List of Archived Posts

2013 Newsgroup Postings (06/18 - 07/17)

By Any Other Name
Minicomputer Pricing
IBM commitment to academia
Ported Tools - Unix
IBM commitment to academia
IBM commitment to academia
The Subroutine Call
IBM commitment to academia
DEC Demise (was IBM commitment to academia)
IBM commitment to academia
EBCDIC and the P-Bit
EBCDIC and the P-Bit
Corrupted credit ratings: Standard & Poor's lawsuit and the evidence
EBCDIC and the P-Bit
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Should we, as an industry, STOP using the word Mainframe and find (and start using) something more up-to-date
65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program
Should we, as an industry, STOP using the word Mainframe and find (and start using) something more up-to-date
Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life - Washington Post
"Archive": Online documentary on future of long-term digital storage & attempts to preserve its contents on a massive scale
Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
RBS Mainframe Meltdown: A year on, the fallout is still coming
NSA Releases Secret Pre-History of Computers
By Any Other Name
By Any Other Name
DRAM is the new Bulk Core
Jean Sammet quotation
DRAM is the new Bulk Core
65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program
Some Hard Numbers On The Western Banking System
The Subroutine Call
The Subroutine Call
DRAM is the new Bulk Core
1969 networked word processor "Astrotype"
Reader Comment on SA22-7832-08 (PoPS), should I?
Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
Theology question: Parameter formats
Theology question: Parameter formats
65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program
Tech Time Warp of the Week: IBM STRETCH, 1961
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Making mainframe technology hip again
Google takes on Internet Standards with TCP Proposals, SPDY standardization
Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
The Subroutine Call
Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
1969 networked word processor "Astrotype"
unusual IBM system console
Doug Englebart
Doug Englebart
Making mainframe technology hip again
Making mainframe technology hip again
Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many
Making mainframe technology hip again
Making mainframe technology hip again
unusual IBM system console
The Real Snowden Question
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
regex that never matches?
Boyd's cycle: the path to guaranteed success + 6 big companies as evidence
The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it
Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it
Insane Insider Threat Program in Context of Morally and Mentally Bankrupt US Intelligence System
Has the US Lost Its Grand Strategic Mind?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

By Any Other Name

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: By Any Other Name
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2013 22:25:20 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
Google turns up almost nothing on Jib-prime. Did you happen to save any doc?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#86 By Any Other Name

don't find anything more on JIB' ... some on microcode development system ... used for developing JIB' code on 370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#17 with these old email about using 370 for software development (aka microcode development system)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email791010
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email791010b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email791010c

above mentions have difficult time moving MDS from MVS to CMS (in part because using various MVS features not supported by CMS).

other email mentioning mds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email800717
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#19

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email800624 in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#23

finally instead of changing application code to work with cms features ... they wrote 12k code to add simulation for the unsupported MVS features to CMS (there use to be joke about the 64k-byte os/360 simulation in cms was a lot more efficient than the 8mbyte os/360 simulation in MVS)

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email800903
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#25

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#email810128
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#40

JIB' was done at los gatos lab ... designed to management requirements ... so it can't be said that LSG is to blame (besides getting to play engineer in bldg14&15, I got to play in LSG/bldg29)

LSG also did "blue iliad" ... first 32bit risc/801 chip ... really large and never got beyond sampling. however, LSG pioneered use of scanning electronic microscope in chip debugging. misc. old email mentioning 801/risc ... including iliad and blue iliad references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#801

I had several offices and labs in LSG (even tho I was in research and had office in research bldg). LSG also did the LSM (Los Gatos State Machine ... although in publication LSM became logic simulation machine). It was one of the few logic simulation machines that included clock support ... most assumed synchronous clock. Clock support allowed support of chips w/o global synchronous clock as well as digital chips with analog circuits (i.e. thinfilm r/w disk heads).

HSDT included 4.5m TDMA satellite dish in LSG back parking lot and a 7m TDMA satellite dish in Austin next to the AWD engineering bldg (had transponder on SBS4 which went up on 41D ... I was invited to launch party at the cape). High-speed link between Austin and the LSM in Los Gatos is credited with helping bring in the RIOS (aka rs/6000) chipset a year early. misc. past posts mentioning HSDT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

past posts mentioning LSM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#3 Chip Emulators - was How does a chip get designed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#55 Multics hardware (was Re: "Soul of a New Machine" Computer?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#77 Pipelining in the past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#82 Future architecture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#26 LSM, YSE, & EVE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#31 asynchronous CPUs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#3 Ping: Anne & Lynn Wheeler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#14 Ping: Anne & Lynn Wheeler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#38 When nerds were nerds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#16 US fiscal policy (Was: Bob Bemer, Computer Pioneer,Father of ASCII,Invento
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#25 CKD Disks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#65 360 longevity, was RISCs too close to hardware?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#6 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#33 Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#42 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#11 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#73 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#61 Fast and Safe C Strings: User friendly C macros to Declare and use C Strings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#53 Drums: Memory or Peripheral?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#58 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#61 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#22 What if phone company had developed Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#67 1401 simulator for OS/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#68 CA to IBM TCP Conversion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#68 Toyota Beats GM in Global Production
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#75 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#63 What happened to computer architecture (and comp.arch?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#71 using an FPGA to emulate a vintage computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#83 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#52 Basic question about CPU instructions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#50 The Credit Card Criminals Are Getting Crafty

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minicomputer Pricing

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Minicomputer Pricing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2013 00:45:02 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
2341? The 2311 attached to a 2841 and the 2314 to a 2844. According to the 145 Functional Specifications manual, the IFA attached to a 2319, which would make it the equivalent of a 2844.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#81 Minicomputer Pricing

finger slip 2314

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM commitment to academia

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM commitment to academia
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 19 Jun 2013 06:22:26 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
The classic business-school analysis of DEC's misfortunes makes them an instance of the effects of "disruptive technology": microprocessors replacing mnicomputers.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#76 DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#78 IBM commitment to academia

vax sold into the same mid-range market as 4300s and except for large corporate orders, in about the same numbers. the large corporate 4300s orders hundred to large hundreds at a time to be placed out in departmental areas was sort of the leading edge of the distributed computing tsunami wave. these distributed vm/4300s inside ibm contributed to scarcity of conference rooms inside ibm (i.e. they were going out into departmental supply rooms and conferences rooms) and big contributer to the internal network passing 1000 nodes in 1983 ... the internal network was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late '85 or early '86 ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

it also contributed to ibm coming out with the 3375 ... emulated CKD on FBA 3370. I had been told that even if I provided fully integrated and tested FBA support to MVS, I still needed a $26M business case to cover education, training, and documentation ... oh and I couldn't use long-term life-cycle changes ... I could only use incremental new sales ... and customers were already buying as much disk as could be made ... so customers would just switch from same amount of FBA as they had been buying CKD. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

the issue was that 3380s were the high-end disk ... and the only disks in the low&mid-range were FBA. MVS couldn't participant in this huge explosion in distributed processing on 4300s ... in part because it didn't have support for disk that was suitable in non-datacenter environments. Disk division was forced into producing 3375 (CKD emulated on 3370) ... however MVS support paradigm also didn't scale well to running on hundreds of distributed systems.

old post with decade of vax sales, sliced&diced by US/non-US, year, model
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0

clusters of 4300s also represented threat to 3033 ... they had more aggregate processing power than 3033 and were significantly cheaper and required significantly less floor space and environmental resources. at one point, POK 3033 was playing internal politics and got the allocation of critical 4300 manufacturing component cut in half. old 4300-related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

in the decade of vax sales, towards the end, it is possible to see workstations and large PCs moving up into the mid-range market. something similar happened to 4300s ... the 4331/4341 followons (4361/4381) was expecting to continued explosion in sales ... but the mid-range market was already starting to move (4361/4381 suffering same effects as vax).

before 4300s shipped, there were engineering 4341 models in disk engineering&test ... and I had better access to 4341 for doing benchmarks than the performance group in (endicott) 4341 manufacturing. one of the benchmarks that I ran was for LLNL ... that were looking at buying 70 4341 for compute cluster ... if they met certain performance & price/performance requirements. old reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email790220

sort of start of being involved with LLNL compute clusters ... reference to more than decade later on cluster scaleup ... recent post with old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#email910808

other old email on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

within hrs of the last email in the above, cluster scaleup was transferred and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors ... and within week or two, it was announced as IBM supercomputer.

I was also working with Jim Gray on original relational/SQL implementation ... system/r ... originally done on vm 370/145 in bldg. 28 (san jose research). early joint study on system/r was with bank of america. Old email from Jim about BofA doing 60 vm/4341s and I needed to further reduce the effort to manage large numbers of distributed machines.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email800311b

later when Jim was leaving for Tandem ... he was palming bunch of stuff on me (including dealing with BofA, DBMS consulting with IMS group, etc)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801016

system/r folklore is that mainstream corporate attention was focused on EAGLE ... and was able to do technology transfer and get System/R out (under the radar) through Endicott as SQL/DS. Later when EAGLE imploded, the System/R group was asked how fast could they do a port to MVS ... which eventually comes out as DB2. misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

the late 80s was when senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference and opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. the issue was that the communicatin group had strategic responsibility for everything that crossed the datacenter walls and were fiercely fighting off distributed computing and client/server in support of their dumb (emulated) terminal install base. the disk division was starting to see data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales; they had come up with several solutions to correct the problem ... but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group. this was significant factor in the corporate downturn and the company going into the red in the early 90s. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

Time magzine had article 28Dec1992 about the downfall of IBM "How IBM Was Left Behind" ... includes a discussion of the re-organization of the company into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company ... behind paywall but lives free at wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

my archived posts in recent thread in (closed linkedin) IMBers discussing the company board bringing in new executive that stopped the breakup and "resurrected" the company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#77
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#87

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ported Tools - Unix

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Ported Tools - Unix
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 19 Jun 2013 07:22:34 -0700
PaulGBoulder@AIM.COM (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
I hate EBCDIC!

old reference that EBCDIC was one of the biggest goofs for 360 ... was supposed to have been ascii ... "EBCDIC and the P-Bit (The Biggest Computer Goof Ever)"
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM

recent posts mentioning above:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#56 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#72 One reason for monocase was Re: Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#14 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#61 32760?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM commitment to academia

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM commitment to academia
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2013 14:37:53 -0400
gerhard@VALLEY.NET (Gerhard Postpischil) writes:
That might answer the how, but not the why. I attribute it to bad management that failed to innovate in a timely fashion, didn't provide proper technical direction (1), nor effective sales. Ultimately I blame Ken Olsen: "There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home." (2) As a glaring example of this. DEC marketed three distinct lines of PCs, all failures.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#76 DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#78 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#2 IBM commitment to academia

commodore had the volumes in the home market and ibm/pc had the volumes in the business market. ibm/pc with 3270 emulator card was about the same price as real 3270 terminal ... so it was no-brainer business case for a company to switch from justified real 3270s to ibm/pc with 3270 emulation and some local computing in single desktop footprint at the same price.

total microvax numbers were less than the numbers of ibm/pc at single large corporate customer ... previous reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0

the large profit margin and market size attracted the clone pc makers ... which started snowball effect, the lowered price increased the size of the market and the increased volumes further lowered the price ... at some point breaking threashold into home market displacing commodore (and other players in the home market). Late 80s, the fareast clone makers were building up huge inventory for the xmas season. 386sx machines were then introduced that wiped out the 286 market ... which then saw huge clearance sales (of the 286 inventory built up for xmas season). one of the issues was that the decreasing circuit size, increased the circuits per chip, increased the performance, and also decreased the number of support chips needed for system ... further reducing system costs. The decreasing circuit size and increase in circuits per chip ... increased the upfront costs for chip design as well as each new generation of chip manufacturing facilities. as upfront costs exceeded billions ... market size of billions became important to spread the upfront costs so it became only a few dollars per chip (along with technology reaching billions of circuits per chip).

enormous numbers of 3270s had logistic problem with each (real or emulated) 3270 having coax cable running from each 3270 back to the datacenter. the coax cable trays were starting to exceed weight loading limits in buildings. the communication group positioned token-ring as solution to the coax cable weight loading problem ... single token-ring LAN run serving 300 or more IBM/PC emulated 3270s

the communication group fight to preserve its (emulated) dumb terminal install base would generate enormous amount of FUD in token-ring comparisons with ethernet (just part of its strangle-hold on mainframe datacenter fighting off distributed computing and client/server). recent posts about the communication group FUD in news articles on anniversary of ethernet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#31 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#32 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#33 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#34 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#40 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#27 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#84 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World

in the middle of all this, the new Almaden research bldg was coming online that had significant CAT-5 provisioning for token-ring ... however they found that 10mbit ethernet over CAT-5 had both higher aggregate LAN thruput and lower latency than 16mbit token-ring. This was also in period when 16mbit token-ring cards were going for $900 and high-performance ethernet cards (even with some protocol offload) were dropping below $100.

there was another problem. the communication group had 16mbit token-ring per card throughput designed for terminal emulation. The AWD workstation division had done its own 4mbit token-ring card for the PC/RT (with AT-bus). For RS/6000, the division was mandated to use PS2 microchannel cards. The problem was (with the dumb terminal emulation design point) the PS2 16mbit token-ring microchannel card had lower per-card throughput than the PC/RT 4mbit token-ring card (a PC/RT server with 4mbit token-ring card had higher throughput than RS/6000 with 16mbit token-ring microchannel card).

trying to save the PC market ... with proprietary PS2 ... the head of POK mainframe division was also transferred to boca to try and turn it around. there were lots of internal FUD/claims about PC clone market ... I started posting to internal corporate forums the quantity one prices from sunday issues of silicon valley paper (showing actual numbers were drastically less than internal business cases). past posts with some of those long-ago prices from sunday paper
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#79 a.f.c history checkup... (was What specifications will the standard year 2001 PC have?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#81 a.f.c history checkup... (was What specifications will the standard year 2001 PC have?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#82 a.f.c history checkup... (was What specifications will the standard year 2001 PC have?)

The new head of PS2 also contracted with Dataquest (before gartner bought dataquest) for large report about the pc market over the following 5-10 yrs ... which was to include several hrs video taped roundtable of dozen silicon valley experts. I knew the person at Dataquest handling the ibm contract and was asked to be one of the silicon valley experts. I cleared participation with my immediate management on the condition they garble my introduction on the video tape

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM commitment to academia

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM commitment to academia
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 19 Jun 2013 12:02:57 -0700
shmuel+gen@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
It didn't help that the MVS address space was painfully small compared to the VAX. It wasn't until MVS/ESA that IBM caught up.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#76 DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#78 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#2 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#4 IBM commitment to academia

during the Future System period ... 370 (hardware & software) development was being killed off (and lack of new products is credited with giving clone processors market foothold). with death of FS ... there was mad rush to get products back into the 370 pipeline ... misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

part of that was 303x in parallel with 3081 & 370/xa. The head of POK also managed to convince corporate to kill off the vm370 product, shutdown the burlington mall development group and move all the people to POK ... or otherwise he wouldn't be able to meet the mvs/xa ship schedule.

the burlington mall group wasn't going to be told until the very last moment in order to minimize people being able to escape ... however it leaked a few months early ... and quite a few people were able to escape the move to POK ... quite a few going to DEC to work on vax/vms (this was in the very early days of starting vax/vms development) ... resulting in the head of POK being considered one of the biggest contributors to vax/vms.

endicott eventually managed to save the vm370 product mission ... but had to reconsitute a development group from scratch ... the resulting learning curve resulted in quite a few comments regarding code quality during the period on VMSHARE
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

there was also quite a bit of enhancements to vm370 lost in the burlington mall shutdown ... including a major expansion of MVS emulation in cms.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Subroutine Call

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Subroutine Call
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2013 10:13:04 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
This is always used as a knock on capability-based systems, but if the industry put half as much effort into optimizing such things in hardware as they have into other areas, the speed differential probably wouldn't be significant.

GNOSIS was capability based system for ibm 370, by one of the virtual machine based commercial online service companies. part of it was designed to be platform for 3rd party offerings ... a dbms or application could be offered and gnosis would not only accurately account for all resources by users ... for charging purposes ... but also accurately account by specific resource to enable remittance to 3rd parties (calls not only checked domain crossing and checking capabilities but had significant pathlength for resource accounting)

In the 80s, M/D bought the company and spun off several units (its telco front-end sold to BT) ... and gnosis is spun off into KeyKOS (I'm brought in to audit gnosis as part of the spin-off). For KeyKOS all the accounting pathlength is stripped away and they have benchmarks that show capability based applications beating throughput of TPF (besides edfficient pathlength, they claim that higher-level abstractions allowing optimization that can't be done in the extremely low-level TPF environment).

tymshare
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymshare

GNOSIS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOSIS
KeyKOS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KeyKOS
documents and references
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOSIS

and spawns

EROS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extremely_Reliable_Operating_System
CapROS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CapROS
Coyotos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coyotos

IBM's high-performance transaction processing facility, originated for the airline industry as ACP ... but rebranded 1979 as TPF when financial and other reservation industries were using it
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transaction_Processing_Facility

recent posts mentioning GNOSIS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#80 Still not convinced about the superiority of mainframe security vs distributed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#55 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#33 Delay between idea and implementation

past posts mentioning virtual machine based online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM commitment to academia

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM commitment to academia
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 20 Jun 2013 07:41:00 -0700
gerhard@VALLEY.NET (Gerhard Postpischil) writes:
Unless one is in the possession of detailed data, unlikely to become public, it is difficult to judge why a company makes decisions. It is doubtful that clinical kainophobia is pertinent; more likely factors are cash flow, risk aversion, sales projections, and other non-technical issues. For a successful company like DEC, technical aspects were the least of their problems, as they had exemplary staff, including some ex-IBMers. This is why I conclude that their collapse and sale was due to poor management, even if that doesn't provide any specifics.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#76 DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#78 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#2 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#4 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#5 IBM commitment to academia

over in a.f.c. there are quite a few former DEC people ... and while they don't criticize the influx of people from the vm370 burlington mall development group (at the very start of vax/vms development) ... they don't have any kind words for the former IBM middle managers. recent mention shutdown of vm370 burlington mall development group (i.e. name comes from location of the bldg. in burlington mall ... when the group outgrew the space in 545 tech sq. ... they move out to the vacant former SBC building ... SBC having gone to CDC as part of legal settlement).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#5 IBM commitment to academia

more details about DEC ... Compaq then bought DEC (there have been lots of comments that Compaq wanted DEC's field service division) ... then HP buys Compaq. Just recently comment that HP has decommitted OpenVMS and hoping that HP would release source of open use.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Equipment_Corporation

Note that as the Time magazine article details ... IBM only narrowly missed similar fate with the perparation for breaking up into the "baby blues" ... 28Dec1992 ... downfall of IBM "How IBM Was Left Behind"
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

we had left early in the year ... 31July1992 coincidentally the same day they shutdown all the scientific centers (had been part of the sales&marketing division and major interface to academia). old email reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#email920722

note that the split up into the 13 "baby blues" ... was a lot more complicated that one might thought. Early 1993 (before board brought in new executive that reversed the breakup and resurrects the company). We were invited in to do detailed examination of all the contractual arrangements ... one business unit might have contract with outside supplier ... but other business units would be relying on the same contract. All of those implicit business arrangements were going to have to be explicitly recognized

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DEC Demise (was IBM commitment to academia)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: DEC Demise (was IBM commitment to academia)
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 20 Jun 2013 13:01:35 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
Other, sublethal examples abound. John Cocke invented RISC as an IBM employee/fellow. IBM did not quite ignore it, but it was left to others to exploit it (as something more than a sea anchor to windward) until its much later reincarnation as millicode.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#76 DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#78 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#2 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#4 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#5 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#7 IBM commitment to academia

advice to self: have to be really careful when going out drinking with john. I've often contended that, in part, John did 801/risc as reaction to the horrible complexity in Future System ... misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#futuresys

79-80 there was big push to move vast array of internal microprocessors to 801/risc ... microprocessors in low&mid range 370, control microprocessors, the as/400 (merged followon to s/36 & s/38), etc. these were in large part Iliad chips of one form or another. for various reasons, the efforts faltered and you saw some number of the engineers leaving to do risc at other vendors. ... misc. old 801 email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#801

The 4331&4341 followons (4361&4381) were going to be Iliad (801/risc) ... I helped with whitepaper that derailed those efforts. An issue was that circuits were getting small enough that it was possible to directly implement much of 370 directly in hardware (rather than having to resort to the microcode implementations of previous generations).

one of the efforts was ROMP chip for what was going to be the displaywriter follow-on ... however that got canceled (lot of word processing was moving to personal computing). the group looked around and decided to retarget it to the unix workstation market. they got the company that had done the unix port for ibm/pc (pc/ix) to do one for romp ... and it came out as pc/rt and aix. followon to ROMP was RIOS chipset for rs/6000.

recent post about los gatos lab doing "blue iliad" ... first 32bit 801 ... never got much past sample chips:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#0 By Any Other Name

past posts mentioning 801, risc, fort knox, iliad, romp, rios, power, power/pc, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

however, there is the tale of ACS360 ... which ibm management shutdown because they were afraid that it would advance computing technology too fast, and they would loose control of the market.
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

above also discusses features from ACS360 showing up more than 20yrs later in ES/9000. other recent posts referencing ACS360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#18 What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#26 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#52 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#1 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#10 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#13 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#44 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#72 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#83 Minicomputer Pricing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM commitment to academia

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM commitment to academia
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 20 Jun 2013 21:46:18 -0700
waynevb@GMAIL.COM (Wayne Bickerdike) writes:
When I left IBM my manager asked what I was going to work on. I told him, "micro computers, non-IBM stuff, XENIX, CP/M, Apple IIs, Cromemco, Altos, Northstar". He said, "I don't ever see IBM getting into those markets". A couple of years later the PC was launched and IBM still didn't get it.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#76 DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#78 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#2 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#4 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#5 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#7 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#8 DEC Demise (was IBM commitment to academia)

for the fun of it, i periodically post ... recently in (closed linkedin) IBM'ers ... partially archived here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#0 What is you opinion is the one defining IBM product?

and as for ms/dos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS-DOS
before ms/dos there was seattle computer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Computer_Products
and before seattle computer there was cp/m
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/M
and before cp/m, kildall worked on cp/67-cms at npg school (gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20071011100440/http://www.khet.net/gmc/docs/museum/en_cpmName.html
npg reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Postgraduate_School

additional lineage is that some of the CTSS people went to the 5th flr and did Multics, others went to the science center on the 4th flr and did cp/67-cms (actually 360/67 wasn't ready yet so they did hardware modifications to 360/40 for virtual memory and did cp/40-cms ... which later morphs into cp/67-cms when 360/67 becomes available). past posts mentioning 545 tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

folklore is that unix is outgrowth of Multics work (and the name a play on Multics).

ctss
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System
multics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics
cp/40-cms
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP-40
cp/67-cms
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS

Last year, Les sent me scan of his 82SEAS CP/40 talk, I OCR'ed it
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

EBCDIC and the P-Bit

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: EBCDIC and the P-Bit
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Jun 2013 07:20:39 -0700
RJKinsman@HOTMAIL.COM (Roland Kinsman) writes:
So, this is going to sound extremely naïve, but I wonder if having EBCDIC instead of ASCII helped make IBM mainframe OS less penetrable to hackers.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#3 Ported Tools - Unix

1) lots of attacks are proportional to number of deployed machines (and public coverage of such attacks tends to be proportional to number of machines).

2) lots of attacks are value of the expected returns making big financial industry mainframes attractive targets. the financial industry is extremely publicity adverse about such attacks ... lots will not be made public. at financial industry critical infrastructure meetings ... one of the biggest issues was insisting that any information sharing would not be subject to FISA.
https://www.fsisac.com/about
critical infrastructure protection
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_infrastructure_protection

we were also tangentially involved in the cal. state data breach notification legislation (the original, many other states have passed similar legislation since then). the issue was that little or nothing was being done ... normally entities take security measures in self-protection ... in the case of many of the data breaches, the institutions with the breaches had nothing at risk ... it was individuals. there was some hope that the publicity resulting from the notifications would result in institutions taking corrective actions (as well as allowing individuals to take countermeasures ... like closing account).

however, account from long ago and far away (note I didn't learn about these guys until much later)
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

one the installations became quite active in SHARE and their installation code was CAD (cloak-and-dagger) ... also shows up in vmshare archives
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

misc. other recent posts mentioning P-bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#56 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#72 One reason for monocase was Re: Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#14 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#61 32760?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

EBCDIC and the P-Bit

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: EBCDIC and the P-Bit
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Jun 2013 08:29:55 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#3 Ported Tools - Unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#10 EBCDIC and the P-Bit

of course there was also some amount of rivalry between the 5th flr (multics) and 4th flr (cp/67). they (also) had a lot of very security oriented customers. 545 tech sq postings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

recent reference to IBM research report "Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#35 Some Things Never Die
can now be found here
http://www.acsac.org/2002/papers/classic-multics.pdf
original evaluation:
http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/history/karg74.pdf

one of the points was the Multics was implemented in PLI and lacked the common vulnerabilities that are epidemic in C-language based software.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics

specifically related to exploits in networking ... the original mainframe tcp/ip product had been implemented in vs/pascal ... and also had none of the common vulnerabilities and exploits that are epidemic in C-language based implementations.

part of the rivalry was number of sites (list of all Multics installations)
http://www.multicians.org/sites.html

one of my hobbies was production systems for internal datacenters ... first with cp/67 and then moved to vm370 with csc/vm. It wasn't fair to compare numbers with actual vm370 customers or even total internal vm370 customers ... so the comparison was just the number of csc/vm installations with total Multics customers (with peak csc/vm internal installations possibly 50% larger than total Multics customers).

One of Multics premier sites was AFDS (#71 on above list). so it was *fun* when AFDS was looking at 210 vm370 systems ... old email posted in multics discussion group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404
above mentions that they were original looking for 20 ... but further explanation in this post has it increasing to 210
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#15 departmental servers

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Corrupted credit ratings: Standard & Poor's lawsuit and the evidence

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Corrupted credit ratings: Standard & Poor's lawsuit and the evidence
Date: 21 June 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Corrupted credit ratings: Standard & Poor's lawsuit and the evidence
http://www.voxeu.org/article/corrupted-credit-ratings-standard-poor-s-lawsuit-and-evidence

The Oct2008 congressional hearings into the pivotal role that the rating agencies played in the financial mess ... had testimony by rating agency employees saying that they raised warnings that both the sellers of the toxic securities and the dept. doing the ratings knew they weren't worth triple-A. News commentators at the time said the the rating agencies would likely avoid federal prosecution with threat of blackmailing the gov. with rating downgrade.

The Last Mystery of the Financial Crisis; It's long been suspected that ratings agencies like Moody's and Standard & Poor's helped trigger the meltdown. A new trove of embarrassing documents shows how they did it
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-last-mystery-of-the-financial-crisis-20130619

You F--ked Up, You Trusted Us': Talking Ratings Agencies With Chris Hayes
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/you-f-ked-up-you-trusted-us-talking-ratings-agencies-with-chris-hayes-20130621

past posts mentioning congressional hearings into the rating agencies:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#30 How reliable are the credit rating companies? Who is over seeing them?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#14 What are the challenges in risk analytics post financial crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#78 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#41 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#49 Is the current downturn cyclic or systemic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#4 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#31 In the News: SEC storms the 'Castle'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#9 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#69 Moody's hints at move that could be catastrophic for US debt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#25 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#36 On Protectionism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#55 Mobius Says Financial Crisis 'Around the Corner'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#44 S&P Downgrades USA; Time to Downgrade S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#2 First Website Launched 20 Years Ago Today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#16 Feds Launch Probe Into S&P Mortgage Rates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#71 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#7 Beyond the 10,000 Hour Rule
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#53 Should Bethany McLean Be Bothered by the Government Lawsuit Against S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#68 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

EBCDIC and the P-Bit

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: EBCDIC and the P-Bit
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Jun 2013 15:10:31 -0700
Efinnell15@AOL.COM (Ed Finnell) writes:
I remember the 'security paper' CIA published after MVS got B1 rating. There was a tuning paper that came out about the same time. One was green and one was yellow. Anyway, long story short, last paragraph in security report says "if it's attached to a network none of this applies"

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#3 Ported Tools - Unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#10 EBCDIC and the P-Bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#11 EBCDIC and the P-Bit

the science center did a port of apl\360 to cp/67-cms for cms\apl and made it available on the science center cp/67-cms system (in addition to marketing to customers).

cms\apl opened up apl to real-world applications with both virtual memory sized workspaces (most apl\360 systems limited workspace size to 16kbytes) and system call APIs (being able to do things like file opertions). remote users in armonk started using it for business modeling and loaded the most valuable and holiest of corporate assets on the science center cp/67-cms system.

this required some security considerations since the science center allowed remote dialins and access by staff and students from educational institutions in the boston/cambridge area.

misc. past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 21 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5
recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#8 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#10 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#15 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

IBM CEO Ginni Rometty Handed This Man A New $7 Billion Business Unit
http://www.businessinsider.com/ibm-hands-clementi-a-new-7b-unit-2013-6

from above:
When you add up all the different kinds of cloud computing services, you're looking at a $131 billion market, Gartner figures. IBM says it plans to nab at least $7 billion of in the next 18 months.

... snip ...

Supposedly the epiphany for Guestner when he was brought in to resurrect the IBM company (including stopping splitting up the company that had been re-organized into the "baby blues" for the split up) was to redirect it from a product company into a services company.

The article mentions that Clementi was responsible for "reviving" mainframe business in the mid-2000s ... which would correspond with the z9s & z10s ... although financial reports is that total mainframe business is 6.25 times mainframe hardware sales (i.e. mainframe customers pay $5.25 for software & services for every $1 they pay for hardware ... mainframe hardware only accounts for 4% of total revenue).

If Amazon Beats IBM For CIA Cloud Deal, It Could Shake Up A Whole New Market
http://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-and-ibm-fight-for-cia-cloud-2013-6

Look At Facebook's Gorgeous New Data Center Built With Its Game-Changing Servers
http://www.businessinsider.com/facebooks-newest-data-center-2013-6

GAO sheds light on IBM-Amazon CIA battle
http://washingtontechnology.com/articles/2013/06/14/cia-cloud-contract-gao.aspx

from above:
IBM said it could build the CIA's cloud computing infrastructure for less, but the CIA thought Amazon's more expensive solution was technically superior, according to the Government Accountability Office.

But GAO ruled in favor of IBM's protest after finding that the CIA was "unreasonable" in how it evaluated the pricing offered by the two companies.


... snip ...

GE intros 'cloud agnostic' data platform with Pivotal, Amazon Web Services; Summary: GE is also touting that the value of its new Industrial Internet scheme will reach nearly $1.3 trillion by 2020
http://www.zdnet.com/ge-intros-cloud-agnostic-data-platform-with-pivotal-amazon-web-services-7000016962/
GE moves into 'Industrial Internet' service with Amazon
http://news.yahoo.com/ge-moves-industrial-internet-amazon-172419770.html

AOL was one of the dialup online service providers in the 80s
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_service_provider

they were hit by the emergence of WWW in 1994 (referenced in above) and had to compete with emerging ISPs which were offering flat-rate service:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_service_provider

from above:
In contrast to the online services' multitiered per-minute or per-hour rates, many ISPs offered flat-fee, unlimited access plans.

... snip ...

some of the people that I knew from NSFNET backbone days went to work for AOL around the mid-90s ... corresponding with the rise of the web. In fact, June 17, 1995 AOL internet-facing servers started crashing. Over the next two months lots of experts were brought in to look at the problem. Finally one of their people flew out to the west coast Aug 17 and offered to buy me a hamburger after work. While I ate the hamburger, he described the problem ... I mentioned that it was an internet issue we had identified several years earlier and gave him a q&d fix which he applied later that night.

Report: The CIA Picked Amazon To Build Its Cloud Even Though IBM Would've Been Cheaper
http://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-building-private-cloud-for-cia-2013-6

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Should we, as an industry, STOP using the word Mainframe and find (and start using) something more up-to-date

Refed: **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Should we, as an industry, STOP using the word Mainframe and find (and start using) something more up-to-date
Date: 21 June 2013
Blog: Mainframe Experts
re:
http://lnkd.in/hG8_tP

We recently had a little vax/vms discussion over in ibm-main ... vax/vms sold about the same aggregate numbers in small number orders ... as 4300s ... big difference with 4300s was the large corporate orders ... some multiple hundreds at a time ... it was the leading edge of the distributed computing tsunami ... and inside ibm, it contributed to the big explosion in the size of the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until late '85 or early '86) and scarcity of conference rooms (machines were going out into departmental supply rooms and conference rooms).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#2 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#4 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#5 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#7 ..

decade of vax sales sliced&diced by model, US/non-US, year, etc.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0 ..

from the numbers, by the middle 80s the mid-range started to be taken over by workstations and large PCs. something similar happened with 4300s ... there was anticipation that the 4331/4341 followon (4361/4381) would see the same continued growth ... but they saw similar mid-range collapse as vax.

big issue for MVS was that 3380s were the high-end disks for datacenter environments ...the mid-range disks that could go out in non-datacenter environments were all FBA (3370 & 3310) ... and MVS didn't have FBA support (to this day). Eventually 3375, emulated CKD on 3370, came out ... giving MVS an opportunity to play in the big mid-range explosion. It didn't help a whole lot since the people resources for MVS support and maintenance didn't scale well to large numbers (large hundreds) of distributed systems.

old email about AFDS wanting to come by to talk about 20 vm/4341 systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404
however, by the time they came by, it had grown to 210 vm/4341 systems

In this time-frame, i also did some LLNL benchmarks who were looking at 70 vm/4341s for a cluster cmpute farm (sort of precursor to present day supercomputers). of course decade later, I was working with LLNL on cluster compute farms involving RS/6000s (instead of 370s). other old 4300 related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

the other problem was POK was threatened by 4341 ... clusters of 4341 had higher throughput than 3033, a lot less expensive, and required significantly less floor space and environmental resources. at one point head of pok got internal allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component cut in half as a way of reducing the 4341 threat.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: 65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2013 09:54:59 -0400
65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program
http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/13/06/22/0247220/65-years-ago-manchesters-baby-ran-electronically-stored-program

Remembering 'Baby' - first computer to run electronically stored program 65 years ago
http://paritynews.com/science/item/1149-remembering-baby-first-computer-to-run-electronically-stored-program-65-years-ago

from above:
The 'Baby' was developed by Frederic C. Williams, Tom Kilburn and Geoff Tootill at the Manchester University and it wasn't any ordinary system that you would find today [PDF]. 'Baby' served as a testbed for the experimental Williams-Kilburn tube - a cathode ray tube that was used to store binary digits aka bits. The reason this became a milestone in computing history was that up until 'Baby' ran the first electronically stored program, there was no means of storing and accessing this stored information in a cost-effective and flexible way.

... snip ...

PDF reference:
http://www.mosi.org.uk/media/34352414/the%20baby,%20the%20world%27s%20first%20stored-program%20computer.pdf

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Should we, as an industry, STOP using the word Mainframe and find (and start using) something more up-to-date

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Should we, as an industry, STOP using the word Mainframe and find (and start using) something more up-to-date
Date: 22 June 2013
Blog: Mainframe Experts
re:
http://lnkd.in/hG8_tP
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#15 Should we, as an industry, STOP using the word Mainframe and find (and start using) something more up-to-date

In the late 80s, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at the annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference and open with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had strategic ownership of everything that crossed the datacenter walls (had stranglehold on datacenter) and was preserving in dumb (emulated) terminal install base, fiercely fighting off client/server and distributed computing. The disk division had seen data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with the drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with several solutions to the problem, but they were constantly vetoed by the communication group. This was a major factor in the downturn and the company going into the red a couple years later. Time article from 28Dec1992 about the company being reorganized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breakup ... the downfall of IBM "How IBM Was Left Behind"
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

In this time-frame we had come up with 3-tier architecture and out presenting it in corporate executive marketing presentations ... and taking a lot of arrows from the communication group. My wife had also written it into a response to large gov. distributed computing RFI. Old posts in thread about the origins of middleware ... with pieces from the presentation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#16 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#17 ..

the above showed the cost of putting in a mainframe at the top of 3-tier network could be significantly less expensive and have much higher throughput that using the communication group dumb terminal components

some more pieces from later thread also on where middleware came from
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#202

Another example is the communication group fought hard to have the mainframe tcp/ip product from being announced. When they couldn't actually stop the announcement, they switched gears and claimed that it had to be announced through the communication group and with communication group products (since they had "strategic" ownership of everything that crossed the datacenter walls). The resulting product got 44kbytes/sec throughput using a whole 3090 processor. I did the changes to support RFC1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research got channel throughput between cray and 4341 using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). misc. past posts mentioning RFC1044 support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

... oh, and more old posts mentioning 3-tier
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

the original mainframe tcp/ip was eventually ported to MVS by emulating some number of vm370 functions (and throughput managed to be as slow or worse than the original implementation w/o my rfc1044 changes).

the communication group then hired a contractor to do tcp/ip stack implementation in vtam ... and when he demonstrated it, tcp ran much faster than lu6.2. The communication group then told him that everybody knows that a *valid* tcp implementation is much slower than lu6.2 ... and they would only pay for a *valid* tcp implementation.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life - Washington Post

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life - Washington Post
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2013 14:32:14 -0400
gabe@GABEGOLD.COM (Gabe Goldberg) writes:

http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-06-07/business/39803388_1_computer-giant-ibm-gerstner-jr-life


this has a lot more
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V._Gerstner,_Jr.

including becoming chairman of carlyle after leaving ibm.

more detailed histories talk about him being in competition to be the next CEO of AMEX ... the looser then leaves ... and eventually does take over some other companies and eventually citibank ... in violation of glass-steagall ... greenspan gives him an exemption while he lobbies congress for repeal of glass-steagall ... originating too-big-to-fail and major factor in the financial mess.

AMEX and KKR are in competition for private-equity take-over of RJR ... KKR wins ... but runs into trouble with RJR and hires Gerstner away to turn it around ... before the IBM board hires Gerstner away to resurrect IBM. Gerstner then leaves to be chairman of another major private equity company.

RJR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RJR_Nabisco
KKR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kohlberg_Kravis_Roberts

It mentions that private equity leveraged buyout of RJR had been the largest buyout up until that point.

Carlyle
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlyle_Group

gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

recent posts mentioning gerstner and/or resurrection of ibm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#76 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#3 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#34 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#77 Spacewar! on S/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#4 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#20 Y2K hacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#33 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#35 Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#76 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#17 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#19 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#42 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#79 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#15 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#46 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#49 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#61 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#76 DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#77 IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#87 IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#2 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#7 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"Archive": Online documentary on future of long-term digital storage & attempts to preserve its contents on a massive scale

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Archive": Online documentary on future of long-term digital storage & attempts to preserve its contents on a massive scale
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2013 18:35:49 -0400
jsavard@excxn.aNOSPAMb.cdn.invalid (John Savard) writes:
And here I thought the Internet Archive belonged to the Smithsonian Institution, and was being paid for by the U.S. taxpayer.

I first met brewster when he formed wais inc, and moved to cal. wais inc. was in old house just over the palo alto line in menlo park a few blocks from el camino. AOL then bought wais inc, and he did incubator in the old presidio in san fran. recently, he moved wayback machine into former church

wais inc
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_area_information_server
internet archive
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Archive
note that it is mirrored
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliotheca_Alexandrina

there are more activities with library of congress than smithsonian.

some presentation has large array with blinking blue lights on the alter in a dim room. recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#9 The round wheels industry is heading for collapse

above has this reference w/some pictures of the "new" location
http://www.archive.org/details/InternetArchiveNewBuildingAt300Funston
and
http://www.archive.org/details/300FunstonStSanFranciscoCa

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 08:07:02 -0400
article on former IBM Chairman (recently posted to ibm-main)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#18

Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-06-07/business/39803388_1_computer-giant-ibm-gerstner-jr-life

more detailed histories talk about him being in competition to be the next CEO of AMEX ... the looser then leaves ... and eventually does take over some other companies and eventually citibank ... in violation of glass-steagall ... greenspan gives him an exemption while he lobbies congress for repeal of glass-steagall ... originating too-big-to-fail and major factor in the financial mess.

AMEX and KKR are in competition for private-equity take-over of RJR ... KKR wins ... but runs into trouble with RJR and hires Gerstner away to turn it around ... before the IBM board hires Gerstner away to resurrect IBM. Gerstner then leaves to be chairman of another major private equity company.

RJR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RJR_Nabisco
KKR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kohlberg_Kravis_Roberts

It mentions that private equity leveraged buyout of RJR had been the largest buyout up until that point.

wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V._Gerstner,_Jr.

after IBM, becomes Chairman of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlyle_Group

which does private equity buyout of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booz_Allen_Hamilton

Booz Allen, the World's Most Profitable Spy Organization (and in the middle of the recent controversy)
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-20/booz-allen-the-worlds-most-profitable-spy-organization

marines small wars manual
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Wars_Manual

based on their experience dealing with small scale conflicts was written about the same time (and based on same experience) as "War Is A Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

characterizes same events done in support of MICC and wallstreet. "War Is A Racket" wiki references perpetual war,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_war

includes references to several Boyd's acolytes ... misc. past posts & web references to Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

also references: "The Iron Triangle: Inside the Secret World of the Carlyle Group"
http://www.amazon.com/The-Iron-Triangle-Carlyle-ebook/dp/B008N9I4N0/

In the past I do a security chip ... in the 90s, I semi-facetious say I would take $500 mil-spec chip, cost reduce it by 2-3 orders of magnitude (eventually under a dollar) while making it more secure. Problem is that eliminating all costs tends to 1) eliminate profit for 3rd party operators (both in financial and security industries) and 2) significantly reduces barriers to entry (both anathema to what is taught in business schools). Lots of patents (includes person-centric also reduing costs, opportunity for profit, and barrier to entry) ... all assigned
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadssummary.htm

company we are at when doing the AADS chip ... was spun out of AMEX (about the time IBM was going into the red) ... largest IPO up until that time. More recently KKR does a leveraged buyout, reverse-IPO of the company ... largest reverse-IPO up until that time (15yrs after being the largest IPO).

Long ago and far away, my wife transfers to company IBM forms with Aetna and Comsat to do satellite computer data, however, mainstream company communication protocol products hardly work over satellite, significantly reducing business opportunity. Her office is in bldg. they have in Tyson's corner. IBM eventually dissolves the company, satellites going to Hughes (now Boeing) and most of the people going to MCI (although she returns to IBM). The bldg. eventually is taken over by BAH. During the AADS period, BAH wants a meeting to discuss the subject and want to hold it in conference room that is outside the office of a former agency head (office is approx. same location where my wife's office had been). During the meeting, somebody in BAH concludes that they don't see how to make a profit ... also during the meeting, there is reference to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipper_chip

AADS prototype chips are done in security chip fab. it includes circuits to do keygen as part of fab initial power-on/test process ... and exporting the public key (with the power-on/test data) ... but there are no facilities for divulging the private key

past posts mentioning communication group having stranglehold on datacenters and major factor in IBM downturn (not just difficulty working over satellites) and going in the red in the early 90s (trying to protect their dumb terminal paradigm) ... resulting in board bringing in new CEO to "resurrect" the company:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

past posts mentioning Tyson's corner:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#19 Tysons Corner, Virginia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#23 Tysons Corner, Virginia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#27 Tysons Corner, Virginia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#56 South San Jose (was Tysons Corner, Virginia)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#57 South San Jose (was Tysons Corner, Virginia)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#58 South San Jose (was Tysons Corner, Virginia)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#60 South San Jose (was Tysons Corner, Virginia)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#56 YKYBHTLW....
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#35 Cybersecurity Today: The Wild, Wild West
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#31 Colossal Cave Adventure in PL/I

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 10:10:47 -0400
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
Of course, it wasn't just "Nixon". There were hundreds of different police, military, corporate, and intelligence agencies that had motives to spy. Individual police departments often had "Red squads", if the department was large enough, that's a tradition that went back to the 1920s.

recent thread: Lessons from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5

references "The Lyndon Johnson tapes: Richard Nixon's 'treason'"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21768668

Presidential telephone tapes ... has LBJ talking about investigation into the Vietnam peace talks being undermined by Nixon ... in order to improve Nixon's election chances.

some amount of this was related to anniversary of Iraq invasion ... and lots of fabrication that went on to justify the invasion.

there were comments about later presidents stopped recording calls ... because of things being released. Release of presidential records can turn up all sorts of things. Note at the start of the century, it was time to release the Reagan presidential records (under the presidential records act), but the incoming new administration signed executive order to keep them classified (possibly because there would be references to members of team b activities in conjunction with Iraq during the 80s ... some of the same team b members part of the new administration planning for invasion of iraq ... even before 9/11).

recent posts mentioning executive order to counter release of records under presidential records act:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#58 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#62 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#74 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?

other recent posts mentioning team b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#76 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#7 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#30 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#53 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#92 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 10:17:13 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
references "The Lyndon Johnson tapes: Richard Nixon's 'treason"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21768668


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#21 "Highway Patrol" back on TV

the Nixon treason also discussed in this recent a.f.c. thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 11:12:28 -0400
Ibmekon writes:
Another simple technique to prevent accountability is to use secret email accounts.

Presumably they are given to the NSA for exclusion from tapping.

From
http://www.upi.com/blog/2013/06/04/Obama-secret-email-released-after-FOIA-fight/6051370364155/

"Agencies that keep private emails said that, while the addresses are not made public, the content of those emails is searched in official investigations and records are turned over when requested"


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#21 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#22 "Highway Patrol" back on TV

with regard to the reagan period ... a major email event was the contra affair ... and then all the executive branch emails had to be searched for contra references (however, all these supposedly clearly said that it was official gov. servers and official gov. email ... no expectation of privacy):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#68 Our Pecora Moment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#82 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?

i.e. in the 80s, administration was backing iraq in the iran/iraqi war ... and then it turns out they were also selling arms to iran ... becoming arms merchants to both sides ... some recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#82 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?

Iran-Contra affair
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
Iran-Iraq War
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_War
United States support for Iraq during the Iran-Iraq war
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war

above has pictures of members of team b meeting with Saddam.

team b wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_B

more on Nixon's treason (also points out team b around nixon)

Nixon's treason still shapes the Republican Party
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/03/24/1196597/-Nixon-s-treason-still-shapes-the-Republican-Party

past posts mentioning PROFS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#46 Does the word "mainframe" still have a meaning?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#35 Newbie TOPS-10 7.03 question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#39 Newbie TOPS-10 7.03 question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#40 Newbie TOPS-10 7.03 question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#58 history of CMS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#59 history of CMS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#64 history of CMS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#50 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#4 HONE, ****, misc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#34 VSE (Was: Re: Refusal to change was Re: LE and COBOL)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#45 hyperblock drift, was filesystem structure (long warning)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#69 Gartner Office Information Systems 6/2/89
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#56 Goodbye PROFS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#26 Microsoft Internet Patch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#13 Mainframe Virus ????
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#43 FULIST
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#23 sorting was: The System/360 Model 20 Wasn't As Bad As All That
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#4 Another BIG Mainframe Bites the Dust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#42 vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#31 IBMLink 2000 Finding ESO levels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#32 IBMLink 2000 Finding ESO levels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#4 The Genealogy of the IBM PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#13 Why is switch to DSL so traumatic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#50 Using rexx to send an email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#29 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#54 An old fashioned Christmas
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#55 An old fashioned Christmas
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#46 Whitehouse Emails Were Lost Due to "Upgrade"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#59 Happy 20th Birthday, AS/400
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#8 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#16 Mainframe hacking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#41 another item related to ASCII vs. EBCDIC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#34 IBM Poughkeepsie?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#33 U.S. house decommissions its last mainframe, saves $730,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#38 U.S. house decommissions its last mainframe, saves $730,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#43 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#64 spool file tag data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#1 DEC-10 SOS Editor Intra-Line Editing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#8 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#44 sysout using machine control instead of ANSI control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#87 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#97 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#88 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#61 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#4 When will MVS be able to use cheap dasd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#45 Is email dead? What do you think?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#4 Is email dead? What do you think?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#10 Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#65 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#67 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#83 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#81 A History of VM Performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#82 A History of VM Performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#13 I actually miss working at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#12 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#57 SNA/VTAM Misinformation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#77 Internet pioneer Paul Baran
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#88 Would mainframe technology be relevant in the age of cloud computing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#92 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#95 VM IS DEAD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#11 History of APL -- Software Preservation Group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#73 We list every company in the world that has a mainframe computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#6 Robert Morris, man who helped develop Unix, dies at 78
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#59 FW: Mysterious Email (original had no subject)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#44 CMS load module format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#60 How old is the oldest email in your current email inbox?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#62 JCL CROSS-REFERENCE Utilities (OT for Paul, Rick, and Shmuel)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#15 John R. Opel, RIP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#30 Any candidates for best acronyms?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#38 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#78 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#81 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#141 With cloud computing back to old problems as DDos attacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#17 Inventor of e-mail honored by Smithsonian
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#24 Inventor of e-mail honored by Smithsonian
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#37 IBM cuts more than 1,000 U.S. Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#47 You Don't Need a Cyber Attack to Take Down The North American Power Grid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#49 Do you know where all your sensitive data is located?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#55 Just for a laugh... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#77 Just for a laugh... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#42 The IBM "Open Door" policy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#24 Does the IBM System z Mainframe rely on Security by Obscurity or is it Secure by Design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#61 Should you support or abandon the 3270 as a User Interface?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#66 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 13:50:43 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
past posts mentioning PROFS

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#21 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#22 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#23 "Highway Patrol" back on TV

the iran/contra affair somewhat demonstrated what could be done if you saved everything (except it was gov. email, no expectation of privacy and not violating bill of rights).

for some time there has been assumptions that the gov. was illegally electronically evesdropping on everything ... predating the prospect that everything could be saved/recorded (i.e. millions of multi-terabyte disk drives) ... example is emacs has had function that would add words to email that were purported to be on list of keywords used in domestic surveillance.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 17:37:18 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
for some time there has been assumptions that the gov. was illegally electronically evesdropping on everything ... predating the prospect that everything could be saved/recorded (i.e. millions of multi-terabyte disk drives) ... example is emacs has had function that would add words to email that were purported to be on list of keywords used in domestic surveillance.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#21 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#22 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#23 "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#24 "Highway Patrol" back on TV

petabyte in 42u rack
http://www.aberdeeninc.com/abcatg/petabyte-storage.htm

this claims 240TB in 4U ... so possibly 2petabytes in a rack?
http://www.sunstarco.com/Storage/Nexsan/NexSAN_E60X.htm

500 racks, 1,000 petabyte or exabyte

a zettabyte would be 500,000 racks
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zettabyte

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 18:16:05 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
after IBM, becomes Chairman of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlyle_Group

which does private equity buyout of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booz_Allen_Hamilton

Booz Allen, the World's Most Profitable Spy Organization (and in the middle of the recent controversy)
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-20/booz-allen-the-worlds-most-profitable-spy-organization


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#18 Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life

How Booz Allen Hamilton Swallowed Washington
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington

Does Carlyle have a Booz Allen problem?; Carlyle has made lots of money on Booz Allen, but the NSA scandal could tamp down future returns.
http://finance.fortune.cnn.com/2013/06/12/does-carlyle-have-a-booz-allen-problem/

Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

from above:
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

aka, privatizing of the us government.

older reference to growing Success of Failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

not just in the intelligence community but across the government (long term revenue is higher with a series of failures than an immediate success).

gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

recent posts referencing Success of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#62 America Is Basically Helpless Against The Chinese Hackers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#63 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#53 NSA phone records
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#54 NSA phone records

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

RBS Mainframe Meltdown: A year on, the fallout is still coming

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: RBS Mainframe Meltdown: A year on, the fallout is still coming
Date: 23 June 2013
Blog: IBMers
RBS Mainframe Meltdown: A year on, the fallout is still coming; When the totally brand new kit comes on ... what do you think will happen?
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/06/21/rbs_chernobyl_one_year_on/

... except the first sentence says that "an incident when a case of simple human error by those running critical systems resulted in a crisis" ... I thot the part of migrating everything to the newest generation of mainframe was interesting ... even after the crisis.

Long ago and far away, my wife had been con'ed into going to POK to be in charge of loosely-coupled architecture where she did peer-coupled shared data architecture ... which saw little uptake (except for IMS hotstandby) until sysplex. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

In more recent years, we would periodically drop in on the guy running one of the largest financial network and he attributed 100% availability to 1) triple-redundant, geographically separated IMS hot-standby and 2) automated operator ... aka an increasing number of outages were becoming the result of human error

There was lots of work done on CP67 in the 60s ... not only for security but also for automation ... so it could be left up 7x24. Part of the issue was IBM mainframes were leased and IBM charged on the basis of the cpu meter ... the cpu meter ran whenever the processor and/or channels were busy ... and datacenter costs were recovered by charging for online user resource use. In the early days of offering 7x24, there was little use ... but in order to encourage 7x24 use, the system had to be left up 7x24 (even with little or no use). As a result there was lots of attention to reducing off-shift costs as far as possible. One of the efforts was special channel programs that would accept incoming data from online users ... but allow channel to go idle when there was no incoming data (and therefor allow the cpu meter to stop when system was otherwise idle). The other CP67 effort in the 60s was to automate as much as system operation allowing dark room with no operator off-shift (for instance, CP67 could fail, automatically record all the information, and automagically reboot and be up & running within minute or two). some past posts about 7x24 cp67 online operation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

Later in the 70s, I was doing lots of automatic benchmarking offshift on weekends ... I need the system to automatically reboot between benchmarks and automagically execute the next benchmarking script ... and reboot hundreds of times for different benchmarks. This required doing what we called was automated operator. This was then moved from (internal) cp67 to (internal) vm370 ... csc/vm production system. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#benchmark

In parallel with this ... more and more services (back then service virtual machines modern vernacular virtual appliance) were being deployed in virtual address spaces ... and so it was no longer necessary just to have the system back up and running automagically ... but it was also necessary to get all this virtual services back up and running. The automated operator done for automated benchmarks ... was trivial to adapt for this purpose.

I've periodically mentioned that during the FS period, lots of 370 stuff was being killed off ... and then with the failure of FS ... there was mad rush to get products back into the 370 pipeline. This contributed to decision to start releasing some of my csc/vm stuff to customers (I had continued to do 360/370 stuff during the FS period, even periodically ridiculing their activities). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

old email mentioning moving from cp67 to csc/vm (including support used for automated operator)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430 ..
and discussion of releasing csc/vm features in standard product ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#8 ..

The automated startup was released ... but CSC/VM also included SPM code ... originally done for CP/67 by the Pisa Science Center ... which supported computer processing of system & operator messages ... which was not released.

Note even if not automated ... there has also been lots of work on fail safe ... if person makes a mistake ... that any damage is strictly limited.

Triva: the internal network implementation included support for SPM ... even across different systems in the network. This was leveraged by internal multi-user spacewar game where players could be on the same machine or different machines.

Other trivia: the cpu meter required that both processor and all channels be idle for 400ms before it came to a stop. Long after business moved from rental/sales to purchase (and cpu meter was no longer an issue), MVS still had an internal timer operation that would go off every 400ms. (which would make sure that the cpu meter would never stop as long as MVS was running)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

NSA Releases Secret Pre-History of Computers

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: NSA Releases Secret Pre-History of Computers
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2013 09:45:21 -0400
NSA Releases Secret Pre-History of Computers
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/06/24/1136255/nsa-releases-secret-pre-history-of-computers

It Wasn't All Magic: The Early Struggle to Automate Cryptanalysis
http://www.governmentattic.org/8docs/NSA-WasntAllMagic_2002.pdf
A Collection of Writings on Traffic Analysis.
http://www.governmentattic.org/8docs/NSA-TrafficAnalysisMonograph_1993.pdf

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

By Any Other Name

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: By Any Other Name
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2013 17:58:28 -0400
Jon Elson <jmelson@wustl.edu> writes:
Major performance degradation? These machines were DOGS! From the 360/30 with a totally laughable 40 K instructions/second, as long as all programs used only RR instructions, to the 370/145 which was a bit faster with MST logic, but still ran just a few hundred K instructions/second (.36 or .46 mips depending on version). For the first machine with semiconductor memory, it ought to have done better. It did have pretty good I/O throughput, which of course was IBM's strong suit. We had TSO running on a 3145, and they got FOUR users to tie up the whole machine! Geez, wasn't just a few years later we had 25 users on a VAX 11/780 with no problems. (Note: we NEVER, EVER bought a 360 or 370 new, and often bought them a bit too late, when they were past obsolete.)

Note that VM370 typically supported ten times as many users as TSO (on same hardware), with much better interactive response and throughput ... and much better graceful degradation as workload increased.

vax-11/780 supposedly was considered closer in performance to 4341 than 145.

370/145 Announced 23Sep1970
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP3145.html
370/148 Announced 30Jun1976
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP3148.html
vax-11/780 25Oct1977
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VAX-11
4341 Announced 30Jan1979
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP4341.html

there was a lot of simplification in the morph from cp/67 to vm/370 ... dropping a lot of performance enhancements I had done. I did some work to re-introduce some instruction pathlength optimization that was re-introduced in vm/370 release 2. However, much of cp/67 to vm/370 migration wasn't done until after release 2 ... for csc/vm internal use. Old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

some of csc/vm was shipped to customers as part of vm/370 release 3. other parts of csc/vm was shipped to customers as part of separate charged-for addon to vm/370 release 3.

I also got sucked into working on ECPS for 138/148. Engines avg. 10 native instructions for every 370 instruction. 370 instructions dropped into native nearly on 1:1 basis (for 10:1 performance improvement). Was told that the machines had 6kbytes for ECPS instructions, so objective was to identify that highest used 6kbytes of instructions. This old post has some of the kernel pathlength analysis (highest 6kbytes accounted for 79.55% of kernel cpu time). ECPS shipped for 138/148 (late in release 3 cycle)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21

recent post mentioning head of POK (high-end mainframe) considered one of the biggest contributors to vax/vms:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#5

i.e. head of POK convinced corporate to kill-off vm370 product, shutdown the burlington mall development group and transfer all the people to POK to support mvs/xa (or otherwise mvs/xa wouldn't make ship schedule in the 80s). objective was to not tell the group until just before shutdown (to minimize number of people that would escape), however it managed to leak a couple months early ... allowing many developers to escape (some number going over to dec). endicott eventually managed to save the vm370 product mission ... but had to reconstitute a development group from scratch. share user group had some number of comments about code quality on online discussion group (originated aug1976) ... archived here
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

By Any Other Name

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: By Any Other Name
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 25 Jun 2013 00:05:41 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
At Princeton, I don't think they ever got more than a dozen users running under TSS on a 360/67.

The problem wasn't the hardware, it was bloated code and a virtual memory system that predated the idea of a working set.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#29 By Any Other Name

undergraduate in late 60s, got to play with 768kbyte 360/67 on weekends (ran as 360/65 with os/360 during the week) with cp67 ... trading off some when IBM SE played with tss/360.

we did simulated fortran edit, compile, and execute script ... tss/360 script running 4 simulated users with the script had worse response and throughput than cp/67-cms had running 35 simulated uses. this had some of the pathlength rewrite that i had done by late summer 1968 ... but not all ... part of SHARE presentation i did late summer 1968
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18

release 1 of cp67 didn't do lru page replacement with references bits and didn't have page thrashing control. Lincoln labs did a fixed configuration page thrashing controls ... which was run for above.

I then did dynamic adaptive page thrashing controls, (global) clock-like page replacement with reference bits and dynamic adaptive resource management (achieved similar objective to working set acm paper published in 1968). I also then did order seek queueing for queued disk requests and chained requires for queued page requests on drums or same head position on disk. All significantly further improved throughput and response of "large" number of cms users.

tss/360 looking for bright spot ... did some benchmarks with 1mbyte 360/67 single processor and 2mbyte 360/67 dual processor ... with the 2mbyte dual processor having 3.8 times the throughput of single processor. The spin was that tss/360 was the most advanced multiprocessor operating system since it could get nearly four times the throughput with twice the resources. it actually turns out that the tss/360 kernel was so bloated ... needed much more than 1mbyte real storage for any significant resources available for applications.

much later in the early 80s ... there was co-worker of jim gray's at tandem trying to get his stanford phd on clock/global LRU page replacement ... and was being fiercely fought by the forces behind the 1968 acm working set article (which turned out to also be local lru page replacement). Jim knew that I had done a lot of work as undergraduate in the 60s and asked me to help with his co-worker.

It turns out my stuff was running in the standard cp67 release 3 ... including the 768kbyte single process 360/67 (104 pages for paging after fixed kernel requirements) at the cambridge science center. Thea Grenoble Science Center had 1mbyte 360/67 (154 pages for paging after fixed kernel requirements). Grenoble then modified the cp67 system to implement what was described in the 68 acm working set paper. That grenoble system with 30-35 users had about the same response and throughput as the cambridge system running similar workloads with 70-75 users (half as many users and 50% more real storage for paging). old post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#1

past posts discussing Jim's request
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#46
with part of the response
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email821019

past posts mentioning the paging work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#clock

Jim had originally made the request at the 14-16Dec81 SIGOPS conference ... but research management wouldn't let me send a response until nearly a year later (hopefully it wasn't management taking sides in the academic dispute ... but trying to punish me because they blamed me for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s).

trivia: the thesis advisor later became stanford president

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DRAM is the new Bulk Core

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: DRAM is the new Bulk Core
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Tue, 25 Jun 2013 09:59:58 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
It works fine, but it's still just a way to look at files on the disk.

When I mentioned the S/38 and AS/400, and now I suppose IBM i, I wasn't kidding. They don't have files, just persistent objects.


DRAM is more like the new disk. Bulk core (LCS) for 360 was more like a factor of 4-10 times slower than normal memory. Common recent observation is if latency is measured in processor cycles ... the current latency to memory is compareable to number of processor cycles for disk accesses in the 60s.

tss/360 (360/67) predated s/38 ... same time something similar in multics ... "single-level-store" in the 60s.

early 70s, ibm was going to completely replace 360/370 with "future system" ... completely different than 360/370 ... and also "single level store". Both tss/360 and FS had very poor throughput (although they never actually got around to actually building FS, it died w/o even being announced ... although not before dumping billions ... in 1970 dollars ... down the hole).

at the univ. in the 60s, i played with cp/67-cms on the weekends (on 360/67) ... sometimes alternating with the IBM SE playing with tss/360. we did fortran edit, compile and execute synthetic benchmark and ran on both cp/67-cms and tss/360. cp/67-cms running it with 35 synthetic users had better response and throughput than tss/360 running 4 synthetic users (same hardware, same workload)

at the science center in the early 70s ... i continued to work on cp/67-cms and did a page-mapped filesystem for cms (drawing on lots of things that i considered short-comings in tss/360 single-level-store implementation) ... i also would periodically ridicule the FS activities ... considering what I had running better than their blue-sky stuff. There was also somewhat of rivalry between the science center on 4th flr of 545 tech sq and project mac & multics on 5th flr.

lots of stuff that I had done for cp/67-cms (and later vm370-cms) shipped to customers ... but not the paged-mapped filesystem stuff ... could be considered the bad rep that single-level-store got as result of FS failure (although I could show three times the throughput for moderate filesystem intensive workload compared to standard cms filesystem).

folklore is that some of the FS people retreated to Rochester and did S/38. the issue there is that in the low-end business machine market ... throughput wasn't as much of an issue ... and could be partially compensated for with hardware (one of the nails in the FS coffin was analysis that if FS was built out of the fastest available hardware ... 370/195 ... a workload from 370/195 would have throughput of 370/145 ... about 30 times slowdown).

misc. past posts mentioning FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys
misc. past posts mnetioning doing paged-mapped filesystem for cms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

some other web FS refs:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/fs.html
http://www.ecole.org/en/seances/CM07
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Future_Systems_project
http://gdrean.perso.sfr.fr/papers/promises.html

multics web site:
http://www.multicians.org/index.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Jean Sammet quotation

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Jean Sammet quotation
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 25 Jun 2013 07:07:39 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
Sammet, Jean E. "Brief survey of languages used for systems implementation." ACM SIGPLAN Notices. Vol. 6. No. 9. ACM, 1971.

A Google Scholar search using "Jean Sammet" as the search argument yielded 768 references, a number of which any decently informed person in this field should be acquainted with.


wiki page
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_E._Sammet

Jean was at the ibm boston programming center on the 3rd flr of 545 tech sq (ibm science center was on the 4th flr and project mac, multics was on the 5th flr).

the cp/67-cms group split off from the science center and in the process of morphing into the vm370 group took over the boston programming center on the 3rd flr ... absorbing most of the people (although Jean and one or two others effectively became attached to the science center).

I would sometimes bring my kids with me when I went in to do some work on weekends ... and they could get noisy running up and down some of the halls. Usually the only other person that was in on the weekends was Jean ... and she would periodically look me up to complain about how noisy my kids were.

misc. past posts mentoning 545 tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DRAM is the new Bulk Core

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: DRAM is the new Bulk Core
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Tue, 25 Jun 2013 14:38:13 -0400
jgk@panix.com (Joe keane) writes:
Disks are random-access. Sequential is mag tapes.

The main difference i see is that with disk I/O, it's expected that the current thread will -not- continue, for now that is.

Start the I/O, then call the scheduler to find something to do.

We don't do this with cache, because it's not that slow.

processor: program missed in L1! operating system: OK, what the hell am i supposed to processor: now *you* missed in L1! operating system: !?


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#31 DRAM is the new Bulk Core

however out-of-order execution, branch prediction, speculative execution and multi-threading are hardware mechanisms for giving execution units stuff to do while waiting on cache miss (memory latency masking, hardware equivalent of 60s multiprogramming and multithreading).

I first encountered multi-threading when in the early 70s, I was asked if I could help with 370/195 multiprocessor (never got announced). 195 pipeline had out-of-order execution but neither branch prediction nor speculative execution ... so conditional branch would stall the pipeline (analogous to cache miss instruction stalls) ... and most codes ran at half 370/195 peak rate because of conditional branches.

idea was to have to have simulated multiprocessor with dual i-stream ... instructions in the pipeline would be flagged with one-bit indicating which i-stream they were associated with (two i-streams, running concurrently had chance of keeping execution units feed).

system/38 had a lot of simplification for single-level-store (in addition to throughput issues) ... one was treating all disks as common pool and doing scatter allocation. As a result, system backups required stopping the whole system and doing complete backup of everything as an integral whole. Single disk failures were common failure mode at the time ... any single disk failure required stopping the whole system replacing the physical disk and then doing a complete system restore (which could take as much as 24hrs elapsed time). It was one of the motivations making system/38 an early adapter of raid disks (original raid disk patent was by engineer at the ibm san jose disk plant in the 70s ... that I happened to do some work with).

for higher performance systems, one of the scenarios is attempting to do contiguous allocation on disk and having larger sequential transfers.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 25 Jun 2013 20:03:00 -0400
jsavard@excxn.aNOSPAMb.cdn.invalid (John Savard) writes:
There certainly was a drum available for the System/360, the 7320. It was a swap device, though, not directly part of main memory.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#16 65 Years Ago, Manchester's Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program

there were two drums for 360 ... 2303 and 2301 ... both had 4mbyte capacity and the 2303 transferred about 300kbytes/sec.

the 2301 was very similar to 2303 but transferred 4tracks in parallel ... transfer rate 1.2kbytes/sec ... each 2301 "track" was four times larger than 2303 track ... and there was only 1/4th as many tracks.

original cp67 did single request at a time to 2301 ... so was avg. rotational delay for each transfer resulted in peak 80 4k page i/os. per second. As undergraduate in the 60s, I modified cp67 to do ordered seek gueuing for moveable arm disk ... and channel program chained requests ... doing multiple transfer in same operation ... requests were chained to maximize transfers per revolution ... being able to peak at 270 4k page i/os per second (and with ordered seek queuing easily got twice the throughput on 2314s ... compared to fifo). This was all changes that were picked up and shipped in standard cp67 product.

As configurations and number of users increased ... available space on 2301 became proportionally smaller. in the 70s, csc still only had 360/67 with 768kbyte real memory ... but number of users increasing and number of 2314 drives increase to 45 drives (5 8+1 drive strings and one 5 drive string). Paging was to 2314 if there wasn't 2301 and/or 2301 fills up. I add drum<->disk page migration to keep most active pages on 2301.

purely demand paging ... recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#29 By Any Other Name
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#30 By Any Other Name

other recent posts mentioning cp/67:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#9 IBM ad for Basic Operating System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#16 How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#31 I/O Optimization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#32 Getting at the original command name/line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#35 Some Things Never Die
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#45 Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#47 Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#51 Search for first Web page takes detour into US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#67 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#69 cp67 & vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#71 cp67 & vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#73 Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#75 cp67 & vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#76 DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#84 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#85 Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#9 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#11 EBCDIC and the P-Bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#13 EBCDIC and the P-Bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#27 RBS Mainframe Meltdown: A year on, the fallout is still coming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#31 DRAM is the new Bulk Core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#32 Jean Sammet quotation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Some Hard Numbers On The Western Banking System

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Some Hard Numbers On The Western Banking System
Date: 26 June 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/WG2eEvXftME

Some Hard Numbers On The Western Banking System
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-25/some-hard-numbers-western-banking-system

from above:
The rest of customer deposits are mostly invested in residential mortgage backed securities (similar to those which collapsed in 2008) and commercial loans. In fact, the bank's loan portfolio exceeds total customer deposits. Not exactly the picture of financial health.

... snip ...

The Oct2008 congressional hearings into the pivotal role that the rating agencies played in the financial mess had lots of testimony that the rating agencies were selling triple-A ratings for mortgage backed securities when they knew they weren't worth triple-A. News commentator at the time commented that the rating agencies would likely avoid federal prosecution with ability to blackmail the gov. with threat of rating downgrade. Nothing came up it at the time, but more recently more information has come to light that substantiates the congressional testimony:
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/you-f-ked-up-you-trusted-us-talking-ratings-agencies-with-chris-hayes-20130621
and
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/the-daily-show-does-ratings-agencies-20130625

recent posts mentioning those triple-A ratings:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#0 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#62 Taleb On "Skin In The Game" And His Disdain For Public Intellectuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#68 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#38 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#39 The Alchemy of Securitization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#44 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#71 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#23 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#59 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#90 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#49 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#61 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#5 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#55 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#65 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#66 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#68 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#12 Corrupted credit ratings: Standard & Poor's lawsuit and the evidence

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Subroutine Call

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Subroutine Call
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 26 Jun 2013 11:23:54 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Here you seem to be defining "system" as either TSO or VM/CMS.

Of course, both can run on the same hardware at the same time. Ignoring the "bolted together" aspect, it's an example of one system doing both batch and interactive.

But I don't think I'd put forth IBM as an example of what a system can do. IBM with it's "business case" philosophy sometimes restricts itself from producing state of the art software.

That said ISPF and MVS batch are more integrated and do both batch and interactive pretty well. Add on CICS or IMS/DC and we have the 3rd leg, transactional.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#6 The Subroutine Call

note: similarly "add-on" vs1 (or mvs) in a virtual machine and you have batch facilties.

note that original objective of CICS was to be a subsystem that avoided the use of os/360 system services (initially MVT and later MVS) because they were enormously heavy weight. CICS would acquired system resources at start up ... and then while runing provide its own system services ... in lieu of os/360 system services ... as much as possible (doing eveything possible to minimize/avoid using standard os/360 services)

disclaimer: as undergraduate, the univ. library got an ONR grant to do online catalog ... and the project was also selected to be beta-test for the original CICS product release; I got tasked to support/debug CICS for that effort. misc. past posts mentioning CICS (&/or BDAM)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#cics

one of the problems with mvs was that it continued to use CKD DASD (and not support FBA ... to this day, even though real CKD hasn't been manufactured for decades) and multi-track search. misc. past posts mentioning ckd, fba, multi-track searches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

long ago and far away ... at one point in time, san jose research datacenter had upgraded 370/195/MVT to 370/168/MVS in shared dasd configuration with 370/158 vm370/cms. even tho the dasd strings were physically shared ... there were dasd strings that were suppose to be dedicated to mvs and others dedicated to vm370/cms.

one day, an operator mounted a mvs pack on a vm370/cms string ... and within five minutes, the datacenter was receiving irate calls from cms users regarding severe cms performance degradation. besides all the other limitations in mvs for interactive computing ... the extensive use of CKD multi-track search results in enormous i/o degradation with shared resources (in this case the disk controller for the vm370 cms disk string was being locked up by the multi-track searches going on with the mvs disk).

mvs operations was immediately asked to move the disk pack and they refused ... saying that they would wait until after first shift. the vm370 group had an highly optimized vs1 system for running in virtual machine environment ... they then mounted the vs1 system pack on an a drive on an MVS "string" and started some of our own activity. The VS1 pack on MVS "string" managed to bring the 168/mvs system to its knees ... providing significant throughput release to the cms users (this was even tho the mvs was running on 168 system, and the vs1 system was running in a virtual machine on a heavily loaded 158 system). mvs operations immediately aggreed to move the mvs pack off vm370 string, if we would move the vs1 pack.

In the past, I was called into large customer accounts that was having horrible performance problems ... after all the traditional experts had been brought in and failed to resolve the issue ... an example was a very large national retailer that had numerours systems in loosely-coupled environment ... turns out the performance problem would be the extensive use of CKD multi-track search locking up channels, controllers, and disk. In the national retailer case ... it had a large PDS application library shared across all systems. The PDS directory was 3cyls ... avg. application load was two PDS directory multi-track taking approx. 0.5sec elapsed time followed by the load of the application. The aggregate application load throughput across all the systems in the configuration was less than two per second. With large hundreds of stores across the country all constantly trying to load applications ... things got really, really, bad.

During vm370 life, there was increasing support in the hardware for virtual machine operation. 360/370 making virtual machines possible was the strong separation between problem state instructions and supervisor state instructions ... where virtual machine was run in problem mode and all supervisor state instructions would interrupt into the virtual machine supervisor for simulation. Increasingly there was special mode for hardware handling execution of supervisor state instructions in virtual machine mode (eliminating the overhead of simulation by virtual machine supervisor).

A major step was when Amdahl did "hypervisor" ... implemented in macro-code ... that provided a subset of virtual machine operation totally supported by the hardware eliminating requirement for a software virtual machine operating system.

Eventually IBM responded with PR/SM for the 3090 ... this was significantly more difficult effort. Amdahl was a flavor of standard 370 instructions ... which significantly simplified programming. 3090 PR/SM had to be implemented in the horizontal microcode which was a significantly larger effort.

PR/SM eventually is extended to the current LPAR ... where nearly all systems are run in (LPAR) virtual machine mode.

Trivia: After then 23jun1969 unbundling announcement, IBM had a hard time adapted to charging for software, one of the rules was that the price charged users had to cover the software development and support costs. misc. past posts mentioning unbundling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

There were some number of os/360 products that weren't viable because of their development&support costs were greater than what customers were willing to pay. However, company found some bookkeeping tricks to address the opportunity. For instance MVS JES2 networking support wasn't able to justify announce and ship because their costs was so high. On the otherhand, the corporation was trying to kill off vm370 and wouldn't approve the announcement of VM370 networking support (even tho its costs were close to zero). JES2 eventually cooked a deal with VM370 networking where they were announced as a joint product ... taking the combined JES2&VM370 costs spread across all the VM370 customers ... reduced the product price to level that JES2 customers would pay (in effect vm370 customers were subsidizing JES2).

Another case was ISPF ... the bookkeeping was done a different way ... they put the VM370 performance products in the same development group as ISPF and did the accounting for the group. They cut the VM370 performance products staff back to 3 people and used the revenue from VM370 performance products to subsidize the 200 people in the ISPF development.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Subroutine Call

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Subroutine Call
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 26 Jun 2013 14:33:54 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Somehow I've managed to almost completely avoid CICS and fell into the IMS/DLI/DC world instead.

I suppose at this time, there's nothing on this planet that will bring z/OS into the FBA world.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#6 The Subroutine Call
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#36 The Subroutine Call

I got sucked into IMS periodically.

In 1980 when STL (now renamed silicon valley lab) was bursting at the seams they were moving 300 people from the IMS group to off-site bldg. with remote connection back to STL datacenter. They tried remote 3270s but found the response and human factors totally unacceptable ... they were use to doing their work with channel-attached vm370/cms 3270s. I got con'ned into doing support for channel extender so they could have local channel attached 3270s at the remote site ... turns out some of the stuff done for channel extender resulted in them not seeing difference between real channel attached and the remote channel attahced ... as well as improving the thruput of the local systems by 10-15% (3270 channel programs were down loaded as data to remote channel emulator, offloading some amount of processing from local machine and improving efficiency and throughput). ... some past posts mentioning channel-extender and other high-speed work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

same year, Jim Gray was departing for Tandem and palming off some number of things on me ... including DBMS consulting to the IMS group ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801016

later I was doing some work with VTAM/NCP emulator done on series/1 by one of the babybells ... getting sucked into turning it out as product. The series/1 had a huge number of enhancements ... compared to the base SNA ... that the IMS group became extremely interested in. some old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#67
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#70

IMS hot-standby could fall over almost immediately ... the problem was that it then required VTAM re-establishing sessions. For some of their environments with 30k-60k connections ... it could take an 2-3hrs before it was back up and running (VTAM session establishment was enormously resource hungry ... in both cpu cycles as well as real storage requirements ... resulting in heavy paging).

It turns out one of the features supported by series/1 was shadow sessions ... when the initial session was established ... a shadow session could be established with the backup ... somewhat like tandem was doing ... old tandem availability overview summary done by Jim
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

... so all sessions were ready as soon as hot-standby was ready.

There were lots of internal politics to get around the communication group (since s/1 sales in another division would displace their 37x5 sales). One of the largest 37x5 customers offered to completely underwrite all my funding getting the product out (so I was independent on any internal IBM budget) ... they justified that having s/1 based product ... they would recover all my costs (of turning out the product) in under a year.

what the communication group did next to bury the effort could only be described as truth is stranger than fiction.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DRAM is the new Bulk Core

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: DRAM is the new Bulk Core
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Wed, 26 Jun 2013 19:30:32 -0400
Robert Wessel <robertwessel2@yahoo.com> writes:
Only in the context of the times. Eliminating seeks back then (when you had 80-100ms seeks), left you with only rotational delay (12.5ms, typically, for 2400rpm devices), so that was a substantial (about six or eight-fold) improvement. And 12.5ms was fast only in the sense that most machines only managed to execute a few thousand instructions in that time.

As seek times dropped towards the rotational delays in the late seventies and early eighties, you started seeing increases in rotational rates.

These days seek times are similar to the rotational delays, so you'd only get about a factor of two improvement, but tracks are so much shorter relative to disk capacity now that such a thing would be utterly pointless (it would be far more expensive than the equivalent amount of RAM, not to mention slower).


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#31 DRAM is the new Bulk Core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#33 DRAM is the new Bulk Core

recent discussion about 360 fixed-head drums 2301 & 2303 (head per track).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#34

2303 was standard head r/w with 300kbytes/sec

2301 r/w four heads in parallel for 1.2mbytes/sec transfer with each "track" four times larger and 1/4 as many tracks (same amount of total capacity).

cp67 initially delivered to the univ did single page request at a time to the 2301 ... resulting in "random access" avg. rotational delay per request ... peak at 80 4kbyte page transfers/sec. I did the changes to do page i/o requests with all queued requests in single operation orgranized to maximize number of page transfer per revolution ... increasing peak throughput to approx. 270 4kbyte page requests/sec. (sort of think of it as analog to ordered-seek queueing for moveable arm disks).

later in the 70s there was 2305 fixed-head (head per track) that did 1.5mbytes/sec transfer ... still big difference between throughput of single request at a time random access (avg. rotational delay per request) and careful maximum transfers per rotation.
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_2305.html

there was a special model 2305 that did 3mbyte/sec with two heads in parallel. There were the same number of physical heads as 2305 by pairs of heads were located on the same track offset by 180degrees ... so there was half as many tracks and total capacity was half. Avg. rotational delay was only quarter revolution ... since the two halfs of the track only had to rotate to half the distance before it was at the dual heads position.

in 1980, 3380 moveable arm disks came out with 3mbyte/sec transfer ... and to compensate for lack of new generation of head/track devices ... software was developed to do paging i/o operation in "big page" (full-track) operations (got ten 4kbyte page transfers for every arm access + rotational delay).
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3380.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

1969 networked word processor "Astrotype"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 1969 networked word processor "Astrotype"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 28 Jun 2013 10:43:17 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
You didn't have to have a PDP-10 in the backend but newspapers had typeset-10 running on the -10. I suppose some setups may have had Typeset-8s in "lcoal" areas which then transferred the end product to the -10 for page setup.

The typesetting products for the 10 and 8 were two different products. We didn't run Typeset-8 in Marlboro; we did run Typeset-10.


in the early 90s worked with atex to port from vax/cluster to ha/cmp
http://www.atex.com/

past posts mentioning ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

past posts mentioning atex:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#22 DOS history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#23 DOS history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#1 Home mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#21 DOS C prompt in "Vista"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#57 Ikea type font change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#58 Ikea type font change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#60 Ikea type font change

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Reader Comment on SA22-7832-08 (PoPS), should I?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Reader Comment on SA22-7832-08 (PoPS), should I?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 28 Jun 2013 08:02:00 -0700
charlesm@MCN.ORG (Charles Mills) writes:
I could picture a very 21st century, "electronic" PoP that presented an "index" to the detailed descriptions in the form of a table that could be sorted on name, on mnemonic, on hex opcode, etc.

triva ... PoPs was one of first major IBM pub to move to CMS script. CTSS runoff had been ported to CMS "script" at the science center in the mid-60s ... then in 1969, GML was invented at the science center and GML tag processing added to script. Issue for PoPs. was that it was subset of the architecture "redbook" (for distribution in red 3-ring binder). File had conditional directives and CMS script command line options would output either full "redbook" or the Pops subset (i.e. whole sections that were architecture only and each instruction might have architecture and/or engineering notes about trade-offs, implementation issues, etc).

I never did PoPs ... but did help with ios3270 "greencard" ... a q&d to HTML here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/gcard.html

Over 30yrs ago, I did do a rexx replacement for IPCS (at a time when it was huge amount of assembler) ... my original object was in less than half time over 3months ... re-implement IPCS with ten times the function and ten times the performance (little slight of hand going from assembler to rexx). For this, I did do the problem determination and abend code manual ... converting it to fully index, with (dumprx) being able to pick pieces from the manual on the fly. ... misc. past posts mentioning dumprx
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumpx

dumprx rexx could be run either by itself or within xedit ... so had full capability of xedit to operate.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
Date: 28 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/cN9fFJ
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#13 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#43 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions

How Edward Snowden Snuck Through
http://nation.time.com/2013/06/26/how-edward-snowden-snuck-through/

a lot of this seems to misdirect from the mechanics of being able to obtain all the information at all. 20yrs ago, open security literature had gov. agency state-of-the-art was not only strict access controls but also behavior based monitoring that would catch employee atypical activity. all of that appears to have gone by the wayside as part of privatising the intelligence community and transition to for-profit operation. It appears that they not only aren't doing monitoring but don't appear to even have any idea what may have been taken. References to super administrative privileges imply that provisions requiring multiple individuals have also gone by the wayside.

NSA Networks Might Have Been Missing Anti-Leak Technology
http://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2013/06/nsa-networks-might-have-been-missing-anti-leak-technology/65708/

Would appear to be regression from 20yrs ago ...possibly associated with transition to for-profit operation Also possibly more technology monitor public than internal security. In the financial industry in the past, open security literature claims that as much as 70-80% of breaches have involved insiders ... although it might be more ... in the financial services presidential critical infrastructure meetings, a major concern was making sure that the exploit information sharing ISAC not be subject to FOIA.

... also not exactly unexpected given the stories about classified details of major weapons systems leaking out over the internet for years.

reference to growing Success of Failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

Booz Allen, the World's Most Profitable Spy Organization
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-20/booz-allen-the-worlds-most-profitable-spy-organization
Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

from above:
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

the whistleblower in the Success of Failure case was treated very badly. The scenario is for-profit operations have discovered that a series of failures is a lot more revenue than an immediate success (sort of natural evolution of the beltway bandits "leave no money on the table" paradigm). The congressional investigation put the agency on probation for five years (but did little for the whistleblower) and not able to manage its own projects. However, that may have been just a ploy ... further privatizing the gov. (solution to the problem of for-profit companies in projects is to have more for-profit involvement ... of course, some quarters claim that there is guaranteed 5% kickback to congress on appropriated funds to for-profit companies ... which doesn't happen if it is straight gov. agency)

oh and a little IBM connection.

Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-06-07/business/39803388_1_computer-giant-ibm-gerstner-jr-life

more detailed histories talk about him being in competition to be the next CEO of AMEX ... the looser then leaves ... and eventually does take over some other companies and eventually citibank ... in violation of glass-steagall ... greenspan gives him an exemption while he lobbies congress for repeal of glass-steagall ... originating too-big-to-fail and major factor in the financial mess.

AMEX and KKR are in competition for private-equity take-over of RJR ... KKR wins ... but runs into trouble with RJR and hires Gerstner away to turn it around ... before the IBM board hires Gerstner away to resurrect IBM. Gerstner then leaves to be chairman of another major private equity company.

RJR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RJR_Nabisco
KKR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kohlberg_Kravis_Roberts

It mentions that private equity leveraged buyout of RJR had been the largest buyout up until that point.

wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V._Gerstner,_Jr.
after IBM, becomes Chairman of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlyle_Group
which then does private equity buyout of ... guess who?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booz_Allen_Hamilton

gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Theology question: Parameter formats

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Theology question: Parameter formats
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 28 Jun 2013 14:50:54 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
The elephant in the room is being studiously ignored.

The crucial objection to C's nul-delimited strings of 'conceptually unlimited' length has so far gone unmentioned here. They have been the all but exclusive foci of security breaches, thousands of them, of systems written in C/C++ and their dialects.


I had exceeded my quota on null-delimited string rants for the month.

recent posts about IBM research review of Multics security ... written in PLI and not having any of the string related issues epidemic in c-language implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#35 Some Things Never Die
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#11 EBCDIC and the P-Bit

also, original mainframe tcp/ip stack was implemented in vs/pascal and had none of the string related issues epidemic in c-language implementations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#34 CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#80 Minicomputer Pricing
as well as
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#11 EBCDIC and the P-Bit

lots of past posts on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#buffer

for various reasons the original vs/pascal tcp/ip implementation had some performance issues ... only getting about 44kbytes/sec throughput using full 3090 processor. I did the rfc1044 changes and in some tuning tests at cray research between 4341 and cray ... got sustained channel speed using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed) ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

but not as bad as the subsequent implementation that the communication group contracted for a tcp/ip stack support in vtam. Initial demo had tcp much faster than lu6.2. The communication group told the contractor that everybody knows that for a valid tcp/ip implementation, lu6.2 is much faster than tcp ... and they would only be paying for a *valid* implementation.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Theology question: Parameter formats

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Theology question: Parameter formats
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 28 Jun 2013 16:45:44 -0700
PaulGBoulder@AIM.COM (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
You have, in the past, deprecated "nanny languages", those which enforce compile time or run time validity constraints. Yet Wheeler is praising Pascal for so protecting against security breaches.

It's as easy in C as in assembler to check for buffer overrun (and easier in both cases not to check; damn the consequences). C provides safer versions for many standard library functions:

o instead of strcpy(), strncpy() o instead of strcat(), strncat() o instead of strcmp(), strncmp() o instead of sprintf(), snprintf() o instead of gets(), fgets()


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#42 Theology question: Parameter formats

it isn't just that the oldtime standard never bothered to check that from string length exceeded target buffer

typical C buffer is string array and programmer has to manually manage that buffer length (aka the value used for length). other languages would do the equivalent of the strn functions w/o the programmer manually having to specify the length.

there are additional addons for C that track the target buffer lengths to eliminate the numerous *mistakes* ... even with strn operators (since the values have to be filled in).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 65 Years Ago, Manchester's 'Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 28 Jun 2013 21:35:08 -0400
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
We can't even put people in orbit, we have to rent a boost from Russia.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#16 65 Years Ago, Manchester's Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#34 65 Years Ago, Manchester's Baby' Ran Electronically Stored Program

not only that ... other us rockets that are going up are using russian engines
http://www.spacenews.com/article/launch-report/35956orbital-sues-ula-seeks-rd-180-engines-515-million-in-damages

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech Time Warp of the Week: IBM STRETCH, 1961

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Tech Time Warp of the Week: IBM STRETCH, 1961
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 29 Jun 2013 09:36:59 -0400
Tech Time Warp of the Week: IBM STRETCH, 1961
http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/06/ibm-stretch-nsa/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 29 Jun 2013 12:40:37 -0400
Jorgen Grahn <grahn+nntp@snipabacken.se> writes:
I didn't claim there was.

But there *are* things in Firefox which are worth a lot of money. Being on the list of search engines; being on the initial list of useful bookmarks and so on. If I recall correctly money changes hands when those lists are created.

For better information, see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefox#Affiliations


for all the browsers since invention of SSL ... paying to be certification authority included in the root list shipped as part of the browser has also been source of income.

i've mentioned several times that we were brought in to consult with small client/server startup that wanted to do payments on their server, they had also invented this technology called "SSL" that they wanted to use; the result is now frequently called electronic commerce.

As part of that effort we had to audit the "SSL" process including these new businesses called "certification authorities" ... and establish several requirements for deployment and operation. Almost immediately some number of the requirements were violating ... contributing to some number of the exploits that continue to this day. About that time, I started making references to "comfort" (SSL) digital certificates (i.e. not real security but provides the facade).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#sslcert

for a little drift:

Google making the Web faster with protocol that reduces round trips
http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/06/google-making-the-web-faster-with-protocol-that-reduces-round-trips/

above talks about mapping HTTPS, reducing round-trips, reduce latency.

I've mentioned before that when HTTP originally was mapped on top of TCP ... it changed the paradigm. The TCP implementations assumed long-lived sessions and had relatively inefficient session shutdown. The HTTP(/HTTPS) process had new session for each request ... which enormously drove up session shutdowns. There was point in mid-90s, as webserver traffic scaled up where lots of the large webservers were running 95% of cpu doing FINWAIT (session shutdown) processing. At one point NETSCAPE moved more a whole lot of large SUN servers to a single SEQUENT server. Turns out that SEQUENT had encountered the FINWAIT problem some time before in UNIX commercial markets servicing 20,000 concurrent TELNET sessions.

However, I've also pontificated about some of the techniques for improving integrity of HTTPS/SSL, certification authorities and SSL digital certificates ... but part of the improved integrity then also eliminates majority of the requirement for SSL digital certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#catch22

In the posts, I periodically mention XTP and mapping public key exchange and lightweight HTTPS/SSL piggy-backed on XTP exchange. I had been on the XTP technical advisory board in the 80s ... which did a 3-packet minimum exchange for reliable transport (compared to 7-packet minimum for TCP) ... and SSL/HTTPS then has additional protocol chatter exchange within the TCP session ... the piggy-backing would accomplish public-key encryption for "SSL-light" within the standard XTP minimum 3-packet (significantly reducing latency and round trips).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#xtphsp

Earlier in HSDT, also had done dynamic rate-based pacing as congestion control mechanism ... which I then wrote up for XTP protocol
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/xtprate.html

part of the issue is in the transition from extremely heavy-weight ARPANET, IMP ... as opposed to light-weight, low latency operation for internetworking ... discussed in this wiki entry for former co-worker at science center
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

from above:
That impetus came from strong arguments by Danny Cohen and Jon Postel at USC-ISI and David P. Reed from MIT who advocated for a low delay, if unreliable, datagram mode of operation. From this debate emerged the Internet Protocol and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP)

... snip ...

IMPs had used end-to-end buffer reservation as congestion control ... which scaled extremely poorly. internetworking dropped that but was increasingly subject to congestion/overload.

In '88, Van Jacobson introduce slow-start as mechanism for congestion management
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slow-start

however, ACM SIGCOMM had article same year how slow-start is non-stable in large heterogeneous networks. One scenario has slow-start trying to approximating spreading out packet transmission indirectly with adjusting number of outstanding packets ... to prevent back-to-back packet transmission ... and buffer overload at intermediate nodes. However, in large heterogeneous networks, returning ACKs are subject to clumping/batching ... so several arrive at one time, resulting in several back-to-back packets being transmitted.

Dynamic rate-based control can explicitly controls the time-interval between packet transmissions and is immune to back-to-back packet transmission caused by ACK clumping. I've periodically pontificated that Van Jacobson may have had to resort to windowing as a indirect state control mechanism because many of the platforms from the period had extremely poor timer facilities.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Making mainframe technology hip again

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Making mainframe technology hip again
Date: 29 June 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/fgPaXK

Making mainframe technology hip again
http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/opinion/Making-mainframe-technology-hip-again

mainframe channel paid enormous penalty for end-to-end half-duplex operation ... with channel program serialized one CCW at a time in mainframe memory.

1980, I get con'ed into doing support for channel extender allowing 300 people from the IMS group to be moved to offsite bldg, with channel-attached 3270 back to the STL datacenter. Part of this was downloading complete channel program to the remote end for remote execution. This resulted in the 300 not seeing any difference in human factors and response (compared to local execution) and also improved local mainframe throughput by 10-15 percent (improved channel i/o efficiency).

1988 I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they had ... this morphs into fibre channel standard ... includes downloading channel program to remote end and efficient concurrent transfer in both directions (note this is before ESCON, which is already obsolete by the time it ships). Then some POK channel engineers got involved defining heavy duty layer on top of FCS that drastically reduced native throughput ... which then evolves into FICON.

Recent z196 peak i/o benchmark got 2M IOPS using 104 FICON. Also, reports that max. 14 system assist processors run 100% busy at 2.2M SSCH/sec ... and recommends keeping utilization to 70% or less (1.5M SSCH/sec). By comparison a recent "native" FCS was announced for E5-2600 claiming over 1M IOPS (two such FCS having more thruput than 104 FICON ... even though 104 FICON are built on top of 104 FCS)

It is actually worse than that. Channel program requires real addresses. In the 60s, CP67 running virtual machines required CCWTRANS to scan the channel program of the virtual machine and create a duplicate that substituted real addresses for the virtual addresses.

OS/360 has a paradigm where the access methods are running in the application space, creating the channel programs and doing an EXCP/SVC0. In the transition from MVT to OS/VS2 ... Ludlow took CCWTRANS from CP67 and crafted it into the side of EXCP processing ... i.e. OS/VS2 EXCP has the same problem with channel programs built in the virtual address space as does CP67(/VM370) with channel programs built by virtual machine ... i.e. the channel program has to be scanned by software with a duplicate program built where the access method virtual channel program (with virtual addresses) and a duplicate channel program built that substitutes real addresses for the virtual addresses.

Disclaimer: visiting POK, I would periodically wander thru the 706 machine room 3rd shift ... when Ludlow was busily trying to get the initial implementation of OS/VS2 up and running. This is old post with reminiscenes by one of the other people involved ... including difficulty moving the real memory 360 paradigm (including real memory channel programming) to a virtual memory paradigm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73

above also mentions that one of the major HASP developers had done another approach for moving MFT to virtual memory environment that he called RASP (however that wasn't used). The above also mentions work on extended CCWs to handle virtual addresses which never got done.

There were lots of trade-offs in 360 ... especially with respect to real addresses ... that should have been completely changed for virtual memory ... but didn't get done. One of the reasons is that shortly after decision to have all 370s be virtual memory based (compared to just the 360/67 for 360) ... there was also a decision to start the FS project ... which was going to completely replace 370 (and significantly different from 370) ... during the FS period, there was lots of 370 development shutdown (which is also credited with giving the clone processors a market foothold). There was billions spent on FS ... and when it imploded w/o even being announced ... there was mad rush to get products back into the 370 pipeline. This was a major contributor that 370 never evolved more graceful migration to virtual memory environment (lots of stuff haphazard, rushed and not cleanly thought out).

There are various things around the web about it was going to take the company decades to recover from the FS failure ... and by that time there was big downturn in the mainframe market, the company had gone into the red, the company had been re-organized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company (saved at the last minute by the board bringing in Gerstner to reverse the process) ... and people in POK mainframe were sending out email that would the last person to leave POK, please turn out the lights (take-off on billboard from the 60s in Seattle during a Boeing downturn).

A single FCS for e5-2600 capable of doing over 1M IOPS ... says something about the paradgim ... when peak I/O z196 doing 2M IOPS requires 104 FICON and 14 system assist processors all running nearly 100% busy

I'm saying that preserving some of the trade-offs made for 360 50 yrs ago affects its competitiveness. There is the alternate scenario ... there is no real intention to be competitive ... just try and preserve maximum compatibility and milk the current install base for as long as possible

... consider that they have made i/o programming enhancements to some of these server platforms ... e5-2600 is two chips, 8 core(processors) per chip ... 16 core (processors) total ... A single e5-2600 FCS claiming over 1M IOPS has got to have sophisticated/efficient programming model.

80 processor z196 peak I/O at 2M IOPS has 104 FICON and 14 i/o system assist processors (running nearly saturation). There are almost as many dedicated i/o SAP processors (running flat out) as there are total e5-2600 processors.

other recent posts mentioning FICON:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#12 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#16 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#45 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#4 Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#38 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#2 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#4 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#14 Tech Time Warp of the Week: The 50-Pound Portable PC, 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#23 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#49 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#85 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#42 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#79 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#80 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#86 By Any Other Name

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Google takes on Internet Standards with TCP Proposals, SPDY standardization

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Google takes on Internet Standards with TCP Proposals, SPDY standardization
Date: 30 June 2013
Blog: IETF - The Internet Engineering Task Force
re:
http://lnkd.in/FCwpMR
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#98 Google works on Internet standards with TCP proposals, SPDY standardization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#99 Google works on Internet standards with TCP proposals, SPDY standardization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#103 Google works on Internet standards with TCP proposals, SPDY standardization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#105 Google works on Internet standards with TCP proposals, SPDY standardization

Google making the Web faster with protocol that reduces round trips;

Chrome testers to get faster speed with QUIC, an experimental network protocol.
http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/06/google-making-the-web-faster-with-protocol-that-reduces-round-trip

as mentioned upthread, I was on XTP technical advisory board which would do reliable transport in minimum of 3packets (compared to minimum of 7packets for TCP). I also wrote the specification for XTP dynamic rate-based transmission for congestion management ... and several times more recently I've written about doing HTTPS/TLS piggy-backed on XTP reliable 3packet exchange.

Google's New Secure UDP-Based Protocol
http://tech.slashdot.org/story/13/06/28/1857202/quic-googles-new-secure-udp-based-protocol

recent discussion in a.f.c.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#46

from last year here in linkedin IETF

little drift (from last month) ... my "catch22" theme about having some public key as part of domain name lookup

Google now the largest public DNS provider in the world
http://www.fiercecio.com/techwatch/story/google-now-largest-public-dns-provider-world/2012-02-16

I had lots of gripes about PKI after doing whats now frequently called electronic commerce with SSL (getting close to 20yrs ago) ... and after one particular session with a few people ... they appeared to kickoff OCSP to try and address some of the issues ... which carefully avoided actually eliminating the certificate part.

I worked on XTP back in the 80s ... was looking at real-time flow ... for things like video on demand ... but also reliable transaction with minimum of 3packet exchange (compared to 7packet minium exchange for tcp/ip). HTTP was supposedly datagram/atomic ... but implemented on top of TCP for reliable. One of the consequences was TCP had been long-term session ... and handle inefficient mechanism for FINWAIT processing (session shutdown) assuming few on the list. There was period in the 90s as webservers scaled up and found that they were spending 90+% of total CPU time in FINWAIT processing.

The other opportunity is replacing PKI stale/static digital certificate processing with real-time information ... part of this shows up in this item about little security progress in almost 20yrs
https://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001368.html

related to latency ... not simply real-time

How One Second Could Cost Amazon $1.6 Billion In Sales
http://www.fastcompany.com/1825005/impatient-america-needs-faster-intertubes

False Start's sad demise: Google abandons noble attempt to make SSL less painful
http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2012/04/google-abandons-noble-experiment-to-make-ssl-less-painful.ars

reference to above ... also "too expensive" ... one of the things potentially part of SPDY.

Note part of the original "SSL" as part of e-commerce ... there was criteria that "SSL" be used for the initial connection and used for the whole session with the website. Fairly early, websites found that "SSL" cut their throughput by 90-95% and so they dropped back to just using "SSL" for checkout/paying ... which violated a fundamental "SSL" security criteria.

"SSL" security/integrity requires that user understands the relationship between the website they think they are talking to and the corresponding URL that they've entered into the browser. Then the browser "SSL" establishes the relationship between the entered URL and the webserver actually being talked to.

*BOTH* are required to establish the integrity that the webserver that the user thinks they are talking to is actually the webserver they are talking to. Dropping back to user clicking on pay/checkout buttom violates fundamental "SSL" requirement ... since an unvalidated webserver is providing the URL (not the user) for the SSL session ... potentially degrading to simply the webserver is whatever webserver that the webserver claims to be.

Google gives Apache a SPDY boost; Google's SPDY protocol could speed delivery of Web pages from Apache servers
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9226347/Google_gives_Apache_a_SPDY_boost
Google gives Apache a SPDY boost Google's SPDY protocol could speed delivery of Web pages from Apache servers
http://www.infoworld.com/d/networking/google-gives-apache-spdy-boost-191244
Google Gives Apache a SPDY Boost
http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/254063/google_gives_apache_a_spdy_boost.html

and ....

Going With the Flow: Google's Secret Switch to the Next Wave of Networking
http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2012/04/going-with-the-flow-google/
Google reVAMP network via OpenFlow
http://www.zdnet.com/blog/btl/google-reVAMPS-network-via-openflow/74405
Google describes its OpenFlow network
http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-news/4371179/Google-describes-its-OpenFlow-network

Part of the original use of SSL for e-commerce ... it was also used for the payment transaction interaction between the e-commerce servers and something called the "payment gateway" (sat on the internet and provided gateway to the payment networks). For this communication, I mandated "mutual SSL authentication" (implementation didn't yet exist) ... which used public-key authentication for the parties at both ends. However, the servers and the payment gateway needed to be pre-registered with each other ... so digital certificates were redundant and superfluous (purely a side-effect of the SSL library being used) ... effectively much more akin to PGP public key (w/o requirement to have digital certificates).

Not as SPDY as You Thought
http://www.guypo.com/technical/not-as-spdy-as-you-thought/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
Date: 30 June 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/DCMcPh

way upthread for the fun of it ... i periodically reference "EBCDIC and the P-BIT (The Biggest Computer Goof Ever)"
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM

i.e. 360 was originally suppose to be an ASCII machine and it was really big goof when it became an EBCDIC instead

The downturn of mainframe accelerated in the late 80s. In the mid-80s, top management was predicting that the business would double ($60B to $120B) mostly based on mainframe sales .... even when that business was starting to go in the opposite direction. Top management had massive building program to double mainframe manufacturing capacity. A senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference and open with statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The problem was that the communication group had strategic responsibility for everything that crossed the datacenter walls ("stranglehold" on datacenters), attempting to preserve their dumb (emulated) terminal install base and fiercely fighting off client/server and distributed computing. The disk division was starting see data fleeing the datacenter for distributed computing friendly platforms. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to fix the problem ... but were constantly vetoed by the communication group

In the mid-90s, one of the last major bastions of mainframe was the financial industry ... however they were spending billions of dollars to redo overnight batch settlement to parallel processing on large number of "killer micros" for straight-through processing The issue was that old time financial batch processing had been front-ended with real-time transactions in the 70s&80s ... but completion of transactions still waited until overnight batch for completion. The problem was globalization was both increasing the amount of business that needed to be done and shrinking the size of the overnight window.

It turns out that they were using some parallelization technology that introduced a factor of 100 times overhead increase (compared to batch cobol) ... totally swamping any anticipated throughput increases from large numbers of killer micros ... and didn't bother to pay any attention to throughput issues (even when presented with numbers) until deployments.

As an aside at least up until start of the century ... start of fall semester saw a big upswing in homework questions on usenet newsgroups ... at the time, university frequently was the first major exposure that they had to internet and online.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internet

IBM-MAIN originated as BITNET mailing list during the 80s.

A co-worker at the science center had originated the ibm internal network ... larger than arpanet/internet from just about the start until sometime late '85 or early '86.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

In the early 80s, the corporation started sponsoring BITNET (in the US, EARN in Europe) with technology similar to that used for the internal network (vm370 rscs/vnet). First part of the 80s, BITNET/EARN was also larger than arpanet/internet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET

The big change in arpanet/internet was the switch from (IMP-based) arpanet to internetworking on 1Jan1983. At the time of the switch-over ARPANET had 100 IMP network nodes (and possibly 255 connected hosts) ... when internal network was about to pass 1000. IMPs were tightly controlled resource by the government and implementation didn't scale well (there were jokes that periodically nearly all ARPANET bandwidth was taken up with IMP administration overhead protocol chatter).

disclaimer: I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s. Folklore is that when the executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me (rumor is that what saved me from being fired was over 25,000 employees were reading &/or participating; mostly happening w/o the executive even being aware of the internal network and/or online computer conferecing).

from ibm jargon:
Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

This particular discussion started Spring 1981, when I visited Jim Gray at Tandem, wrote up and distributed a trip report (he had left IBM the fall before ... palming a bunch of stuff on to me ... DBMS consulting with the IMS group ... interfacing with early customers of the original relational/SQL implementation).

There was several reasons that early BITNET was primarily vm/370 rscs/vnet. The MVS/JES2 networking support traces back to TUCC where unused entries in the HASP 255 psuedo-device table was used to define network nodes (typically around 150-170 nodes). Well up to release, some of the source code still carried "TUCC" in cols. 68-71.

The JES2 code would trash traffic if the origin and/or destination node wasn't locally defined in the table (which became increasingly difficult as total nodes exceeded max number that could be defined)

The internal network (vm/370 rscs/vnet) had cleanly defined layers ... and as result was able to cleanly do native line-drivers as well as foreign line-drivers to things like JES2.

JES2 had intermingled network information with other JES2 fields ... JES2 systems had to be kept to boundary nodes ... in part because of their propensity for trashing traffic (not being able to define all nodes).

However, the other problem JES2 had was because the fields weren't cleanly separated ... two JES2 at different release levels ... exchanging traffic had tendency to crash JES2 and bring down MVS. Internally, a large number of foreign JES2 drivers grew up for RSCS/VNET that were specific for JES2 releases. It was the responsibility of the RSCS/VNET JES2 drivers to have canonical representation of JES2 header fields and covert to specific format expected by JES2 release it was talking to. There was infamous case of JES2 system in San Jose resulting in MVS system in Hursley crashing. ... and it was blamed on the Hursley VM370 system not using the appropriate JES2 driver (that would keep the San Jose MVS system from crashing the Hursley MVS system)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Subroutine Call

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Subroutine Call
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2013 11:55:21 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
The Cray-1 had exteremly fast I/O channels for its day.

we got called in a little to help LANL with HiPPI ... which was standardization of Cray's 100mbyte/sec channel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HIPPI

a co-worker had left IBM and was doing various projects in silicon valley. One project he did was for Apple ... he had Cray machine with with 100mbyte/sec graphics device and they were doing lots of human factors studies ... being able to simulate various graphical Apple operations on the Cray with 100mbyte/sec graphical device

the 3090 group trying to show they played as supercomputer ... had added vector facility ... although some of the 3090 engineers would complain that it was just for show ... that they had increased performance of scalar floating point that it kept up with memory bandwidth ... vector adds multiple (slow) floating point units that operate in parallel ... being able to utilize excess memory bandwidth

the other thing they had to show was being able to connect HiPPI devices being able to do 100mbyte/sec. The 3090 i/o interface barely does 4.5mbyte/sec ... so some kingston engineers came up with gimick to hack into the side of the 3090 extended store bus (which could handle the data rate). Unfortunately the 3090 extended store interface was purely 4kbyte move operations ... so they had to resort to reserved addresses on the extended store bus and using peak/poke i/o progrmaming paradigm.

1988 we were also asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they have ... which morphs into fibre-channel standard ... parallel 1gbit/sec in both directions. The HiPPI group was then doing stuff for serial-HiPPI (HiPPI being parallel half-duplex operation).

In 1980, I was con'ed into doing channel extender support for STL which was moving 300 people from the IMS group to offsite building with remote servuce back into the STL datacenter. Part of that was downloading the mainframe channel program to a remote channel simulator (significantly cutting the protocol handshaking that channel operation required back into mainframe processor memory). The vendor then tries to get aggreement that they can ship my support. There is a group in POK that has been playing with some serial stuff ... and they make sure that the corporate doesn't approve ... they were afraid if it is in the marketplace ... it might inhibit the ability to ship their serial stuff. some past posts mentioning doing high-speed stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

However, they don't ship until a decade later in 1990 as ESCON with ES/9000 ... by which time it is already obsolete. FCS is starting to emerge ... and it has i/o programming download support (part of cutting latency operation) ... ESCON is much slower and doesn't have I/O programming download support ... continuing to simulate half-duplex operation (lots of bandwidth idle/lost because of sequential protocol chatter latency)

Some mainframe channel engineers eventually get involved with fibre-channel standard and define a heavy-weight layer on top of FCS that drastically cuts throughput (effectively simulating ESCON and half-duplex operation on faster fiber) ... which eventually emerges as FICON.

The fibre-channel wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibre_Channel

from above:
Fibre Channel started in 1988, with ANSI standard approval in 1994, as a way to simplify the HIPPI system then in use for similar roles. HIPPI used a massive 50-pair cable with bulky connectors, and had limited cable lengths. When Fibre Channel started to compete for the mass storage market its primary competitor was IBM's proprietary Serial Storage Architecture (SSA) interface. Eventually the market chose Fibre Channel over SSA, depriving IBM of control over the next generation of mid- to high-end storage technology. Fibre Channel was primarily concerned with simplifying the connections and increasing distances, as opposed to increasing speeds

... snip ...

we had been involved with SSA precursor in HA/CMP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp
and reference in this old post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

but wanted it to morph into inter-operable as fractional FCS ... but instead it morphs into incompatible standard (aka it didn't need to play out that way with "either/or"). Also the part in above of not being concerned with increasing speeds is disingenuous

FICON wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FICON

for a little more topic drift ... recent post about cutting protocol chatter for minimizing latency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#46 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#48 Google takes on Internet Standards with TCP Proposals, SBDY standardization

other recent posts mentioning FICON:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#2 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#4 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#14 Tech Time Warp of the Week: The 50-Pound Portable PC, 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#23 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#49 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#85 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#42 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#79 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#80 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#86 By Any Other Name
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#47 Making mainframe technology hip again

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
Date: 30 June 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/DCMcPh
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#49 Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful

wiki entry for co-worker responsible for the internal network as well as what was used for bitnet
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

This also goes into some detail
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cool-to-be-clever-edson-hendricks/id483020515?mt=8

and there is a physical book that can be ordered from amazon and other booksellers.

somewhat in the wake of being blamed for online computer conferencing ... there was taskforce to investigate. part of the outcome was setting up officially sanctioned discussions using automated tool (TOOLSRUN) that could ooperate in both usenet news mode as well as (listserv) mailing list mode.

old email from somebody that just moved to Paris to setup EARN ... asking if I had any network applications for universities:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#email840320 ..

bitnet listserv then done in Paris in 1986
http://www.lsoft.com/corporate/history-listserv.asp

precursor internet/public-cloud ... interconnected supercomputers as information utility:
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing

we had been working with director of NSF and the NSF supercomputer centers and were suppose to get $20M to connect them all together. Congress then cut the budget and several other things happen. Finally NSF releases an RFP ... but internal politics prevent us from bidding. Director of NSF tries to help by writing the company a letter (copying the CEO), but that just makes the internal politics worse (as well as comments about what we already had running was at least five years ahead of all bid submissions). Some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

Recent posts discussing some new stuff Google pushing for internet/public-cloud that we had running nearly 30yrs ago
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#46 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#48 ..

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
Date: 30 June 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/DCMcPh
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#49 Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#51 Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful

RSCS/VNET used spool ... vm370 spool was a serialized synchronous API ... and loaded vm370 might only be able to provide 4-5 4kbyte records/sec to RSCS/VNET ... say 20kbyte/sec or 200kbits/sec. For HSDT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

i had multiple T1 links (and faster links) ... each link 1.5mbit/sec full duplex, 3mbits/sec aggregate ... I needed on the order of minimum 3mbytes/sec effective, sustained out of the spool API for HSDT RSCS/VNET. I rewrote vm370 spool in vs/pascal running in a virtual address space ... did whole bunch of really fancy stuff ... contiguous allocation, multi-page writes, multi-page reads, asynchronous operation .

I also tried making it available for the internal backbone machines (which were starting to have multiple 56kbit duplex links ... needing 100kbit/sec sustained per link). This is old email where it was in period that the communication group trying to force the internal network (starting with the internal backbone machines) to SNA. Email referenced that the corporate backbone meetings were restricted to managers only as part of forcing the SNA ... and started precluding technical people ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#email870302 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#email870306 ..

Original mainframe tcp/ip product was also implemented in VS/Pascal ... but had some throughput issues ... got 44kbyte/sec using nearly full 3090 processor. I did the changes to support RFC1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research got sustained channel throughput between Cray and 4341 using only modest amount of 4341 processor ... possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#rfc1044

other posts mentioning internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 01 July 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5

keeps marching on: Amazon's $600 Million CIA Deal Really Is For A Game-Changing 'Private' Cloud
http://www.businessinsider.com/details-emerge-on-amazons-cia-cloud-2013-6

from above:
If Amazon gets into the enterprise cloud business in a big way, as all signs indicate is will, that's not good news for companies like IBM, HP, Dell, VMware or Microsoft who are all banking that cloud will be the next big growth area for them.

... snip ...

archived past posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#58 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#61 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#72 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#74 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#78 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#80 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#93 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#8 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#10 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#15 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
Date: 02 July 2013
Blog: IBMers
Private equity companies have been major driver behind off-shoring jobs. Private equity companies are similar to real-estate speculators, which take out mortgage to buy a house, hold during inflation, and then flip it (paying off the original mortgage with the higher priced sale). Difference is that in the reverse-IPO/IPO flip, the original loan to do the reverse-IPO transfers to the new owners (private equity walks away with the proceeds of the IPO, leaving the company with enormous debt, including the original loan to do the reverse-IPO). Treasure Islands: Uncovering the Damage of Offshore Banking and Tax Havens, pg216/loc4511-14:
Plenty of good firms have gone bust as a result of this offshore debt-loading, which the New York Times in 2009 described as "a Wall Street version of 'Flip This House.'" 48 More than half of the companies that defaulted on their debt that year were either previously or currently owned by private equity firms.

... snip ...

Off-shoring jobs is one of the short-term boost to numbers during the private equity flipping process.

Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-06-07/business/39803388_1_computer-giant-ibm-gerstner-jr-life

more detailed histories talk about him being in competition to be the next CEO of AMEX ... the looser then leaves ... and eventually does take over some other companies and eventually citibank ... in violation of glass-steagall ... greenspan gives him an exemption while he lobbies congress for repeal of glass-steagall ... originating too-big-to-fail and major factor in the financial mess.

AMEX and KKR are in competition for private-equity take-over of RJR ... KKR wins ... but runs into trouble with RJR and hires Gerstner away to turn it around ... before the IBM board hires Gerstner away to resurrect IBM. Gerstner then leaves to be chairman of another major private equity company.

RJR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RJR_Nabisco
KKR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kohlberg_Kravis_Roberts

It mentions that private equity leveraged buyout of RJR had been the largest buyout up until that point.

wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V._Gerstner,_Jr.
after IBM, becomes Chairman of another large private equity company
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlyle_Group
which then does private equity buyout of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booz_Allen_Hamilton

Booz Allen, the World's Most Profitable Spy Organization (and in the middle of the recent controversy)
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-20/booz-allen-the-worlds-most-profitable-spy-organization

for-profit companies privatizing intelligence

Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

from above:
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

Spying on the EU is an exercise in futility
http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/concoughlin/100224120/spying-on-the-eu-is-an-exercise-in-futility/

well there is economic espionage (and the for-profit companies running intelligence)

How Much Are the NSA and CIA Front Running Markets?
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/06/how-much-are-the-nsa-and-cia-front-running-markets.html

part of the long winded details of tax havens and money laundering

Treasure Islands: Uncovering the Damage of Offshore Banking and Tax Havens
http://www.amazon.com/Treasure-Islands-Havens-Stole-ebook/dp/B004OA6420/

competition between the US and Britain in the race to the bottom for tax haven secrecy and money laundering.

gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#84 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#87 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#90 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#92 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#95 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#82 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#2 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#12 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#18 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#31 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#46 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#68 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#63 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#65 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#71 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#23 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than any of the other countries in the world including the USA.?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#67 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than any of the other countries in the world including the USA.?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#9 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than any of the other countries in the world including the USA.?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

1969 networked word processor "Astrotype"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 1969 networked word processor "Astrotype"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Jul 2013 13:07:30 -0400
Patrick Scheible <kkt@zipcon.net> writes:
There are docs, not as good as the ones for DEC back in the day but when you're selling a $100,000 worth of product it's easy to include a few thousand $ worth of technical writer's time. When it's a $500 PC, not so much. There are also a lot of resources now that weren't available in the 1970s.

say @$50 on 200,000 $500 PCs is same as $10,000 on 1,000 $100,000 machines ... one could claim that good documentation is more important when it is 200,000 customers ... might actually be closer to 2,000,000 machines.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

unusual IBM system console

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: unusual IBM system console
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Jul 2013 23:02:12 -0400
"Joe Morris" <j.c.morris@verizon.net> writes:
Unless someone from the inside IBM (like Lynn) says otherwise I would doubt that there would be any attempt to have a 2321 in a publicity photo for the /370. By early 1968 (if not sooner) the Installation News Letter was publishing unofficial tweaks to OS/360 (such as issuing a WTO of "DDCARD MISSING" on an attempt to open a nonexistent DDNAME) that used the address space occupied by 2321-related code as a patch area. I'm sure that some of the IBMers weren't happy about that, but to me it says much about the way the Noodle Stuffer was viewed both inside and outside IBM.

re:
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/datacell.html

when i was undergraduate, univ library got ONR grant to do online catalog ... effort was selected for betatest for original cics program product and i got tasked to support/debug cics. part of the ONR grant went to 2321 datacell.

years later, i ran into one of the former san jose engineers that worked on development of 2321 ... he left in about the same time frame as shugart ... and shows up at memorex ... and then forms database machine startup with somebody from memorex.

i don't understand if it is a ibm product picture with it attached to 370 .... i could understand if it was in some customer shop that had upgrade from 360 to 370 and was still using 2321. I don't recognize the front panel, maybe it is really early picture with 360 front panel mockup

sort of replacement for 2321 is 3850 mss
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/mss.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Doug Englebart

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Doug Englebart
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 04 Jul 2013 08:51:27 -0400
Patrick Scheible <kkt@zipcon.net> writes:
Damn.

He's known for the mouse, but that's least significant of his visions.


doug was at tymshare when m/d bought them ... and tymshare was running his augment system on pdp10. i was brought in to audit/review gnosis for spinoff to keykos. i was also asked if i could find anybody interested at ibm to hire doug. i sent up some interviews ... but it was real mismatch.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Doug Englebart

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Doug Englebart
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 04 Jul 2013 18:27:59 -0400
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
DIdn't Doug Englebart experiment with trackballs too? EIther rejecting them or seeing them as an alternative to the mouse? I finally got one of those last year for 75cents at a garage sale, I haven't used it that much for the simple reason that it has no scroll wheel, and in waiting to get a cheap trackball, I've gotten used to having the scroll wheel. One of these days I may take a cheap scroll mouse and add the scroll wheel to the trackball.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#57 Doug Engelbart

NLS (augment)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NLS_%28computer_system%29

with cord keyboard.

about that time, the human factors group had a cord keyboard for 3277 somewhat the shape of large mouse with depressions for each finger and rocker switch at the finger tips. claims of 2-3 times typing speed of standard 3277 qwerty keyboard (with one hand) ... would allow one handed keyboard with other hand on (real) mouse

other reference "five-key keyset" on left and 3-button mouse on right
http://www.dougengelbart.org/firsts/mouse.html

past posts mentioning engelbart, augment, and/or cord keyboard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#22 No more innovation? Get serious
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#26 Who Owns the HyperLink?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#31 stupid user stories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#4 markup vs wysiwyg (was: Re: learning how to use a computer)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#48 XML, AI, Cyc, psych, and literature
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#55 creat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#47 creat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#12 Flat Query
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#50 stacks: sorting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#51 stacks: sorting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#54 Douglas Engelbart's HyperScope 1.0 Launched
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#22 vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#29 Even worse than UNIX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#53 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#23 Doug Engelbart's "Mother of All Demos"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#57 PC premiered 40 years ago to awed crowd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#62 PC premiered 40 years ago to awed crowd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#3 New machine code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#61 Does IBM host guest speakers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#28 Opinion: The top 10 operating system stinkers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#8 Fathers of Technology: 10 Unsung Heroes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#84 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#9 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#53 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#63 VMSHARE Archives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#11 Typewriter vs. Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#31 Colossal Cave Adventure in PL/I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#2 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#39 Just a quick link to a video by the National Research Council of Canada made in 1971 on computer technology for filmmaking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#40 GNOSIS & KeyKOS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#80 Still not convinced about the superiority of mainframe security vs distributed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#55 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#60 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Making mainframe technology hip again

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Making mainframe technology hip again
Date: 07 July 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/fgPaXK
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#47 Making mainframe technology hip again

note ... see upthread comments about FICON (& SSCH) throughput/overhead compared to underlying fibre-channel .... aka FICON heavy-weight layered ontop of fibre-channel standard. Peak z196 I/O benchmark was 2M IOPS, 104 FICONs (layered on top 104 fibre-channel) & 14 SAPs (near saturation, 14 SAPs rated at 2.2M SSCH/sec running 100% busy, but recommendation SAPs kept to 70% busy or 1.5M SSCH/sec). By comparison, recent fibre-channel announced for e5-2600 claims over 1M IOPS (on single fibre-channel, in effect, two such FCS would have higher throughput than 104 FICON).

As mentioned up thread, in 1980, STL (since renamed silicon valley lab) con'ed me into doing channel-extender support for 300 people from IMS group being moved to off-site bldg with remote access to services back in STL datacenter. Part of that was downloading channel programs to remote end to significantly reduce channel latency & overhead. Later in 1988, I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial technology they have ... which morphs into fibre-channel standard. Later some POK channel engineers become involved and define a heavy-weight layer on top of FCS that significantly cuts the native throughput and eventually mophs into FICON.

max. configured z196 has 80 processors and rating of 50BIPS and goes for $28M or $560,000/BIPS. IBM financial has the mainframe group avg. $6.25 in total revenue for every dollar of processor revenue ... aka on avg, IBM revenue from $28M z196 would total $175M or $3.5M/BIPS. IBM has base list price for E5-2600 blade of $1815 ... which have processor rating of 527BIPS ... or $3.44/BIPS. Large cloud operators are claiming they build their own blades for 1/3rd the cost of brand name blades ... making it closer to $1/BIPS (compared to $3.5M/BIPS for z196; more than million times difference).

Note that the server chip manufacturers are claiming that they now ship more server chips directly to large cloud operators (building their own blades) than they ship to brand name vendors (the numbers for the large cloud operators don't even show up in the server market numbers).

Also note that one of the reasons that large cloud operators are the pioneers in green technology is that with the massive reduction in their system costs ... the other datacenter costs (power, floor space, cooling, etc) are starting to dominate their total cost of operation.

for different discussion on throughput (and latency) see this long-winded discussion over in the internet standards group:
http://lnkd.in/FCwpMR

it references this item that one second can cost Amazon $1.6B in sales
http://www.fastcompany.com/1825005/how-one-second-could-cost-amazon-16-billion-sales

archived posts in the IETF thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#98 Google works on Internet standards with TCP proposals, SPDY standardization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#99 Google works on Internet standards with TCP proposals, SPDY standardization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#103 Google works on Internet standards with TCP proposals, SPDY standardization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#105 Google works on Internet standards with TCP proposals, SPDY standardization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#48 Google takes on Internet Standards with TCP Proposals, SPDY standardization

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Making mainframe technology hip again

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Making mainframe technology hip again
Date: 07 July 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/fgPaXK
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#47 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#59 Making mainframe technology hip again

There is big difference between the capability of the 80s&90s PC chips ... and the most recent generation. Trivial example is the FICON/FCS comparison. FCS is the underlaying technology used for FICON ... recent claim that single FCS for e5-2600 capable of over 1M IOPS while peak z196 i/o benchmark is 2.2M IOPS with 104 FICONs.

x86 chips have fared poorly with RISC chips last few decades ... however the last several generations of x86 server chips have moved to RISC cores with hardware layer that translates x86 instructions into risc micro-instructions ... largely closing the gap with RISC chips. recent posts mentioning current x86 server chips have risc cores
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#59 Why Intel can't retire X86
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#35 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#74 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#10 SAS Deserting the MF?

There are lingering comparisons wtih mainframes and more familiar desktop operations. A large cloud megadatacenter now have hundreds of thousands of systems ... with millions of processors ... there are large number of such megadatacenters around the workd, each with more aggregate processing capacity than the total of all mainframes in the world today. There have been enormous progress in the TCO by public cloud operators of these megadatacenters, system costs, power costs, cooling costs, administration costs, support costs, etc.

public cloud megadatacenters are at least as far past mainframe datacenters as mainframe datacenters are past desktop operation.

trivia ... late 84, early 85 I tried to start a project with large number of server racks ... with each rack containing large number of 370 chips intermixed with risc chips. didn't get very far. We were also working with the director of NSF and various NSF supercomputer centers. At one point, we were to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers ... however, congress cut the budget and some number of other things happen ... eventually NSF releases a RFP. Internal politics prevent us from bidding ... director of NSF tries to help by writing the company a letter (copying the CEO) ... but that just makes the internal politics worse. there is description here ... which later morphs into modern internet
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing

and also precursor to modern public cloud as information utility. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
later processor cluster email here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

above includes reference to Mar85 email where i'm caught between doing presentation to director of NSF and doing meeting on rack clusters with mixture of 370s&risc chips

recent posts mention megadatacenters:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#91 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#35 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#37 Where Does the Cloud Cover the Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#51 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#61 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#74 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#7 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many
Date: 07 July 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/UrgHZQ

Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/technology/big-data-and-a-renewed-debate-over-privacy.html?pagewanted=all

Note recent discussion about gov. agencies collecting all phone and email metadata (and in some cases ... all of the actual content also).

The equivalent metadata in financial transactions is account owner, who got paid, and how much they got paid.

I was co-author of the financial industry X9.99 privacy standard. As part of work we had number of meetings with the gov. HIPAA people. Leaking "who got paid" turns out can be in violation of HIPAA since it can show personal identifiable medical conditions.

also

Multiple Government Agencies Are Keeping Records Of Your Credit Card Transactions
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-30/multiple-government-agencies-are-keeping-records-your-credit-card-transactions

especially with the huge privatizing of the intelligence community by for-profit companies ... there is also issue of leverage the huge data collections for economic espionage and various kinds of financial operations

How Much Are the NSA and CIA Front Running Markets?
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/06/how-much-are-the-nsa-and-cia-front-running-markets.html

slight IBM connection:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V._Gerstner,_Jr.
after IBM, becomes Chairman of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlyle_Group
which does private equity buyout of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booz_Allen_Hamilton

Booz Allen, the World's Most Profitable Spy Organization (and in the middle of the recent controversy)
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-20/booz-allen-the-worlds-most-profitable-spy-organization
How Booz Allen Hamilton Swallowed Washington
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington
Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

from above:
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

recent posts mentioning private-equity companies and/or privatising the gov:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#74 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#53 NSA phone records
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#54 NSA phone records
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#57 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#61 NYT: N.S.A. Chief Says Phone Logs Halted Terror Threats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#18 Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life - Washington Post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#20 Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#26 Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#54 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Making mainframe technology hip again

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Making mainframe technology hip again
Date: 08 July 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/fgPaXK
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#47 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#59 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#60 Making mainframe technology hip again

The original mainframe tcp/ip product used 8232 (industrial pc/at with channel interface cables) ... which was bridge, not a router ... and exorbitantly overpriced. Being a LAN bridge helped account for the tcp/ip product getting approx. 44kbytes/sec using nearly full 3090 processor. I did the rfc1044 support changes for the product and in some tuning tests at cray research, got sustained channel throughput between cray and 4341, using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). past posts mentioning rfc1044 support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

The communication group was violently opposed to having tcp/ip product ... and when eventually they couldn't completely stop it ... they invoked the clause that the communication group has strategic responsibility for everything that crosses the datacenter walls ... and took over responsibility. Note later, they also contracted out tcp/ip stack support in vtam ... and when the contractor initially demo'ed it having significantly higher throughput than LU6.2 ... he was told that everybody knows that a *proper* tcp/ip implementation is much slower than LU6.2 ... and they would only be paying for a *proper* implementation.

Note that one of the primary architects for Itanium (the original 64bit server) had previously been the person behind 3033 dual-address space (when he was at IBM) ... and included a lot of super security features in the Itanium design. Itanium has pretty much lost out to an alternative 64bit extension to traditional x86 ... in part because of competition between multiple x86 server chip vendors (the competition between multiple vendors is also credited with much of the pace of new features and accelerated price/performance). In any case, the person is now at a niche software operation specializing in super security software for Itanium platform. Itanium
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itanium
Itanium 1989-2000
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itanium#Development:_1989.E2.80.932000

trivia ... at one point, Sequent (before IBM bought them) was looking at offering mainframe emulator on Itanium platform and I was brought in as consultant.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequent_Computer_Systems

misc. past posts mentioning 8232:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#36 why is there an "@" key?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#4 Sv: First video terminal?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#45 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#58 IBM S/370-168, 195, and 3033
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#27 Beyond 8+3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#67 3745 & NCP Withdrawl?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#77 COMTEN- IBM networking boxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#33 Why only 24 bits on S/360?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#35 Why only 24 bits on S/360?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#37 Why only 24 bits on S/360?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#2 Fix the shuttle or fly it unmanned
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#26 Microkernels are not "all or nothing". Re: Multics Concepts For
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#35 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#2 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#28 MVCIN instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#45 FULIST
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#48 FULIST
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#49 Channel Distances
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#18 The System/360 Model 20 Wasn't As Bad As All That
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#20 IBM-MAIN longevity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#37 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#24 Processes' memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#25 Processes' memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#27 z/OS, TCP/IP, and OSA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Making mainframe technology hip again

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Making mainframe technology hip again
Date: 08 July 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/fgPaXK
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#47 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#59 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#60 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#62 Making mainframe technology hip again

I didn't learn about these guys until much later
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

as undergraduate, I was making lots of operating system enhancements and would periodically get requests from the vendor for changes ... I didn't know it at the time, but in retrospect, the nature of some of the requests could have originated from that community.

oh and a little x-over from another discussion in this group
http://lnkd.in/UrgHZQ
also archived here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#61 Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many

and similar posts in this discussion in another group ... currently last two posts in the discussion
http://lnkd.in/cN9fFJ
also archived here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

when the communication group was actively fighting off client/server and distributed computing ... we had come up with 3tier architecture ... it was written into a large gov. RFI ... and we were out pitching it to corporate executives ... the mainframe was at the center ... and it "knew" tcp/ip ... since we could make it significantly more efficient than other mainframe-based communication facilities. we were taking lots of FUD and arrows in the back from the communication group ... misc. past posts mentioning 3-tier
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

old post with bits & pieces of the 3-tier presentation from the 80s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#202

other trivia ... upthread I mention having done channel-extender support in 1980 for STL and 300 people from the IMS group being moved to off-site bldg. The vendor then wants to release my support ... however, a group in POK manages to block approval. They have some serial technology they've been playing with ... and they are concerned if my channel extender support is in the market ... it will make it harder for them to justify release of their serial stuff.

In 1988, I'm asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they have ... which evolves into fibre-channel standard (FCS, and includes performance stuff like what I had done in 1980 for channel-extender work). When the POK serial stuff finally ships in 1990 (with es/9000) as ESCON, it is already obsolete.

POK channel engineers then get involved in the FCS and define an extremely heavy-weight layer that drastically cuts the native FCS throughput ... that eventually shows up as FICON. FICON eventually gets an enhancement called TCW ... that is somewhat analogous to what I did for channel-extender in 1980 .. that claims a 30% throughput improvement over original FICON ... but that only slightly narrows the difference with native FCS throughput.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

unusual IBM system console

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: unusual IBM system console
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 08:57:39 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#56 unusual IBM system console

this is old reference to 360/370 "mastheads"
http://ibmcollectables.com/ibmlogo.html

from above:
The story begins in 1956 when designer Paul Rand introduced what IBM refers to as the IBM continuity logo (1956-1972) This logo is the solid block letters IBM in City Medium type font. At the time it was considered a modernization from the IBM in transition (1947-1956) logo in the Beton Bold type font. This earlier logo is most easily recognized by the flat bottom M, where the New block letter logo has a pointy M.

... snip ...

also references this "eight-bar ibm logo" for 370s ... although most of mastheads came to have model number (as seen in above url)
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/logo/logo_8.html
and
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/logo/logo_920912.html

the above could be a 370 mockup also (doesn't have model number)

various 360
http://ibmcollectables.com/gallery/2070-cpu/all_4_360_mastheads

reference 1965 press-pack with picture of 360/70
http://ibmcollectables.com/gallery/2070-cpu/IBM_360_19xx_102657020_lg

360/70 (360/60) were upgraded to 360/75 (& 360/65) before actual ship ... (original models were to have 1ms memory ... models that actually shipped had been upgraded to 750ns memory).

more here:
http://ibmcollectables.com/gallery/album106

as an aside ... the newer versions of ibm archive pages have to click to get enlarged photo in popup ... however, earlier versions at te wayback machine have pictures on the same page ... 360/50
http://web.archive.org/web/20050310234126/http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP2040.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Real Snowden Question

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Real Snowden Question
Date: 09 July 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
How Edward Snowden Snuck Through
http://nation.time.com/2013/06/26/how-edward-snowden-snuck-through/

a lot of this seems to misdirect from the mechanics of being able to obtain all the information at all. 20yrs ago, open security literature had gov. agency state-of-the-art was not only strict access controls but also behavior based monitoring that would catch employee atypical activity. all of that appears to have gone by the wayside as part of privatising the intelligence community and transition to for-profit operation. It appears that they not only aren't doing monitoring but don't appear to even have any idea what may have been taken. References to super administrative privileges imply that provisions requiring multiple individuals have also gone by the wayside.

If the surveillance stories are to be believed ... if the extraction of the information had occurred over the open internet, they would at least be able to determine what has been taken.

Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

from above:
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

aka, privatizing of the us government ... and growing Success Of Failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

the whistleblower in the Success of Failure case was treated very badly. The scenario is for-profit operations have discovered that a series of failures is a lot more revenue than an immediate success (sort of natural evolution of the beltway bandits "leave no money on the table" paradigm). The congressional investigation put the agency on probation for five years (but did little for the whistleblower) and not able to manage its own projects. However, that may have been just a ploy ... further privatizing the gov. (solution to the problem of for-profit companies in projects is to have more for-profit involvement ... of course, some quarters claim that there is guaranteed 5% kickback to congress on appropriated funds to for-profit companies ... which doesn't happen if it is straight gov. agency)

from open literature, would appear to be regression from 20yrs ago ... possibly associated with transition to for-profit operation(?)

NSA Networks Might Have Been Missing Anti-Leak Technology
http://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2013/06/nsa-networks-might-have-been-missing-anti-leak-technology/65708/

In the financial industry in the past, open security literature claims as much as 70-80% of breaches have involved insiders ... although stats are hard to come by ... in the financial services presidential critical infrastructure protection meetings, a major concern was making sure that the exploit information sharing ISAC not be subject to FOIA.

maybe not totally unexpected ... there are stories that classified details of major weapons systems leaking out over the internet for years

The Criminal N.S.A.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/28/opinion/the-criminal-nsa.html

The equivalent metadata in financial statements is account holder, to whom it was paid, and how much was paid. I was co-author of X9.99 financial industry privacy standard. One of the things we had to take into account was HIPAA regulations where listing the name of a testing laboratory in financial statement would leak privacy information covered by HIPAA (aka an enormous amount of privacy information can leak out just using metadata)

Multiple Government Agencies Are Keeping Records Of Your Credit Card Transactions
http://www.zerohedge.com/node/475876

Spying on the EU is an exercise in futility
http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/concoughlin/100224120/spying-on-the-eu-is-an-exercise-in-futility/

how about economic espionage

How Much Are the NSA and CIA Front Running Markets?
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/06/how-much-are-the-nsa-and-cia-front-running-markets.html

part of the long winded details of tax havens and money laundering

Treasure Islands: Uncovering the Damage of Offshore Banking and Tax Havens
http://www.amazon.com/Treasure-Islands-Havens-Stole-ebook/dp/B004OA6420/

competition between the US and Britain in the race to the bottom for tax haven secrecy and money laundering.

along with privatising intelligence with for-profit corporations

some past posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#24 What Makes a substance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#53 NSA phone records
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#54 NSA phone records
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#57 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#61 NYT: N.S.A. Chief Says Phone Logs Halted Terror Threats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#20 Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#26 Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#54 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#61 Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many

more news URLs

More Snowden Revelations: Australia has FOUR U.S. Spy Sites
http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/487833/20130709/edward-snowden-australia-cyber-attack-spy.htm#.Udtm1W12Tqt
American espionage and Europe: Sense, sensibilities and spying
http://www.economist.com/news/international/21580485-edward-snowdens-revelations-about-american-espionage-have-riled-europeans-so-has
Snowden affair clouds U.S. attempts to press China to curb cyber theft
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/08/us-usa-china-cyber-idUSBRE96713220130708
New Snowden leak: Australia's place in US spying web — RT News
http://rt.com/news/australia-nsa-snowden-surveillance-784/
Snowden's future up in the air after retracted tweet
http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/09/world/americas/nsa-snowden-venezuela/
Snowden reveals Australian links to NSA spying
http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/130708/snowden-reveals-australian-links-nsa-spying
Agents like Snowden prone to irrational decision making, study finds
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130709091409.htm
Edward Snowden reveals Australia's Links To Secret US Spy Program
http://www.theage.com.au/world/snowden-reveals-australias-links-to-us-spy-web-20130708-2plyg.html
Look, can we just forget about Snowden for sec... US-China cyber talks held
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/07/09/snowden_overshadows_us_china_cyber_talks/
Snowden has not accepted asylum in Venezuela: WikiLeaks
http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/world/2013-07/10/content_16754476.htm
Snowden case not the first embarrassment for Booz Allen or D.C.'s burgeoning contracting industry
http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/snowden-case-not-the-first-embarassment-for-booz-allen--or-washingtons-burgeoning-contracting-industry/2013/07/08/30440b0a-d9b3-11e2-a9f2-42ee3912ae0e_story.html
Justice Breyer's Roundabout Reflection on Edward Snowden - Emma Green
http://www.theatlantic.com/events/archive/2013/07/justice-breyers-roundabout-reflection-on-edward-snowden/277614/
One More Reason Obama Should Pardon Snowden
http://walt.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2013/07/09/one_more_reason_obama_should_pardon_snowden
Edward Snowden: US surveillance 'not something I'm willing to live under'
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/08/edward-snowden-surveillance-excess-interview
Edward Snowden: 'The US government will say I aided our enemies' – video interview
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/video/2013/jul/08/edward-snowden-video-interview
Undernews: The corporate media's long relationship with the spook world may help explain why it doesn't like Snowden
http://prorevnews.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-corporate-medias-long-relationship.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 10 July 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5

Amazon slashes price of dedicated virtual servers by 80 percent; Summary: Amazon Web Services has lowered the price of renting dedicated virtual server instances on its EC2 compute platform by up to 80 per cent.
http://www.zdnet.com/amazon-slashes-price-of-dedicated-virtual-servers-by-80-percent-7000017880/

competition between multiple server chip vendors have accelerated features and price/performance ... competition between large cloud operators has also accelerated features and price/performance .... part of this is the large cloud mega-datacenters have also been on the forefront of TCO ... power, cooling, maintenance, service, administration, etc ... as mentioned in other discussions operation of large mega-datacenters are as far beyond traditional mainframe datacenters as mainframe datacenters are beyond desktop operation

Amazon cuts prices by 80 percent on some compute-on-demand offerings
http://gigaom.com/2013/07/10/amazon-takes-an-axe-to-dedicated-instances/

past archived posts in discussion:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#58 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#61 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#72 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#74 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#78 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#80 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#93 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#8 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#10 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#15 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#53 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

regex that never matches?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: regex that never matches?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2013 14:03:20 -0400
rkuebbin@TSYS.COM (Kirk Talman) writes:
he would have loved APL

from a.f.c. posting today ... dec1969 C&A issue
http://bitsavers.informatik.uni-stuttgart.de/pdf/computersAndAutomation/196912.pdf

from above:
That issue also has a full page ad for an APL time sharing service.

TEN TIMES MORE POWERFUL THAN FORTRAN!

WHY? THREE WEEKS WORK can be done in one productive day.

HOW? Continuous hands-on-time programming; over 400 turn-arounds possible per day.

WHAT IS IT? It's a newly-discovered computational shorthand, a fully-general computer languagefor all types of programming. Every Programmer should learn it. (APL became an IBM PRODUCT in September, 1969; not to be confused with PL/, an older IBM language)

PROBLEM-SOLVING at your desk. INTERACTIVE; hands-on-time for fast turn-around. COST: You pay only $12 per hour because others "time share" the same machine. MANY HIGH-POWERED PROGRAMS available for immediate use or easily incorporated into, your own programming. ALWAYS AVAILABLE, 24 hours per day, 7 days a week, including holidays. . SCHEDULES: Immediate diagnostics and faster programming; therefore, schedules can be met and beaten, with APL. LOCATIONS: For information on terminals and service, call the location nearest you and ask for the sales department.


... snip ...

Note that the science center ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

ported apl\360 to cms for cms\apl ... expanding workspace size to virtual memory (typical apl\360 workspace size was 16kbytes) and adding API to system services (like read/write files) ... as a result it really expanded being able to do real world applications.

one of the early online apl users on the csc cp67 system were the business people down in armonk corporate hdqtrs ... who loaded the most valuable corporate asset on the system (all the customer data) to do business modeling in APL. This required some security issues since science center also had online access to students & staff at various institutions in the boston area.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Boyd's cycle: the path to guaranteed success + 6 big companies as evidence

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Boyd's cycle: the path to guaranteed success + 6 big companies as evidence
Date: 10 July 2013
Blog: Facebook - Colonel John Boyd
Boyd's cycle: the path to guaranteed success + 6 big companies as evidence
http://thebottomofthings.com/boyds-cycle-path-guaranteed-success-10-big-companies-evidence/

from above:
NeXT

After Steve Jobs was forced out of Apple he started Next Inc. to develop computer workstations intended for higher education and business markets. 7 years later, the company had only shipped around 50K units so they changed gear and focused on their innovative object oriented operating system. It turned out to be a great decision because Apple bought the entire company in 1996 for almost $500M and put Jobs back at the helm of what is now one of the most valuable companies in the world.


... snip ...

Next was CMU's MACH unix work-alike (which was then used for make-over of apple MAC) ... which was all the rage in the 80s (ucla's locus, berkeley's BSD, etc). Object-oriented operating system's became the rage ... including SUN's "spring" Apple spins off "pink" stuff into taligent as object oriented development environment. At one point, my wife and I spend a week with Taligent ... going through all the stuff that was needed to turn it into base for doing "industrial strength" computing ... we also get asked if we would consider taking on "commercializing" Sun's spring ... and turning it out as product.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taligent
before Jobs was brought back
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Jobs
and spring
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_%28operating_system%29

mach basis for lots of stuff:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mach_%28kernel%29

... i would claim the original microkernel was cp67 that I worked on as undergraduate in 60s https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS ... I had sponsored Boyd's briefings at IBM and was in silicon valley for over 20yrs and periodically interacted with lots of the inhabitants ... and overlap with Boyd and that culture. One of the things about silicon valley 70s&80s was much more "to do", sharing and cooperation. Get-togethers would have people bringing unannounced products and being able to play with each others toys. much of OODA-loop now focuses on beating advisories rather than cooperating. ... before original MAC was announced ... i could have dinner with MAC developers and argue about its design.

other trivia ... in 1969, GML was invented at science center (also did CP67 and bunch of other stuff), a decade later it morphs into ISO standard SGML, and after another decade it morphs into HTML at CERN. while 1st webserver at CERN was on next, 1st webserver outside europe was on CERN's sister location SLAC (in silicon valley) on VM370 system (descendent of cp67):
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it
Date: 10 July 2013
Blog: Financial Cryptography
The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it
https://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001439.html
and non-SSL
http://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001439.html

I periodically tell this story about realizing in the 80s there was three kinds of crypto 1) the kind they don't care about, 2) the kind that you can't do, 3) the kind that you can only do for them. There would be periodic news about prohibited crypto (type #2).

I had HSDT project with T1 and faster links. All the links on the internal network were required to have link encryptors (some comment that in the mid-80s that the internal network had more than half of all link encryptors in the world).

T1 link encryptors were really expensive and it was almost impossible to get anything faster than T1. I got involved in project where the objective was to have hardware encryptors that could handle LAN speed, cost less than $100 and be able to change key on every packet.

The crypto products group reviewed it and claimed that it significantly reduced the crypto strength compared to standard DES. It took me three months to figure out how to convince them that it was actually much stronger than standard DES. However, it was hollow victory ... I then got told we could build as many as we wanted ... but there would be only one customer ... all would be shipped to location on the east cost (aka type #3).

Old email about benchmarking software DES where it would take a dedicated mainframe processor to handle sustained 1.5mbits/sec and two dedicated mainframe processors to handle full-duplex T1.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#email841115

old email about proposal for pgp-like implementation for the internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email810506
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email810515

another aspect, recent posts mentioning there might also be economic espionage by for-profit companies involved in intelligence:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#54 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#61 Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#65 The Real Snowden Question

past posts mentioning 3 kinds of crypto:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#87 New test attempt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#86 Own a piece of the crypto wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#32 Getting Out Hard Drive in Real Old Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#27 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#43 Internet Evolution - Part I: Encryption basics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#20 TELSTAR satellite experiment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#60 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#0 We list every company in the world that has a mainframe computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#63 ARPANET's coming out party: when the Internet first took center stage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#85 Key Escrow from a Safe Distance: Looking back at the Clipper Chip
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#63 Reject gmail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#70 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#47 T-carrier
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#31 The Vindication of Barb

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2013 10:41:37 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I suspect it was developed out of earlier loops intended for factory-floor use. For example the IBM 2790 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_2790) (this sounds like early 60s don't have exact date). I know there were earlier systems, but it would take more time to search than I have right now.

If anyone has any material that would shed light on the development of token ring, now's the time.


there is this
http://www.google.com/patents/US4195351

my wife is co-inventor (under earlier name) ... I think it was used in series/1 "chat-ring"

recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#31 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#32 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#33 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#34 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#40 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#27 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#84 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 11 Jul 2013 07:58:59 -0700
john.archie.mckown@GMAIL.COM (John McKown) writes:
Java initially runs intepreted JVM byte code. As the program runs, the JVM invokes a "just in time" compiler to transform the byte code into native z series instructions. As I understand it, the common back end that is being discussed for COBOL, PL/I, C/C++, et al. is this "just in time" compiler/optimizer.

I wish z/OS did for Java what the i does. The javac compiler creates a byte code .class file. However, attached to this byte code file is actual pSeries native instruction which is what is really run. The i has a lot of interesting things. What blew me away was that the compilers produce TIMI instructions (similar in concept to Java byte code). The first time a program is run, the OS compiles the TIMI into native code and attaches that code to the "program object" and thereafter runs the "program object" code. Well, sort of. Because this compiler may be improved. If this happens, or if the TIMI code is moved to another processor, the OS will recompile and recreate the "program object". All automatically. Must drive auditors and change control people up the wall.


I've been in some discussion about whether JAVA was done totally independent of spring ... or with some spring overloap ... from Spring documentation:

A Client-Side Stub Interpreter

Peter B. Kessler

Abstract

We have built a research operating system in which all services are presented through interfaces described by an interface description language. The system consists of a micro-kernel that supports a small number of these interfaces, and a large number of interfaces that are implemented by user-level code. A typical service implements one or more interfaces, but is a client of many other interfaces that are implemented elsewhere in the system. We have an interface compiler that generates client-side and service-side stubs to deliver calls from clients to services providing location transparency if the client and server are in different address spaces. The code for client-side stubs was occupying a large amount of the text space on our clients, so a stub interpreter was written to replace the client-side stub methods. The result was that we traded 125k bytes of stub code for 13k bytes of stub descriptions and 4k bytes of stub interpreter. This paper describes the stub interpreter, the stub descriptions, and discusses some alternatives.


... snip ...

Disclaimer: after leaving IBM ... we were asked about taking on turning Spring out as commercial product
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_%28operating_system%29

and green reference:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_%28software_platform%29

trivia: general manager of the sun business group that included JAVA had previously been VP of software development at MIPS ... done some startups before that ... and earlier had been at the Los Gatos VLSI tools group and one of two people responsible for what became IBM's vs/pascal (although I was in research, I also had offices and labs in LSG bldg).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2013 00:31:38 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
there is this
http://www.google.com/patents/US4195351


re:
http:/www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#70

this is the "token ring" patent
http://www.google.com/patents/US4293948

has priority date 23nov1967 and filing date 29oct1974, which predates 4195351 (filing&priority date 27Jan1978), but the above talks about master/terminal as opposed to what sounds much more like lan in 4195351

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Jul 2013 07:20:56 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#71 Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers

2nd hand about testimony in the gov. legal action ... claim that top executive from one of the seven dwarfs testified that by the late 50s every computer company realized that the single most important market criteria had become a compatible product line ... however, in the 60s, only ibm management was able to force the lab managers responsible for different products to toe the compatibility product requirement. the implication was that since IBM was the only company that provided the single most important market requirement (compatibility) ... they might even be able to get every other detail wrong and still dominate the market. ibm and the 7 dwarfs
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BUNCH

old post about end of 360 advance computing system
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

mentions that ibm executives shut the project down because they were afraid that it would advance computer technology too fast and they would loose control of the market ... shortly after amdahl leaves and starts his clone 360 company. end of the page has features from ACS-360 showing up in es/9000 more than 20yrs later.

note that this was in the time that clone controllers were starting to appear. IBM responded with the Future System effort ... which was to make the controller interface so tightly integrated and complex that it would significantly raise the bar for clone controller businesses. lots of past posts (and various web references) to future system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

Future System was completely different and incompatible with 360/370 ... and internal politics were shutting down 370 projects ... the resulting lack of 370 products during the period is credited with giving the clone processors a market foothold

the subsequent failure of future system effort is claimed to cast dark shadow over the company for decades (as well as significant change in corporate culture to sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers) ... contributing to the big downturn and going into the red in the early 90s ... although another major contributing factor was the strangle-hold that the communication group had on datacenters ... trying to fight off client/server and distributed computing and preserve its (emulated) dumb terminal install base. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

also it wasn't until 3090 that you see new computer ... both 303x & 3081 are q&d efforts using left-over technology ... some reference here:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

trivia ... as an undergraduate in the 60s i did lots of changes to both os/360 and cp/67. when cp/67 was first delivered to univ. it had terminal support for 1052 & 2741 terminals (and did automatic terminal identification ... any terminal could be connected to any controller port and cp/67 would figure out type of terminal). The univ had lots of tty/ascii terminals ... and I added tty support to cp67 ... doing it so that it was also dynamically recognized (any terminal type on any port). I wanted to have a single dial-up number for all terminals ("hunt group") ... finding the available line to the controller ... however it didn't quite work. While the ibm 360 terminal controller allowed type of line-scanner to be dynamically associated with any port ... they had done a short-cut and hard-wired line-speed oscillator to each port.

this was major motivation for univ. to start clone controller project ... started with interdata/3 minicomputer (instruction set very similar to 360), reverse engineer the channel interface and built channel interface board for interdata/3, the interdata/3 was programmed to emulate ibm controller ... but in addition to dynamically associate line-scanner type with each port ... it could also dynamically determine terminal baud rate. later four of us are written up as being responsible for (some part of) clone controller business. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

it was then enhanced with an interdata/4 to handle the channel interface and cluster of interdata/3s handling the port interfaces. later perkin-elmer buys interdata and the product continues to be sold under the perkin-elmer logo. A decade ago, visiting a large east coast financial transaction datacenter ... there is one such perkin-elmer box handling significant percentage of point-of-sale dial-up terminals in the eastern part of the country.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Jul 2013 07:42:43 -0700
sipples@SG.IBM.COM (Timothy Sipples) writes:
Power servers are a good example of a success. IBM is the leader in the distributed UNIX server market and by quite a margin. Yet rewind the clock a couple decades and *nobody* would have predicted that. IBM doggedly, persistently focused on succeeding in that market. And IBM did it the old fashioned way: with lots of long-term investments to develop and to build better products than the competition.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#71 Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#73 Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers

the server market is combined risc & cisc (mostly x86) chips. as mentioned the server market is brand name vendors and doesn't include the huge explosion in number of servers being built by the large cloud operators (claim is that the number of cloud servers is larger than the total brand name server market) ... and is the major growth market.

news the last couple weeks is IBM is aggresively looking at moving into this high growth cloud market ... but it is meeting steep competition.

this is really long-winded discussion on linkedin
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5

on "The Cloud is killing traditional hardware and software"
http://www.infoworld.com/d/cloud-computing/the-cloud-killing-traditional-hardware-and-software-216963

part of the issue is that cloud operators have claimed for some time they are building servers for 1/3rd the price of brand name servers. there are various rumors that some of the large server vendors have moved into "white box" assemblies for cloud operators (matching large cloud operators price) and selling to smaller private cloud operations (that aren't large enough to setup their own server build operations).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Jul 2013 12:20:10 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#71 Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#73 Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#74 Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers

for the fun of it ... from today at computer history museum
http://www.computerhistory.org/tdih/July/12/
July 12, 1949
IBM's Watson believes electronics will replace moving parts

At an IBM sales meeting, Thomas J. Watson Jr. predicts that all moving parts in machines would be replaced by electronics within 10 years. Watson's visionary ideals of where the fledgling computer industry might go helped lead his company to dominance in production of all varieties of computers, from work stations to personal computers.


... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it
Date: 12 July 2013
Blog: Financial Cryptography
re:
http://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001439.html
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#69 The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it

from a different perspective, posted recently a number of times

How Edward Snowden Snuck Through
http://nation.time.com/2013/06/26/how-edward-snowden-snuck-through/

a lot of this seems to misdirect from the mechanics of being able to obtain all the information at all. 20yrs ago, open security literature had gov. agency state-of-the-art was not only strict access controls but also behavior based monitoring that would catch employee atypical activity. all of that appears to have gone by the wayside as part of privatizing the intelligence community and transition to for-profit operation. It appears that they not only aren't doing monitoring but don't appear to even have any idea what may have been taken. References to super administrative privileges imply that provisions requiring multiple individuals have also gone by the wayside.

NSA Networks Might Have Been Missing Anti-Leak Technology
http://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2013/06/nsa-networks-might-have-been-missing-anti-leak-technology/65708/

Would appear to be regression from 20yrs ago ...possibly associated with transition to for-profit operation. Also possibly more technology monitor public than internal security. In the financial industry in the past, open security literature claims that as much as 70-80% of breaches have involved insiders ... although it might be more ... in the financial services presidential critical infrastructure protection meetings, a major concern was making sure that the exploit information sharing ISAC not be subject to FOIA.

... also not exactly unexpected given the stories about classified details of major weapons systems leaking out over the internet for years.

reference to growing Success of Failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

Booz Allen, the World's Most Profitable Spy Organization
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-20/booz-allen-the-worlds-most-profitable-spy-organization
Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

from above:
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

the whistleblower in the Success of Failure: case was treated very badly. The scenario is for-profit operations have discovered that a series of failures is a lot more revenue than an immediate success (sort of natural evolution of the beltway bandits "leave no money on the table" paradigm). The congressional investigation put the agency on probation for five years (but did little for the whistleblower) and not able to manage its own projects. However, that may have been just a ploy ... further privatizing the gov. (solution to the problem of for-profit companies in projects is to have more for-profit involvement ... of course, some quarters claim that there is guaranteed 5% kickback to congress on appropriated funds to for-profit companies ... which doesn't happen if it is straight gov. agency)

oh and a little IBM connection.

Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-06-07/business/39803388_1_computer-giant-ibm-gerstner-jr-life

more detailed histories talk about him being in competition to be the next CEO of AMEX ... the looser then leaves ... and eventually does take over some other companies and eventually citibank ... in violation of glass-steagall ... greenspan gives him an exemption while he lobbies congress for repeal of glass-steagall ... originating too-big-to-fail and major factor in the financial mess.

AMEX and KKR are in competition for private-equity take-over of RJR ... KKR wins ... but runs into trouble with RJR and hires Gerstner away to turn it around ... before the IBM board hires Gerstner away to resurrect IBM. Gerstner then leaves to be chairman of another major private equity company.

RJR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RJR_Nabisco
KKR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kohlberg_Kravis_Roberts

It mentions that private equity leveraged buyout of RJR had been the largest buyout up until that point.

wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V._Gerstner,_Jr.
after IBM, becomes Chairman of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlyle_Group
which then does private equity buyout of ... guess who?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booz_Allen_Hamilton

a little more on privatizing gov. by for-profit companies and economic espionage

Penalties Are Weak for Misbehaving Contractors
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/07/weak-penalties-for-misbehaving-contractors.html
Snowden case not the first embarrassment for Booz Allen, or D.C. contracting industry
http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/snowden-case-not-the-first-embarassment-for-booz-allen--or-washingtons-burgeoning-contracting-industry/2013/07/08/30440b0a-d9b3-11e2-a9f2-42ee3912ae0e_story.html

gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Insane Insider Threat Program in Context of Morally and Mentally Bankrupt US Intelligence System

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Insane Insider Threat Program in Context of Morally and Mentally Bankrupt US Intelligence System
Date: 12 July 2013
Blog: Facebook
Insane Insider Threat Program in Context of Morally and Mentally Bankrupt US Intelligence System
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2013/07/chuck-spinney-insane-insider-threat-program-in-context-of-morally-and-mentally-bankrupt-us-intelligence-system/

from above:
The operative word in this application of artificial intelligence theory is "artificial" because a real intelligence appreciation, as the American strategist John Boyd showed, resides in a decision maker's Orientation. Boyd's theory of Orientation involves a balanced interplay of an ever-evolving synthesis growing out of many-sided, continuing analyses, which cut into a problem from many different angles.

... snip ...

I managed to pontificate on the subject several times in this blog entry: The Failure of Cyber Defence - The Mindset is against it
http://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001439.html
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#69 The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#76 The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it

disclaimer: early last decade the top technical director in information assurance at the agency asked me to be on a panel discussion on information assurance in trusted computing track at Intel developer's conference. In the 90s, I semi-facetiously said I was taking a $500 mil-spec security chip, aggressively cost reducing by 2-3 orders of magnitude (eventually under a dollar) while improving the security. In my presentation, I quipped that my chip was at least as good as anything the agency was doing ... also the person running the trusted computing module was in the front row ... and I comment that it was nice to see after a couple years their chip was starting to look at lot more like mine; he quipped back that I didn't have a committee of 200 people helping me design a chip. I had also gotten into dustup with GSA over chips used in CAC badges.
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

this is reference to old NASA high dependability computer workship where I'm one of the keynotes with Jim Gray
http://web.archive.org/web/20011004023230/http://www.hdcc.cs.cmu.edu/may01/index.html

I had worked with Jim over 30years ago in research on the original sql/relational DBMS implementation ... and at the time of the NASA conference he was running San Fran microsoft research center. A couple years later (before he disappears), he cons me into interviewing for chief security architect in redmond ... the interview goes on for several weeks ... but we could never come to agreement on the terms.

As I mentioned in previous references, I would contend that big part of current issues are the privatizing the gov with for-profit companies that have little or no interest in many of the problems ... akin to reference to comments in recent discussion about data breach notification (and they may actually have an interest in there being problems)

Penalties Are Weak for Misbehaving Contractors
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/07/weak-penalties-for-misbehaving-contractors.html
Snowden case not the first embarrassment for Booz Allen, or D.C. contracting industry
http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/snowden-case-not-the-first-embarassment-for-booz-allen--or-washingtons-burgeoning-contracting-industry/2013/07/08/30440b0a-d9b3-11e2-a9f2-42ee3912ae0e_story.html

Forget Snowden: What have we learned about the NSA? Pay attention to the organ grinder, not the monkey
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/07/12/forget_snowden_what_have_we_learned_about_the_nsa_in_the_last_month/

... except the organ grinder is for-profit companies

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Has the US Lost Its Grand Strategic Mind?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Has the US Lost Its Grand Strategic Mind?
Date: 12 July 2013
Blog: Facebook
Has the US Lost Its Grand Strategic Mind?
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2013/07/chuck-spinney-has-the-us-lost-its-grand-strategic-mind/

Marine's small wars manual
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Wars_Manual
"War is Racket" written about the same time about the same events by Marine general & 2-time Medal of Honor recipient ... US military operating on behalf of wallstreet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket
above references
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_war
which mention some of Boyd's acolytes as well as Spinney's theme
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html
Now this is member of congress and contemporary of Mahan ... has some things to say about Mahan aligned with Roosevelt on US imperialism in the period ... "Triumphant plutocracy; the story of American public life from 1870 to 1920"
http://archive.org/details/triumphantpluto00pettrich as well as Spinney's theme ... loc6265-74:

XXX. THE LEAGUE TO PERPETUATE WAR The war has just begun. I said that when the Armistice terms were published and when I read the Treaty and the League Covenant I felt more than ever convinced of the justice of my conclusion. The Treaty of Versailles is merely an armistice -- a suspension of hostilities, while the combatants get their wind. There is a war in every chapter of the Treaty and in every section of the League Covenant; war all over the world; war without end so long as the conditions endure which produce these documents.

... snip ...

Boyd, Boyd acolytes, and reform movement did concentrate on MICC (Eisenhower tried to warn about in his goodby speech). Earlier this year was 30yr anniv. of the time article with Spinney on the cover that Boyd had largely engineered. The objective of MICC was to siphon as much money as possible which has accelerated with increasing focus on quarterly profits and privatising the goverment. The anniv of the time article was closely followed by the anniv. of Iraq invasion ... where there was quite a bit more written (by Spinney and others) about continuous conflict and perpetual war as way of maximizing profits, I've archived my postings in the two threads: "A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army" and "Lessons Learned from the Iraq War" here (has quite a few URLs for Spinney's writing):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#30 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 ..
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#92 ..

possibly a better title would be something about lots of effort to keep the real "grand strategy" obfuscated ... discussed here "Insecurity: The Cost of American Militarism"
http://www.amazon.com/National-Insecurity-American-Militarism-ebook/dp/B00ATLNI04/
and "Prophets of War":
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA/
Steele's review of above:
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2011/01/review-prophets-of-war-lockheed-martin-and-the-making-of-the-military-industrial-complex/
references this ... Sprey interviews the author on CSPAN
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2011/01/journal-whats-wrong-with-american-defense/
personal experiences discussed here "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man"
http://www.amazon.com/Confessions-Economic-Hit-none-ebook/dp/B001AFF266/
as well as "Extreme Prejudice"
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

Boyd would have lots of stuff to say about having much more effective fighter jet than F16 ... something along the lines of the F20/tigershark. With the lock-hold that MICC had on the US market ... they thought they could sell to overseas market (possible 10times the flying hrs per dollar ... i.e. more planes per dollar than f16 and more flying hrs per maint. hours than f16). MICC then got congress to pass ear-marked USAID for all F20 candidate countries ... where the USAID could only be spent on F16s. Recent news has another round of F16s going to Egypt (as aside over the last decade some of the same F20 words have been used about F35 ... even though it is total fabrication)

America's True Stake in Egypt
http://www.realclearworld.com/blog/2013/07/americas-true-stake-in-egypt.html

I don't read it as believing there are any white hats ... I read it as comments about lots of meddling in the affairs with all the money that was being spread around ... and not clear that there is any higher level strategic direction behind the meddling.

first iraq invasion involved getting various indigenous people to cooperate-based on all sorts of promises ... and then abandoning them to be slaughtered (also after playing arms merchants to both sides in iraq/iran war) ... 2nd invasion is beginning to look like repeat ... question is whether there is a real strategy or is it hidden under lots of layers of misdirection and obfuscation.

slightly earlier article from chuck:

How to Thwart Democracy? In Egypt the Military is Supreme
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/2013/07/in-egypt-military-is-supreme.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 11:43:07 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I'd like a flat tax with *NO* deductions or exemptions allowed. All income from whatever source is taxed the same. Have maybe three or four tax brackets so it's "progresive." Studies have shown you could reduce the tax rates across the board and still bring in more money, and it wouldn't cause the economic distortions the current system does.

i've periodic mention economic conference from 2008 pushing "flat tax" ... independent of the direct merits of "flat tax". the claim was that lobbying by special interest groups for loopholes is major contributor to congress being considered the most corrupt institution on earth ... all goes away with move to "flat tax". At the time, loopholes accounted for tax code being over 65,000 pages (now over 72,000 pages) and the cost of dealing with the complexity accounted for 3% of GDP and non-optimal business decisions based on loopholes account for another 3% of GDP ... going to flat tax would gain back 6% of GDP which would more than offset the loss of any beneficial loopholes.

they had televised economic round table where the economists joked about if there was actual move to "flat tax" and eliminating the graft & corruption related to tax loopholes ... congress would find some other mechanism for graft & corruption. they also semi-facetiously joked about major lobbying against "flat tax" has been by Ireland. This came up recently in news about major technology companies using Ireland to pay zero percent tax rate (in part Ireland allows companies to declare earnings in some other jurisdiction ... w/o verifying that they reported the earnings in that jurisdication ... and telling the other jurisdictions that they are Ireland companies).

Double Irish arrangement
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Irish_arrangement
Apple Seen Using Loopholes to Avoid $9 Billion in Taxes
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-05-20/apple-s-offshore-entities-avoid-taxes-senate-probe-finds.html
Congress creates massive tax loopholes, shocked Apple uses them
http://blog.sfgate.com/techchron/2013/05/21/congress-creates-massive-tax-loopholes-slams-apple-for-using-them/

so part of the congress graft&corruption is that they have been getting one-time payments for the loopholes ... even though that the loopholes provide benefits year after year ... recently congress has been looking for mechanism for getting annual reoccurring payments for the loopholes.

the congressional graft&corruption shows up a different way in the privatising of the federal gov ... there are claims that congress expects 5% kickback on federal gov. appropriations that go to for-profit companies (i.e. federal agencies are bared from making payments to congress, so congress has motivation in the privitization).

Booz Allen, the World's Most Profitable Spy Organization (and in the middle of the recent controversy)
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-20/booz-allen-the-worlds-most-profitable-spy-organization
How Booz Allen Hamilton Swallowed Washington
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington
Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

from above:
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

this actually has a computer industry tie-in ... referenced recently a few times in these posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#20 Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#26 Louis V. Gerstner Jr. lays out his post-IBM life
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#54 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#61 Big Data Is Opening Doors, but Maybe Too Many
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#65 The Real Snowden Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#76 The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it

misc. past posts mentioning flat tax discussion:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#13 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#39 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#88 taking down the machine - z9 series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#14 Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#74 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#20 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#20 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#80 A Close Look at the Perry Tax Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#4 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#14 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#87 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#80 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#81 Ireland feels the heat from Apple tax row
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#86 How Wall Street Defanged Dodd-Frank

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 14:39:48 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
non-optimal business decisions based on loopholes account for another 3% of GDP ... going to flat tax would gain back 6% of GDP which would more than offset the loss of any beneficial loopholes.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

thats approx. $1T/annum lost in the economy because of the complexity of the current tax code (6% of GDP) ... all that complexity eliminated by going to flat-rate.

also ... 2010 there was CBO report that the baseline budget had all federal debt retired in 2010 ... however congress allowed the fiscal responsbility act to expire in 2002 (required federal spending be matched by tax revenue) ... and then made changes in tax code that cut tax revenue by almost $1T/annum and also increased federal spending by almost $1T/annum ... so by 2010 they had created a (additional) $12T budget gap (much of this happening immediately after allows fiscal responsibility act to expire). this was big motivation in the middle of the last decade for the comptroller general to start including in speeches that nobody in congress was capable of middle schoole arithmetic (for how congress was savaging the budget).

part of the tax code changes was to give special treatment to certain kinds of income so that it was reclassified as gains (cutting tax rate in half) ... which also allowed lots of it to be hidden offshore (cutting tax revenue on lots of it to zero).

misc. past posts mentioning comptroller general speeches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#20 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#21 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#80 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#82 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#91 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#10 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#19 Another "migration" from the mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#74 Horrid thought about Politics, President Bush, and Democrats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#22 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#66 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#13 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#26 2007 Year in Review on Mainframes - Interesting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#73 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#81 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#2 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#40 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#50 fraying infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#86 Banks failing to manage IT risk - study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#98 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#5 Republican accomplishments and Hoover
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#8 Taxcuts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#17 Michigan industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#20 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#55 Hexadecimal Kid - articles from Computerworld wanted
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#39 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#60 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#33 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#79 Idiotic take on Bush tax cuts expiring
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#59 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#69 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#75 origin of 'fields'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#44 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#18 Congressional Bickering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#8 The True Cost of 9/11 -- Includes 18 Veteran Suicides a Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#36 The Next Convergence: The Future of Economic Growth in a Multispeed World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#59 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#68 Bernanke Hearings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#57 The Mortgage Crisis---Some Inside Views
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#67 The debt fallout: How Social Security went "cash negative" earlier than expected
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#42 Speed: Re: Soups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#136 Gingrich urged yes vote on controversial Medicare bill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#6 We are on the brink of a historic decision [referring to defence cuts]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#50 They're Trying to Block Military Cuts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#53 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#36 McCain calls for U.S.-led airstrikes in Syria
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#58 Word Length
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#61 Zakaria: by itself, Buffett rule is good
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#68 'Gutting' Our Military
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#81 The Pentagon's New Defense Clandestine Service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#88 Defense acquisitions are broken and no one cares
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#45 Fareed Zakaria
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#5 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#6 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#25 US economic update. Everything that follows is a result of what you see here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#27 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#33 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#61 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#81 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#45 If all of the American earned dollars hidden in off shore accounts were uncovered and taxed do you think we would be able to close the deficit gap?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#74 Unthinkable, Predictable Disasters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#79 Romney and Ryan's Phony Deficit-Reduction Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#85 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#33 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#0 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#73 These Two Charts Show How The Priorities Of US Companies Have Gotten Screwed Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#30 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#36 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#41 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#3 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#4 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#51 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 15:04:35 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
For businesses, would you tax total revenue, with no deduction for wages or expenses?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

one of the interesting comparisons between private equity buyouts flipping companies and speculators flipping houses ... is in flipping houses ... the speculator pays off their original mortgage with the proceeds from the flip.

private equity buyouts can walk away with enormous profits from flipping a company ... even when the company is sold at a loss ... because they transfer the original buyout loan to the books of the purchased company (the private equity company get enormous fees for the reverse-IPO ... that also goes on the books of the purchased company ... and then walk away with all the proceeds of the flip).

reverse-ipo (private equity buyout) companies have enormous debt loads (private equity company skimming off everything not nailed down). Claim is that half of corporate debt default are companies that have had private equity buyout. Treasure Islands: Uncovering the Damage of Offshore Banking and Tax Havens, pg216/loc4511-14:
Plenty of good firms have gone bust as a result of this offshore debt-loading, which the New York Times in 2009 described as "a Wall Street version of 'Flip This House.'" 48 More than half of the companies that defaulted on their debt that year were either previously or currently owned by private equity firms.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 15:21:30 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#81 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?

hot off the presses

Insight: Apple controversy lays bare complex Irish tax web
http://news.yahoo.com/insight-apple-controversy-lays-bare-complex-irish-tax-090728679.html
TAXED AT 0.004 PERCENT

Apple's ability to pay tax of just two percent of its $74 billion in overseas income over the past three years hinged on an unusual loophole in the Irish tax code that allowed it to channel profits into Irish-incorporated subsidiaries that had no declared tax residency anywhere in the world.


... snip ...

note that it is rather interesting that back in 2008, it was supposedly an Irish (or possibly front for large corporations) lobbying congress to stay with current tax code paradigm ...

some recent posts referencing huge document leak from offshore tax havens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#27 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#28 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#46 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#95 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#6 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#11 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 16:07:33 -0400
Ibmekon writes:
When I studied the technology it seemed to me that the major advantages of Tokenring over Ethernet were nullified by the use of ASIC chips in fast 100mb Ethernet hubs. One issue it dealt with was workstation "runaway". Another was in reducing collisions to drive up bandwidth effecive usage.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#84 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#70 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#72 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World

recent post mentioning ACM SIGCOMM '88 article on slow-start non-stable in large heterogeneous network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#46 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

it had another article on ethernet ... that in typical 30station enet with low-level device driver code in every station continuously transmitting minimum sized packets as fast as possible ... effective 10mbit enet throughput dropped off to 8mbits/sec (which is still better than effective throughput of 16mbit t/r)

as i've mentioned before ... corporate forces generated an enormous amount of FUD in the period (not simply restricted to t/r):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#25 Still think the mainframe is going away soon: Think again. IBM mainframe computer sales are 4% of IBM's revenue; with software, services, and storage it's 25%
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#58 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#76 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#81 How Criticizing in Private Undermines Your Team - Harvard Business Review
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#44 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#72 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#77 IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#85 Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#4 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#63 Making mainframe technology hip again

other recent ethernet postings:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#31 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#32 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#33 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#34 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#40 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#27 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 17:08:17 -0400
"jklam" <jkl@nlgrf.com> writes:
But it has massive downsides like transferring quite a bit of the income tax paid by the top half to the bottom half that currently pays no net federal income tax at all.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#81 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#82 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

push the $1T/annun improvement in GDP into actual jobs and reducing the unemployment rate. early on when Federal Reserve had started pumping trillions into too-big-to-fail ... there was a statement that they had anticipated that it would trickle-down to main street ... but they found that it wasn't ... the too-big-to-fail were just pocketing the windfall ... and Federal Reserve claimed that they couldn't do anything to force them; note however, the federal reserve could have stopped giving away the largess ... however recent comments are that wallstreet and too-big-to-fail are now addicted to the federal reserve stimulas ... even if it isn't helping the rest of the country.

top 1% has 43% of financial wealth, bottom 80% of americans has 7% of financial wealth ... i.e. top 20% has 93% of wealth. construct flat rate so that that top 1% would pay 43% of taxes (top 20% would pay 93% of taxes)

there is also shift from corporate taxes to individual taxes. in the 30s, there was approx. same corporate tax revenue as individual tax revenue ... currently there is 4-5 as much individual tax revenue as corporate tax revenue.
http://www.taxpolicycenter.org/taxfacts/displayafact.cfm?Docid=203

eliminating enormous loopholes and returning to 30s where there was approx. as much corporate tax revenue as individual tax revenue would go a long ways to reducing individual tax rate.

getting balanced budget and eliminating federal debt ... also reduces the budget by significant amount devoted to carrying debt load ($12T budget gap opened last decade by congress cutting tax revenues and increase spending ... of the current $16T debt).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_federal_budget

above has total debt payments of $432B for 2012 ... although some funny money ... general fund has borrowing from SS trust fund ... which it has to pay interest on ... out of total budget of $3,539B (debt load is 12% of total).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 18:49:02 -0400
"jklam" <jkl@nlgrf.com> writes:
Sure, and the obvious way to do that is to pull the plug on the bulk of the immense military budget, but that would inevitably produce immense numbers of people with no job anymore and would arguably have a dramatic effect on the economy too.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#81 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#82 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

the recent sequestering involves returning defense spending to 2007 level ... lockheed responded that lots of jobs would be lost ... the response was that while lockheed revenues went up since 2007 ... the number of workers decreased ... and that lots of people would be glad if lockheed returned to 2007 employment levels ... as well as the 2006 executive compensation levels. there is lots of fabrication about employment levels and obfuscation and misdirection about the profits being siphoned off.

the 2010 cbo report previously mentioned ... after allowing fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002, tax revenues were decreased by $6T and spending was increased by $6T during the last decade (compared to baseline that had all federal debt retired by 2010 ... for $12T budget gap) ... the increase included slightly over $2T (of the $6T) increase for DOD ... slightly over $1T for the two wars and can't explain where the other slightly over $1T disappeared (GAO constantly submits reports that DOD financial accounting is in violation of federal laws and standards ... and keeps putting off into the future estimates about when DOD financial accounting may come into compliance). There is constant fabrication, obfuscation and misdirection that the huge amount of money being siphoned off in some way goes to large number of employee.

recent posts mentioning lockheed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#68 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#54 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#32 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#43 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#51 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#5 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#75 What Makes a substance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#76 What Makes a substance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#74 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#36 CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#78 Has the US Lost Its Grand Strategic Mind?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 18:58:16 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#81 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#82 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#85 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

at least in the case of the Iraq invasion last decade, the original estimate was that total cost would be $50B ... recent estimates are that long term costs (including veterans benefits and medical expenses) it is pushing $5T ... a factor of 100 times increase ... with lots of it being siphoned off and disappearing into various pockets.

recent posts mentioning Iraq invasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#49 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#59 The Madness of King George Revisited
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#51 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#78 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#83 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#92 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#10 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#64 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#21 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#78 Has the US Lost Its Grand Strategic Mind?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2013 10:20:07 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
ROTFLMAO.

DEC got tax breaks, too. So they built a manufacturing plant and hired a lot of people. That was the goal of the tax breaks. keep the productive people in Ireland rather than losing their home-grown brains and brawn.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#81 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#82 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#85 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#86 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

except in this case, the picture of the "home location" in ireland appears to be a one room office staffed by person that operates on behalf of multiple corporations ... pure tax dodge ... ireland gains a trivial amount in taxes as part of deal ... more like kickback for helping with the scam.

in other cases there are references to shoebox corporations ... corporations setting up home office ... in a tax location done by somebody that specializes in the activity ... each corporation little more than a shoebox on a wall with hundreds (or thousands) of other shoebox corporations.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2013 10:26:49 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Not really. Accountants could go back to doing accounting jobs rather than fiddling tax law jobs. And H&R block would stop charging $350 to fill out a 1040EZ form.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#81 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#82 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#85 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#86 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

note that there is a lot of fabrication by special interests that have huge stake in preserving the current status quo .... manufacturing a whole series of arguments about jobs, poor people, unfair taxes, etc ... as obfuscation and misdirection ... the current operation is enormously profitable to the special interests that don't want anything changed ... and, of course, the graft&corruption for congress selling the tax loopholes is also extremely profitable.

in congress's case there are periodic references to it being Kabuki theater ... nothing is really what it seems ... fabricated conflict between the different parties both encourages the flow of money from various supporters as well as contributes to nothing changing.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2013 11:14:18 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
note that there is a lot of fabrication by special interests that have huge stake in preserving the current status quo .... manufacturing a whole series of arguments about jobs, poor people, unfair taxes, etc ... as obfuscation and misdirection ... the current operation is enormously profitable to the special interests that don't want anything changed ... and, of course, the graft&corruption for congress selling the tax loopholes is also extremely profitable.

in congress's case there are periodic references to it being Kabuki theater ... nothing is really what it seems ... fabricated conflict between the different parties both encourages the flow of money from various supporters as well as contributes to nothing changing.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#81 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#82 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#85 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#86 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#87 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

"Merchants of Doubt" portray group of public relations from the 50s formed for fabricating positions and influencing public opinion for the tobacco industry ... but then moves on in support of other special interests (energy, military, pharmaceutical, financial, etc).
http://www.amazon.com/Merchants-of-Doubt-ebook/dp/B003RRXXO8/

"Economists and the Powerful" has special interests capturing economists ... going back to the start of last century ... combination then leads up to capture of financial regulatory agencies.
http://www.amazon.com/Economists-Powerful-Convenient-Distorted-ebook/dp/B009K44OW2/
loc 72-74:

Only through having been caught so blatantly with their noses in the troughs (e.g. the 2011 Academy Award–winning documentary Inside Job) has the American Economic Association finally been forced to adopt an ethical code, and that code is weak and incomplete compared with other disciplines.

... snip ...

The capture of economists have them respinning theory in support of the special interests. There was business news article as the economy was imploding that a high level consultant was advising too-big-to-fail to tie-up as many economists as possible ... in order to influence the public spin on what had happened (as well as recommendations regarding corrective action). Given how capture of economists has been protrayed, it was remarkable that there were any to take position on eliminating tax loopholes.

A big turning point was GLBA and repeal of Glass-Steagall. About the same time, CFTC had proposal to regulate derivatives (played major role in both ENRON and later AIG) ... the wife of the person behind GLBA was put in as chairwoman of CFTC until her husband got law passed prohibiting derivative regulation. She then resigned and joined the ENRON board ... and on the financial audit committee.

past posts mentioning congress as Kabuki theater, "Merchants of Doubt" and/or "Economists and the Powerful".
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#74 Why is everyone talking about AIG bonuses of millions and keeping their mouth shut on billions sent to foreign banks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#4 Geithner, Bernanke have little in arsenal to fight new crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#18 What Uncle Warren doesn't mention
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#39 Kabuki Theater 1603-1629
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#44 Kabuki Theater 1603-1629
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#54 Why stability trumps innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#67 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#68 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#0 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#2 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#5 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#14 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#52 Chinese researchers say early climate changes responsible for human crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#66 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#73 A question for the readership
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#86 Congress as Kabuki Theater
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#99 Stop SOPA! A Plea from the Inventors of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#137 The High Cost of Failing Artificial Hips
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#24 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#33 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#22 You can't do the math without the words
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#16 IBM cuts more than 1,000 U.S. Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#36 McCain calls for U.S.-led airstrikes in Syria
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#61 Why Republicans Aren't Mentioning the Real Cause of Rising Prices at the Gas Pump
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#1 The Dallas Fed Is Calling For The Immediate Breakup Of Large Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#58 Word Length
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#88 Developing a Disruptive Mindset
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#15 Born Fighting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#17 Let the IRS Do Your Taxes, Really
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#25 Time to competency for new software language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#31 Rome speaks to us. Their example can inspire us to avoid their fate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#46 Why America Is Slouching Towards Third World Status
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#32 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#33 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#34 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#39 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#64 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#1 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#41 Lawmakers reworked financial portfolios after talks with Fed, Treasury officials
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#86 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#12 The Secret Consensus Among Economists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#55 CALCULATORS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#60 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#66 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#32 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#53 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#30 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#35 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#62 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#64 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#20 The Big Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#44 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#87 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#1 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#2 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#7 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#24 What Makes a substance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#36 Fed proposes annual assessments for large financial companies

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2013 15:32:48 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#82 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

US blocks crackdown on tax avoidance by net firms like Google and Amazon; France fails to win backing for tough new international rules targeting online companies in run-up to G20 summit
http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2013/jul/14/us-tax-avoidance-google-amazon

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 14:05:44 -0400
Stephen Sprunk <stephen@sprunk.org> writes:
Are you actually reading what you're citing?

The 50th percentile, i.e. the median, rose from $45,325 in 1979 to a mere $49,777 in 2009; that's an increase of just 9.8% over 30 years. The 20th percentile rose from $19,274 in 1979 to $20,453 in 2009, a mere 6.1% increase.

OTOH, the 95th percentile's income rose 39.5% over the same period, so of course _they_ think everything is going just fine.


1979-2009 productivity increase 80%, avg. hourly compensation increase 8%, avg. hourly wage 7%.
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

article (may require registration)
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html

mentions that 1975, 47% of woman with children under 18 working and 2008 it had risen to 71% ... i.e. increase percent of two wage-owner households helped with median household income.

recent posts mentioning the article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#15 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#65 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#7 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#15 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#77 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

then there is

Income Growth For Bottom 90 Percent Of Americans Averaged Just $59 Over 4 Decades: Analysis
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/25/income-growth-americans_n_2949309.html

... and avg $116,071 for the top 10%

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 14:42:30 -0400
Is This The Chart Reflecting The True State Of The US Economy?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-07-16/chart-reflecting-true-state-us-economy

from above:
By now even five year-olds understand two simple things: i) the market is no longer a discounting mechanism thanks to the Fed's 4+ year experiment in manipulating equities in order to generate a "wealth effect" and ii) virtually all economic indicators are distorted, as such critical measures of economic "health" as GDP confuse credit creation by the Fed with traditional private-sector credit creation (commercial bank loan growth).

... snip ...

recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#81 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#82 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#85 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#86 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#87 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#90 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#91 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 20:41:33 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#91 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?

another graph ... from today

About That "Incomes Are Rising" Claim...
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-07-16/guest-post-about-incomes-are-rising-claim

... "the truth is the economy is only improving for a thin slice of the households"

1920 bottom 90% earned 60% of total income, dropping to 50% of total income in 1930 ... raises to approx. 70% 1950-1980 and then starts dropping to 50% of total income ... approx. corresponds to avg. hourly income in the sept2011 nytimes article. The top 0.1% (making more than $1.7m) increase to 10.4% of total income.

a little on jobs:

David Brooks Wonders Why Men Can't Find Jobs: Comedy Ensues
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/david-brooks-wonders-why-men-cant-find-jobs-comedy-ensues-20130716

wiki: Income inequality in the United States
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Income_inequality_in_the_United_States

a few recent posts referencing web resources on income inequality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#14 Free $10 Million Loans For All! and Other Wall Street Notes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#65 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#2 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#44 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#50 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#86 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

a few of the references:

Income inequality in America: The 99 percent
http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/10/income-inequality-america
Fix income inequality with $10 million loans for everyone!
http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/fix-income-inequality-with-10-million-loans-for-everyone/2012/04/13/gIQATUQAFT_story.html
The Unequal State of America: A Reuters series
http://www.reuters.com/subjects/income-inequality
It's the Inequality, Stupid
http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2011/02/income-inequality-in-america-chart-graph
How clearly do we see the rising inequality in America? How do we feel about it? Much depends on these answers.
http://fabiusmaximus.com/2012/09/27/liscio-income-inequality-research-polls43607/
Eight Key Charts About the Growing Income Inequality in the United States
http://johnhively.wordpress.com/2012/09/17/eight-key-charts-about-the-growing-income-inequality-in-the-united-states/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2013 10:20:19 -0400
Walter Banks <walter@bytecraft.com> writes:
Why shouldn't unearned income be taxed as income?

Earned income is limited to what can be earned in 2000 hours of labour a year, unearned income is when income goes exponential. (Losses in unearned income are linear and earnings are a power function) there is a lot of incentive to make a living that way.


there was some articles on how hedge funds lobbied congress to get their income reclassified to unearned ... it is bizarre the difference in rates between earned/unearned ... but also opportunities for graft & corruption about the things that can get reclassified as unearned (as periodically noted the whole issue of graft&corruption around the tax code is significant factor in congress being considered the most corrupt institution on earth).

slightly related is the article from the early 80s calling for 100% unearned profit tax on the US auto industries ... supposedly the import quotas was to reduce competition allowing us industry to significant raise prices and to use the big jump in profits to remake the industries. however they just pocketed the money and continued business as usual.

1990, nearly a decade later, the industry had the C4 task force ... looking at total remake ... they were planning on heavily leveraging technology for the remake so invited representatives from technology companies to participate. they could accurately describe the compeititon and what they needed to do ... but again they just continued business as normal.

two decades later ... they are still business as usual and require additional gov. bailouts ... and claims are that even after the bailouts ... they continue business as usual. the auto industry has effectively been on the gov. dole for over three decades. most recently they also managed to skim off much of the industry retirement funds and dump the obligation on the federal gov (something that has been going on in a number of other industries)

misc. past posts mentioning c4 task force and/or call for 100% unearned profit tax:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#52 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#23 auto industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#14 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#17 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#20 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#49 The Pankian Metaphor (redux)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#88 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#11 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#24 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#28 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#39 competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#84 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#77 Tell me why the taxpayer should be saving GM and Chrysler (and Ford) managers & shareholders at this stage of the game?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#22 Is Pride going to decimate the auto Industry?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#63 Have you told your Congressman how to VOTE on the auto bailout?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#18 What next? from where would the Banks be hit?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#20 Five great technological revolutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#57 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#20 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#2 China-US Insights on the Future of the Auto Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#3 IBM interprets Lean development's Kaizen with new MCIF product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#31 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#14 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#47 z9 / z10 instruction speed(s)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#55 Handling multicore CPUs; what the competition is thinking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#70 Handling multicore CPUs; what the competition is thinking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#8 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#75 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#0 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#22 60 Minutes News Report:Unemployed for over 99 weeks!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#59 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#23 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#90 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#2 Car models and corporate culture: It's all lies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#35 Having left IBM, seem to be reminded that IBM is not the same IBM I had joined
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#34 Boyd's Reading List Revisited
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#35 The Next Convergence: The Future of Economic Growth in a Multispeed World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#73 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#65 Soups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#81 A Close Look at the Perry Tax Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#86 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#52 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#22 Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#25 You may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#31 Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#26 Why Can't America Catch UP?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#32 US real-estate has lost $7T in value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#40 Where are all the old tech workers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#62 Why Is Finance So Big?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#54 IBM cuts more than 1,000 U.S. Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#78 Time to Think ... and to Listen
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#77 Vampire Squid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#88 Defense acquisitions are broken and no one cares
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#70 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#31 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#86 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#24 Why Asian companies struggle to manage global workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#28 Why Asian companies struggle to manage global workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#21 Is there a connection between your strategic and tactical assertions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#36 Race Against the Machine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#12 First Battle: Operation Starlite and the Beginning of the Blood Debt in Vietnam
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#61 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#1 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#79 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970



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