factory schedules and deliveries ... being able to monitor product schedules.

undergraduate in the 60s, I was hired to support IBM mainframe software. The univ. library had gotten ONR grant to do online catalog. Part of the money went to getting 2321 datacell. The effort was also selected to be betatest for the original CICS product. I was then tasked to support and debug CICS (CICS had been developed at customer location and the library chose some BDAM options/features different from the original customer ... which resulted in some bugs in how CICS do file OPEN). some past CICS &/or BDAM posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#cics

... different "PROFS" ... I was blamed for online computer communication/conferencing (precursor to social media) on the internal network ... larger than arpanet/internet from just about beginning until sometime mid-80s ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

folklore is that when corporate executive committee was told about online computer communication/conferncing, 5of6 wanted to fire me. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

There was internal group working on menu-based system for non-computer literate users (especially managers and executives) which was released as PROFS. They had picked up a lot of internal applications that were imbedded in PROFS ... including a very early version of VMSG email client. Then when the VMSG author offered them a much enhanced version, the PROFS group tried to get him fired (they had claimed credit for all parts of PROFS). Things quieted down after he showed that all PROFS messages in the world contained his initials in non-displayed field. Afterwards, the VMSG author only distributed the source to me and one other person.

The technology in the internal network was also used in the corporate sponsored university BITNET ... also for a time larger than arpanet/internet
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET
some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

The big increase in the number of these machines significantly contributed to the explosion in 4300s ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

book/ipad about former co-worker at the science center responsible for the internal network (& bitnet) technology
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cool-to-be-clever-edson-hendricks/id483020515?mt=8
It's Cool to Be Clever: The Story of Edson C. Hendricks, the Genius Who Invented the Design for the Internet
http://www.amazon.com/Its-Cool-Be-Clever-Hendricks/dp/1897435630/
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

trivia ... at the time of the 1Jan1983 arpanet/internet cutover to TCP/IP, it had approx. 100 IMP nodes and 255 connected hosts ... at the same time the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes .... old post with list of corporate locations that added one or more nodes during 1983.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8

we were also starting to work with the NSF director about interconnecting the NSF supercomputer centers ... which morphs into the NSFNET backbone (precursor to modern internet) ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 15 Nov 2015 13:35:12 -0800
hancock4 writes:
Ironic given that IBM p/r material often bragged about how they encouraged a collaborative atmosphere.

Many years ago some mangements encouraged programmers to experiment (on their own time) with different or advanced techniques to improve their skills or discover new methods.

But in later years programmers were forbidden to do anything but their assigned work within assigned parameters. Some managements even searched programmer libraries to check for unauthorized stuff.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#58 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#59 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#62 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#66 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

in the early 80s, we had battle at SJR with corporate auditors. Corporate wanted the 3270 logon screen to say "For Business Purposes Only", search all computer files and eliminate all "demo" programs (aka games). We got SJR to change the 3270 logon screen to say "For Management Approved Uses Only", worked hard to get the corporate business conduct guide (given to all employees) to equate personal online files similar to privacy provisions given to personal locked desk, and to support leaving "demo" programs available.

Corporate auditors were onsite ... doing things like after hours sweep of bldg and offices looking for unsecured confidential information left out. We had placed 6670 printers (computer connected IBM Copier3s) out in all the deparment area with support for colored paper in the alternate paper feed drawer ... that was used to print file separator page. Since the page was nominally blank, the printing of the separator page was modified to select a random entry from some files (ibmjargon, and file with collected quotations). One of the print files left out on departmental 6670 printer had the following:
[Business Maxims:] Signs, real and imagined, which belong on the walls of the nation's offices: 1) Never Try to Teach a Pig to Sing; It Wastes Your Time and It Annoys the Pig. 2) Sometimes the Crowd IS Right. 3) Auditors Are the People Who Go in After the War Is Lost and Bayonet the Wounded. 4) To Err Is Human -- To Forgive Is Not Company Policy.

and the corporate auditors complained to management that we were ridiculing them.

as an aside ... entry in ibmjargon referring to part of the online computer communication:
Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

some past posts mentioning demo programs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#71 Password Rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#12 What if the computers went back to the '70s too?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#68 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#43 Boyd's Briefings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#49 GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#89 Make the mainframe work environment fun and intuitive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#62 Mixing Auth and Non-Auth Modules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#95 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#6 Some fun with IBM acronyms and jargon (was Re: Auditors Don't Know Squat!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#57 Displaywriter, Unix manuals added to Bitsavers

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

R.I.P. Gene Amdahl, pioneer in mainframe computing

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: R.I.P. Gene Amdahl, pioneer in mainframe computing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 17 Nov 2015 09:33:37 -0800
jmreno <none@nowhere.com> writes:
U.S. Patent 3,400,371 Data Processing System issued Sept 3, 1968 to G. M. Amdahl et al.

There are 964 pages of which 495 are drawings, and it has 131 claims.


we were working with boutique patent law firm on AADS patents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadssummary.htm
more refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

and had nearly 50 draft patents and would have some 1800+ claims (all assigned, we got a couple thousand for each patent) ... and the patent firm predicted well over 100 before we were done. Then some executive looked at how much all the patents would cost (not just our awards, but filling, both in US and international) ... and directed that all the claims to be repackaged in nine patents. Later the patent office came back and said that it was getting tired of the humongous patents where the filing fee didn't even cover the cost of reading the claims ... and directed that the claims had to be reorganized into at least 30 patents (and corporate hdqtrs ruled that inventor awards were only for original patents ... not for the reorganized "derivative" patents).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

rationality

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: rationality
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 19 Nov 2015 10:00:43 -0800
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
And fix them..

my uncle was tank mechanic for most of ww2 ... but shermans were very vulnerable; the british referred to them as tommy cookers ... they washed out the inside and tried to find the next crew. towards the end they were shanghaiing cooks and potato peelers ... apparently what saved my uncle was he was too big to fit inside.

when i was 8, my uncle first taught me to drive '38 1.5 ton chevy truck (starter motor was peddle on the floor, no synchromesh, every gear was double-clutch) and other vehicles ... mostly on dirt roads ... but I got to drive on paved highways every once and awhile. on dirt roads with deep ruts, you tried to drive just next to the ruts (also tended to be smoother ride).

past posts mentioning shermans:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#85 V-Man's Patton Quote (LONG) (Pronafity)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#30 Review of Steve McConnell's AFTER THE GOLD RUSH
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#3 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#10 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#11 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#16 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#27 Controversial paper - Good response article on ZDNet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#24 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#53 Chained I/O's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#19 FW: Looking for Disk Calc program/Exec (long)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#11 The 8008
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#14 The 8008
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#14 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#28 was change headers: The Fate of VM - was: Re: Baby MVS???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#12 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#21 WWII supplies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#11 To: Graymouse -- Ireland and the EU, What in the H... is all this about?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#21 To: Graymouse -- Ireland and the EU, What in the H... is all this about?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#17 realtors (and GM, too!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#28 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#29 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#43 Boyd's Briefings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#60 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#17 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#63 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#71 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Department of Defense Head Ashton Carter Enlists Silicon Valley to Transform the Military

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Department of Defense Head Ashton Carter Enlists Silicon Valley to Transform the Military
Date: 19 Nov, 2015
Blog: Facebook
Department of Defense Head Ashton Carter Enlists Silicon Valley to Transform the Military
http://www.wired.com/2015/11/secretary-of-defense-ashton-carter/
"Wooing Silicon Valley may prove easier than the battles Carter faces on his home turf. The Pentagon is a bulging, labyrinthine, inefficient organization with misaligned resources--the military has 25 percent more real estate than it needs, for example, but not enough hackers."

... snip ...

... not to mention the military-industrial complex, Occupy the Economy: Challenging Capitalism loc990-93:
President Eisenhower's comment about the military-industry complex is fairly well known. Less known is the comment of Seymour Melman, who was a Columbia University professor, who talked about the "permanent war economy." Correct me if I'm wrong, but the weapons industry, which is highly influential in the U.S., is extremely capital-intensive but it actually doesn't provide many jobs. It's not labor-intensive.

... snip ...

Spinney's perpetual war:
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

SecDef pulls back on personnel reforms, leaves out big changes for now
http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/benefits/2015/11/18/secdef-pulls-back-personnel-reforms-leaves-out-big-changes/76004136/

Then there is the "Harvard responsible for the rise of Putin"

John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html
How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html
Russian Military Politics and Russia's 2010 Defense Doctrine
http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1050

similar to articles about US efforts last decade responsible for the rise of ISIS. and then there is Success Of Failure (also uploaded to files 22Oct)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
Success Of Failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

but also:

Spies like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
How Booz Allen Hamilton Swallowed Washington
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington

and ..

Blowback---The Washington War Party's Folly Comes Home To Roost
http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/blowback-the-washington-war-partys-folly-comes-home-to-roost/
Memo To Jim Acosta And Other Clueless War Channel Correspondents---Washington Can't Take Out "Those Bastards" Because That's Not Its Goal
http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/memo-to-jim-acosta-and-other-clueless-war-channel-correspondents-washington-cant-take-out-those-bastards-because-thats-not-its-goal/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Miniskirts and mainframes

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Miniskirts and mainframes
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 20 Nov 2015 16:01:14 -0800
Alan Bowler <atbowler@thinkage.ca> writes:
No. In both cases, it was timesharing users. However, I am cheating a little. Gcos timesharing restricts individual timesharing users to about 3/4 megabyte programs, and does not support character at a time terminal I/O; basic line editing was (is) done in a front end, and TSS does not seen the line until the user hits CR. So no screen editors like VI which is what most of the VAX users were using.

Gcos users were mostly Fortran, and Pascal with some but there was also B, APL, Algol, Cobol, assembler, Lisp, Snobol, Spitbol, and later C. Gcos design encourages users to run long grindy big programs as batch jobs so the heavy CPU stuff was no all trying to run simultaneously.

What I was really objecting to in the prof characterization was calling the VAX a mini. The 750 was as much a mainframe was the DPS-8/49.


as i've perodically pontificated VAX & 4331/4341 sold into the same mid-range market ... and in similar numbers ... at least for small number orders ... big different for 4331/4341 were the large corporate orders of hundreds of machines. as before ... 4361/4381 was followon to 4331/4341 and expected to see similar explosion in sales ... but as the VAX sales numbers show ... by mid-80s, mid-range market was starting to move to workstations & large PCs.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0 Computers in Science Fiction

some past 4300 email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

low-end & mid-range mainframes ... but large corporations were also putting large numbers of 4300s out in departmental areas. However, datacenter clusters of 4341 were less expensive than 3033, had higher aggregate throughput, smaller floor & environmental footprint. In 1979, I got sucked into doing benchmark for lab, looking at getting 70 4341s for compute farm ... sort of the leading edge of coming supercomputers.
158 3031 4341

Rain 45.64 secs 37.03 secs 36.21 secs Rain4 43.90 secs 36.61 secs 36.13 secs

also times approx; 145 168-3 91 145 secs. 9.1 secs 6.77 secs

rain/rain4 was from Lawrence Radiation lab ... and ran on cdc6600 in 35.77 secs.


... snip ...

In the mid-80s I was working with director of NSF on interconnecting the NSF supercomputer center (which morphs into the NSFNET backbone with connection of regional networks, precursor to modern internet) as well as large clusters of arbitrary mix of 370 & 801/risc chips. Old email about having to choose between presenting to the NSF director and getting somebody else to do it in order to attend a cluster meeing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#email850314
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email850315

other NSFNET related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

Later, working with rs/6000 for ha/cmp ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

including working on cluster scaleup with both national labs as well as RDBMS vendors for commercial ... referernce to commercial cluster scaleup meeting in Ellison's conference room, Jan1992
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

within a couple weeks of the Ellison meeting, cluster scaleup was transferred, announced as supercomputer (for technical and scientific *ONLY*), and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors. some cluster scaleup email from the period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

couple press from that spring, 17Feb1992, scientific and technical *ONLY*
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
11May1992, IBM caught by *SURPRISE* (???) at national lab interest in clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 20 Nov 2015 16:34:07 -0800
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
Not likely. The mayor's brother-in-law's construction company doesn't build them that way, and they make too much money filling potholes.

I drove cross country in the winter to join science center in cambridge ... there was marked difference in I90 road quality crossing into mass (mass turnpike) ... i made reference to frost heaves being worse on mass turnpike than Idaho county roads in the rockies (i.e. little or no road bed rather than 6ft deep needed as countermeasure to frost heaves). Mass natives made jokes about interests required constant/reoccurring road repair every year (relative small scale compared to the "big dig" where claims were tha 90%, nearly $20B? disappeared into pockets).

past posts mentioning mass turnpike (& annual reoccurring revenue)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#28 trains was: Al Gore and the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#35 pop density was: trains was: Al Gore and the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#36 pop density was: trains was: Al Gore and the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#68 Killer Hard Drives - Shrapnel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#67 The problem with installable operating systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#69 The problem with installable operating systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#11 Idiot drivers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#49 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#36 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#39 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#6 Greatest Software Ever Written?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#74 GETMAIN/FREEMAIN and virtual storage backing up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#38 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#73 Cormpany sponsored insurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#22 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#24 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#26 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#55 The 10 Highest-Paid CEOs Who Laid Off The Most Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#12 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#7 U.S. Files Breakup Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#72 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

past posts mentioning "big dig"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#25 TGV in the USA?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#73 Cormpany sponsored insurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#41 fraying infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#56 IBM drops Power7 drain in 'Blue Waters'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#0 Urban transportation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#55 TV Big Bang 10/12/09
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#11 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#14 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#15 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#18 other days around me
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#48 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamationmade30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#4 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#105 only sometimes From looms to computers to looms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#42 Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#27 Federal Subsidies

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Miniskirts and mainframes

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Miniskirts and mainframes
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 21 Nov 2015 11:03:29 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
Thee was a world of difference in software usability, both systems and applications. I'd venture to say, partly based on your comments, that the corporate users of 43xx machines used them to run dedicated applications, developed centrally and distributed. In no way would I turn a branch office staff loose on a 43xx. A VAX could be used that way, but was simple enough to be managed, for the most part, by a fraction of a staff member's time, and easy enough to use that people,could develop local applications on it, to the dame extent that they might on a PC.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#71 Miniskirts and mainframes

IBM SHARE user group made a point that VAX was simpler to manage than VM370/CMS. If IBM had simplified VM370 further the claim rather than 4300s and VAXes selling about the same number of machines (except for large corporate 4300 orders of hundreds at a time), 4300s would have made significant further inroads into VAX sales.

There was an attempt to make VM370 part of all 138/148s (4300 precursor) shipped from the factory ... but this was in the aftermath of FS ... some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

... when POK was convincing corporate to kill VM370 and transfer all the people to POK for MVS/XA (or otherwise MVS/XA wouldn't ship on time). POK managed to get VM370 development group in Burlington Mall closed and people transferred to POK ... but many escaped and stayed in Boston area (joke that head of POK was one of the largest contributors to VMS).

Endicott did finally manage to save the VM370 product mission ... but had to reconstitute a development group from scratch. In Aug1976, Tymshare had started making its vm370/cms online computer conferencing facility available for free to the SHARE user group ... as VMSHARE ... archives
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

there are vmshare comments in the late 70s & early 80s about vm370/cms code quality as Endicott is rebuilding a development group.

The internal network was larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime in the mid-80s ... some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

technology was done by former co-worker
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cool-to-be-clever-edson-hendricks/id483020515?mt=8
It's Cool to Be Clever: The Story of Edson C. Hendricks, the Genius Who Invented the Design for the Internet
http://www.amazon.com/Its-Cool-Be-Clever-Hendricks/dp/1897435630/
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

at the science center, some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

At the time of the great arpanet/internet cutover to internetworking protocol on 1Jan1983, it had approx. 100 IMPs and 255 connected hosts ... while the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes. A big part of this was explosion in vm/4341s going in all over the world ... including at branch offices.

nearly identical internal network technology was also being used for BITNET ... the corporate sponsored univ. network ... which for a time was also larger than arpanet/internet. Large univ. were installing multiple vm/4341s around campus and departments ... usually requiring some fraction of student employee ... typically required more than VMS ... but still much less than full time employee. BITNET ref
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET
BITNET posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

BITNET was referred to EARN in europe, old email by person responsible for setting up EARN:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#email840320

above was sent to me somewhat as result of being blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s & early 80s.

The POK favorite son operating systems (MVS) wanted to play in the explosion in 4300 sales, but had difficulty. The real problem was typical MVS system required 10-20 fulltime support people (including dedicated operators) ... which didn't scale for enterprise looking at installing 1000 machines out in deparmental areas. However, they focused on the only entry & mid-range disks were all FBA (3310&3370). For whatever reason MVS failed to support FBA, only CKD (down to this day, even though real CKD disks haven't been made for decades). The only CKD were the high-end 3380s ... datacenter environmentals didn't play well out in departmental areas. This eventually resulted in creating 3375 CKD disk product (CKD architecture simulated on 3370 FBA disks) ... but had little impact in MVS being able to penetrate the mid-range, departmental market. Some CKD & FBA posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

other trivia ... first/original webserver in the US was the SLAC vm370/cms system:
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/firstpages.shtml
The first global Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game
http://www.lextrait.com/Vincent/mad.html
listserv
http://www.lsoft.com/products/listserv-history.asp

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Were you at SHARE in Seattle? Watch your credit card statements!

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Were you at SHARE in Seattle? Watch your credit card statements!
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Nov 2015 12:38:38 -0800
martin_packer@UK.IBM.COM (Martin Packer) writes:
Ah Chip & PIN at last.

there was a large pilot deployment in the US around the turn of the century ... however it was in the Yes Card period ... the issue was it was possible to use the same skimming exploits to collect information for counterfeit magstripe card ... for making counterfeit chipcards.

Gov. LEOs did a description of Yes Card cases at an ATM Integrity TaskForce meeting ... prompting somebody in the audience to exclaim that they managed to spend billions of dollars to prove that chipcards are less secure than magstripe.

In the wake of that, all evidence of the pilot evaporated w/o a trace and speculation was that it would be a long time while things were tried in the US again (waiting for more glitches to be worked out in other jurisdictions).

The problem was 1) it was as easy to make counterfeit chipcards as magstripe and 2) they had moved business rules out into the chip. A chipcard terminal would ask the chip 1) was the correct PIN entered, 2) should the transaction be done offline, 3) is the transaction within the credit limit. A counterfeit Yes Card would answer "YES" to all three, so didn't need to know the correct PIN and didn't need to do online check with backend (and all transaction are approved). Traditional countermeasure for counterfeit magstripe card is to deactivate the account at the backend ... but that doesn't work with Yes Card

I had warned the people doing the pilot about the problems, but they went ahead and did it anyway (they were myopically focused on lost/stolen cards and ignored the counterfeit Yes Card scenarios).

Reference to Yes Card presentation at the bottom of this CARTES2002 trip report (gone 404, but lives on at the wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

posts mentioning Yes Card
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

disclaimer: in the mid/late 90s, I was asked to do a protocol&chip that had no such vulnerabilities and was significantly more secure ... then the transit industry also requested that it could also run contactless within the power&time constraints of transit turnstyle (w/o any reduction in security&integrity) ... have you seen how long these transactions take? ... even when they are getting full contact power.

some more references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Were you at SHARE in Seattle? Watch your credit card statements!

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Were you at SHARE in Seattle? Watch your credit card statements!
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Nov 2015 16:13:37 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#74 Were you at SHARE in Seattle? Watch your credit card statements!

slight mainframe related trivia.

chip&protocol had a booth at the '99 world-wide retail banking conference ... along with press release ... in this old post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/ansiepay.htm#x959bai X9.59/AADS announcement at BAI

leading up to the conference ... we spent a lot of time with one of the other companies including regular meetings with their CEO ... who in prior life had been president of DSD (pok mainframe).

a lot of the work had started in the x9a10 financial standard working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for ALL retail payments ... and as a result it was required to not only work for point-of-sale ... but ALL payments (including internet). The downside was that eliminating much of the fraud&risk it commoditized payments and reduced barriers to entry. '99 was also the year that GLBA passed (now better known for repeal of Glass-Steagall), rhetoric on the floor of congress was the (original) primary purpose of GLBA was to prevent new entries into banking (especially prevent competition from entities with much more efficient technologies).

x9.59 posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959
glass-steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 21 Nov 2015 18:33:25 -0800
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
Lots of repairs are expensive. It may be cheaper to go for a design of road that can go for say 20 years between resurfacing.

major US highways are designed for 18wheeler axle-ton mile load lifetimes (modulo basic structural issues like frost heaves) ... other traffic is effectively negligible:
603.1 Introduction

The primary goal of the design of the pavement structural section is to provide a structurally stable and durable pavement and base system which, with a minimum of maintenance, will carry the projected traffic loading for the designated design period. This topic discusses the factors to be considered and procedures to be followed in developing a projection of truck traffic for design of the "pavement structure" or the structural section for specific projects.

Pavement structural sections are designed to carry the projected truck traffic considering the expanded truck traffic volume, mix, and the axle loads converted to 80 kN equivalent single axle loads (ESAL's) expected to occur during the design period. The effects on pavement life of passenger cars, pickups, and two-axle trucks are considered to be negligible.

Traffic information that is required for structural section design includes axle loads, axle configurations, and number of applications. The results of the AASHO Road Test (performed in the early 1960's in Illinois) have shown that the damaging effect of the passage of an axle load can be represented by a number of 80 kN ESAL's. For example, one application of a 53 kN single axle load was found to cause damage equal to an application of approximately 0.23 of an 80 kN single axle load, and four applications of a 53 kN single axle were found to cause the same damage (or reduction in serviceability) as one application of an 80 kN single axle.


... snip ...

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#41 Transportation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#7 OT Global warming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#5 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#6 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#12 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#19 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#24 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#26 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#32 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#35 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#46 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#49 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#51 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#52 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#56 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#57 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#59 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#60 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#61 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#62 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#0 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#5 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#6 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#11 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#23 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#97 Loads Weighing Heavily on Roads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#21 Horrid thought about Politics, President Bush, and Democrats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#55 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#48 fraying infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#68 Historian predicts the end of 'science superpowers'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#25 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#36 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#61 Idiotic cars driving themselves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#39 Central vs. expanded storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#52 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#80 A Close Look at the Perry Tax Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#83 A Close Look at the Perry Tax Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#28 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#29 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#168 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#47 Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Clear up this C9 business (I hope)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Clear up this C9 business (I hope).
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers, comp.os.cpm
Date: Sat, 28 Nov 2015 09:15:17 -0800
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
But then there was the NEC V20, which was 8088 pin compatible, but had the instruction set of the 80186. That worked out well I guess, the added instructions of the 80186, but no extra hardware to get in the way. But it could also be switched to become an 8080, to run the old code. I know there was excitement at the time, but I'm not sure in the long run how many actually used that feature. I think I have a V20 somewhere around.

"hotshot" for the IBM PCjr ... and could do V20 at the same time ... (remove the 8088 chip and plug hotshot board into the 8088 socket, then either plug the 8088 chip into the hotshot board or replace it with a V20) from the PCJRHOME forum
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#email860929
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#80 IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue would rather you forgot
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#email861114
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#83 Happy DEC-10 Day

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Global Financial Crisis: Analysis and Policy Implications

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Global Financial Crisis: Analysis and Policy Implications
Date: 29 Nov 2015
Blog: Facebook
The Global Financial Crisis: Analysis and Policy Implications
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34742.pdf

Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild were office bldgs in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots). In the late 90s, I was asked to look at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures. Then loan originators were securitizing loans&mortgages and paying for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds, claim is it accounts for 30% loss in funds and trillions shortfall for pensions), largely enabling being able to do over $27T 2001-2008
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

toxic CDO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

One of the first market freezes was muni-bond market when investors began to realize that triple-A ratings were for sale and it might not be possible to trust any ratings (Warren Buffett then stepped in and started offering insurance to unfreeze the market).

Supposedly $700B TARP funds were appropriated for purchase of toxic assets, however end of 2008 just the four largest too big to fail were still carrying $5.2T off-book
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home

... and TARP funds were actually used for other purposes and Federal Reserve stepped in ... buying trillions at 98cents on the dollar and providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds. The FED fought long hard legal battle to stop disclosing what it was doing and lost. Shortly afterwards the FED Chair had press conference where he said that he expected that the TBTF would use the ZIRP funds to lend to mainstreet, but when they didn't, he had no way to force them (but that didn't stop the ZIRP funds). However, supposedly one of the reasons he was chosen as FED Chair was because he was student of the Depression, where the same thing was tried with the same results ... so there should have been no expectation of something different this time.

too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Jan2009 (decade after being asked to try and help prevent the economic mess), I was asked to HTML'ize the Pecora Hearings (30s senate hearings into the '29 crash, resulted in criminal convictions & jail terms and Glass-Steagall) with lots of internal XREFs and URLs between what happened then and what happened this time (references that the new congress might have appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call saying it won't be needed after all (references to enormous piles of wallstreet money totally burying Washington).

Pecora and/or Glass-Steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

Note in the late 90s, a Federal LEO described how some number of investment bankers walked away clean from the S&L crises and were then currently running Internet IPO mills, variation on pump&dump ... but new IPOs needed to fail so that the field would be clear for the next round of IPOs. Comment was that they were then predicted to get into mortgages next.

Phishing for Phools: The Economics of Manipulation and Deception
http://www.amazon.com/Phishing-Phools-Economics-Manipulation-Deception-ebook/dp/B00WAM14RE/

pg23/loc594-96:
The reputations of the great US credit ratings agencies had been built up over the course of almost a century in rating bonds. The public used these ratings as an indicator of the likelihood of default. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, the ratings agencies took on themselves a new task: not just of rating bonds, but also of rating more complex securities, the new (complex) financial derivatives.

... snip ...

aka ... they could trade on their bond rating reputaton for selling triple-A ratings on toxic CDOs. Note that being able to buy triple-A ratings enabled loan originators not having to care about loan quality or borrower's qualification, they could immediately sell off every loan they could make. However, that wasn't enough, they then started doing (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs designed to fail, sell to their customers and then take out CDS gambling gets that they would fail (creating enormous demand for bad loans).

AIG was largest holder of these CDS gambling bets and was negotiating to pay off at 50-60cents on the dollar when the sec. of treasury steps in and forces them to sign a document that they can't sue those making the bets and to take TARP funds to pay off at 100cents on the dollar. The largest recipient of TARP funds was AIG and the largest recipient of face value payoffs was firm formally headed by the sec. of treasury.

Phishing for Phools, pg39/899-900:
The CDSs played several roles in the financial crisis. AIG's holdings, as large as they were, were still only 1 percent of the approximately $57 trillion in the entire market.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

New Smoking Gun: U.S. and UK KNEW Saddam Did NOT Possess WMDs

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: New Smoking Gun: U.S. and UK KNEW Saddam Did NOT Possess WMDs
Date: 30 Nov 2015
Blog: Facebook
New Smoking Gun: U.S. and UK KNEW Saddam Did NOT Possess WMDs
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-11-30/new-smoking-gun-us-and-uk-knew-saddam-did-not-possess-wmds

last decade, cousin of white house chief of staff Card ... was dealing with the Iraqis at the UN and was given evidence that WMDs had been decommissioned, provides information to her cousin, Powell and some number of others, then gets locked up in military hospital .... "EXTREME PREJUDICE-- The Terrifying Story of the Patriot Act and the Cover Ups of 9/11 and Iraq"
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

they eventually find the decommissioned WMDs ... tracing back to US in the 80s ... but the information got classified
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html?_r=0

military-industrial complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

recent WMD posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#0 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#17 Cromnibus cartoon
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#67 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#72 George W. Bush: Still the worst; A new study ranks Bush near the very bottom in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#0 S&L Crisis and Economic Mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#16 Keydriven bit permutations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#27 What were the complaints of binary code programmers that not accept Assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#37 C.I.A. Is Said to Have Bought and Destroyed Iraqi Chemical Weapons
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#78 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#5 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#21 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#108 Occupy Democrats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#54 The Jeb Bush Adviser Who Should Scare You
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#73 The Jeb Bush Adviser Who Should Scare You
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#9 Why do we keep losing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#29 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95 ^A^K boy scouts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#34 43rd President
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#67 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#1 Jeb: George W. Bush is a top foreign policy adviser
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#42 No, the F-35 Can't Fight at Long Range, Either
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#76 Pentagon remains stubbornly unable to account for its billions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#12 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#13 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#16 Federal Deficits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#33 The wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan were lost before they began, not on the battlefields
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#60 rationality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Corruption Is as Bad in the US as in Developing Countries

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Corruption Is as Bad in the US as in Developing Countries
Date: 30 Nov 2015
Blog: Facebook
Corruption Is as Bad in the US as in Developing Countries
http://billmoyers.com/2015/11/27/corruption-is-just-as-endemic-in-america-as-in-developing-countries/

Enormous upswing in outsourcing to for-profit companies last decade ... quotes about 10% ... split between lobbyists and congress (illegal for gov. agencies to lobby) ... periodic comments that congress is most corrupt institution on earth ... single contract can be more money than some country's annual budget.

Local DC press/news will periodically refer to washington politics as Kabuki Theater ... what you see publicly has little or nothing to do with what is really going on (including facade of conflict between parties increases the funds). posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

example 70% of budget and over half of people, including Snowden's employer
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
... and Success Of Failure
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

Success Of Failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Automatic (COBOL) Binary Optimizer Now Availabile

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM Automatic (COBOL) Binary Optimizer Now Availabile
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 30 Nov 2015 18:18:47 -0800
charlesm@MCN.ORG (Charles Mills) writes:
Now, in a sense, mainframes ARE getting faster. More cache. Higher real memory limits and for Z, dramatically lowered memory prices. That processor multi-threading thing. But especially, new instructions that are inherently faster than the old way of doing things. Load and store on condition are the i-cache's dream instructions! Lots and lots of new "faster way to do things" instructions on the z12 and z13.

cache miss access to memory ... when measured in number of processor cycles ... is compariable to 60s disk access time when measured in number of 60s processor cycles. non-mainframe processors have been doing memory latency compensation for decades, out-of-order execution, branch prediction, speculative execution, hyperthreading, etc (aka waiting for memory access increasing being treated like multiprogramming in the 60s while waiting for disk i/o). Also, industry standard, non-risc processors some time ago introduced risc micro-ops ... where standard instructions were translated into risc microops for execution scheduling.

mainframe implementations are more & more reusing industry standard implementations, fixed-block disks, fibre-channel standard, CMOS, etc. Half the per-processor performance improvement from z10->z196 playing catchup, is claimed to be introduction of some of these industry standard memory access compensation technologies .... with further additions in z12 (its not clear about z13 ... some numbers about total system throughput compared to z12, is less than the increase in number of processors ... possibly implying that per processor throughput didn't increase or even declined).

ckd/fba disks posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd
ficon/fibre channel standard posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

recent hyperthreading posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#27 Webcasts - New Technology for System z
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#43 z13 "new"(?) characteristics from RedBook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#61 ou sont les VAXen d'antan, was Variable-Length Instructions that aren't
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#69 A New Performance Model ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#23 A Modest Proposal (for avoiding OOO)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#27 the legacy of Seymour Cray

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Automatic (COBOL) Binary Optimizer Now Availabile

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM Automatic (COBOL) Binary Optimizer Now Availabile
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 1 Dec 2015 11:59:58 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#81 IBM Automatic (COBOL) Binary Optimizer Now Availabile

hyperthreading trivia ...

early 70s, I got sucked into helping with hyperthreading effort for 370/195 (that never shipped).

370/195 could run at 10MIPS, but most codes ran at 5MIPs. 195 had our-of-order execution, but didn't have branch prediction or speculative execution ... so conditiional branches stalled the pipeline (had to do careful programming to get 10MIPS, but abundance of conditional branches in most codes would keet machine to 5MIPS). Two i-streams running at 5MIPS would be able to keep machine running aggregate 10MIPS.

Idea was to have dual i-stream and registers ... but same single pipeline and execution units ... with instructions flagged as to i-stream. this discussion of end of ACS-360 includes references to hardware muiltithreading patents (and red/blue bit tagging).
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

other acs-360 reference/trivia ... Amdahl says that executives were afraid that it would advance state-of-the-art too fast and company would loose control of the market ... so acs-360 was shutdown. There is also description of acs-360 features that show up over 20yrs later in ES-9000.

recent posts mentioning end of ACS360:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#27 Webcasts - New Technology for System z
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#61 ou sont les VAXen d'antan, was Variable-Length Instructions that aren't
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#26 OT: Digital? Cloud? Modern And Cost-Effective? Surprise! It's The Mainframe - Forbes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#69 A New Performance Model ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#91 Critique of System/360, 1967
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#14 3033 & 3081 question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#20 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#68 A Modest Proposal (for avoiding OOO)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#3 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#23 A Modest Proposal (for avoiding OOO)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#13 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#57 Gene Amhdahl Dies at 92

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 2015 19:14:03 -0800
Jon Elson <jmelson@wustl.edu> writes:
Wikipedia says 400,000 VAXes were sold. Not sure how accurate that is, or what period that covers.

old post with 88 IDC report, VAX sliced&diced by model, year, US/non-US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0

it has 139,195 total from 1978-1987 ... but that includes 64,900 MVII

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

disARMed

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: disARMed
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Dec 2015 08:42:25 -0800
David Wade <dave.g4ugm@gmail.com> writes:
I think thats the approach IBM took with the z Series mainframes. There ae various levels of microcode ansd millicode so knowing what is actually as basic instruction can be interesting...

there are so few Z series being sold that they are increasingly leveraging other technologies (with some differentiation layer on top).

z12 processor was 32nm technology ... I had calculated that based on 1qtr2014 sale numbers and straight remap 32nm to 14nm and 300mm to 450mm wafers ... processor chips for several years of z mainframe sales could be handled by a single wafer (little over decade ago I had chip done and minimum wafer run was six wafers, assume that it is still something similar).

recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#82 Is there an Inventory of the Installed Mainframe Systems Worldwide
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#31 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#36 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#83 Miniskirts and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#19 Linux Foundation Launches Open Mainframe Project

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

First Single-Chip Out-of-Order Microprocessor?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: First Single-Chip Out-of-Order Microprocessor?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Sat, 05 Dec 2015 09:19:50 -0800
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Not having a cache on chip, and even having the MMU off-chip doesn't, in my estimation, disqualify it as a single-chip microprocessor; the CPU is still just on one chip. So the 88110 wasn't the answer I was looking for, even if some other chip was even earlier.

the executive we reported to when we started HA/CMP (rs/6000) had previously been at Motorola, then he went over to head up Somerset for AIM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIM_alliance

... and then went to president of MIPS (for mips10000).

I have desk ornament with six chips of the original RIOS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/riospw.jpg

rios chip set

801/risc had long tradition of no cache coherency ... part of somerset single chip 801, I somewhat characterize as borrowing cache coherency from 88k and adding to 801.

past posts mentioning 801/risc, iliad, romp, rios, rs/6000, power/pc, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Old HASP

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Old HASP
Date: 05 Dec 2015
Blog: Facebook
Undergraduate in the 60s, univ. hired me fulltime to be responsible for IBM mainframe systems ... this included going to SHARE. On route to east coast SHARE, I took a side-trip from LaGuardia to Ithaca on what I remember was DC3 (to see Bill Worley to talk about a lot of the mods. that I had made to HASP ). We were held in the plane on the tarmac for an hour but still flew through the middle of thunderstorm ... and I got severely air sick. I stumbled off at Elmira, got a rental car and found a motel to stay in ... and then drove to Ithaca the next day. ... worley/cornell/hasp ref
http://www.worldcat.org/title/cornell-hasp-ie-houston-automatic-spooling-priority-system-for-the-ibm-360/oclc/63226490

HASP, JES, NJI/NJE, etc posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#hasp

In former life my wife was in the gburg JES group, one of the LASP "catchers" for jes3, and one of the JESUS (jes unified system) spec coauthors ... this was mid 70s ... until Cannavino con'ed her into going to POK to be in charge of loosely-coupled architecture.

In POK, she did "shared data" architecture .... but didn't remain long there; in part because there was little uptake of the architecture (except for IMS hot standby) until SYSPLEX & parallel SYSPLEX ... and because of constant battles with communication group attempting to force her into using SNA/VTAM for loosely-coupled operation. There would periodically be a (temporary) truce where the communication group said she could do anything within datacenter walls, but they owned everything that crossed the datacenter walls (but almost immediately they would resume trying to force her into using SNA/VTAM).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

Washington System Center in Gburg ... WTSC in POK, AFE System Center in Shady Grove (near gburg). AFE hdqtrs was in Terrytown. EMEA hdqtrs had been in westchester.

SE training used to be sort of apprentice program as part of large group at customer installation. With the 23Jun1969 unbundling announcement (starting to charge for software, SE services, etc), they couldn't figure out how not to charge for apprentice SEs training onsite at customer location.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

Response was HONE (hands-on network environment), a number of CP67 virtual machine datacenters with branch office access running guest operating systems. CP67/CMS, internal network, invent GML (precursor to SGML, HTML), etc had been done at the Science Center. The Science Center also ported to APL\360 to CMS for CMS\APL. HONE also started offering CMS\APL based sales&marketing support applications on HONE ... which came to dominate all HONE activity (and guest operating system use dwindled away).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

One of my hobbies was providing enhanced production operating systems for internal datacenters ... including HONE ... and I would get called in for things like installing HONE-clones at new locations around the world. One of the first was EMEA hdqtrs move from NY to Paris ... and a HONE installation for EMEA hdqtrs went into La Defense.

In the mid-70s, the US HONE datacenters were consolidated in Palo Alto (trivia, when FACEBOOK moved to silicon valley it was new bldg, next door to the old HONE datacenter). In the late 70s, HONE VM370 (HONE had moved from CP67 to VM370) was enhanced for loosely-coupled cluster support (largest single-system in the world, load-balancing and fall-over recovery, this support didn't ship to customers until 30years later). In the early 80s, US HONE was replicated in Dallas and then a 3rd in Boulder for geographic survivability in case of whole datacenter failure.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

One of the people that my wife worked with on catcher for LASP (to JES3) recently passed. I had gotten question from customer (who was updating some wiki entries) about early os/vs2 and virtual memory ... and redistributed it to some IBMers from the period. This is (archived) post with some of his recollections
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Maneuver breaks out

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Maneuver breaks out
Date: 05 Dec 2015
Blog: Slightly East of New
Maneuver breaks out
http://slightlyeastofnew.com/2015/12/02/maneuver-breaks-out/

I've done theme that mobile & lean converge with agility.

In addition to sponsoring Boyd's briefings at IBM, some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

I was also blamed for online computer conferencing (precursor to social media) on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime in mid-80s) in the late 70s and early 80s ... where we had a lot of agility related discussions. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

In the early 80s there was Washington Post article calling for 100% unearned profit tax on the US auto industry ... import quotas were supposedly to provide US auto industry with significant profits (reduced competition allowing significant price increases) that would be used to remake the industry; however they just pocketed the profits and continued business as usual.

In 1990, the US auto industry had the C4 taskforce to look at completely remaking themselves and because the were planning on heavily leveraging technology, major technology vendors were invited to send representatives. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#auto.c4.taskforce

In the meatings they had detailed descriptions about what the foreign makers were doing and what US makers needed to change. One of the detailed descriptions was the auto industry had been taking 7-8yrs to go from start to rolling off the line (and were typically running two efforts in parallel offset by a couple years ... so something new was coming out every 3-4 years instead of 7-8 years). Foreign imports had cut the process in half (3-4yrs) and were in the process of cutting it in half again (18-24months). Foreign imports could respond to changing buying habits or changing technology much more quickly than US makers. Offline I would chide my IBM "mainframe" brethren (that were attending) how could they expect to help (since they had similar schedule, 7-8yr product cycle, with two efforts running in parallel offset by a couple years)? Silicon Valley chip products were on path towards 18-24month.

As an aside, in the early-to-mid 80s, I had a project I called HSDT (high-speed data transport) and was working with director of NSF on connecting the NSF supercomputer centers. Some of the stuff was being built on the other side of the pacific and would have to visit periodically (one of the vendors was Matsushita and they couldn't resist showing off some of the stuff they were doing for Toyota). As an aside, as regional networks tie into the NSF supercomputer centers, it morphs into the NSFNET backbone ... precursor to modern Internet. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What's Worked in Computer Science

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What's Worked in Computer Science
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Sun, 06 Dec 2015 17:47:56 -0800
Bengt Larsson <bengtl12.net@telia.NOSPAMcom> writes:
Isn't it simpler to say simply that a RISC architecture is explicitly designed to be a good target for a compiler, but CISC designs had a strong component of looking natural to an assembly-language programmer.

the 801/risc presentations from 76/77 era was that compiler/software technology would be leveraged to greatly simplifying hardware implementation.

801/risc would have simple hardware implementation; compiler would generate correct code, loader would only load valid compiled programs ... so it wasn't necessary to have hardware privileged/non-privileged support; virtual memory could be handled with just 16 segment registers because inline code could change segment values (in much the same way adddress registers value can be changed, w/o needing kernel calls for validating authorization), no cache coherency (loader that may operate on instructions would have instructions to force d-cache lines to memory and invalidate i-cache lines)

I've periodically claimed that 801/risc was at least partially motivated to go to the opposite extreme of the (failed) FS effort with its complex hardware implementation. FS reference
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

past 801, risc, iliad, romp, rios, power/pc, etc post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

First Single-Chip Out-of-Order Microprocessor?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: First Single-Chip Out-of-Order Microprocessor?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:29:22 -0800
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
I have now found a source of more comprehensive information.

It doesn't list out-of-order implementations as such, and thus would exclude the 88100, but instead lists the various processors which employed register renaming.

After the POWER1, the next one is from 1992, and is whatever CPU was used in the ES/9000 mainframe. And next year, IBM is again out in front, with several single-chip PowerPC implementations using register renaming.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#85 First Single-Chip Out-of-Order Microprocessor?

ES/9000 in 1990 ... reference to end of ACS-360 ... Amdahl shutting it down because executives were afraid it would advance state-of-the-art too fast and company would loose control of the market
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

also lists hyperthreading patents and ACS-360 features that show up in ES/9000 more than 20yrs later ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

History--did relay logic (e.g. crossbar switch) need air conditioning?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: History--did relay logic (e.g. crossbar switch) need air conditioning?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 2015 10:02:48 -0800
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
Something we, here in the Silicon Valley, are quite aware of :-(. They finally cleaned up the superfund site on Bernal (Fairchild/Nat Semi, IIRC); but there is still plenty of groundwater remediation occuring throughout the valley.

one of my co-workers that lived south of the fairchild bldg (affected by fairchild ground water contamination) ... came down with cancer attributed to that contamination.

shortly after new grocery store went in (where fairchild bldg use to be). I was in the store and noticed that the ATM machine was open'ed and being worked on. I went over and started talking to the person ... this was after nations had taken over bank of america and changed its name to bank of america. He said that nations was letting lots of the bank of america people go. He said that he was assigned to go through all the bank of america ATM machines (in the local area) and replace the advanced, state-of-the-art, intrusion detection with some hack that nations used (so all nationsbank ATM machines would be the same) ... and when he was done, he would be let go to.

It was more than academic interest ... I was on financial industry standard committees working on security features ... topic drift ... one of the standards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959
and some of the technology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

tandem had bought one of ATM machine technology providers (Atalla, in part because tandem machines were extensively used in the ATM/cashmachine networks and tandem had been bought by compaq) ... old post referencing workshop that compaq/tandem/atalla had sponsored for us:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm

report on AADS pilot done by NACHA and one of the ATM networks (gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine, aka 23July2001))
http://web.archive.org/web/20070706004855/http://internetcouncil.nacha.org/News/news.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Happy Dec-10 Day!!!

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy Dec-10 Day!!!
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 2015 11:35:22 -0800
mausg writes:
Familys that have fallen in `class' are a fertile ground for revolutionaries, the `lumpenproletariate' vent their frustrations in family of social group. China are following their own path, as opposed to Russia, the Chinese anti- corruption drive at the moment is catching VeryImportantPeople. Contrast to the UK-US answer, specially in the UK, where it seems to be a mark of status that one can `walk' even with seeming good evidence of fraud.

Its amazing that many people regard Russia still as a Socialist country, in an argument split, leftists still regard Russia as `good'.


Then there is the "Harvard responsible for the rise of Putin"

John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html
How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html
Russian Military Politics and Russia's 2010 Defense Doctrine
http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1050

similar to articles about US efforts last decade responsible for the rise of ISIS. and then there is Success Of Failure (sometimes serves blank page on 1st click and have to click again)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

but also:

Spies like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
How Booz Allen Hamilton Swallowed Washington
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington

For The Record, Yes, George W. Bush Did Help Create ISIS
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/14/jeb-bush-isis_n_7284558.html
Blowback---The Washington War Party's Folly Comes Home To Roost
http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/blowback-the-washington-war-partys-folly-comes-home-to-roost/
Memo To Jim Acosta And Other Clueless War Channel Correspondents---Washington Can't Take Out "Those Bastards" Because That's Not Its Goal
http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/memo-to-jim-acosta-and-other-clueless-war-channel-correspondents-washington-cant-take-out-those-bastards-because-thats-not-its-goal/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 13 Dec 2015 12:04:39 -0800
pete@PETELANCASHIRE.COM (Pete Lancashire) writes:
Showing my age ....

I worked for Burroughs as an engineering technician.

A customer with 360/65 instantaneous loss of power. I was there only for a couple hours to drop off some equipment. Later heard they lost a couple disk packs.


separate from power failures can precipitate disk drive failure.

IBM CKD dasd had power loss failure mode ... where there wasn't enough power to maintain memory contents ... but there was enough power left for the controller to complete a write operation ... problem was that the channel had stopped transferring data ... so the controller continued writting all zeros. The result was that after recovery, a subsequent read would show no errors ... for the record that had write operation ("correctly") complete with all zeros (this was especially troublesome when things like VTOC record was being written)

FBA introduced that a physical record would not be written unless all data was available to correctly complete a write. This philosophy continued for RAID (write "failure" either completes correctly or at least results in error indication for subsequent read).

During the 80s, there was lots of work trying to figure out how to retrofit such a fix to CKD dasd ... or at least provide a way for system to recognize an incorrect trailing zeros write.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 13 Dec 2015 17:48:41 -0800
tony.j.newman writes:
This happend to us, 3380 continued to write x'00' over VM byte allocation map on cyl 0.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#92 Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

Original CMS filesystem from the mid-60s almost had a fix for this ... updated filesysem control information was written to new locations ... and then the MFD was rewritten pointing to the new version of control information rather than old version. It worked for all writes except for the MFD. The new CMS "EDF" filesystem in the 2nd half of the 70s went to a pair of MFDs. There was the current MFD and a write would always be to the alternate MFD ... if completely corectly, the alternate becomes the (new) current and the (old) current becomes the alternate.

A version number goes at the end of (EDF) MFD, on startup/recovery, both MFD is read and the most recent one is used ... a power failure, trailing zeros write would always result in that record appearing as older than the other MFD.

In early 80s, I did a CP kernel filesystem ... including spool file system that addressed the problem for CP also. My motivation was that I had HSDT project and I needed VM370 spool file system that ran much faster for RSCS driving multiple T1 (& faster) links (standard spool file system typically got 5-32kbytes/sec ... I needed 3mbytes or better throughput. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

I did the implementation in vs/pascal running in virtual address space but still managed to significant improvement over the standard implementation done as part of vm370 kernel in assembler.

At one point, I thought I finally had a path to getting it picked up through the corporate network backbone which nodes were moving to multiple 56kbit links. However, this was about the time the communication group was putting intense pressure on the corporate nework to move to SNA ... technical people started being excluded from the backbone meetings ... so they could focus on the pressure being applied to move to SNA.

However, by that time I also was doing the throughput enhancements to mainframe TCP/IP product (also implemented in vs/pascal). At the time, the standard product got about 44kbytes/sec using nearly full 3090 processor. In some tuning tests of the "fixes" at Cray Research between Cray and 4341 ... got channel speed throughput using only modest amount of the 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

old email reference to communication group forcing internal network to move to SNA:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870302
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#email870306

posts mentioning internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

other trivia ... I had also done a paged-mapped CMS filesystem originallyh for CP67 ... and then later moved to VM370. In the early 80s (on 3380 drives), side-by-side comparison of moderate i/o intensive workload ... it would get three times the througput of standard CMS filesystem. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

old post with some (mmap) benchmark measurements from the 1st half of the 80s ... included in '86 SEAS presentation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#25 DCSS as SWAP disk for z/Linux
and repeated in hillgang meeting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#88 Hillgang -- VM Performance

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Systems thinking--still in short supply

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Systems thinking--still in short supply
Date: 13 Dec 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LynnWheeler/posts/H6qTv9K53Ww

Systems thinking--still in short supply
http://slightlyeastofnew.com/2015/12/13/systems-thinking-still-in-short-supply/

In the wake of the 7Mar83 Time/Spinney article ... usually behind paywall ... but (mostly) lives free at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20070320170523/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953733,00.html

one of my co-workers got Spinney's number and called him up. Chuck told him he really needed to talk to Boyd. I then got con'ed into sponsoring Boyd's briefings at IBM (and got to spend a lot of time alone with John). past Boyd posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

In the briefings, John would say that military officers got WW2 training in rigid, top-down command&control structure ... which required bloated officer corp (he would also contrast it with the WW2 German military). He observed that many of these former US military officers were then starting to contaminate US corporate culture, with their management style (rigid, top-down command & control and bloated middle management). However about the same time, articles were appearing claiming MBAs were starting to destroy US corporate culture with their myopic attention to quarterly numbers.

trivia: I was blamed for online computer conferencing (precursor to modern social media) on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s) in the late 70s and early 80s. There was a lot of discussion then about the myopic focus on short-term quarterly results.

Note in the wake of ENRON, the rhetoric in Congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives (and auditors) did jailtime. However there was joke that it was just a large present to the audit industry (for what happened to the industry and major audit houses in the wake of ENRON). Sarbanes-Oxley required that SEC do something, and possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings (which also used to drive larger executive bonuses), even showing that the fraudulent filings increased after Sarbanes-Oxley goes into effect (and nobody doing jail time).
http://www.gao.gov/special.pubs/gao-06-1079sp/

posts mentioning enron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
posts mentioning Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley

Several articles having pointed out that even when the fraudulent filings have been restated, there is never any recovery of the inflated bonuses.

trivia: I was asked to participate in a 2004 financial meeting (in Liechtenstein) of European CEOs and corporate presidents that focused on effects of Sarbanes-Oxley spilling over into Europe (Liechtenstein appeared to be hosting these meetings as part of getting off the Treasury's money laundering black list). posts mentioning money laundering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering

More recently, there has been a lot written about executives of large US corporations, focused on heavy borrowing for large stock buybacks, that juice the quarterly earnings per outstanding share, driving larger bonuses (exacerbating the short term myopic attention on quarterly numbers).
http://www.amazon.com/Great-Deformation-Corruption-Capitalism-America/dp/1586489127/

pg464/loc9995-10000:
IBM was not the born-again growth machine trumpeted by the mob of Wall Street momo traders. It was actually a stock buyback contraption on steroids. During the five years ending in fiscal 2011, the company spent a staggering $67 billion repurchasing its own shares, a figure that was equal to 100 percent of its net income.

pg465/10014-17:
Total shareholder distributions, including dividends, amounted to $82 billion, or 122 percent, of net income over this five-year period. Likewise, during the last five years IBM spent less on capital investment than its depreciation and amortization charges, and also shrank its constant dollar spending for research and development by nearly 2 percent annually.

... snip ...

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#stock.buyback

The other effect about the cheap money is the rise of private-equity borrowing for LBOs ... this has comparison to house flipping (except they can sell for less than they paid and still walk away with boat loads of money)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

posts mentioning private-equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

There is enormous pressure put on the victim companies to service the extreme debt load (cutting corners and generating revenue every way possible), side-effect is that over half of corporate defaults involve private-equity victim companies. An especially attractive target has been companies doing business with the US government (intensive lobbying last decade has accelerated the rise of government out-sourcing). Articles reference that private-equity victims include those responsible for doing government security clearances (which were just filling out the paper work and not actually doing the background checks).

Spies like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
How Booz Allen Hamilton Swallowed Washington
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington

somewhat related to associated rise of the Success Of Failure culture (sometimes serves up blank page on initial click and has to be repeated)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

posts mentioning Success Of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

"Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World" Ferguson & Morris on failure of IBM's Future System:
... and perhaps most damaging, the old culture under Watson Snr and Jr of free and vigorous debate was replaced with sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers. It's claimed that thereafter, IBM lived in the shadow of defeat

... and:
But because of the heavy investment of face by the top management, F/S took years to kill, although its wrongheadedness was obvious from the very outset. "For the first time, during F/S, outspoken criticism became politically dangerous," recalls a former top executive.

... snip ...

other FS references
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/fs.html
http://www.ecole.org/en/seances/CM07

posts mentioning Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

AMEX was in competition with KKR for private equity LBO of RJR. KKR won, but when they ran into trouble, they hire away the president of AMEX to turn it around.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

IBM went into the red and was being reorganized into the 13 "Baby Blues" in preparation of breaking up the company
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

Then the IBM board hires the former AMEX president to resurrect the company and reverse the breakup, using some of the same techniques used at RJR:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

The former AMEX president then leaves IBM to head up a major private-equity company that does a LBO of the company that was Snowden's employer (70% of the intelligence budget and over half the people is at for-profit companies)

posts mentioning Gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

book "1984"--modern privacy

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: book "1984"--modern privacy
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2015 07:40:34 -0800
hancock4 writes:
IMHO, the big risk to privacy are the hidden and not so hidden databases that may contain derogatory information about us, be it accurate or not. For instance, the newspaper reported that doctors have a database about difficult patients, and landlords have a database about difficult tenants.

Journalists push for these kinds of things--lack of privacy-- because it makes their job easier, indeed, helps create opportunities. If a Senator's son misbehaves at college, now they can find out about it and report on it, something that might have been buried years ago.


just finishing schneier's book: Data and Goliath
http://www.amazon.com/Data-Goliath-Battles-Collect-Control-ebook/dp/B00L3KQ1LI/

he glosses over a number of details like opt-in/opt-out ... I've posted before about being somewhat involved in cal. data breach notification and cal. opt-in legislation ... having been brought in to help word smith cal. electronic signature legislation ... while they were also working on the other two pieces. The data-breach notification legislation passed although since then there has been a number of federal bills (none yet passed), about evenly divided between those similar to cal's and those that would effectively eliminate notification requirement.

Before the opt-in bill passes, a (federal preemption) opt-out addenda was added to GLBA (now better known for repeal of Glass-Steagall). Opt-in requires explicit authorization before an organization can share your personal information, out-out can share your personal information unless it has record of your objecting (opting-out).

I've posted before about being at a 2004 annual national privacy conference in Wash DC and in a panel session with all the FTC commissioners, somebody in the room gets up and asks them if they are going to do anything about GLBA "opt-out" ... he says he is with a call center technology company used by all the major financial operations ... and all of their 1-800 "opt-out" services provide no provisions for keeping a record of a "opt-out" call (and with no "opt-out" record, they are free to share your personal information).

posts mentioning electronic signature legislation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#signature
posts mentiong data breach notification
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification
posts mentioning Pecora Hearings &/or Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

recent posts mentioning opt-in/opt-out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#17 Cromnibus cartoon
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#54 How do we take political considerations into account in the OODA-Loop?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#55 HealthCare.gov in Cahoots with Dozens of Tracking Websites
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#45 rationality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Systems thinking--still in short supply

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Systems thinking--still in short supply
Date: 14 Dec 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#94 Systems thinking--still in short supply

website is by oldtime Boyd acolyte
http://slightlyeastofnew.com/

recently did an updated version of briefings that Boyd would give at IBM
http://slightlyeastofnew.com/2015/12/08/presentation-slides-from-lkce15/

which has prompted some number of discussions
http://slightlyeastofnew.com/2015/12/03/all-about-agility-in-400-sec/
http://slightlyeastofnew.com/2015/12/02/maneuver-breaks-out/

other trivia ... about co-worker from the science center:

It's Cool to Be Clever: The Story of Edson C. Hendricks, the Genius Who Invented the Design for the Internet
http://www.amazon.com/Its-Cool-Be-Clever-Hendricks/dp/1897435630/
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

Ed was responsible for the internal network which was larger than the ARPANET/INTERNET from just about the beginning until sometime in the mid-80s I attribute much of this because Ed included a form of gateway and distributed control in every node from the beginning. The ARPANET/INTERENET didn't get this until the great 1JAN1983 cutover to internetworking protocol. This replaced the tightly controlled, centrally administrated IMPs. At the 1JAN1983 cutover there was approx. 100 IMP network nodes (with approx. 255 connected hosts) at the same time the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes. Part of the IMP folklore from the early 80s was that the 100 tightly controlled IMPs would periodically totally saturate all the network links with administrative protocol chatter anytime there was any significant event (part of the requirement to cutover to internetworking protocol was that the existing IMP technology couldn't scale).

slightly related trivia, we were working with director of NSF on interconnecting the NSF supercomputer centers and were suppose to get $20M ... related to my HSDT project ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#hsdt

Then congress cut the budget and some number of other things happen, and finally they release RFP (largely based on stuff HSDT already had running). Internal politics prevents us from bidding. The director of NSF tries to help, writting the company a letter, copying the CEO ... but that just makes the internal politics worse. As regional neworks connect into these centers, it morphs into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to the modern internet. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
related article
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

Boyd posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html
internal network posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
HSDT posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt
NSFNET posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Administrators and moderators of alt.folklore.computers Google

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Re: Administrators and moderators of alt.folklore.computers Google
 Groups, please erase all the messages that I not should have posted here in
alt.folklore.computers Google Groups!
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2015 13:00:01 -0800 (PST)
in the "old" days ... there use to be a rash of questions every Sept. from freshmen just exposed to Usenet &/or internet for the first time ... looking to get homework done for free. Then initially with rise of AOL ... the homework questions started coming from younger and year around

OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
Date: 15 Dec 2015
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#92 OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#93 OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

and
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/bit.listserv.ibm-main/P228glGAxEw

After transferring to SJR, I got con'ed into playing disk engineer across the street. The disk engineering lab was running prescheduled stand alone mainframe testing 7x24 around the clock for testing. They had tried running MVS for concurrent testing ... but found MVS had 15min MTBF in that environment. I offered to rewrite IOS to make it bullet proof and never fail, enabling any amount of concurrent on-demand testing ... greatly increasing productivity. I produced a research report about the enhancements and happened to mention the 15min MTBF MVS. Later I got a call from somebody in the POK MVS group, I thought at first that they might want to know about all the enhancements, but they just wanted to know who my manager was. Later I find out that they were more interested in getting me separated from the corporation. When they couldn't, I was told that they would do their best to make career unpleasant (including no corporate awards).

Old email reference a little time later ... for 3380, FE had 57 regression test of 57 typical errors to be expected, MVS was still failing in all cases requiring re-IPL, and in 2/3rds of the cases there was no indication of what caused the failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801015

past posts mentioning getting to play disk engineer in bldgs 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

When we were doing IBM's HA/CMP project ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

we spent a lot of time looking at various failure scenarios. One of the buzz words was "telco provisioning". There was a datacenter in manhattan that was carefully chosen to be in building that had multiple power feeds from different substations on different sides of the building, multiple telco feeds from different exchanges on different sides of the building, and multiple water main feeds on different sides of the building. It was taken out when a transformer in the building exploded, contaminating the building with PCB and the building had to be evacuated.

As part of HA/CMP, we also worked on geographically separated operations and when I was out marketing HA/CMP, I coined the terms disaster survivability and geographic survivability (to differentiate from disaster/recovery). I then got asked to write a section for the corporate continuous availability strategy document. It got removed when both rochester (as/400) and POK (mainframe) complained that they couldn't meet the requirements.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Systems thinking--still in short supply

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Systems thinking--still in short supply
Date: 15 Dec 2015
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#94 Systems thinking--still in short supply
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#96 Systems thinking--still in short supply

other trivia ... about co-worker from the science center:

One of the baby bells did a PU4&PU5 emulation on Series/1 running on top of distributed control and real networking underneath with enormous more function than standard SNA. It was well known that the communication group was famous for corporate dirty tricks ... so approached the largest customer of 32x5 boxes to completely fund the internal costs (they showed that they would totally recover all costs within 9months moving over to such a type-1 product from real 32x5). What the communication group did next can only be described as truth is stranger than fiction. Part of presentation that I gave at fall1986 SNA architecture review board meeting in Raleigh.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#67

part of presentation that one of the baby bell people gave at '86 IBM Common user group meeting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#70

Actually one of the SRI instructors had me in for a day to give talk about HSDT and other stuff.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

Other trivia ... very early in the days of SNA architecture, my wife and another person (who later went on to be an SRI instructor) authored AWP39 peer-to-peer networking architecture (they had to use the "peer-to-peer" qualifier to indicate real networking ... since the communication group had co-opted the plain "network" term for SNA which is a communication protocol and doesn't have a network layer).

Much later the author of AWP164 (which is released as APPN) and I are reporting to the same executive ... I periodically needle him to stop playing with the communication group and work on real networking. When APPN is getting ready for announce, the communication group non-concurs and there is a couple month escalation period ... eventually resulting in the APPN announcement letter being carefully written to avoid implying that there is any relationship between APPN and SNA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
Date: 15 Dec 2015
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#92 OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#93 OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#98 OT: Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

when I was undergraduate, I was brought into boeing as fulltime employee (to help with creating BCS, computing moved into independent business unit to better monetize the investment) ... and at the time Renton datacenter had upwards of $300M in IBM equipment (in 60s dollars, that summer there was constant flow of 360/65s staged in the Renton hallways awaiting installation), which I thot might be the largest in the world. They were looking at duplicating it in Everett because there was disaster scenario where Mt. Rainer heats up and there is massive mud slide that takes out the Renton datacenter (some claim that being w/o the Renton datacenter for a week would cost the company more than the cost of the Renton datacenter). That summer 747-3 was flying the skies of seattle getting FAA certification.

Later I'm sponsoring John Boyd's briefings at IBM ... and turns out that he commanded "spook base" about the same time I was at Boeing ... which is claimed to have been a $2.5B "windfall" for IBM (again in '60s dollars, supposedly had the largest air conditioned building in that part of the world)). posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

posts mentioning availability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

This new 'skyscraper' chip could make computers run 1,000 times faster

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: This new 'skyscraper' chip could make computers run 1,000 times faster
Date: 15 Dec 2015
Blog: Facebook
This new 'skyscraper' chip could make computers run 1,000 times faster
http://www.sciencealert.com/this-new-skyscraper-chip-could-make-our-computers-1-000-times-faster

Note that many of the chips supporting older instruction sets ... now have hardware layer translating instructions into RISC micro-ops for scheduling and execution. It adds slight latency for any specific instruction but greatly increases the execution throughput of the chip (so there is now little throughput different between such chips and "real" RISC chips). The big throughput issue are things like super-scalar, out-of-order execution, speculative execution, branch prediction, hyperthreading, etc ... that help mask cache miss and memory access latency. Existing memory access latency ... when measured in count of processor cycles ... is comparable to 1960s disk access time when measured in count of 1960s processor cycles

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Accounting industry and SEC hobble America's audit watchdog

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Accounting industry and SEC hobble America's audit watchdog
Date: 17 Dec 2015
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LynnWheeler/posts/PJWyQdKFWd5

Accounting industry and SEC hobble America's audit watchdog
http://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/usa-accounting-PCAOB/

Rhetoric in congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley was going to prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives (and auditors) did jailtime, but it required SEC to do something. However, at the time there were jokes that it was actually just a huge gift to the audit industry. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings, even showing that they increased after Sarbanes-Oxley goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime). posts mentioning Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley

GAO Financial Restatement Database (GAO-06-1079sp)
http://www.gao.gov/special.pubs/gao-06-1079sp/

from above:
The database consists of two files: (1) a file that lists 1,390 restatement announcements that we identified as having been made because of financial reporting fraud and/or accounting errors between July 1, 2002, and September 30, 2005, and (2) a file that lists 396 restatement announcements that we identified as having been made because of financial reporting fraud and/or accounting errors between October 1, 2005, and June 30, 2006.

... snip ...

various reports was that part of the motivation for the fraudulent financial reporting was increasing bonuses of executives ... however, even after financial restatements, inflated bonuses weren't clawed back.

financial reporting fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

The "joke" about gift to the audit industry ... was that Sarbanes-Oxley required corporations to significantly increase spending on audits ... but apparently no intention of seeing executives and auditors in jail ... aka a congressional Kabuki Theater moment (what you see publicly has little to do with what really goes on)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Median Age of US Managers

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Median Age of US Managers
Date: 18 Dec 2015
Blog: Facebook
Median Age of US Managers
http://utopiayouarestandinginit.com/2015/12/16/the-average-age-of-managers-as-a-cause-of-the-1970s-productivity-slowdowns/

Mid-80s corporate was projecting that sales would shortly double (from something like $60B to $120B) .... mostly based on mainframe business ... there was massive internal building program to double mainframe manufacturing capacity and huge influx of "fast track" MBAs being rapidly rotated thru mid-level positions (to the detriment of many business units) ... presumably trying to double executive ranks. This was at the time that mainframe business was starting to go in the opposite directions ... and in a few years the company goes into the red.

In high school, i worked some number of construction jobs and summer after freshman year in collage, I was foreman on job with three 9-person crews. Shortly after joining IBM in 70, I was asked to be a manager ... I asked to read the manager's manual over the weekend and came back on Monday saying I didn't think my background of doing attitude adjustment in the parking lot after work would be looked on favorably by IBM.

Late 80s, senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at the world-wide, annual communication group conference supposedly on 3174 performance and opened his talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had stranglehold on datacenters (trying to protect its dumb terminal paradigm install base) with its corporate strategic ownership with everything that crossed datacenter walls. The disk division was seeing data fleeing datacenters to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with number of solutions to correct the problem, but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group.

other trivia ... about co-worker from the science center:

It's Cool to Be Clever: The Story of Edson C. Hendricks, the Genius Who Invented the Design for the Internet
http://www.amazon.com/Its-Cool-Be-Clever-Hendricks/dp/1897435630/
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

Ed was responsible for the internal network which was larger than the ARPANET/INTERNET from just about the beginning until sometime in the mid-80s. I attribute much of this because Ed included a form of gateway and distributed control in every node from the beginning. The ARPANET/INTERENET didn't get this until the great 1JAN1983 cutover to internetworking protocol. This replaced the tightly controlled, centrally administrated IMPs. At the 1JAN1983 cutover there was approx. 100 IMP network nodes (with approx. 255 connected hosts) at the same time the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes. Part of the IMP folklore from the early 80s was that the 100 tightly controlled IMPs would periodically totally saturate all the network links with administrative protocol chatter anytime there was any significant event (part of the requirement to cutover to internetworking protocol was that the existing IMP technology couldn't scale). posts mentioning internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

slightly related trivia, we were working with director of NSF on interconnecting the NSF supercomputer centers and were suppose to get $20M ... related to my HSDT project ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#hsdt

Then congress cut the budget and some number of other things happen, and finally they release RFP (largely based on stuff HSDT already had running). Internal politics prevents us from bidding. The director of NSF tries to help, writting the company a letter, copying the CEO ... but that just makes the internal politics worse. As regional neworks connect into these centers, it morphs into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to the modern internet. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
related article
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

The original mainframe TCP/IP product was implemented in VS/Pascal ... but had some throughput issues, getting 44kbytes/sec throughput ussing full 3090 processor. I did the enhancements to support RFC1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research between Cray and 4341, got sustained 4341 channel throughput using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed) ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

The communication group had tried all sorts of corporate dirty tricks to block the activities. The internal network was not-SNA ... but in the late 80s ... about the same time I was doing RFC1044 support, the communication group was applying intense corporate political pressure to convert the internal network to SNA.

The corporate sponsored university BITNET used the same technology as the internal network ... and then converted to TCP/IP. It would have been much more cost effective and efficient if the internal network converted to TCP/IP also ... instead of SNA. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

posts mentioning science center:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Dec 2015 00:05:07 -0800
jcewing@ACM.ORG (Joel C. Ewing) writes:
No (about the "free", not about the "dead for decades"), DOS/VS was the last really free base (last version Release 34?). Perhaps technically DOS/VSE was "free", as there didn't appear to be a monthly licensing charge for DOS/VSE itself (Computerworld, April 30, 1979, p4), but in the practical sense a production DOS/VSE system was definitely not free as there were monthly support charges for DOS/VSE and separate monthly licensing plus support charges for must-have VSE add-on components like VSE/Power and others. DOS/VSE came out with the IBM 4331 & 4341 processors in 1979 and supported running in both S/370 mode or the ECPS:VSE mode supported by the 4300 processor family.

various legal actions resulted in 23June1969 unbundling announcement where (application) software & other stuff started to be charged for (however they made the case the kernel software should still be free). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

during future system effort 370 efforts were being killed off (lack of 370 products there era is credited with clone processors market foothold). after future system failed ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

there was mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipeline. POK kick off 3033 (168 logic mapped to faster chips) and 3081/XA in parallel ... reference
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

XA had a lot of extensions tailored for MVS.

Endicott did something similar for e-architecture (4331 & 4341) tailored for vs1&dos. In large part a single virtual address space supported as part of the hardware architecture. Rather than having segment & page tables ... there were two new instructions that told the machine what virtual address was at what real address ... and invalidated the virtual address.

However there was an enormous explosion in vm/4300 sales (before announce, 4341s were referred to a "E4") ... which required multiple virtual address space ... which met that large number of 4300s ran in 370 mode rather than e-mode. Note that POK had convinced corporate to kill off the vm370 product and move all the development people to POK as part of MVS/XA development (including excuse that MVS/XA would ship on time, if they couldn't get the additional resources). Endicott manage to save the vm370 product mission, but had to reconstitute a development group from scratch. some old 4300 related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

Note that VS1 and VM/370 "ECPS" was different than e-machine architecture. It originated with the 138/148 (virgil/tully) ... where selected high use kernel/system instructions paths were implemented in microcode. The low & mid-range machine were vertical microcode machines with an avg of 10 native instructions per 370 instruction (somewhat analogous to mainframe emulators that run on Intel platforms). Kernel instruction paths tended to get 10:1 performance improvement when moved to microcode. I did the initial study and effort for the VM/370 ECPS ... old post with results for selecting pathlengths to be moved to microcode (I was told that I needed to select the 6kbytes of highest executed kernel instructions, which turned out to account of 80% of vm/370 kernel execution)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist

trivia ... the methodology for selecting the VS1 paths wasn't nearly so rigorous.

other trivia ... major motivation for Future System product was as countermeasure to clone controllers ... but the (failed) Future System effort contributed significantly to the rise of the clone processors. The threat of clone processors resulted in decision to transition to charging for system/kernel software. I continued to work on 370 stuff all during the FS period ... even periodically ridiculing FS stuff ... which wasn't exactly career enhancing. Also one of my hobbies was developing&supporting advanced enhanced operating systems for internal datacenters ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

In any case, the mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipeline contributed to decision to pick up various of my stuff and ship it in products for customers. One part of that stuff (dynamic adaptive resource manager) was selected to be guinea pig for starting to charge for system/kernel software ... and I had to spend some amount of time with lawyers & business types going over policies for system/kernel software charging.

even more trivia: when 3033 looked at doing something similar to ECPS ... it didn't work out as well. 3033 was horizontal microcode machine that had been optimized so it was executing nearly one 370 instruction per machine cycle. Directly dropping system/kernel 370 pathlengths into microcode could even result in running slower than the original 370.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Dec 2015 10:52:04 -0800
tony@VSE2PDF.COM (Tony Thigpen) writes:
The 4300 did not come out of Endicott. It was developed in Germany, in the same lab that developes DOS/VSE.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#104 DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z.

As an undergraduate I do lots of work on cp67 (including to run in 256kbyte machine). The morph of cp67 to vm370, did a lot of simplification of cp67 at the same time bloating the kernel size so performance was seriously impacting running in 256kbytes. Boeblingon does 115&125 ... and at one point I get dragged into optimizing vm370 to run on 256kbyte 125 customer machines.

boeblingon does 135 and 138. Then Boeblingon does 4331. Endicott had con'ed me into doing lots of work on 148, vm/370 ecps. At the same time I was helping Endicott with 148 vm370 ECPS, the 125 group also asked me to do the design and specification for a 5-way 125 SMP machine (which never shipped, it turns out the Endicott 148 people felt threaten that 5-way 125 multiprocessor would impact their market ... which put me in odd position since I was doing both).

Later was dragged into doing a lot of work with regard to 4341.

Across the street, the disk engineering group in bldg. 14 and the disk product test group in bldg. 15 dragged me into playing disk engineer ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

the product test group in bldg 15 would typically get the 3rd or 4th engineering model for doing disk i/o testing. they got the 3rd enginneering model of 3033 and very early E4 (4341) engineering machine for testing. Because I was doing so much stuff for them, I would get lots of time on bldg. 15 systems for other stuff I might want to do. The performance test marketing group in Endicott con'ed me into doing customer benchmarking on the bldg. 15 enginneering E4/4341 ... since I had bettter access to the machine ... than they had to early engineering machines in Endicott. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

email includes references that when the E4/4341 originally arrived in bldg. 15 ... it had the proceessor cycle slowed down (allowed machine to work as they refined the engineering) so that the benchmarks were not as good as they could be. Later as they refined the machine, they were able to crank down the processor cycle.

One of the benchmarks was for LLNL that was looking at getting 70 4341s for a compute farm (sort of the precursor to modern cluster, GRID and supercomputing). It showed 4341 was faster than 158&3031 and 4341 cluster was faster, cheaper, much less floor space and environmentals than 3033. The cluster 4341 threat to 3033 was so big that at one point, the head of POK got corporate to cut the allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component in half.

other trivia: circa 1980, there was plan to move the large variety of internal microprocessors to 801/RISC, including low&mid-range (vertical microcode) 370s, what was to be as/400, lots of controllers, etc. For various reasons that effort floundered and they continued with various CISC microprocessors. I helped somebody in endicott with white paper showing that VLSI was moving to the point, that large part of 370 could be implemented in silicon ... as opposed to having to be emulated ... which would be much faster & price/performance than pure emulation in 801/RISC (other side effect was that some number of 801/RISC engineers leave and go to work on RISC projects at other vendors).

Boeblingon does 4361 (4331 follow-on) and Endicott does 4381 (4341 follow-on) in CISC. IBM was expecting that 4361/4381 would continue the enormous 4331/4341 sales explosion, but by that time the mid-range market was starting to move to workstations and large PCs.

Previous posts mentions in the wake of the FS failure, there was mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipeline, this included 3033 (168 logic remap to faster chips) and 3081/xa kicked off at the same time
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

Turns out during the 3033 engineering period, I was also involved in a 16-way 370 SMP effort and we con'ed some of the 3033 processor engineers to work on it in their spare time. At first everybody thot it was really great effort, and then somebody tells the head of POK that it could be decades before MVS had effective 16-way support ... and he then invites some of us to never visit POK again ... and tells the 3033 processor engineers to stop being distracted by other activities. some SMP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

With the 3033 out the door, the 3033 processor engineers start work on trout1.5 (aka 3090, in parallel with ongoing 3081/xa) circa 1980. Part of the 3090 effort was to use 4331 as service processor running a highly modified version of vm370 release 6 ... and I periodically get dragged into that effort. The 3090 service processor eventually gets upgraded to pair of 4361s running highly modified version of vm370 release 6 ... a couple (later) old email references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#email861031
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#email861223

Early days of REXX (well before ships to customers), I wanted to demonstrate it wasn't just another pretty scripting language ... and chose to rewrite IPCS all in REXX as demonstration. At the time, IPCS was a enormous amount of assembler code. I set to rewrite IPCS all in REXX, with ten times the function and ten times the performance, working half time over three months. I finished early and so started doing library of automated analysis that would look for typical failure mode signatures.

I had expected that when REXX shipped to customers, my rewritten IPCS would also ship to customers (it was by then in use by nearly all internal datacenters and customer support PSRs). I did get permission to make presentations on my rewrite of IPCS at customer user group meetings (and within couple weeks, similar implementations started to appear at customer shops). In any case, the above 3092 (aka 4361) email references was about picking up my IPCS rewrite and shipping as part of standard 3092. Some past posts mentioning IPCS rewrite
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z.
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Dec 2015 12:01:07 -0800
other trivia

in the wake of FS and mad rush ... 303x was kicked off ... as mentioned 3033 was 168 logic remapped to 20% faster chips ... that happened to have ten times more circuits per chip. Using original 168 logic, 3033 would have been only 20% faster than 168 (aka 3.6mips). However, some specific logic rework to use the larger circuits per chip got it up to 50% faster than 168 (4.5mips).

158 manufacturing had been enormously automated ... somewhat like what they quote for incremental cost of an automobile rolling off the line. The 158 integrated channel microcode was used for the 303x channel director (158 engine w/o 370 microcode and with the integrated channel microcode). 3031 was two 158 engines, one with just the 370 microcode and a 2nd (channel director) with just just the integrated channel microcode. A 3032 is 168-3 reworked to use 303x channel director for external channels.

some benchmark numbers for LLNL ... looking at getting 70 4341s for computer farm (precursor to modern GRID, cloud, and supercomputers)
158 3031 4341

Rain 45.64 secs 37.03 secs 36.21 secs Rain4 43.90 secs 36.61 secs 36.13 secs

also times approx; 145 168-3 91 145 secs. 9.1 secs 6.77 secs


also had run in 35.77 on CDC6600. 158 370 was slower than 3031 because the (single) 158 engine was being shared between the 370 microcode and the integrated channel microcode (which ran even when channels were idle).

Part of the original morph from cp67 (and 360/67) to VM370 (multiple 370 models) was vm370 had table of supported 370 models ... with various model characteristics. As part of my moving from cp67 to vm370 ... old email reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

... I replaced the static table of supported 370 models with dynamic code to determaine the characteristics ... it made it much simpler to deploy a csc/vm production system to different machines (like engineering models) not included in the shipped static table of supported machines. some posts discussion work at the scientific center (why it was called csc/vm). some past scientific center posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

Later I transfer to San Jose research ... on the san jose plant site (accross the street from bldgs. 14&15) and csc/vm morphs into sjr/vm. Old 4341 email about engineering model processor cycle time includes reference to checking the DSPSL value ... which is one of my dynamically determined values ... old reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email790220

from my dynamic adaptive resource manager ... which was guinea pig for starting to charge for system/kernel software (customers referred to as "fair share" since the default resource management policy was "fair share") ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

then somebody leaks the benchmark numbers to the press ... and they initially try to blame me ... reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email790226

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

25 Years: How the Web began

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: 25 Years: How the Web began
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 2015 15:08:07 -0800
25 Years: How the Web began
http://www.zdnet.com/article/25-years-how-the-web-began/

First webserver in US was on (CERN sister lab) SLAC VM370 system
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml
and
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/firstpages.shtml

trivia: GML was invented at science center in 1969, a decade later it morphs into ISO standard SGML, and after another decade it morphs into HTML at CERN. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml
and science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

We were working with NSF director to interconnect the NSF supercomputer labs and were suppose to get $20M. Then congress cuts the budget, some number of other things happen, and finally NSF releases an RFP (based largely on what we already have running). Internal politics prevent us from bidding. The NSF director tries to help by writing the company a letter copying the CEO, but that just makes the internal politics worse. As regional networks connect into the sites, it morphs into the NSFNET backbone (precursor to the modern internet). some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

During part of this, the communication group was spreading internal misinformation about how they might be able to play. Somebody collects a lot of their email and forwards it to us ... small part, heavily snipped and redacted to protect the guilty:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

25 Years: How the Web began

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: 25 Years: How the Web began
Date: 21 Dec 2015
Blog: Facebook
25 Years: How the Web began
http://www.zdnet.com/article/25-years-how-the-web-began/

First webserver in US was on (CERN sister lab) SLAC VM370 system
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml
and
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/firstpages.shtml

trivia: GML was invented at science center in 1969, a decade later it morphs into ISO standard SGML, and after another decade it morphs into HTML at CERN. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml
and science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

We were working with NSF director to interconnect the NSF supercomputer labs and were suppose to get $20M. Then congress cuts the budget, some number of other things happen, and finally NSF releases an RFP (based largely on what we already have running). Internal politics prevent us from bidding. The NSF director tries to help by writing the company a letter copying the CEO, but that just makes the internal politics worse. As regional networks connect into the sites, it morphs into the NSFNET backbone (precursor to the modern internet). some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

During part of this, the communication group was spreading internal misinformation about how they might be able to play. Somebody collects a lot of their email and forwards it to us ... small part, heavily snipped and redacted to protect the guilty:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109

other trivia ... about co-worker from the science center:

It's Cool to Be Clever: The Story of Edson C. Hendricks, the Genius Who Invented the Design for the Internet
http://www.amazon.com/Its-Cool-Be-Clever-Hendricks/dp/1897435630/
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

Ed was responsible for the internal network which was larger than the ARPANET/INTERNET from just about the beginning until sometime in the mid-80s. I attribute much of this because Ed included a form of gateway and distributed control in every node from the beginning. The ARPANET/INTERENET didn't get this until the great 1JAN1983 cutover to internetworking protocol. This replaced the tightly controlled, centrally administrated IMPs. At the 1JAN1983 cutover there was approx. 100 IMP network nodes (with approx. 255 connected hosts) at the same time the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes. Part of the IMP folklore from the early 80s was that the 100 tightly controlled IMPs would periodically totally saturate all the network links with administrative protocol chatter anytime there was any significant event (part of the requirement to cutover to internetworking protocol was that the existing IMP technology couldn't scale).

slightly related trivia, we were working with director of NSF on interconnecting the NSF supercomputer centers and were suppose to get $20M ... related to my HSDT project ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#hsdt

The original mainframe TCP/IP product was implemented in VS/Pascal ... but had some throughput issues, getting 44kbytes/sec throughput ussing full 3090 processor. I did the enhancements to support RFC1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research between Cray and 4341, got sustained 4341 channel throughput using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed) ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

The communication group had tried all sorts of corporate dirty tricks to block the activities. The internal network was not-SNA ... but in the late 80s ... about the same time I was doing RFC1044 support, the communication group was applying intense corporate political pressure to convert the internal network to SNA. Then CJN meetings were restricted to managers only in this period (afraid that technical people might confuse the move to SNA with facts). Some old email:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#email870302
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#email870306

The corporate sponsored university BITNET used the same technology as the internal network ... and then converted to TCP/IP. It would have been much more cost effective and efficient if the internal network converted to TCP/IP also ... instead of SNA. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

PC/RT had done their own 4mbit T/R card. For the RS/6000 (w/microchannel), they were told that they had to use PS2 microchannel cards. The design point for the PS2 16mbit T/R cards was dumb terminal emulation with 300+ sharing same network (very low throughput per card). As a result a PC/RT server with 4mbit T/R card had higher throughput than RS/6000 with 16mbit T/R card. posts mentioning 801/risc, romp, rios, pc/rt, rs/6000, power, power/pc, etc.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

The new almaden bldg. was heavily wired with CAT5 assuming it would be used for 16mbit T/R ... however they found that 10mbit ethernet had higher per card throughput, and the network had higher aggregate network throughput and lower latency.

There was IBM report released in this time-frame showing ethernet throughput ... which I can only assume that they used original 3mbit prototype ethernet before listen before transmit. An ACM SIGCOMM paper about the same time showed typical 10mbit ethernet configuration getting 8mbit/sec effective throughput when all low driver software were put in loop continuously transmitting minimum sized packets.

In 1988, I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they had, which quickly becomes fibre-channel standard. Later some POK channel engineers become involved and they define a heavy-weight protocol for fibre-channel that drastically cuts the native throughput ... eventually released as FICON.

IBM has published a z196 peak I/O throughput that uses 104 FICON to get 2M IOPS. About the same time a fibre-channel is announced for E5-2600 blade claiming over 1M IOPS (i.e. two such fibre-channel have higher throughput than 104 FICON ... running over 104 fibre-channel). I have yet to see more recent reports done for z12 and z13. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

25 Years: How the Web began

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 25 Years: How the Web began
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 2015 10:12:47 -0800
hancock4 writes:
I remember Boardwatch magazine (and its opinionated editor). I think he was based in Columbine which later gained notoriety.

pagesat did satellite broadcast of usenet ... i got pagesat receiver for free in return doing ms/dos and a couple unix drivers for the pagesat receiver ... and co-authoring an (june '93) boardwatch article.

i ran waffle BBS on ms/dos machine with complete pagesat usenet feed.

picture of sat dish in backyard.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/pagesat.jpg

pagesat dish

a decade earlier ... in HSDT project
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

... which included TDMA satellite system ... had 4.5M dishes in the backyards of Yorktown Research on the east coast and Los Gatos Lab on the west coast ... and 7M dish at the Austin plant site.

other trivia ... "GML" was chosen because "G", "M", and "L" are last name first letter of former co-workers at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

some pagesat/boardwatch past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#38 Vanishing Posts...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#39 I'll Be! Al Gore DID Invent the Internet After All ! NOT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#66 UUCP email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005l.html#16 Newsgroups (Was Another OS/390 to z/OS 1.4 migration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#11 An Out-of-the-Main Activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#17 What if phone company had developed Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#16 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#19 IBM-MAIN longevity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#19 Another one bites the dust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#84 Anyone going to Supercomputers '09 in Portland?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#74 bulletin board
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#75 Posts missing from ibm-main on google groups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#92 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#26 Anyone here run UUCP?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#67 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#38 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#57 email security re: hotmail.com

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 Dec 2015 10:47:27 -0800
charlesm@MCN.ORG (Charles Mills) writes:
Not so simple anymore.

"How long does a store halfword take?" used to be a question that had an answer. It no longer does.

My working rule of thumb (admittedly grossly oversimplified) is "instructions take no time, storage references take forever." I have heard it said that storage is the new DASD. This is true so much that the z13 processors implement a kind of "internal multiprogramming" so that one CPU internal thread can do something useful while another thread is waiting for a storage reference.

Here is an example of how complex it is. I am responsible for an "event" or transaction driven program. I of course have test programs that will run events through the subject software. How many microseconds does each event consume? One surprising factor is how fast do you push the events through. If I max out the speed of event generation (as opposed to say, one event tenth of a second) then on a real-world shared Z the microseconds of CPU per event falls in HALF! Same exact sequence of instructions -- half the CPU time! Why? My presumption is that because if the program is running flat out it "owns" the caches and there is much less processor "wait" (for instruction and data fetch, not ECB type wait) time.


so such accounting measuring CPU time (elapsed instruction time) is analogous to early accounting which measured by elapsed wall clock time.

cache miss/memory access latency ... when measured in count of processor cycles is comparable to 60s disk access when measured in in count of 60s processor cycles.

There is lot of analogy between page thrashing when overcommitting real memory and cache misses. This is old account of motivation behind moving 370 to all virtual memory. The issue was that as processors got faster, they spent more and more time waiting for disk. To keep the processors busy, required increasing levels of multiprogramming to overlap execution with waiting on disk. At the time, MVT storage allocation was so bad that a region sizes needed to be four times larger than actually used. As a result, a typical 1mbyte 370/165 would only have four regions. Going to virtual memory, it would be possible to run 16 regions in a typical 1mbyte 370/165 with little or no paging ... significantly increasing aggregate throughput.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

risc has been doing cache miss compensation for decades, out-of-order execution, branch prediction, speculative execution, hyperthreading ... can be viewed as hardware analogy to 60s multitasking ... given the processor something else to do while waiting for cache miss. Decade or more ago, some of the other non-risc chips started moving to hardware layer that translated instructions into risc micro-ops for scheduling and execution ... largely mitigating performance difference between those CISC architectures and RISC.

IBM documentation claimed that half the per processor improvement from z10->z196 was the introduction of many of the features that have been common in risc implementation for decades ... with further refinement in ec12 and z13.
z10, 64processors, aggregate 30BIPS or 496MIPS/proc
z196, 80processors, aggregate 50BIPS or 625MIPS/proc
EC12, 101 processor, aggregate 75BIPS or 743MIPS/proc


however, z13 claims 30% more throughput than EC12 with 40% more processors ... which would make it 700MIPS/processor

by comparison z10 era E5-2600v1 blade was about 500 BIPS, 16 processors or 31BIPS/proce. E5-2600v4 blade is pushing 2000BIPS, 36 processors or 50BIPS/proc.

as an aside, 370/195 pipeline was doing out-of-order execution ... but didn't do branch prediction or speculative execution ... and conditional branch would drain the pipeline. careful coding could keep the execution units busy getting 10MIPS ... but normal codes typically ran around 5MIPS (because of conditional branches). I got sucked into helping with hyperthreading 370/195 (which never shipped), it would simulate two processors with two instructions streams, sets of registers, etc ... assuming two instruction streams, each running at 5MIPS would then keep all execution units running at 10MIPS.

from account of shutdown of ACS-360
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html
Sidebar: Multithreading

In summer 1968, Ed Sussenguth investigated making the ACS-360 into a multithreaded design by adding a second instruction counter and a second set of registers to the simulator. Instructions were tagged with an additional "red/blue" bit to designate the instruction stream and register set; and, as was expected, the utilization of the functional units increased since more independent instructions were available.

IBM patents and disclosures on multithreading include:

US Patent 3,728,692, J.W. Fennel, Jr., Instruction selection in a two-program counter instruction unit, filed August 1971, and issued April 1973.

US Patent 3,771,138, J.O. Celtruda, et al., Apparatus and method for serializing instructions from two independent instruction streams, filed August 1971, and issued November 1973. Note: John Earle is one of the inventors listed on the '138. "Multiple instruction stream uniprocessor," IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, January 1976, 2pp. [for S/370]


... snip ...

Note the next sidebar is ES/9000 ... containing many features from ACS-360 more than 20yrs later (Amdahl's account is that executives ended ACS-360 because it would advance state-of-the-art too fast and they would loose control of the market).

other trivia ... starting in the middle to late 70s, I started pontificting that relative system performance of disks were declining and by the early 80s, disk relative system performance had declined by a factor of 10 times (order of magnitude) over a period of 15 years (disks and gotten 3-5 times faster, but processors had gotten 50 times faster). Disk division executives took exception to my statements and assigned the division performance group to refute what I was saying. After several weeks they came back and effectively said that I had understated the problem. Their analysis was then respun into SHARE presentation (B874) on optimizing disk configurations for system throughput ... old reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#3
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#68

piece of my 15 year comparison ... 360/67 cp67 to 3081 vm/370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#31

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 Dec 2015 13:42:05 -0800
mike.a.schwab@GMAIL.COM (Mike Schwab) writes:
If branch predicting is a big hang up, the obvious solution is to start processing all possible outcomes then keep the one that is actually taken. I. E. B OUTCOME(R15) where R15 is a return code of 0,4,8,12,16.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#110 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

aka, speculative execution ... instructions executed on path ... that is not actually taken ... are not committed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speculative_execution
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speculative_execution#Eager_execution

Eager execution is a form of speculative execution where both sides of the conditional branch are executed; however, the results are committed only if the predicate is true. With unlimited resources, eager execution (also known as oracle execution) would in theory provide the same performance as perfect branch prediction. With limited resources eager execution should be employed carefully since the number of resources needed grows exponentially with each level of branches executed eagerly.[7]

... snip ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eager_evaluation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 2015 14:11:46 -0800
JO.Skip.Robinson@ATT.NET (Skip Robinson) writes:
'What a programmer is supposed to do' is avoid stupid code. We were once tasked with finding the bottleneck in a fairly mundane VSAM application. It ran horribly, consuming scads of both CPU and wall clock. It didn't take long using an OTS product to discover that for every single I/O, the cluster was being opened and closed again even though nothing else happened in the meantime. Simply changing that logic slashed resource utilization.

In another case, we were on the verge of upgrading a CEC when the application folks themselves discovered a few grossly inefficient SQL calls. Fixing those calls dropped overall LPAR utilization dramatically.

What Tom and I are both saying is that focus on instruction timing should be seen as more of an avocation than a serious professional pursuit. Like playing with model trains at the expense of improving actual rail systems. It's interesting, but not much real business depends on the outcome.


the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

pioneered a lot of early performance technology, activity monitoring (multiple regssion analysis and workload profiling) sampling for hot-spot analysis, analytical modeling, algorithm simulation, etc ... some of it eventually evolving into capacity planning.

one of the science center's APL-based analytical modeling was packaged on the HONE system (vm370/cms based online internal world-wide sales and marketing support)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

as "Peformance Predictor". Customer support people could gather system details and provide activity profile information to the Peformance Predictor and then asked questions about what will happen if additional hardware was added or workload changed.

In the wake of corporate troubles of the early 90s, the company unloaded a lot of resources (for instance, internal VLSI design tools were given to outside company that specialized in selling such tools).

There was somebody that had acquired the rights to a descendant of the Performance Predictor and had ran it through an APL->C langugage convertor ... and used it for succesful performance consulting career. Around the turn of the century, I ran into him at a large datacenter that had 40+ max. configured ibm mainframe systems. The number of systems were sized to be able to do financial transaction settlement in the overnight batch window ... all running a 450k statement COBOL application.

The COBOL application had evolved over a couple decades and was under the care of a large performance group that was constantly doing hot-spot sampling and optimizing hotspots. The performance predictor descendant was being used for identifying more global issues ... which resulted in about 7% improvement (on an already enormously optimized application).

I voluntered to do multiple regression analysis on higher level activity data. This found a certain activity was accounting for 20+ percent processor use. Looking at it closer, they realized that it was invoking a certain very expensive process three times ... when it only needed to be invoked once ... correcting that resulted in 14% improvement

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#50 Where can you get a Minor in Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#20 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#21 Distributed Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#24 Job ad for z/OS systems programmer trainee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#73 Price of CPU seconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#81 Intel: an expensive many-core future is ahead of us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#5 Why do IBMers think disks are 'Direct Access'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#76 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#55 Cobol hits 50 and keeps counting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#20 IBM forecasts 'new world order' for financial services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#35 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#32 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#25 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#45 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#83 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#78 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#65 A New Performance Model ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 Dec 2015 18:01:28 -0800
rpinion@NETSCAPE.COM (Richard Pinion) writes:
Don't use zoned decimal for subscripts or counters, rather use indexes for subscripts and binary for counter type variables. And when using conditional branching, try to code so as to make the branch the exception rather than the rule. For large table lookups, use a binary search as opposed to a sequential search.

These simple coding techniques can also reduce CPU time.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#110 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#111 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#112 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

in late 70s we would have friday nights after work ... and discuss a number of things ... along the lines of what came up in tandem memos ... aka I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s) in the late 70s and early 80. folklore is that when the corporate executive committee were told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. from IBMJARGON:

[Tandem Memos] n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). "That's another Tandem Memos." A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticized the way products were [are] developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

one of the issues was that the majority of the people inside the company didn't actually use computers ... and we thot things would be be improved if the people in the company actually had personal experience using computers, especially managers and executives. So we eventually came up with the idea of online telephone books ... of (nearly) everybody in the corporation ... especially if lookup elapsed time was less than look up of paper telephone book.

avg binary search of 256k is 18 ... aka 2*18. Also important was there were nearly 64 entries in physical block ... so binary search to the correct physical block is 12 reads (i.e. 64 is 2**6, 18-6=12).

However, it is fairly easy to calculate the name letter frequency ... so instead of doing binary search, do radix search (based on letter frequency) and can get within the correct physical block within 1-3 physical reads (instead of 12). We also got fancy doing first two letter frequency and partially adjusting 2nd probe, based on how accurate the first probe was. In any case, binary search for totally unknown distribution characteristics.

So one friday night, we established the criteria, to design, implement, test and deploy the lookup program had to take less than a person week of effort ... and less than another person week to design, implement, test and deploy the process for collecting, formating and distributing the online telephone books.

trivia ... long ago and far away ... a couple people I had worked with at Oracle (when I was at IBM and working on cluster scaleup for HA/CMP), had left and were at small client/server responsible for something called commerce server. After cluster scaleup was transferred, announced as IBM supercomputer, and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors ... we decide to leave. We are then brought in as consultants at this small client/server startup because they want to do payment transactions on the server, the startup had also invented this technology called SSL they want to use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce".

TCP/IP protocol has session termination process that includes something called FINWAIT list. At the time, session termination was relative infrequent process and common TCP/IP implementations used a sequential search of the FINWAIT list (assuming that there would be few or none entries on the list). HTTP (& HTTPS) implementation chose to use TCP ... even tho it is a datagram protocol rather than a session protocol. There was period in the early/mid 90s as web use was scaling up where webservers saturated spending 90-95% of cpu time doing FINWAIT list searches .... before the various implementations were upgraded to do significantly more efficient management of FINWAIT (session termination) process.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Between CISC and RISC

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Between CISC and RISC
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Sat, 26 Dec 2015 16:18:29 -0800
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Of course, I do recall that the heat wall was why Intel went back to a Pentium III-esque design in the Core series... and why we don't have things that go over 4 GHz these days. Except for IBM's 5 GHz mainframe chip!

IBM can throw lots of cooling & power at it ... also big cloud chip customers are more&more looking for energy/instruction

and as an aside:
z10, 64processors, aggregate 30BIPS or 496MIPS/proc
z196, 80processors, aggregate 50BIPS or 625MIPS/proc
EC12, 101 processor, aggregate 75BIPS or 743MIPS/proc


however, recent z13 claims 30% more throughput than EC12 with 40% more processors ... which would make it 700MIPS/processor

z10 era E5-2600v1 blade can be over 500 BIPS, 16 processors or 30BIPS/proc. more recent E5-2600v4 blade is pushing 2000BIPS, 36 processors or 50BIPS/proc.

recent posts mentioning z196/ec12/z13 and/or e5-2600:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#33 Why on Earth Is IBM Still Making Mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#35 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#36 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#39 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#40 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#43 z13 "new"(?) characteristics from RedBook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#46 Why on Earth Is IBM Still Making Mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#78 Is there an Inventory of the Inalled Mainframe Systems Worldwide
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#82 Is there an Inventory of the Installed Mainframe Systems Worldwide
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#56 New Principles of Operation (and Vector Facility for z/Architecture)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#29 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#30 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#31 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#36 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#69 A New Performance Model ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#93 HONE Shutdown
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#39 Remember 3277?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#14 Clone Controllers and Channel Extenders
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#0 What are some of your thoughts on future of mainframe in terms of Big Data?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#5 Can you have a robust IT system that needs experts to run it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#35 Moving to the Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#83 Miniskirts and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#93 Miniskirts and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#19 Linux Foundation Launches Open Mainframe Project
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#42 20 Things Incoming College Freshmen Will Never Understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#83 Term "Open Systems" (as Sometimes Currently Used) is Dead -- Who's with Me?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#93 HP being sued, not by IBM.....yet!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#96 TCP joke
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#2 More "ageing mainframe" (bad) press
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#81 IBM Automatic (COBOL) Binary Optimizer Now Availabile
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#108 25 Years: How the Web began
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#110 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Source, was: 25 Years: How the Web began

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Source, was: 25 Years: How the Web began
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 27 Dec 2015 12:53:01 -0800
danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> writes:
The Source, at least when I was a customer, used "Prime" somethings. No idea what..

They offered UPI news access as well as the Online Airline Guide.


I've mentioned before that a couple of people we had worked with at Oracle on cluster scaleup ... mentioned in this Jan1992 meeting in Ellison's conference room
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

later have left and show up at small client/server startup responsible for soemthing called commerce server. A few weeks after that meeting, cluster scaleup is transferred, announced as IBM supercomputer and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors .. and we decide to leave. Later we are brought in as consultants at the small client/server startup because they want to do payment transactions (on the "commerce server"), the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they want to use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce".

They had moved into facility on middlefield road at the "T" with Ellis street. We are also brought in to talk about "electronic commerce" with "connect, inc" which is part way down Ellis st (towards 101). They had online service that was based on massive amount of code on top of oracle ... where they added http&https support in relative short period of time.

There is something in the back of my mind that they used a lot of Prime computers ... but I can't find a reference at the moment. from long ago and far away ...
Connect, Inc. is the first company to develop and market flexible and scalable integrated online server software solutions. With nine years of online experience, the company is at the forefront of providing high-end software and services for Fortune-class enterprises wishing to conduct complex business transactions securely on the Internet or other data networks. CONNECT is a private company, founded in 1987 and headquartered in Mountain View, Calif. For more information, telephone 1-800-262-2638 or access the CONNECT World Wide Web site at
http://www.connectinc.com. -0-


... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 27 Dec 2015 13:21:21 -0800
shmuel+ibm-main@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
We ran more than that, plus TSO, on a 2 MiB machine.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#110 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#111 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#112 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#113 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

IBM executives were looking at 370/165 ... where typical customer had 1mbyte ... in part because 165 real memory was very expensive ... and typical regions were such that they only got four in 1mbytes (after system real storage requirement)

later, newer memory for 370/168 was less expensive ... and started to see four mbytes as much more common ... aka four mbytes as 370/165 would have met that typical MVT customer could have gotten 16 regions ... w/o having to resort to virtual memory ... but the decision had already been made.

basical initial transtion os/mvt to os/vs2 svs was MVT laid out in single 16mbyte virtual address space ... and little bit of code to build the segement/page tables and handle page faults. The biggest code hit was adding channel program translation in EXCP ... code initially copied from CP67 CCWTRANS channel program translation.

prior reference/discssion to justification for 370 virutal memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

later transition to os/vs2 MVS with multiple virtual address spaces ... had other problems. The os/360 MVT heritage was heavily based on pointer passing API paradigm ... and with move to MVS. The first pointer passing ... was put an 8mbyte image of the MVT kernel into every application virtual address space ... leaving only 8mbytes (out of 16) for application use. Then because of subsystems were now in their own (different) virtual address space ... needed a way for passing parameters & data back and forth between applications and subsystems using pointer passing API. The result was "common segment" ... a one mbyte area that also appeared in every virtual address space .... which could be used to pass arguments/data back&forth between applications and subsystems (leaving only 7mbytes for applications). The next issue was demand for common segment was somewhat proportional to number of concurrent applications and subsystems ... so the common segment area became common system area (CSA) as requirements exceeded 1mbytes. Into the 3033 area, larger operations were pushing CSA to 4&5 mbytes and threatening to push it to 8mbytes ... leaving no space at all for application (of course with MVS kernel at 8mbytes and CSA at 8mbytes, there wouldn't be any left for applications ... which drops the demand for CSA to zero).

Part of the solution to address the OS/360 MVT pointer passing API problem was included in the original XA architecture (later referred to 811 ... because documents dated Nov1978) were access registers ... and ability to address/access multiple address spaces. To try and alleviate the CSA explosion in 3033 time-frame ... a subset of access registers was retrofitted to 3033 as dual-address space mode ... but it provide only limited help since it still required updating all the subsystems to support dual-address space mode (instead of CSA).

trivia: the person responsible for retrofitting dual-access to 3033 ... later leaves IBM for another vendor and later shows up as one of the people behind HP Snake and later Itanium.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

25 Years: How the Web began

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 25 Years: How the Web began
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Dec 2015 08:24:17 -0800
hancock4 writes:
We forget that many on-line systems of the 1960s required terse command strings with position dependent operands. This was necessary to hold down connect time, CPU time, and memory in interpreting user requests. That kind of stuff was way too terse for occasional lay users.

in the mid-90s, we were asked by the largest airline res system at redoing parts of their system. I went away (with copy of the full official airline guide) and came back 2months later with an implementation for ROUTES (finding the flts that got from ptA to ptB, about 1/4th of system utilization).

at the time, standard reservation terminal interface had changed little from the 60s, numerous extremely terse character sequences with manual effort to tie the sequence all together. It ran about 100 times faster and could handle all airlines for all flts for everybody in the world ... which none of the existing implementations could handle ... with a lot of additional features (to handle the whole worlds load would run on ten rs/6000 990s ... a decade later, would fit on cellphone).

Part of the issue, was that the design of existing implementation hadn't changed since the 60s ... with various kinds of trade-offs made at that time. Starting from scratch, with 30yrs advances, could make totally different set of trade-offs. One of the differences, was existing implementations had trouble where more than two connecting flts were required. New implementation could handle any number of connecting flts necessary to get between any two points on the planet.

Also demo'ed a newer user interface ... that collapsed three separate arcane interactions into single transaction that would return significantly more information ... which could be sorted by various criteria. Could even display map of the flt(s), overlayed with current weather conditions.

some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#17 Old Computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#100 Why won't the AS/400 die? Or, It's 1999 why do I have to learn how to use
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#103 IBM 9020 computers used by FAA (was Re: EPO stories (was: HELP IT'S HOT!!!!!))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#136a checks (was S/390 on PowerPC?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#20 Competitors to SABRE?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#26 Disk caching and file systems. Disk history...people forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#69 Block oriented I/O over IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#45 Did AT&T offer Unix to Digital Equipment in the 70s?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#49 Did AT&T offer Unix to Digital Equipment in the 70s?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#17 I hate Compaq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#0 TSS/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#3 News IBM loses supercomputer crown
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#2 Computers in Science Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#3 Why are Mainframe Computers really still in use at all?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#12 Why did OSI fail compared with TCP-IP?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#43 IBM doing anything for 50th Anniv?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#83 HONE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#83 Summary: Robots of Doom
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#67 Tweaking old computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#48 InfiniBand Group Sharply, Evenly Divided
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#30 diffence between itanium and alpha
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#67 unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#3 Ping: Anne & Lynn Wheeler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#47 What makes a mainframe a mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#6 Mainframe not a good architecture for interactive workloads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#44 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#58 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#14 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#6 Xah Lee's Unixism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#23 Demo: Things in Hierarchies (w/o RM/SQL)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#29 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#26 IBM 3614 and 3624 ATM's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#85 The TransRelational Model: Performance Concerns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#22 The Soul of Barb's New Machine (was Re: creat)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#41 something like a CTC on a PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#67 intel's Vanderpool and virtualization in general
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#47 Using the Cache to Change the Width of Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#22 System/360; Hardwired vs. Microcoded
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#44 What was new&important in computer architecture 10 years ago ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#44 Intel engineer discusses their dual-core design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#7 HASP/ASP JES/JES2/JES3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#5 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#6 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#9 Arpa address
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#4 How Many 360/195s and 370/195s were shipped?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#18 RAMAC 305(?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#18 50th Anniversary of invention of disk drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#52 US Air computers delay psgrs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#22 Bidirectional Binary Self-Joins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#41 US Airways badmouths legacy system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#41 Fast and Safe C Strings: User friendly C macros to Declare and use C Strings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#28 Even worse than UNIX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#72 The top 10 dead (or dying) computer skills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#8 nouns and adjectives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#45 64 gig memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#53 Migration from Mainframe to othre platforms - the othe bell?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#19 American Airlines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#32 CLIs and GUIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#41 Automation is still not accepted to streamline the business processes... why organizations are not accepting newer technologies?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#33 IBM touts encryption innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#55 IBM halves mainframe Linux engine prices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#66 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#73 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#74 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#80 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#19 Processes' memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#52 Article says mainframe most cost-efficient platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#42 IBM 3883 Manuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#16 Sabre Talk Information?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#81 Hashing for DISTINCT or GROUP BY in SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#17 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#42 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#14 Sabre; The First Online Reservation System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#43 Sabre; The First Online Reservation System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#8 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#77 program coding pads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#35 Last Word on Dennis Ritchie
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#92 Innovation and iconoclasm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#8 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#70 Disruptive Thinkers: Defining the Problem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#7 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#23 How to Stuff a Wild Duck
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#50 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#16 System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#59 history of Programming language and CPU in relation to each
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#13 Should you support or abandon the 3270 as a User Interface?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#1 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#7 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#52 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#65 Linear search vs. Binary search
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#87 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#0 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#20 Write Inhibit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#10 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#54 Has the last fighter pilot been born?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#101 Costs of core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#53 transactions, was There Is Still Hope
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#84 History--error checking in Baudot (5 bit) transmissions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#34 50th/60th anniversary of SABRE--real-time airline reservations computer system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#41 50th/60th anniversary of SABRE--real-time airline reservations computer system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#54 RR songs, was Re: e50th/60th anniversary of SABRE--real-time airline reservations computer system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#57 RR songs, was Re: e50th/60th anniversary of SABRE--real-time airline reservations computer system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#58 RR songs, was Re: e50th/60th anniversary of SABRE--real-time airline reservations computer system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#29 Power grid groans, blackouts roll through L.A. area as heat wave nears peak
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#29 IBM 1401 emulation on 360 processors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#69 RR songs, was Re: e50th/60th anniversary of SABRE--real-time airline reservations computer system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#75 How Russia's S-400 makes the F-35 obsolete
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#107 crash, restart, and all that, was Your earliest dream?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#84 ACP/TPF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#5 Can you have a robust IT system that needs experts to run it?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

25 Years: How the Web began

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 25 Years: How the Web began
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Dec 2015 13:35:12 -0800
hancock4 writes:
The long term trend of technology has been to make things simpler for operators; to improve accuracy and speed.

For instance, the Bell System introduced a new switchboard using pushbuttons with automated actions, instead of lever keys and manual action. One objective was to make it easier for occasional operators to work the switchboard, who wouldn't need as much training in the nuances that older boards required.


we've had a lot of discussions in the past about operating computers analogous to driving cars ... now we are getting operator-less cars ... some silicon valley people have been quoted it is more like riding a horse ... i.e. the horse handles a lot of the mechanics.

in the late 90s, we periodically stopped by to talk to person responsible for the largest financial transaction system ... which happened to still run on mainframes. He would claim that its 100% availability for several years were due to

1) (triple-replicated) IMS hot-standy ... at geographically separated locations 2) automated operator (eliminated human mistakes)

this corresponds to Jim Gray's study from the early 80s ... about service outages had shifted away from hardware failures (as hardware became much more reliable). ref
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#71 High Availabilty on S/390
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#107 Computer History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#128 Examples of non-relational databases
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#136a checks (was S/390 on PowerPC?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#22 Computer of the century
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#12 Amdahl Exits Mainframe Market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#43 Life as a programmer--1960, 1965?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#13 LINUS for S/390
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#70 Pentium 4 Prefetch engine?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#71 Pentium 4 Prefetch engine?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#44 Where are IBM z390 SPECint2000 results?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#47 Where are IBM z390 SPECint2000 results?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#8 VM: checking some myths.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#13 HP-UX will not be ported to Alpha (no surprise)exit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#14 HP-UX will not be ported to Alpha (no surprise)exit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#18 HP-UX will not be ported to Alpha (no surprise)exit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#47 five-nines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#47 Sysplex Info
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#85 The demise of compaq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#24 Buffer overflow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#68 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#73 Where did text file line ending characters begin?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#62 Itanium2 performance data from SGI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#27 why does wait state exist?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#14 Home mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#54 Newbie: Two quesions about mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#37 Calculating expected reliability for designed system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#3 Disk capacity and backup solutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#56 The figures of merit that make mainframes worth the price
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#60 The figures of merit that make mainframes worth the price
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#27 instant messaging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#22 foundations of relational theory? - some references for the
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#45 hung/zombie users ... long boring, wandering story
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004.html#40 AMD/Linux vs Intel/Microsoft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#48 Automating secure transactions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#46 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#75 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#53 8086 memory space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#59 8086 memory space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#7 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#9 intel's Vanderpool and virtualization in general (was Re: Cell press release, redacted.)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#60 Ancient history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#52 Cluster computing drawbacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#30 auto reIPL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#37 Mainframe Applications and Records Keeping?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#2 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#30 Why so little parallelism?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#16 intersection between autolog command and cmsback (more history)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#16 Attractive Alternatives to Mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#56 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#76 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#44 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#10 The top 10 dead (or dying) computer skills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#40 windows time service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#11 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#88 Annoying Processor Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#7 Annoying Processor Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#17 Does anyone have any IT data center disaster stories?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#64 Crippleware: hardware examples
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#76 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#5 Privacy, Identity theft, account fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#75 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#4 Why do IBMers think disks are 'Direct Access'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#1 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#15 Confessions of a Cobol programmer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#0 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#28 Check out Computer glitch to cause flight delays across U.S. - MarketWatch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#20 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#25 Was VM ever used as an exokernel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#4 Did a mainframe glitch trigger DBS Bank outage?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#55 Mainframe Hacking -- Fact or Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#69 No command, and control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#0 Mainframe technology in 2011 and beyond; who is going to run these Mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#93 Itanium at ISSCC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#4 Cool Things You Can Do in z/OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#6 New job for mainframes: Cloud platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#3 Banks Face Ongoing Cyber Threats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#16 How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#27 RBS Mainframe Meltdown: A year on, the fallout is still coming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#23 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#48 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#93 Costs of core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#19 weird trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#54 Why you need batch cloud computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#113 How Much Bandwidth do we have?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#59 Why major financial institutions are growing their use of mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#99 PROFS & GML

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 29 Dec 2015 09:50:57 -0800
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
To win in an invasion situation you frequently need to fight 3:1 So the Allies would have needed an army of 3 * 400 000 = 1 200 000 men to displace them.

Those 400 000 German soldiers and their weapons could have made a big difference around Moscow or in France. Using a few parachute jumps and radio messages to neutralise them was cheap.


from recent on going "misson command" (auftragstaktik) discussions
Logistics and industrial capability wins in state on state wars. On D Day (6 Jun) the US alone flew over 3,000 sorties the Germans could only manage 150. The famous debrief of a German anti-tank commander when captured at Normandy when asked how he came to be captured, his answer was he ran out of anti-tank shells before the americans ran out of tanks.

....

Massive overwhelming resources and willingness to fight a war of attrition (whether or not it is called a strategy) can offset otherwise significant strategic and tactical shortcomings. One of Roosevelt stories was reference to Churchill wanting to postpone D-Day another year or two while Germany&Russia further exhausted each other on the eastern front (3/4 of german military resources were used against Russia) ... but Roosevelt didn't believe the American public would stand for the war continuing into 1947. Current version is how the military-industrial complex manages American public opinion for a war that continues forever.

perpetual war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war
military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

From Guderian's Panzer Leader, loc2902-3:
Hitler then said: 'If I had known that the figures for Russian tank strength which you gave in your book were in fact the true ones, I would not--I believe--ever have started this war.'

loc2903-6:
He was referring to my book Achtung! Panzer!, published in 1937, in which I had estimated Russian tank strength at that time as 10,000; both the Chief of the Army General Staff, Beck, and the censor had disagreed with this statement. It had cost me a lot of trouble to get that figure printed; but I had been able to show that intelligence reports at the time spoke of 17,000 Russian tanks and that my estimate was therefore, if anything, a very conservative one.

loc2262-64:
At this time our yearly tank production scarcely amounted to more than 1,000 of all types. In view of our enemies' production figures this was very small. As far back as 1933 I had visited a single Russian tank factory which was producing 22 tanks per day of the Christie-Russki type.

... snip ...

Even John Forster Dulles significant role in rebuilding German economy and their military industry wasn't able to overcome; John Foster Dulles; The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War, loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc905-7:
was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism

... snip ...

In 1943, when US Strategic Bombing program was looking for location and detailed description of German military targets, they got them from wallstreet (1/3 of US WW2 spending went to strategic bombing).

recent references to US Strategic Bombing Program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#13 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#52 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#69 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#77 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#79 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#82 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#83 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#0 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#28 Kill Chain: The Rise of High Tech Assassins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#61 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#62 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#63 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#64 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#70 God No, the U.S. Air Force Doesn't Need Another Curtis LeMay
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#76 Your earliest dream?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#89 Your earliest dream?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#13 Fully Restored WWII Fighter Plane Up for Auction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#37 End of vacuum tubes in computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#52 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#54 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#77 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#81 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#55 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#63 [Poll] Computing favorities

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 29 Dec 2015 12:23:33 -0800
hancock4 writes:
Another fear of the US and England was that the Soviet Union would accept a negotiated surrender with Germany, freeing all German resources to fight on the west. The invasion had to go on in 1944, ready or not. In hindsight, it was good that they delayed until then as the Allies simply weren't sufficiently ady in 1943.

one of the delaying factors for D-day was Churchill had diverted landing boats to further east ... which US believed as pure side-show. They had to wait for additional landing boats to be built for the normandy invasion ... and there still wasn't the necessary resources for Marseille. The "ready" references are in part US learning to fight germans in Africa ... but they could have also learned to fight germans in Europe ... and things would have gone much faster. Part of Churchill's references was concern for English position in the middle east and the flow of resources it extracted from the area (somewhat obfuscating those issues with whether the US was really ready)

this continues after the war, last week was news item that CIA had disclassified its overthrow of the elected government in Iran (which was starting to oppose British looting the country) and reinstated the Shah (which backed British looting the country, in return for backing his staying in power))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#70 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?

... also US having said that they would invade in 42, then 43, but delayed until summer 44 ... the Marshall book has Eisonhower wanting to take Marseille the same time as Normandy invasion ("Anvil") ... but those resources were diverted further east. As a result Allied operations almost came to dead stop until they eventually got around to taking Marseille (port large enough to handle the volume of supplies required by the Allied effort). recent references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#79 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#84 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#54 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#62 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?

strategic bombing program (1/3rd of US WW2 resources) was not as effective as claims before, then or since. Also strategic bombing command insisted that no long range fighters were needed ... everything went into building large strategic bombers. British comment is that the US failed to learn anything from the German bombing of england where German figther escort was critical. The US strategic bomber command learned the hard way that long range figthers were needed.

One of other issues was heavy strategic bombers had responsible for Omaha while medium bombers had responsibility for Utah beach bombing. "The European Campaign: Its Origins and Conduct" loc2582-85:
The bomber preparation of Omaha Beach was a total failure, and German defenses on Omaha Beach were intact as American troops came ashore. At Utah Beach, the bombers were a little more effective because the IXth Bomber Command was using B-26 medium bombers. Wisely, in preparation for supporting the invasion, maintenance crews removed Norden bombsights from the bombers and installed the more effective low-level altitude sights.54

... snip ...

Previous post that US mounted 3,000 sorties on D-day versus 150 for the Germans ... that is just raw numbers ... not taking into account how many of the US 3,000 sorties were effective.

recent posts mention Norden bomb-sight:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#53 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#79 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#82 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#62 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#13 Fully Restored WWII Fighter Plane Up for Auction

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 29 Dec 2015 17:18:23 -0800
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
As a major ally of Germany Italy had to be fought even if the USA was not interested.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#120 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

lots of jokes about quality of italian troops in ww2 ... most of the stories i've seen about battles in italy/sicily were with german troops in well entrenched positions.

would have better off using resources to take Marseillie early as the major supply depot ... and then isolating the entrenched german troops in italy ... rather than frontal assaults ... more like island skipping scenario for pacific ... ignore isolated islands where the enemy has no naval or aerial offensive capabilty.

Roosevelt/Marshall have a line about giving priority to European theater ... that Germany could continue w/o Japan, but Japan couldn't continue w/o Germany (similar italy couldn't continue w/o Germany).

"General of the Army: George C. Marshall, Soldier and Statesman", pg440/loc9282-85:
But because of the landing craft shortage and the Anzio landings, the date of ANVIL had slipped steadily. Anzio stalemated and LSTs ticketed for OVERLORD still resupplying the beachhead, Eisenhower suggested in late January that ANVIL be canceled.

pg440/loc9285-87:
Marshall was irritated. The Combined Chiefs had agreed just weeks before that a seven-division assault in Normandy and a two-division landing in the south of France were possible on May 31 with the available reserves of landing craft. Yet once more, it seemed, no agreement was binding.

pg441/loc9310-12:
The Anzio breakout and the fall of Rome on June 4 settled nothing. While the Americans saw the capture of Rome as the end of the Italian campaign, Churchill and Brooke instead argued the German retreat opened unforeseen opportunities for new attacks toward Florence and the north.

... snip ...

and "The Wars for Asia, 1911-1949", loc4559-63:
When war began, Russian not British or U.S. armies bore the brunt of Germany's land forces. In the initial German invasion, Russia faced 142 Axis divisions, 20 percent more than the 119 divisions that overran France.233 During the Normandy landings, when the United States and Britain finally conducted a cross-channel invasion of the European continent, they faced only 58 Axis divisions compared to the 228 divisions then deployed against Russia on the Eastern Front.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2015 09:23:01 -0800
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
So called "high level negotiations" are scary. Look at photos of Putin, Netanyahu and Obama. Which one would you rather have doing your negotiations for you? I don't even know the name of the Chinese guy but I would guess he could be added to the mix without changing anything. Being belligerent is not a good way to get elected President of the USA.

There was recent news article on the web that Bush canceled plans to visit Europe because he is threaten with being arrested as war criminal over invasion of iraq.

This is followed by news article on the web that Obama campaigned on extracting us from these continuous wars ... and has yet to do it

The original relative stable regions prior to 9/11, the interventions last decade have significantly increased anarchy including spreading to additional regions. 2010 estimates that the bill for two invasions will hit $5T when long term veterens benefits are taken into account (part of original selling the invasions were claims it would cost only $50B ... two orders of magnitude less) ... of course the cost of taking care of veterens are now starting to impact the flow of funds into military-industrial complex (part of the news about charging VA executives for maniputling VA performance statistics is obfuscation and misdirection from the fact that congress enormously underfunded the VA, which is at the root of the service problems) ... and increased lobbying pressure on congress to not sacrifice MICC funds for taking care of veterens.

military-industrial(-congressional) complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

then there is, "is Harvard responsible for the rise of Putin" aka turns out rather than promoting Russian capitalism, they were there promoting our captilism looting of victim countries

John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html
How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html
Russian Military Politics and Russia's 2010 Defense Doctrine
http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1050

long tradition of our capitalism looting victim countries ...

channeling "War is a Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket
and "Economic Hit Man"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessions_of_an_Economic_Hit_Man

perpetual war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#1 do you blame Harvard for Puten
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#4 Pay Any Price: Greed, Power, and Endless War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#5 Swiss Leaks lifts the veil on a secretive banking system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#8 Shoot Bank Of America Now---The Case For Super Glass-Steagall Is Overwhelming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#13 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#3 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#7 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#11 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#14 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#55 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM retirement fund

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: IBM retirement fund
Date: 30 Dec 2015
Blog: Facebook
president of AMEX is in competition to be the next CEO and wins (the looser leaves taking his protegee and goes to Baltimore, taking over what has been described as loan sharking business). AMEX is in competition with KKR for private-equity take-over of RJR and KKR wins. KKR then runs into trouble with RJR and hires away the AMEX president to turn around RJR.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

IBM has gone into the red and is in the process of being broken up into the 13 "baby blues". The board then hires away the former president of AMEX to reverse the breakup and resurrect IBM. Uses some of same techniques at IBM that had been used at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

Later the former president of AMEX leaves IBM and becomes head of another large private-equity company which does LBO (among others) of company that will employ Snowden:
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower. They're not going away any time soon unless the CIA and NSA want to start over and with some off-the-shelf laptops, networked by the Geek Squad from Best Buy. Security clearances used to be a government function too, but are now a profit center for various private-equity subsidiaries.

... snip ...

especially when they get paid for doing background checks but just fillout paperwork and skip the checks.

account of how private-equity turned LBO into similar to house flipping, except the loan stays with the company when it sells; they can even sell for much less than they paid and still walk away with boatloads of money (major factor in spike in corporate defaults).
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

companies in the private-equity mill are under enormous pressure to generate money every way possible (including the security clearance companies just doing paperwork and skipping actually doing any checking). there has been long standing revolving door between gov and beltway bandits and/or wallstreet ... example is recent CIA director resigned in disgrace including slap on the wrist for leaking classified documents ... joins KKR.

private-equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

The looser for AMEX CEO (and protegee) makes some numberr of other acquisitions, eventually acquiring CITIBANK in violation of Glass-Steagall; Greenspan gives them an exemption while they lobby DC for the repeal of Glass-Steagall (enabling too-big-to-fail ... which also results in too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-to-jail ... effective immunity for wide range of illegal activities). The protegee then leaves and becomes CEO of one of the other (big4) too-big-to-fail.

too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Welch pushes GE Capital into one of the major institutions responsible for the financial mess ... and the growth in GE's bottom line.. "Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present", pg200/loc3925-30:
The CNNMoney writers got it slightly wrong. GE was not exactly like the American economy. It was even more dependent on financial services. In the early 2000s, GE was again riding a financial wave, the subprime mortgage lending boom; it had even bought a subprime mortgage broker. GE borrowed still more against equity to exploit the remarkable opportunities, its triple-A rating giving it a major competitive advantage. By 2008, the central weakness of the Welch business strategy, its dependence on financial overspeculation, became ominously clear. GE's profits plunged during the credit crisis and its stock price fell by 60 percent. GE Capital, the main source of its success for twenty-five years, now reported enormous losses.

pg324/loc6382-85:
General Electric's persistent earnings increases were a leading example of how earnings were manipulated to produce consistent gains. Fortune analyzed how Jack Welch used both pension fund reserves and reserves at GE Capital to supplement quarterly earnings in order to make them rise consistently. As noted, they rose every quarter for almost thirteen years. GE stock roughly tripled between 1990 and 1995 and then quintupled between 1995 and early 2000.

... snip ...

Lots of financial engineering ... like what goes on with current stock buyback craze

there is the old line about asking crooks why they rob banks ... "that is where the money is" ... why wallstreet rob pension funds ... "that is where the money is" ... large part of why they were paying the rating agencies for "triple-A" on toxic assets ... so they could sell to pension funds ... and largely responsible for doing $27TRILLION, 2001-2008. Original bloomberg article
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

has finally(?) gone 404 ... "Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With `Fools' Born to Buy Debt." ... but is referenced here:
http://www.cjr.org/the_audit/audit_roundup_8.php
http://www.prisonplanet.com/evil-wall-street-exports-boomed-with-fools-born-to-buy-debt.html
http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/93325-evil-wall-street-exports-boomed-with-fools-born-to-buy-debt/

and ... Looting the Pension Funds
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/looting-the-pension-funds-20130926

disclaimer: Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild were office bldgs in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots). In the late 90s, I was asked to try and help avoid the coming economic mess by looking at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures. Then loan originators were securitizing loans&mortgages and paying for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds, claim is it accounts for 30% loss in funds and trillions shortfall for pensions)

(triple-A rated) toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2015 17:55:09 -0800
mausg writes:
Gave away?.. Roosvelt never had a large chunk of Europe.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#120 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#121 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#122 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

Russia had 500+ divisions facing 228 AXIS divisions. Rest of allies were only facing 58 AXIS divisions. US WW2 history is full of difficulty that Allies had just facing that reduced number. Now, what was it that Roosevelt going to do??

ww2 eastern front
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Front_%28World_War_II%29
The Eastern Front was decisive in determining the outcome of World War II, eventually serving as the main reason for Germany's defeat.[8][9][10]

... snip ...

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 2015 09:15:02 -0800
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Really?

One nuke outside Moscow and the possibility of more? After the demonstration in Japan, I don't think even one would be needed.


Various narratives has Hitler believing that if he had swift advance and threatened Moscow ... they would sue for peace (he believed Russia capitulating preventing turning into another Napoleon). However, Stalin didn't work that way, Russia took horrible damage ... and Stalin just continued on. There are stories like large numberrs of new russian recruits being issued wooden rifle replicas (that didn't shoot) and sent to the front lines ... any attempts at desertion, they would be shot (sometimes in large numbers).

US officials seeing what Russia suffered at the hands of Germany, had no doubt about Stalin's resolve. Rest is just somebody's fantasy.

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970







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