List of Archived Posts

2017 Newsgroup Postings (10/13 - 12/06)

Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge
Allied Radio catalog 1956
WW II cryptography
Somewhat Interesting Mainframe Article
Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It's Barack Obama?
The drug industry's triumph over the DEA
The Changing Face of War: Combat from the Marne to Iraq
Allied Radio catalog 1956
The Mathematics of Inequality
Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It's Barack Obama?
Plutocracy Rising repost from Oct 2012
The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
The Warning
Plutocracy Rising repost from Oct 2012
The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
Blockchain on Mainframe ?
IBM open sources it's JVM and JIT code
OFF TOPIC: Leave it to Beaver--sneakers (early 1960s lifestyle)
The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
WW II cryptography
WW II cryptography
Norden bombsight
WW II cryptography
How to Stuff a Wild Duck
What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
The Do's and Don'ts of Kleptocracy
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS
Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS
Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
How DARPA, The Secretive Agency That Invented The Internet, Is Working To Reinvent It
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
TYMSHARE @ CHM
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core
Debate Over Ken Burns Civil War Doc Continues Over Decades
How Economists Turned Corporations into Predators
America's Over-Hyped Strategic Bombing Experiment
How DARPA, The Secretive Agency That Invented The Internet, Is Working To Reinvent It
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
IBM 1403 Printer Characters
Einhorn: "None Of The Problems From The Financial Crisis Have Been Solved"
IBM 1403 Printer Characters
Testing Progressives, Centrist Dems Team Up with GOP to Deregulate Banks
The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
About Unconventional warfare
Wall Street Wants to Kill the Agency Protecting Americans From Financial Scams
Wall Street Wants to Kill the Agency Protecting Americans From Financial Scams
The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
Sugar Industry Long Downplayed Potential Harms
Wages and Productivity
On the Business Models of War
A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
US to regain supercomputing supremacy with Summit
The true story behind Thanksgiving is a bloody struggle that decimated the population and ended with a head on a stick
Harvard Business School: The U.S. Political System Has Been 'Hijacked'
US to regain supercomputing supremacy with Summit
A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
A-10
A-10
A-10
A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
U.S. Corporate Tax Reform
thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Here's why Warren Buffett is unloading IBM stock
A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Ferranti Atlas paging
VS/Repack
Ferranti Atlas paging
VS/Repack
Ferranti Atlas paging
Ferranti Atlas paging
The 1970s engineering recession
thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
mainframe fortran, or A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
It's 1983: What computer would you buy?
IBM does what IBM does best: Raises the chopper again
why VM, was thrashing
thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
why VM, was thrashing
OS-9
OS-9
The 1970s engineering recession
The 1970s engineering recession
The 1970s engineering recession
why VM, was thrashing
Now Hear This-Prepare For The "To Be Or To Do" Moment
The 1970s engineering recession
The 1970s engineering recession
The 1970s engineering recession
The 1970s engineering recession
It's 1983: What computer would you buy?

Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge
Date: 13 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#68 Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge

pg111/loc2179-82:
The backstory to all this is well reported. The Bush administration appointed hundreds of politically loyal neoconservative bureaucrats to run postwar Iraq, including the top civilian official—L. Paul Bremer. Bremer, heavily influenced by Iraqi exiles like Ahmed Chalabi and supported by Vice President Dick Cheney, implemented a policy of de-Baathification.

pg111/loc2193-95:
On 16 April 2003, Bremer, against the advice of Colin Powell's State Department and the Central Intelligence Agency, disbanded the Iraqi Army. 16 This seemingly simple decision placed a few hundred thousand unemployed young men back on the street with no effective reintegration strategy.

pg171/loc3246-49:
All this talk of "what-ifs" and lost Surge opportunities ignores one salient, if uncomfortable, fact: ISIS is an outgrowth of our own invasion. Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF—as we gleefully named it) was more than just an awful euphemism; it spelled catastrophe—and chaos—for most Iraqis.
... snip ...

related IRAQ posts, WMDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmds
more related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#team.b

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Allied Radio catalog 1956

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Allied Radio catalog 1956
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 14 Oct 2017 09:13:55 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
over half of corporate defaults are those in or have gone through the private-equity mill. analogy with house flipping ... private-equity can do 100% loan to buy the company, put the loan on the companies books, flip it ... difference is the 100% loan goes with the company ... not paid off as part of the sale. private-equity can even sell the company for much less that what they paid and still walk away with boat loads of money (in addition to the enormous fees they are charging during the process).
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#66 Allied Radio catalog 1956
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#67 Allied Radio catalog 1956

IPO in March, Crushed Today: PE Firm Pushes another Retailer into Brick-and-Mortar Meltdown
https://wolfstreet.com/2017/10/12/j-jill-pe-firm-pushes-retailer-into-brick-and-mortar-meltdown/
On March 9, 2017, private equity firm TowerBrook, the owner of women's clothing retailer J. Jill, dumped half of its stake via an IPO at a price of $13 a share into the lap of the unsuspecting public, during a time when brick-and-mortar retailers that are owned by private equity firms are heading into bankruptcy court, one after the other.
... snip ...

J.Jill (JILL) Alert: Johnson Fistel Announces Investigation of J.Jill, Inc.; Encourages Investors to Contact the Firm for Additional Information
http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/J-Jill-JILL-Alert-Johnson-Fistel-Announces-Investigation-of-J-Jill-Inc-Encourages-Investors-to-Contact-the-Firm-for-Additional-Information-1003903600

private-equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

WW II cryptography

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: WW II cryptography
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 14 Oct 2017 11:51:32 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#88 WW II cryptography

Burton was graduate of 1st USAF academy class and on fast track to general ... when he says that Boyd ruined his career by challenging to do what was right. He was forced to retire from the USAF for his part in significantly improving the Bradley fighting vehicle ... seriously embarrasing the maker and others in the Pentagon.

The Pentagon Wars
https://www.amazon.com/Pentagon-Wars-Reformers-Challenge-Guard-ebook/dp/B00HXY969W/
The second half of the book deals with the author's attempts to get frontline equipment tested under combat conditions. For the first time, readers learn the nasty details of his battle with the army over line-fire testing of the Bradley Fighting Vehicle'a battle that he eventually won, leading to the personnel carrier's redesign and the saving of many lives.
... snip ...

HBO then dramatized as movie
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pentagon_Wars

there is little that the military-industrial complex won't do in pursuit of profit. Gun Seller is novel by Hugh Laurie (TV's "House") ... is about the subject, measures that the MIC will go to and also mentions Boyd and OODA-loop
https://www.amazon.com/Gun-Seller-Hugh-Laurie-ebook/dp/B000SEGK0M/

loc4605-11:
The day Alexander Woolf decided to take on the military-industrial complex was the day everything changed. For him, for his family, for his business. Things changed quickly, and they changed for good. Roused from its slumber, the military-industrial complex lifted a great, lazy paw, and swatted him away, as if he were no more than a human being. They cancelled his existing contracts and withdrew possible future ones. They bankrupted his suppliers, disrupted his labour force, and investigated him for tax evasion. They bought his company's stock in a few months and sold it in a few hours, and when that didn't do the trick, they accused him of trading in narcotics. They even had him thrown out of the St Regis, for not replacing a fairway divot.
... snip ...

MIC(C) past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Has military industrial complex wanting the Iraq2 Invasion so badly corporate reps were telling former soviet block countries that if they voted for the invasion in the UN, they would get NATO membership and (directed appropriation) USAID (that could only be spent on modern US arms). From law of unintended consequences ... in the invasion, they were told to bypass ammo dumps looking for WMDs. When they got around to going back, a million metric tons had evaporated. Later started seeing large artillery shell IEDs ... even taking out Abrams
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

The original Iraq2 invasion justification was that Iraq supported Al Qaeda and it would only cost $50B. It then changed to WMDs. US rep to UN (cousin of white house chief of staff Card) dealing with Iraqis was given proof that the WMDs (dating back to US in the Iran/Iraq war) had been decommissioned. The US UN rep provided the information to White House and was then locked up in military hospital. An account was published in 2010, including about the decommisioned WMDs, four years before the information was declassified.
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

The decommissioned WMDs (tracing back to US & Iran/Iraq war) were found early in the invasion, but the information was kept classified until fall of 2014
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html

WMD posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmd

Consistent with Spinney's (another Boyd' acolyte) "perpetual war"
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html
and The Pentagon Labyrinth: 10 Short Essays to Help You Through It (free Kindle at Amazon)
https://www.amazon.com/Pentagon-Labyrinth-Short-Essays-Through-ebook/dp/B014JOVEOS/

as well as "War is a Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket
also references "perpetual war"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_war

perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

a couple books references the 16yrs and counting activities in Iraq and Afghanistan ... WMDs fabricated, surge and other activities significantly misrepresented, and ongoing trillions being dumped into the military-industrial complex

Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge
https://www.amazon.com/Ghost-Riders-Baghdad-Soldiers-Civilians-ebook/dp/B014PWVUAC/
Battle for Baqubah: Killing Our Way Out
https://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-1SG-Robert-Colella/dp/1469791064/

recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#68 Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#0 Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge

Boyd posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Somewhat Interesting Mainframe Article

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Somewhat Interesting Mainframe Article
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 15 Oct 2017 11:27:37 -0700
billwilkie@HOTMAIL.COM (Bill Wilkie) writes:
But the biggest BOONDOGGLE of all times, was what management spent a few million on and that was Four Quadrant Leadership. If discussed something with another person and YOU made the change you were operating from Quadrant 1. If you discussed it with another persons and THEY did it you were operating from Quadrant 2. No one ever figured out whay it was important but everyone in the company had to take the course. We spent millions and the manager who bought it was called a VISIONARY. I suspect or should I say HOPE he is on the unemployment line with the rest of the visionaries.

re:
https://www.infoq.com/articles/retiring-mainframe-programmers

mid-80s, top IBM executives were predicting that corporate revenue would double mostly based on mainframe business ... and there was massive internal bldg program to double mainframe manufacturing capacity.

however, a couple years later, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at the internal, world-wide communication group conference supposedly on 3174 performance, but opened the talk with statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had stanglehold on datacenter with their corporate strategic responsibility for everything that crossed the datacenter walls and were fiercely fighting distributed computing and client/server trying to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm and install base. The disk division was seeing data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. They had come up with several solutions which were constantly vetoed by the communication group.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

The communication group stranglehold on the datacenter not only was affecting disk sales but everything mainframe and a few short years later the company goes into the red.

By the mid-90s, most of the easier applications had fled mainframes (driving IBM into the red) and the major remaining customer was the financial industry (accounting for significant percentage of all new mainframe sales). However, the financial industry was facing significant bottleneck with decades old legacy cobol financial software that did settlement in the overnight batch window ... and globalization (shortening the window) and business increases (increasing workload) was putting extreme strain on the overnight batch window.

Late 90s, there was a period where the financial industry spends billions of dollars on new software to support parallized straight through processing (real-time settlement with every transaction), planning on using large numbers of killer micros. However there were using some industry standard parallelization libraries ... and they continued down the path even when repeatedly told (including by me) the libraries introduced factor of 100 times overhead (compared to mainframe batch cobol). It wasn't until they actually had some major large pilots go down in flames that they pulled back (100 times overhead totally swamped anticipated throughput increases from large numbers of parallelized killer micros).

A decade later, I was involved in effort that approached it from a different standpoint. It supported high level business rules that generated fine-grain, parallelizable SQL statements, and rather than directly implementing parallelization ... it relied on the enormous work that all the RDBMS vendors (including IBM) put into scalable cluster parallelized throughput. Prototype pilots were implemented for different financial sectors that easily supported several times their current peak workloads on non-mainframe cluster RDBMS platforms. This was presented to several financial industry groups and initially had high acceptance ... but then hit brick wall. They eventually said that the top executives still bore significant scars from the failed efforts in the late 90s and it would be a very long time before it would be tried again.

Note that SQL/RDBMS features are common across mainframe and non-mainframe platforms ... all platforms use industry standard fixed-block disks, non-mainframes getting slightly better throughput than mainframe doing CKD simulation on same industry standard disks (real CKD disks haven't been made for decades). Native fibre-channel having significantly higher native throughput than mainframe FICON protocol running over the same fibre-channel.

The most recent published mainframe peak I/O throughput that I've found is z196 getting 2M IOPS using 104 FICON. About the same time there was fibre channel announced for E5-2600V1 blade claiming over million IOPS (for single fibre-channel, two such fibre-channel having higher native throughput than 104 FICON running over 104 fibre-channel).

max configured z196->z14 went from 80 @625MIPS for 50BIPS to 170 @882MIPS for 150BIPS (three times aggregate processing with more than double the number of slightly faster processors).

In the same time frame, two chip e5-2600V1 blade at 530BIPS went to two chip e5-2600v5 at about 4-5 times the aggregate BIPS rate (based on benchmark iterations ratio to iterations run on 370/158 assumed to be 1MIPS processor).

trivia: in 1988 I was asked to help LLNL (LL national lab) help standardize some serial stuff they were working with, which quickly becomes fibre-channel standard ... some past FICON & fibre-channel posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

other triva: in 1980, I was asked to do channel-extender support for STL (now SVL) that was moving 300 people from IMS group to offsite bldg. This included doing lot of the channel protocol stuff at the remote site (significantly reducing the significant channel protocol latency). This is included in the 1988 fibre-channel stuff but not leveraged in FICON. Something similar shows up somewhat in zHPF/TCH (30yrs later) ... but only claims 30% throughput improvement over standard FICON.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

recent batch settlement &/or straight through processing:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#25 1976 vs. 2016?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#48 Windows 10 forceful update?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#84 The mainframe is dead. Long live the mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#23 How to Fix IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#72 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#82 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#58 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#63 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#39 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#43 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#11 The Mainframe vs. the Server Farm: A Comparison
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#32 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It's Barack Obama?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It's Barack Obama?
Date: 15 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It's Barack Obama?
https://www.forbes.com/sites/rickungar/2012/05/24/who-is-the-smallest-government-spender-since-eisenhower-would-you-believe-its-barack-obama/

2002, congress allows fiscal responsibility act to expire (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt). 2010 CBO report was in the interim (2003 thru 2009), tax revenue was cut $6T and spending increase $6T for $12T gap compared to fiscal responsible budget (1st time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars). By 2005, the U.S. Comptroller General was including in speeches that nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmetic (for what they were doing to the budget). Since then, taxes haven't been restored, so debt continues to increase.

Fiscal Responsibility Act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act
US Comptroller General posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

An interesting trivia, it was the republican congress in the 90s primarily responsible for the Fiscal Responsibility Act ... and fiscal responsible budget ... and then after the turn of the century, it was a totally different republican congress primarily responsible for letting the Fiscal Responsibility Act lapse, going crazy selling tax loopholes to special interest and skyrocketing spending.

In addition to lots of complaints by Comptroller General about the turn of the century congress had lost their (budget) mind ... 2008 there was (CBS) TV broadcast of roundtable at annual economist conference on the subject of congress become the most corrupt institution on earth ... primarily for the selling of tax loopholes. Primary focus was on "flat tax" as countermeasure to the rampant corruption (selling tax loopholes). Semi-joke was that major entity lobbying against it was the country of Ireland; one of the new loopholes was being able to move US profits to offshore tax haven ... the country of Ireland was a major beneficiary .... Irish "shoebox" corporations, i.e. Irish corporations that consisted of little more than shoebox containing incorporation papers ... but were booking hundreds of billions in US (and other country) profits.

Recent news that EU has directed Ireland to go back and collect tens of billions in taxes from US technology corporations incorporated in Ireland (on their EU profits that were being booked in Ireland). example" The EU is taking Ireland to court over Apple tax deal worth $15.2B
https://www.fastcompany.com/40476880/the-eu-is-taking-ireland-to-court-over-apple-tax-deal-worth-15-2-billion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The drug industry's triumph over the DEA

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The drug industry's triumph over the DEA
Date: 15 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
The drug industry's triumph over the DEA
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/investigations/dea-drug-industry-congress/?utm_term=.a3b158206e95
Amid a targeted lobbying effort, Congress weakened the DEA's ability to go after drug distributors, even as opioid-related deaths continue to rise, a Washington Post and '60 Minutes' investigation finds.
... snip ...

recent posts mentioning pharma &/or opiods
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#94 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#17 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#27 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#100 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#81 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#27 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#67 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#70 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#56 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#15 How Veterans Are Losing the War at Home
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#51 endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#69 Feds Debt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#84 "Worse Than Big Tobacco": How Big Pharma Fuels the Opioid Epidemic

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Changing Face of War: Combat from the Marne to Iraq

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Changing Face of War: Combat from the Marne to Iraq
Date: 16 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
The Changing Face of War: Combat from the Marne to Iraq
https://www.amazon.com/Changing-Face-War-Combat-Marne-ebook/dp/B001O222HC/

loc4480-85:
Perhaps President Bush and his principal advisers, Vice President Dick Cheney, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, and the latter's deputy Paul Wolfowitz really believed Saddam Hussein was involved in global terrorism—even though the CIA Terrorism Report for 2000 had said he was not, and even though the war itself suggested that he had no links to al-Qaeda and its allies."6 Perhaps they really believed he possessed weapons of mass destruction; although, given the crushing defeat he had suffered in 1991, how they could have thought those weapons constituted a danger to any other country is hard to understand.

loc4485-86:
Perhaps they felt that, with US forces leaving Saudi Arabia and that country seemingly lurching toward civil war, the Middle East was becoming destabilized and the US needed to dominate another major oil-producing country in its stead.
... snip ...

Original US justification for 2003 invasion was that Iraq supported Al Qaeda and it would only cost $50B. It then changed to WMDs. US rep to UN (cousin of white house chief of staff Card) dealing with Iraqis was given proof that the WMDs (dating back to US in the Iran/Iraq war) had been decommissioned. The US UN rep provided the information to White House and was then locked up in military hospital. An account was published in 2010, including about the decommisioned WMDs, four years before the information was declassified.
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

The decommissioned WMDs (tracing back to US) were found early in the invasion, but the information was kept classified until fall of 2014.
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html

The military-industrial-complex wanted Iraq2 invasion so badly that corporate reps were telling former eastern block countries that if they voted for IRAQ2 invasion in the UN, they would get membership in NATO and (directed appropriation) USAID (that could *ONLY* be spent on purchase of US arms).
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

going back even early CIA Director Colby wouldn't agree with "Team B" analysis of Soviet military justifying huge US DOD budget increase. White House Chief of Staff Rumsfeld then gets Colby replaced with Bush that would go along with "Team B"; Rumsfeld becomes SECDEF and his assistant Cheney becomes WH Chief of Staff. Later Rumsfeld and VP Bush are helping Saddam with weapons in the Iran/Iraq war, including WMDs
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war

Then Bush is president and Cheney is SECDEF when sat. photo analyst notifies them is Saddam is marshalling forces for invasion of Kuwait. WH says that Saddam has told them he would do no such thing. Then the sat photo analyst notifies WH that Saddam is marshalling forces to invade Saudi Arabia. Then the WH has to choose between Iraq and Saudis.
http://www.amazon.com/Long-Strange-Journey-Intelligence-ebook/dp/B004NNV5H2/

Later Bush2 is president, Cheney is VP, Rumsfeld is SECDEF (again), and former Team B member is claimed to be primary architect of Iraq strategy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Wolfowitz

MIC(C) past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
related IRAQ posts, WMDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmds
more related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#team.b

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Allied Radio catalog 1956

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Allied Radio catalog 1956
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2017 20:27:06 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#66 Allied Radio catalog 1956
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#67 Allied Radio catalog 1956
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#1 Allied Radio catalog 1956

some more from today ....

Asset-Stripping by Private Equity Firms Is Booming
https://wolfstreet.com/2017/10/16/whats-booming-asset-stripping-by-private-equity-firms/
Most of the brick-and-mortar retailers that have filed for bankruptcy protection to be restructured or liquidated over the past two years have been owned by private equity firms - including the most recent major casualty, Toys 'R's. Part of how PE firms make money is by stripping capital out of their portfolio companies via special dividends funded by "leveraged loans" - more on those in a moment - leaving these companies in a very precarious condition
... snip ...

also over half of all corporate defaults are by companies put thru the PE wringer. one thing I've periodically wondered why all these loan defaults don't affect the credit-rating of the PE firms that took them out.

private-equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Mathematics of Inequality

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Mathematics of Inequality
Date: 18 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
The Mathematics of Inequality; Bruce Boghosian runs the numbers and shows that without redistribution of wealth, the rich get richer and everyone else gets poorer
https://now.tufts.edu/articles/mathematics-inequality

Another Economics Nobel debunking rational actors assumption: Nobel in Economics Is Awarded to Richard Thaler
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/09/business/nobel-economics-richard-thaler.html
Nobel Laureate Richard Thaler: "We Seem To Be Living In The Riskiest Market Of Our Lives"
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-10-10/nobel-laureate-richard-thaler-we-seem-be-living-riskiest-market-our-lives
Nobel Economist Thaler Says He's Nervous About Stock Market
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-10-10/nobel-economist-thaler-says-he-s-nervous-about-stock-market

Kahneman (psychologist) 2002 Economics Nobel
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Kahneman
His 1961 dissertation, advised by Susan Ervin, examined relations between adjectives in the semantic differential and "allowed me to engage in two of my favorite pursuits: the analysis of complex correlational structures and FORTRAN programming," as he would later recall.[4]
... snip ...

here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Kahneman#Judgment_and_decision-making
works with Richard Thaler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Kahneman#Behavioral_economics

there were articles in the wake of economic mess crash about wallstreet had campaign of tying up prominent economists purposefully for obfuscation and misdirection ... misc ...

Economists and the Powerful: Convenient Theories, Distorted Facts, Ample Rewards
http://www.amazon.com/Economists-Powerful-Convenient-Distorted-ebook/dp/B009K44OW2

There were also articles trying to blame the economic mess on the risk managers. However, the risk managers said that they were forced by business people to fiddle the inputs until they got the desired result (GIGO) ... and called for giving risk managers more protection from business people influence.

July2007, Subprime = Triple-A ratings? or 'How to Lie with Statistics' (gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine)
https://web.archive.org/web/20071111031315/http://www.bloggingstocks.com/2007/07/25/subprime-triple-a-ratings-or-how-to-lie-with-statistics/

testimony in the Oct2008 congressional hearings into the role that the rating agencies played, said that the rating agencies were selling "Triple-A" ratings for (toxic) CDOs that they knew weren't worth Triple-A (significantly contributing to being able to do over $27T ... trillion! ... 2001-2008, also enabling selling to operations restricted to only dealing in "safe" investments, including large pension funds). During the hearings a TV commentator made snide remark about the FEDs would never prosecute the rating agencies.

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality
"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
(Triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It's Barack Obama?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It's Barack Obama?
Date: 18 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#4 Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It's Barack Obama?

it talks about spending increase ... not debt. 2010 CBO report was that after fiscal responsibility was let to lapse in 2002 (on track to eliminating all federal debt), taxes were cut $6T and spending increased $6T for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsibility budget. Next administration almost eliminated further budget increases .... but taxes weren't restored ... so debt continued to increase .... the nearly $2T/yr funding gap ... $1T/yr cut in taxes and $1T/yr increase in spending ... still continued ... but the debt increase rate had nearly stopped. For nearly the whole period this century the same party has held the house responsible for house budget/spending committee and tax committee.

To return to fiscal responsibility budget level ... would require increasing taxes by trillion dollars/yr and decreasing spending by trillion dollars/yr ... plus ... what happened last decade with lapse in fiscal responsibility act and tax cuts & spending gone crazy has resulted in debt ballooning to $20T ... with $400B in interest on that debt. To undo that damage requires increasing taxes by nearly another $1.5T (debt draw down over next 20yrs). Total increase in taxes by $2.5T per year and $1T per year cut in spending ... to undo damage done from 2002 letting the fiscal responsibility act lapse. Alternatively leave spending at the current level (with no increase) but increase taxes by $3.5T (instead of $2.5T)

Fiscal Responsibility Act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act
US Comptroller General posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

Surplus (tax revenue in excess of spending) used to decrease debt while deficit (spending in excess of tax revenue) increases debt. Even if year to year shows no spending increase or even spending decrease ... it can still show deficit when there has been enormous tax cut (as happened after fiscal responsibility act was allowed to lapse in 2002 which was on its way to eliminating all federal debt). The level of debt has exploded since those tax cuts after 2002 ($20T) ... and the interest on that debt is becoming major budget item. The interest on the debt almost accounts for the 2016 deficit (spending in excess of revenue).

There are currently two different ways of referring to the debt, one is the total debt of $20T (and total interest) ... and the other is the public debt $14T (and interest, owned to public, non-gov entities). The difference is amount owed to government funds like the Social Security Trust Fund. There is always the suspicion that when they are constantly referring to "public debt" they are spinning things to not only welsh on the interest owned the trust fund ... but even wipe out that debt all together (SS trust fund reset to zero).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Plutocracy Rising repost from Oct 2012

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Plutocracy Rising repost from Oct 2012
Date: 22 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
Plutocracy Rising repost from Oct 2012
http://billmoyers.com/episode/plutocracy-rising/

One of the comments last night was that over 1000 were sent to jail for the S&L crisis and nobody has gone to jail this time. There was a 2008 Wharton article estimating 1000 responsible for majority of the economic mess last decade and it would go a long way to fixing the situation if the gov. could figure out how they could loose their positions.

wharton article sometimes behind registration wall
http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/coming-soon-securitization-with-a-new-improved-and-perhaps-safer-face/
original wharton article at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20080606084328/http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid=1933

from above:
He suggests that the government tell banks that if they want to maintain their federal insurance, they should fire their CEO by the end of the day, and the government will pay the CEO $10 million in severance. Ousting the former CEOs gives the new bank CEOs an incentive to write down all the bad assets immediately, so that any improvement will make them look good going forward. That would speed the painful process of gradual price declines.
...
Linneman figures that 1,000 CEOs are accountable for about 80% of the current lending mess. If the government were to spend $10 billion to restore liquidity to the market in nine months with only 1,000 people losing their jobs, it would be the best investment it could make to restore the economy. "I'm only half-kidding," he quips.
... snip ...

.... note however, ye2008, just the four largest TBTF were still carrying $5.2T in offbook toxic assets. Late summer 2008, some $60B in these toxic assets had been sold for 22 cents on the dollar. If their offbook toxic assets had been written down, they would have declared insolvent and forced to be liquidated. Originally congress was convinced to pass TARP for the purchase of these offbook toxic assets, but with only $700B appropriated, it would barely begin to address the problem. TARP was then used for other purposes (which may have been the intention all along) and the Federal Reserve was left to deal with the problem.

"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
Too Big To Fail posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
(Triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo
inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

Former CIA director and then VP repeatedly claimed that he knew nothing about
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

another family member presides over the economic mess 70 times larger than the S&L crises. S&L crisis had 30,000 criminal referrals and 1000 criminal convictions with jailtime, proportionally the economic mess should have 2.1M criminal referrals and 70,000 criminal convictions.

S&L crises post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#S&L.crisis

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:57:26 -0700
Bob Eager <news0006@eager.cx> writes:
All we had were ASR-33s. This was about 1973.

1968, university had several ASR-33s and one or two 35s, when CP/67 was delivered. CP/67 had 1052 & 2741 terminal support, but no tty. I added the ascii/tty support and since the base CP/67 support did auto terminal identification ... using terminal controller SAD CCW to dynamically switch line/port scanner type, I included TTY support in that fashion. The ibm mainframe terminal controller only supported half-duplex ... i.e. terminal printed character as it was typed ... and then reflected line interrupt to the mainframe (rather than full-duplex, were the terminal didn't print anything as typed, the receiver would echo the character back to the terminal for typing).

In early 80s, I was exchanging email with one of the kids at UCB ... he said that the vax/tty full-duplex character echo delay was frequently 30seconds or more. (allowed type ahead, but takes some getting use to, character typed echo delay at 30+ seconds) Email mentioning SJR getting CSNET "phonenet" gateway
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/internet.htm#email821022

In the 60s, I walso wanted to have single dialup number and single pool of ports for all terminals ("hunt group"). However, while standard mianframe terminal controller supported dynamically changing port/line scanner ... each port/line had line-speed (baud rate) hardwired (and while 1052/2741 terminals had same speed, it was different from TTY ... 134.5 versus for 110) ... so single hunt group wouldn't work. hunt group
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_hunting

This helped motivate university to start clone controller project, doing channel interface hardware board for Interdata/3 programmed to simulate mainframe terminal controller ... but also dynamically determining terminal baud rate (rather than having it hardwired). Interdata starts marketing this commercially and four of us get written for (some part of) clone controller business. This is then enhanced with Interdata/4 for the channel interface with cluster of Interdata/3s for port/line scanners. PE acquires Interdata and continues to market the boxes under PE logo (I ran into one around the turn of the century in large datacenter handling majority of east coast dialup point-of-sale terminals)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

Note the Univ of Michigan did something similar for their 360/67 ... but using PDP8
https://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/gallery/gallery7.html
https://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/gallery/gallery8.html

1052 & 2741 used selectric mechanism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Selectric_typewriter
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Selectric_typewriter#Use_as_a_computer_terminal

Teletype 33
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teletype_Model_33

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Warning

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Warning
Date: 22 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
The Warning
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/warning/

Born was fairly quickly replaced by Gramm's wife while he got legislation passed to block CDS regulation ... billed as favor to Enron. Afterwards she resigns and joins Enron board and member of audit committee.

No2 on times list of those responsible for the economic mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

Gramm and the 'Enron Loophole'
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/17/business/17grammside.html
Enron was a major contributor to Mr. Gramm's political campaigns, and Mr. Gramm's wife, Wendy, served on the Enron board, which she joined after stepping down as chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
... snip ...

Phil Gramm's Enron Favor .. gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine
https://web.archive.org/web/20080711114839/http://www.villagevoice.com/2002-01-15/news/phil-gramm-s-enron-favor/
A few days after she got the ball rolling on the exemption, Wendy Gramm resigned from the commission. Enron soon appointed her to its board of directors, where she served on the audit committee, which oversees the inner financial workings of the corporation. For this, the company paid her between $915,000 and $1.85 million in stocks and dividends, as much as $50,000 in annual salary, and $176,000 in attendance fees
... snip ...

recent posts mentioning Wendy Gramm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#8 Congress just obliterated Obama-era rules preventing ISPs from selling your browsing history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#41 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#85 How can we stop algorithms telling lies?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#13 What the Enron E-mails Say About Us

Note: that while the senator was behind GLBA and repeal of Glass-Steagall, he gets his position on the Time's list, not so much for enabling Too Big To Fail (Too Big To Prosecute and Too Big to Jail), but for blocking CDS regulation.

In 1999, I was asked to help try to prevent the economic mess. Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L Crises to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (poster child was office bldgs in Texas that turned out to be empty lots). I was to improve the integrity of securitized mortgage supporting documents. Then they find that they can pay the rating agencies for triple-A (when rating agencies knew they weren't worth tripl-A, from Oct2008 congressional hearings). Triple-A trumps supporting documents and they can start doing no-documentation, liar loans which then can sell off almost as quickly as they are made (also eliminating any need to care about borrower's qualifications or loan quality), largely enabling doing over $27T 2001-2008 (including selling to operations restricted to only dealing in safe investments like large pension funds).

Then they find they can start doing securitized mortgages designed to fail, pay for triple-A, sell to their customers and then take out (unregulated) CDS gambling bets that they would fail (now they cared about borrower's qualifications, but not in the way you might think).

... note AIG was largest holder of CDS gambling bets and negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar when the SECTREAS steps in and has them sign document that they can't sue those making the bets and to take TARP funds to pay off at face value. The largest recipient of TARP funds is AIG and the largest recipient of face value payoffs is the firm formally headed by the SECTREAS.

"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
Too Big To Fail posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
(Triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo
inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality
S&L crises posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#S&L.crisis
Pecora Hearings and/or Glass-Steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

past posts specifically mentioning "The Warning":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#84 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#82 Oldest Instruction Set still in daily use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#64 Are Americans serious about dealing with money laundering and the drug cartels?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#30 Regulators seek to plug derivatives data gaps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#79 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#62 Civilization, doomed?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Plutocracy Rising repost from Oct 2012

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Plutocracy Rising repost from Oct 2012
Date: 22 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#10 Plutocracy Rising repost from Oct 2012

The spring 2008 wharton document goes into some detail about what went on.

Another detailed article, from late Oct2008, "Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt", original URL www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c
The bundling of consumer loans and home mortgages into packages of securities -- a process known as securitization -- was the biggest U.S. export business of the 21st century. More than $27 trillion of these securities have been sold since 2001, according to the Securities Industry Financial Markets Association, an industry trade group. That's almost twice last year's U.S. gross domestic product of $13.8 trillion
... snip ...

article gone behind paywall
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2008-10-27/evil-wall-street-exports-boomed-with-fools-born-to-buy-debt
and is not at wayback machine ... but sometimes full text can be found with web search of the title ... excerpt here
https://www.prisonplanet.com/evil-wall-street-exports-boomed-with-fools-born-to-buy-debt.html
long reference discussion
http://archives.cjr.org/the_audit/audit_roundup_8.php

"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
(Triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2017 11:02:56 -0700
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Right. And the temp was more than half of my normal speed. Note that I'm talking about input, not TTY output. On a PDP-10, one did not have to wait for the output to stop before typing more since the -10's monitor supported type-ahead.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#11 The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac

late 60s, switching back and forth between tty33 and 2741 ... besides other things, tty33 took more finger strength. some people that could touch type on 2741 would be two finger typing on 33 because they had to use hand force to depress the keys.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Blockchain on Mainframe ?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Blockchain on Mainframe ?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 Oct 2017 11:08:41 -0700
copied from social media IBM group

Blockchain mining using GPU (graphics) chips that have huge number of internal processors
https://hothardware.com/news/amd-radeon-rx-vega-mining-block-chain-ethereum
and xeon crypto (xeon are processor chips used in e5-2600 and other blades) ... benchmark e5-2600v4 against xeon gold (rebranded e5-2600v5)
https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-xeon-scalable-processor-cryptographic-performance

e5-2600v5 (xeon GOLD) blade is somewhere 10-20 times the BIPS (TIPS) rating of max configured z14 (@150BIPS).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM open sources it's JVM and JIT code

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM open sources it's JVM and JIT code
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 Oct 2017 12:39:28 -0700
tony@HARMINC.NET (Tony Harminc) writes:
One can certainly write a Rexx interpreter (or compiler, for that matter), and run it under TSO and/or ISPF; in that sense it *tolerates* those environments. But for reasons known only to IBM, the interfaces needed to implement *integration* with the TSO/E and ISPF environments are undocumented. It used to be possible to write one's own Terminal Monitor Program (TMP), and there was even a book describing how to do so. With TSO/E that book was dropped, and while one can guess at much of what needs to be done, there are OCO control blocks and interfaces that inhibit implementing interfaces like Address TSO and Address ISPF.

early/mid 70s, internal politics from the Future System group was shutting down 370 products (pushing that everything would be moved to completely different Future System). The lack of 370 products during this period is credited with giving clone processor makers market foothold.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

23june1969 unbundling announcement started to charge for software & services ... but managed to make the case that kernel software would still be free.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

when FS imploded there was mad rush to get products back into the 370 pipeline. old IBM reference:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

at the same time (because of the rise of clone processors) there was decision to transition to charging for kernel software (my resource manager was initial guinea pig). This continued into the early 80s ... then starts the OCO-wars. One of the motivations for OCO-wars was (again) the clone processor competition ... but another motivation was that customers weren't migrating off MVS to MVS/XA according to plan. Part of the blame was placed on customers that had source and made local modifications ... which weren't easily migrated from MVS to MVS/XA. Eliminating source would minimize customers making local modifications and enhance IBM control of their customer base.

Complicating things was introduction of clone "hypervisor" (subset of virutal machines in hardware) which allowed concurrent operation of MVS & MVS/XA much more efficiently than traditional virtual machine. IBM was eventually able to respond with PR/SM & LPARS for 3090 (but by that time some amount of the MVS->MVS/XA had passed).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OFF TOPIC: Leave it to Beaver--sneakers (early 1960s lifestyle)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OFF TOPIC:  Leave it to Beaver--sneakers (early 1960s lifestyle)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2017 17:18:16 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Back in the early 1960s, things were different. On a Leave it to Beaver episode, Beaver joined a basketball team. The coach told the kids to come next time wearing sneakers, and Ward had to go out and buy a pair for the Beaver.

When I attended elementary school, sneakers were forbidden except for gym class. We had to bring them separately and change into them just for gym, then change back into shoes afterwards.

Fast forward to today at the office--lots of people wearing running shoes or sneaks to work.


and you couldn't wear street shoes on gym floor.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 15:22:42 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Teletype did offer a CRT unit, and the Bell System made use of them in quantity, but I'm not sure how popular they were in industry. It seemed that the 3270 was everywhere. But in the mid 1980s, my employer was buying all generic 3270-type terminals. IIRC, a 3270 ran about $1,000 while a generic was about $850 at that time.

Also, the cost of controllers dropped significantly, which allowed my employer to greatly expand the number of terminals. For instance, in 1980 we had to use shared terminals in "terminal alley", which I think most companies did. By 1990, everyone had their own terminal (or a PC with an IRMA emulator card).

Some companies had to run their coax cables across the ceiling, suspended by paperclips (we did this, and I saw this at several other sites). But by later years, newer cubicles were built with raceways and wiring to allow hidden wiring.


Los Gatos VLSI did a lot of VLSI design tools ... using Metaware's TWS for some. Also two of the guys used TWS to do mainframe Pascal that was used to implement some number of tools. 1980, one of the guys left ... and along with some number of other people did a startup to do 3274 clone controller. They were going to differentiate themselfs by adding features to do some amount of human factors support ... like editing/input ... trying to get level of MVS interaction up comparable to what users saw with vm370/cms (vm370/cms was dominate system used all over internal IBM in silicon valley ... including purely MVS development projects).

However, before it shipped, IBM announced IBM/PC ... and users could start doing similar things using IBM/PC ... and then using terminal emulation to interact with mainframe ... and I'm not absolutely positive but they may never did ship any boxes.

trivia ... the former LSG VLSI guy then became VP of software development at MIPS ... and then when SGI bought MIPS, he went to SUN and ran the business group that included JAVA.

Intro/base IBM/PC with terminal emulation was only slightly more than 3270. Large companies that already justified hundred/thousands of 3270 ... could switch orders to IBM/PC with little additional justification .... and get single desktop footprint that did mainframe 3270 along with some local computing.

A major motivation for introduction of token-ring ... was to replace 3270 coax for IBM/PC terminal emulations. mid-80s some large 3270 shops were starting to exceed bldg. floor loading limits with all the 3270 coax cable. Could run single token-ring CAT5 ... to departmental MAU ... which then had token-ring CAT5 to individual stations (CAT5 cable was lighter than coax .... and also eliminated needing a cable from the machine room to each individual terminal ... just use single CAT5 to local wiring closet with individual station CAT5 from there).

I also remember some comment that it frequently cost $1000 or more to run new coax from machine room to a new 3270 terminal (aka actual 3270 terminal price was increasing becoming smaller part of the total cost).

past posts mentioning metaware TWS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#19 Beyond 8+3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#71 What terminology reflects the "first" computer language ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#42 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#0 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#1 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#14 Newbie question on table design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#77 CLIs and GUIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#36 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#11 Microprocessors with Definable MIcrocode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#32 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#21 The simplest High Level Language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#52 [Poll] Computing favorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#62 Which Books Can You Recommend For Learning Computer Programming?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#94 Jean Sammet, Co-Designer of a Pioneering Computer Language, Dies at 89

past posts mentioning bldg/floor load limit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#45 MAD Programming Language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#3 Two subjects: 64-bit OS2/eCs, Innotek Products
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#66 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#6 Memory Instrumentation - was "largest parallel sysplex around?"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#46 When did "client server" become part of the language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#49 Mainframe Hall of Fame: 17 New Members Added
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#56 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#4 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#5 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#73 Mannix "computer in a briefcase"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#15 The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

WW II cryptography

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: WW II cryptography
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2017 11:03:35 -0700
When Government Wanted To Prosecute Tribune Reporter For Leak -- But Feared Public Just Wouldn't Get It
https://shadowproof.com/2017/10/25/government-wanted-prosecute-tribune-reporter-leak-feared-public-just-wouldnt-get/
Correspondent Stanley Johnston was accused of revealing the United States cracked a Japanese code, which alerted the military to Japanese war plans before the Battle of Midway. A Tribune editor attributed the source of information to "naval intelligence."

A prosecution was contemplated under the Espionage Act, but the government backed off because they feared what may happen if a trial publicized that the U.S. compromised the Japanese code.

... snip ...

past posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#75 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#77 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#79 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#80 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#81 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#85 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#86 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#87 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#88 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#2 WW II cryptography

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

WW II cryptography

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: WW II cryptography
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2017 11:08:32 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
When Government Wanted To Prosecute Tribune Reporter For Leak -- But Feared Public Just Wouldn't Get It
https://shadowproof.com/2017/10/25/government-wanted-prosecute-tribune-reporter-leak-feared-public-just-wouldnt-get/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#19 WW II cryptography

and ...
Assistant Attorney General Wendell Berge further concluded on July 27, "I do not think this is a case that the public would ever understand. Technical explanation is necessary to spell out the violation, consequently the whole case would become engulfed in questions of freedom of the press, censorship, etc. I do not think we could succeed in making our position clearly enough understood to accomplish any real public benefit."
... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Norden bombsight

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Norden bombsight
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2017 16:52:34 -0700
Al Kossow <aek@bitsavers.org> writes:

http://www.museumofaviation.org/blog/the-politics-pickle-barrels-and-propaganda-of-the-norden-bombsight/


army air corp was initially claiming that strategic four engine heavy bomber program could win the war w/o even having to invade europe ... 1/3rd of US WW2 total spending went into the program so there was lots of pressure to show some results ... including claims for norden bombsight ... however it was difficult to hit targets from 5-6 miles up ... even when given coordinates by wallstreet.

John Foster Dulles was major force behind rebuilding German military and industry from 20s up through early 40s ... when US 1943 strategic bombing program needed German targets and coordinates, they got them from wallstreet.

Example of Norden bombsight ... European Campaign,
https://ssi.armywarcollege.edu/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1075

loc2582-85:
The bomber preparation of Omaha Beach was a total failure, and German defenses on Omaha Beach were intact as American troops came ashore. At Utah Beach, the bombers were a little more effective because the IXth Bomber Command was using B-26 medium bombers. Wisely, in preparation for supporting the invasion, maintenance crews removed Norden bombsights from the bombers and installed the more effective low-level altitude sights.
... snip ...

towards the end, strategic bombing could show results when McNamara was LeMay's staff planning fire bombing of German and Japanese cities (harder to miss whole city with fire bomb ... something was going to catch fire).

MIC(C) past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#3 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#38 Imperial Hubris
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#22 Ironic old "fortune"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#69 The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#61 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#77 Early use of word "computer", 1944
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#53 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#99 The Real Reason You Should See Dunkirk: Hitler Lost World War II There
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#3 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#34 Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

WW II cryptography

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: WW II cryptography
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2017 18:59:44 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
When Government Wanted To Prosecute Tribune Reporter For Leak -- But Feared Public Just Wouldn't Get It
https://shadowproof.com/2017/10/25/government-wanted-prosecute-tribune-reporter-leak-feared-public-just-wouldnt-get/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#19 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#20 WW II cryptography

above points to

grand jury testimony
http://nsarchive2.gwu.edu//dc.html?doc=4111563-Document-39-Grand-Jury-Testimony-of-Stanley

which points to related documents; Lessons On Sources And Methods From The Battle Of Midway, 1942, which also lists 40 additional documents
http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/briefing-book/intelligence/2017-10-25/secrecy-leaks-when-us-government-prosecuted-chicago-tribune

and tribune article
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-met-tribune-espionage-act-book-web-post-out-20171024-story.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How to Stuff a Wild Duck

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: How to Stuff a Wild Duck
Date: 28 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
How to Stuff a Wild Duck
http://www.users.cloud9.net/~bradmcc/GO/wildDuck.html

from ibm jargon:
wild duck - n. A creative technical person who does unconventional things, or at least does things in an unconventional way. Implies respect, and an acknowledgement that many of that person's ideas turn out to be valuable. It is said that IBM does not mind having a few wild ducks around - so long as they fly in formation. This term was created by T._J._Watson Jr., who told a story (by the philosopher Kirkegaard) about a flock of wild ducks that landed near a farm. Some got fed by the farmer and stayed, and either died of obesity or got eaten. The truly wild ones flew away - and survived.
... snip ...

IBM Centennial Film: Wild Ducks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbGcJiaUC-M

This is about wild duck customers .... seems like all references to wild duck employees has been totally obliterated. ... although after the failure of FS ... the (wild duck "employees") reference changes to "as long as they fly in formation".

Ferguson & Morris, "Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World", Time Books (FS reference)
... and perhaps most damaging, the old culture under Watson Snr and Jr of free and vigorous debate was replaced with sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers. It's claimed that thereafter, IBM lived in the shadow of defeat

and ...
But because of the heavy investment of face by the top management, F/S took years to kill, although its wrongheadedness was obvious from the very outset. "For the first time, during F/S, outspoken criticism became politically dangerous," recalls a former top executive.reference to the effect of F/S failure had on corporate culture,
... snip ...

During the FS period, internal 370 projects were being shutdown (which is credited with giving clone processor makers market foothold) since FS was completely different from 370 and was going to complete replace it. During this period I continued to work on 370 stuff and even would periodically ridicule the FS activities (which wasn't exactly career enhancing activity). In the late 70s and early 80s, I was blamed for online computer conferencing (precursor to social media) on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s). Folklore is that when corporate executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.

Future System posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys
Online Computer Congerencing posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc
Date: 84/04/05 11:43:23 To: wheeler

I've been asked to talk to a freelance writer who is ghosting an article for REDACTED (corporate executive) to be published in the Harvard Business Review. The subject of the article is something about "fostering creativity in large corporations"; will know more after I've talked to him. I'd appreciate any comments/thoughts on what ought to be said, not said, or emphasized, and especially any specific experiences you think may be relevant and helpful...

... snip ... top of post, old email index
Date: 84/04/05 18:35:38 To: wheeler

I now know a bit more. The corporate communications people basically outlined the article, and it is subtitled something like "6 steps to creativity".

The 6 points are:

1. Cultivate/encourage the wild duck 2. Encourage creative restlessness -- 3. Require continuing education 4. Give serendipity a chance 5. Manage failure well 6. Think the unthinkable

Such as doing business in "different" ways, e.g., IBUs...

... snip ... top of post, old email index

somewhat related:
Management Briefing Number 1-72: January 18,1972 ZZ04-1312

TO ALL IBM MANAGERS:

Once again, I'm writing you a Management Briefing on the subject of bureaucracy. Evidently the earlier ones haven't worked. So this time I'm taking a further step: I'm going directly to the individual employees in the company. You will be reading this poster and my comment on it in the forthcoming issue of THINK magazine. But I wanted each one of you to have an advance copy because rooting out bureaucracy rests principally with the way each of us runs his own shop.

We've got to make a dent in this problem. By the time the THINK piece comes out, I want the correction process already to have begun. And that job starts with you and with me.

Vin Learson

... and


+-----------------------------------------+ | "BUSINESS ECOLOGY" | | | | | | +---------------+ | | | BUREAUCRACY | | | +---------------+ | | | | is your worst enemy | | because it - | | | | POISONS the mind | | STIFLES the spirit | | POLLUTES self-motivation | | and finally | | KILLS the individual. | +-----------------------------------------+

"I'M Going To Do All I Can to Fight This Problem . . ." by T. Vincent Learson, Chairman

... snip ....

past Wild Duck posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#38 'Innovation' and other crimes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#25 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#18 IT full of 'ducks'? Declare open season
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#30 IBM Centennial Film: Wild Ducks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#33 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#79 Innovation and iconoclasm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#1 What is IBM culture?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#45 What is IBM culture?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#93 John R. Opel, RIP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#105 5 ways to keep your rockstar employees happy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#121 The Myth of Work-Life Balance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#59 Original Thinking Is Hard, Where Good Ideas Come From
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#72 Original Thinking Is Hard, Where Good Ideas Come From
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#3 Time to Think ... and to Listen
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#7 Leadership Trends and Realities: What Does Leadership Look Like Today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#17 Hierarchy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#26 Top Ten Reasons Why Large Companies Fail To Keep Their Best Talent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#19 SnOODAn: Boyd, Snowden, and Resilience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#23 How to Stuff a Wild Duck
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#24 How to Stuff a Wild Duck
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#26 How to Stuff a Wild Duck
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#28 How to Stuff a Wild Duck
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#31 History--punched card transmission over telegraph lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#42 The IBM "Open Door" policy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#65 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#12 How do we fight bureaucracy and bureaucrats in IBM?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#72 In Command, but Out Of Control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#3 Inside the Box People don't actually like creativity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#4 Inside the Box People don't actually like creativity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#68 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#52 IBM Wild Ducks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#97 Where does the term Wild Duck come from?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#98 How to groom a leader?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#105 Happy 50th Birthday to the IBM Cambridge Scientific Center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#52 First 2014 Golden Goose Award to physicist Larry Smarr
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#53 Not Wild Ducks but Wild Geese - The history behind the story
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#54 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#8 Microsoft culture must change, chairman says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#33 Can Ginni really lead the company to the next great product line?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#59 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#65 Are you tired of the negative comments about IBM in this community?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#68 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#79 EBFAS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#80 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#7 You can make your workplace 'happy'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#48 Is coding the new literacy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#56 This Chart From IBM Explains Why Cloud Computing Is Such A Game-Changer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#80 Here's how a retired submarine captain would save IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#17 There's No Such Thing as Corporate DNA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#60 [Poll] Computing favorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#14 Leaked IBM email says cutting 'redundant' jobs is a 'permanent and ongoing' part of its business model
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#96 IBM Wild Ducks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#93 An OODA-loop is a far-from-equilibrium, non-linear system with feedback

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
Date: 29 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War? What would China's history look like if Chiang Kai-shek had ignored George C. Marshall's request in 1946?
https://thediplomat.com/2015/12/what-if-the-kuomingtang-had-won-the-chinese-civil-war/

Miles puts blame on OSS & Wedemeyer/Army (had been Marshall's staff, then Marshall supported Wedemeyer) ... already had given China to Communists before end of WW2. OSS and Army factions can't wrest control of interface w/Nationalists from the Navy, so they setup with the communists (which they can claim sole credit) and do whatever they can to undermine the Navy. Lots in chapter "Wedemeyer Takes Over" pgs433-455 and SACO Deadend Kids Take The Coast, pg492-521
https://www.amazon.com/different-kind-war-little-known-guerrilla/dp/B0007IYOFW
https://books.google.com/books/about/A_Different_Kind_of_War.html?id=U4pBAAAAIAAJ
SACO home page
http://www.saconavy.com/
Marine's account of SACO
https://www.mca-marines.org/gazette/2009/11/marines-china

Wedemeyer testimony Dec 1947, possibly realizes what was done wrong
http://web.archive.org/web/20110203103817/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,804381,00.html

this tries to absolve State dept. blame (when Marshall was SECSTATE)
https://archive.org/details/VanSlykeLymanTheChinaWhitePaper1949

However, assistant secretary of treasury Harry Dexter White was also operating on behalf of Stalin ... and did everything possible to divert congressional funds supporting Kuomintang. Stalin had also sent White draft demands for US to transmit to Japan ... in US Hull note (ultimatum) which was major factor in Japan to attack Pearl Harbor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Dexter_White#Venona_project
hull note
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hull_note#Interpretations

disclaimer: after end of hostilities in Europe, in 1946 my wife's father was posted to Nanking as military advisor to Chiang Kai-shek (conjecture possible punishment because he refused further command in Germany, even when promised promotion to general).

besides other reasons Miles refers to OSS/USArmy giving China to the communists, he describes the part of Chinese army that had cooperated with the Japanese ... towards the end tried to come over to the Nationalists but was vetoed by the US Army ... so they went over to the communists ... and it was largely these forces that show up later in Korea.

W/O OSS/army giving China to the Communists (with some help from Harry Dexter White) ... you don't have Korea, w/o China&Korea, you don't have SE Asia domino theory and you don't have Vietnam. Also you don't have Korea, Pakistan, Iran nuclear situation.

Remember John Foster Dulles played major role in rebuilding German military and industry from 20s up through early 40s. From the law of unintended consequences, when the 1943 US Strategic Bombing program needed coordinates of targets in Germany, they got them from wallstreet.
http://www.amazon.com/Brothers-Foster-Dulles-Allen-Secret-ebook/dp/B00BY5QX1K/

loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc905-7:
Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism
... snip ...

June1940, Germany had a victory celebration at the NYC Waldorf-Astoria with major industrialists. Lots of them were there to hear how to do business with the Nazis (and circumvent the neutrality laws)
http://www.amazon.com/Man-Called-Intrepid-Incredible-Narrative-ebook/dp/B00V9QVE5O/

Later 5000 industrialists from across the US had conference (also) at NYC Waldorf-Astoria and in part because they had gotten such bad reputation for the depression and supporting Nazi Germany, they approved a major propaganda campaign to equate capitalism with Christianity, in part in the early 50s, it leads to "In God We Trust" on money and "under God" in the allegiance.
http://www.amazon.com/One-Nation-Under-God-Corporate-ebook/dp/B00PWX7R56/

If it wasn't for Stalin contriving to get US to send the ultimatums in the Hull note, Japanese may not have attacked Pearl Harbor. Stalin was battling 3/4s of German military (which they continued to battle thru the rest of the war) and wanted to preempt Japan from attacking also, as well as drawing US in on the Soviets side.

other trivia: During "Battle of Britain", FDR's ambassador to Britain (papa Kennedy) was working with Nazis. FDR called him back to Washington and presented Kennedy with the proof and gave him an ultimatum. Kennedy mended his ways, even supporting FDR for reelection in speeches.
http://www.amazon.com/Man-Called-Intrepid-Incredible-Narrative-ebook/dp/B00V9QVE5O/

loc2645-52:
The Kennedys dined with the Roosevelts that evening. Two days later, Joseph P. Kennedy spoke on nationwide radio. A startled public learned he now believed "Franklin D. Roosevelt should be re-elected President." He told a press conference: "I never made anti-British statements or said, on or off the record, that I do not expect Britain to win the war."

British historian Nicholas Bethell wrote: "How Roosevelt contrived the transformation is a mystery." And so it remained until the BSC Papers disclosed that the President had been supplied with enough evidence of Kennedy's disloyalty that the Ambassador, when shown it, saw discretion to be the better part of valor.

... snip ...

Harry Dexter White, Chiang Kai-shek, Different Kind of War recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#90 Economist, Harry Dent Hints: Global Banks Facing a Serious Crisis in Months Ahead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#91 Godwin's Law should force us to remember & fear our shared heritage with Nazi Germany
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#55 Should America Have Entered World War I?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#61 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#51 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#14 Fast OODA-Loops increase Maneuverability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#18 5 Naval Battles That Changed History Forever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#34 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#4 Mapping the decentralized world of tomorrow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#105 Iraq, Longest War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#28 WW2 Internment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#68 Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#75 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#79 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#81 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#87 WW II cryptography

Foster, Intrepid, &/or corporate propaganda recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#10 Separation church and state
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#63 One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#97 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#3 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#36 Trump's S.E.C. Nominee Disclosure Offers Rare Glimpse of Clients and Conflicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#77 Trump's crackdown focuses on people in the U.S. illegally - but not on the businesses that hire them
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#91 Godwin's Law should force us to remember & fear our shared heritage with Nazi Germany
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#55 Should America Have Entered World War I?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#22 Ironic old "fortune"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#23 Ironic old "fortune"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#60 The Illusion Of Victory: America In World War I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#69 The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#18 5 Naval Battles That Changed History Forever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#41 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#55 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#60 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#84 Early use of word "computer", 1944
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#85 Early use of word "computer", 1944
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#102 pneumatic cash systems was Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#99 The Real Reason You Should See Dunkirk: Hitler Lost World War II There
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#3 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#97 Business as Usual: The Long History of Corporate Personhood
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#98 endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#102 75 years ago, Hitler invaded Poland. Here's how it happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#8 The Real Reason Wages Have Stagnated: Our Economy Is Optimized For Financialization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#28 WW2 Internment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#41 Commercial grade ink and paper (Western Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#74 When Working From Home Doesn't Work

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Do's and Don'ts of Kleptocracy

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Do's and Don'ts of Kleptocracy
Date: 30 Oct 2017
Blog: Facebook
The Do's and Don'ts of Kleptocracy
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/10/30/the-dos-and-donts-of-kleptocracy
Hiding and laundering the money often requires a network of devious offshore lawyers ("expert in exotic island banks, sleazy accountants, pirate tax-havens, fake charities, backdated registrations"), corrupt military officers, well-connected mistresses, oblivious front men, or the occasional Liechtenstein foundation.
... snip ...

middle last decade was invited to EU conference held at Lichtenstien castle of CEOs and exchange presidents. Theme of the conference was Sarbanes-Oxley leaking into EU ... seemed to be part of Lichtenstien efforts to get off US Treasury money laundering black list. Stayed at inn dating from 1600s and innkeaper would joke about getting lots of visitors with business cards that said "dept. of money laundering" (specialized in money laundering, rather than anti-money laundering). My talk was that SOX was something of facade, gift to the audit industry (after demise in the wake of ENRON) ... lots of additional audit requirements (expense), but didn't substantially impact fraud. Some prediction that the only possible provision in SOX was the part about whistleblowers.

rhetoric on the floor of congress had been that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives and auditors did jailtime, but it required SEC to do something. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings, even showing they increased after SOX goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime).

note later in the Madoff congressional hearings, they had testimony by the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff. One of his comments that whistleblowers turn up 13 times more fraud than audits.

Enron posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
Sarbanes-Oxley posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes.oxley
Financial reporting fraud posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud
tax evasion, tax fraud, tax haven, tax avoidance posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion
money laundering posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laudering
Madoff postings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff
whistleblower posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: comp.misc, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2017 15:13:50 -0700
RS Wood <rsw@therandymon.com> writes:
Written in 2014, still valid. By the author of "technology is heroin" (an agile/scrum guy).

http://www.whattofix.com/blog/archives/2014/05/we-didnt-mean-for-it-to-turn-out-like-this.php

//--clip Looking at the net today, I can't help but reflect on how it's turning out so differently than we imagined:

We wanted to exchange information, not play games.


something similar was claimed for tv, information distribution, not entertainment. Later claims that majority of video tape industry revenue comes from porn.

in the 60s, there were a few virtual machine spin-offs of CP/67 from the science center ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

for commercial online use ... that quickly moved up the value stream to providing information to the financial industry ... some past virtual machine based commercial online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#online

In the early 70s, Tymshare started offering virtual machine based vm370 (cp/67 followon) commercial services. Aug 1976, Tymshare started offering their vm370/cms based online computer conferencing free to the IBM mainframe user group ... archived here:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

After moving to silicon valley in the 70s, i would go around to various customers periodically, including Tymshare ... and/or see them at the monthly Baybunch meetings hosted at SLAC. I also arranged with Tymshare to make me a full dump of all vmshare files so that I could make them available internally in IBM. some old related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare

On one of the visits to Tymshare, I was introduced to Adventure game ... they had got it from Stanford SAIL PDP10 and ported it to vm370/cms. They told the story of informing head of Tymshare that users were playing games on their service. The head of Tymshare said their system was only for business uses and all games had to be removed. He was then told that 1/3rd of Tymshare revenue was then coming from game playing ... and he changes his mind (I also get copy of Adventure for distribution internally inside IBM).

I was blamed for online computer conferencing (precursor to social media) on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s). Folklore is that when the corporate executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

In early 80s, I was doing some networking in project I called HSDT (in part funded out of the office of the 6th corporate executive) some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

we were also working with the director of NSF and were suppose to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget, some other things happened and eventually a RFP is released. Internal politics prevent us from bidding. The director of NSF tries to help by writing the company a letter (with support from other agencies), copying the CEO ... but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments that what we already have running is at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers it becomes NSFNET backbone, precursor to modern internet. ref
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/401444/grid-computing/
some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

Last project we did at IBM was HA/CMP ... and working with commercial cluster scaleup with Oracle and scientific cluster scaleup with national labs. Then cluster scaleup is transferred and announced as supercomputer for scientific/technical *ONLY* and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors. we decide to leave IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

Later two of the oracle people are at a small client/server startup responsible for something called commerce server and we are brought in as consultants because they want to do payment transactions on the server. The startup has also invented this technology they call "SSL" and the results is now frequently called ecommerce.

Over next few years involved in some number of financial and ecommerce activities. One visit to large datacenter providing ecommerce hosting services ... they talk about the internet popularity contests and regular statistics about webservers with the highest hits per month. They point out that they host five different ecommerce PORN services ... all individually having higher activity per month than the #1 webserver listed in the public popularity contests. They observe that it isn't that different than porn dominating the video tape business.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 31 Oct 2017 11:52:08 -0700
Jesse1.Robinson@SCE.COM (Jesse 1 Robinson) writes:
The name change was much bandied about at SHARE in Providence. I for one have gotten over my indignation and am ready to move on. If you really want to be offended by an assault on the sensibilities, how about the fact that there never was a D(bee)1? The product was spawned in an era where calling anything '2' gave it a veneer of respectability as if it were a new and improved version of some mythical precursor. That was implicitly fake news, which we now know is reprehensible skullduggery.

the original sql/relational implementation done on vm/145 at san jose research in bldg. 28 on main plant site (before almaden was built up the hill). past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

the "official" next generation DBMS was code named EAGLE (DB1?). while the corporation was preoccupied with EAGLE, we managed to do tech transfer to Endicott and get it out as SQL/DS. Then when EAGLE imploded, there was requests about how fast could sql/ds (system/r) be ported to MVS. This was eventually released as DB2 originally for decision support *ONLY*. 1995 System/R reunion
http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/
HTML version
http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/SQL_Reunion_95/sqlr95.html
Some EAGLE reference
http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/SQL_Reunion_95/sqlr95-System.html#Index164

from above:
Eagle was an IMS successor; it was going to do everything. And they were very worried about path lengths. So there had been something in IMS called TP1. But TP1 was more of a general characterization; ET1 was a specific program. And then Jim wrote all this stuff down in an article that he published in Datamation. It had Anonymous et al. or something like that as the author[
... snip ...

When Jim leaves for Tandem, he palms off some amount of stuff on me releted to System/R as well as consulting with the IMS group.

later we were doing cluster scaleup for rs/6000 ha/cmp ... working with oracle, ingres, sybase, etc for commercial scaleup and national labs for scientific scaleup. for commercial scaleup, the issue was ibm's RDBMS cluster was mainframe only (loosely-coupled). These other vendors had open system source base that also supported DEC VAX and DEC VAX/Cluster. I did a cluster scaleuup distributed lock manager that emulated the DEC VAX/Cluster semantics ... making it easier for them to port to HA/CMP. The mainframe DB2 group started complaining that if I was allowed to go ahead, it would be at least 5yrs ahead of them. This is reference to Jan1992 meeting in Ellison's (Oracle CEO) on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

Within a few weeks of the above meeting, cluster scaleup was transferred, announced as IBM supercomputer for numeric/scientific *ONLY*, and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors ... some old email for the period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa
posts mentioning ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

Trivia: one of the oracle people mentioned in the Ellison cluster scaleup meeting claims he was the primary person when he was at IBM, doing the SQL/DS tech transfer to STL (now SVL) for port to MVS (to become DB2).

Totally other trivia: in the wake of being told we couldn't work on more than four processors, we leave IBM. Later two of the other Oracle people in the Ellison cluster scaleup meeting are at a small client/server startup responsible for something called the "commerce" server. We are brought in as consultants because they want to do payment transactions on the server. The startup had also done some technology called "SSL" they wanted to use ... the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce".

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 31 Oct 2017 14:28:23 -0700
ksh@NTRS.COM (Karl S Huf) writes:
Yes, IBM officially rebranded DB2 to Db2 because . . . that's what they do (apologies to GEICO). At least it's still pronounced the same so that's at least one less question I have to field - unlike, say JES2 vs JES3 ("Hey Karl, are we every going to upgrade to JES3?" - actual question).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#27 Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS

more trivia ... my wife served stint in the gburg JES group ... one of the catchers for ASP to turn into JES3 ... then was one of the authors of "JESUS" (JES Unified System) ... the combined features of JES2 and JES3 that the respective customers couldn't live without ... but for various reasons never went any further. She then was con'ed into going to POK to be responsible for mainframe loosely-coupled architecture ... where she did peer-coupled shared data architecture. She didn't remain very long because of 1) little uptake (except for IMS hotstandby until sysplex & parallel sysplex much later) and 2) constant battles with the communication group trying to force her into using SNA for loosely-coupled operation (periodic truce where they allowed she could use anything within the datacenter walls, but communication group had strategic ownership of everything that crossed datacenter walls) past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 31 Oct 2017 18:35:14 -0700
edgould1948@COMCAST.NET (Edward Gould) writes:
Way back in the 1980's we had just gotten in a 4331 for testing. I was given a list of software to order and DL/1 was there but for DOS/VSE. Was it ever available on MVS? My memory is starting to ooze here, but wasn't there a DB for VM as well was it QBE(???).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#27 Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#28 Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS

all the original sql/relational was done on vm/145 and then System/R technology transfer to Endicott for SQL/DS on both DOS/VSE and VM, before transfer to STL & porting to MVS (after EAGLE implodes). some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

YKT also did QBE (query-by-example) for VM370. Old email about "father of QBE and arch-enemy of System/R" doing QBE presentation at SJR
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#email800310

QBE ref:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Query_by_Example

note predating SQL & QBE were 4th generation languages developed on CP67&VM370 for virtual machine based commercial online offerings. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#online

Mathematica original did RAMIS and ran on NCSS ... CP67 spin-off from the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subotpic.html#545tech

then came FOCUS available on TYMSHARE (later vm370-based online commercial system) ... and NCSS did NOMAD (as their own proprietary)

some online refs
http://archive.computerhistory.org/resources/text/Oral_History/RAMIS_and_NOMAD/RAMIS_and_NOMAD.National_CSS.oral_history.2005.102658182.pdf
http://www.decosta.com/Nomad/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOCUS
FOCUS is a computer programming language and development environment. It is a language used to build database queries, and is regarded as a fourth-generation programming language (4GL). Produced by Information Builders Inc., it was originally developed for data handling and analysis on the IBM mainframe.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomad_software
Martin provided a "dozen pages of COBOL, and then just a page or two of Mark IV, from Informatics." Rawlings offered the following single statement, performing a set-at-a-time operation, to show how trivial this problem was with Nomad:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramis_software
RAMIS was initially developed in the mid 1960s by the company MATHEMATICA on a consulting contract for a marketing study by a team headed by Gerald Cohen and subsequently further developed and marketed as a general purpose data management and analysis tool. In the late 1960s Cohen fell out with the management of MATHEMATICA and left to form his own company. Soon thereafter his new company released a new product called FOCUS which was very similar to RAMIS - even, it is rumored, having some of the same bugs.
... snip ...

posts mentioning QBE:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#44 SQL wildcard origins?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#70 Pismronunciation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#11 Dreaming About Redesigning SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#18 Dreaming About Redesigning SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#19 Dreaming About Redesigning SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#25 Network databases
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#21 Ellison Looks Back As Oracle Turns 30
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#82 What would be a truly relational operating system ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#55 Maybe off topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#60 Maybe off topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#1 Deja Cloud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#60 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#37 PDP-10 byte instructions, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#85 Great mainframe history(?)

other posts mentioning RAMIS, NOMAD, &/or FOCUS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#15 CA-RAMIS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#17 CA-RAMIS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#15 Dreaming About Redesigning SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#37 PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#49 Seeking info on HP FOCUS (HP 9000 Series 500) and IBM ROMP CPUs from early 80's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#12 Special characters in passwords was Re: RACF - Password rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#37 Quote from comp.object
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#17 Newbie question on table design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#40 Gone but not forgotten: 10 operating systems the world left behind
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#54 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#55 Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#58 Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#21 What non-IBM software products have been most significant to the mainframe's success
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#26 Global Sourcing with Cloud Computing and Virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#63 VMSHARE Archives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#69 "Best" versus "worst" programming language you've used?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#39 Beyond Patriot? The Multinational MEADS Air Defense Program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#43 z/OS's basis for TCP/IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#51 From Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#84 Time to competency for new software language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#42 360/20, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#57 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#16 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#0 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#62 Google F1 was: Re: MongoDB
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#77 Bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#34 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#32 Speed of computers--wave equation for the copper atom? (curiosity)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#101 Flat (VSAM or other) files still in use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#40 How Larry Ellison Became The Fifth Richest Man In The World By Using IBM's Idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#27 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#107 some computer and online history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#28 {wtf} Tymshare SuperBasic Source Code

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 10:45:29 -0700
Charles Richmond <numerist@aquaporin4.com> writes:
There exists today hacker groups that want to help find the security holes and made computer systems more secure... especially computer systems that control physical things like computers controlling cars and controlling insulin pumps for diabetics.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#26 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

two decades ago, we had at our house a mini-conference with professors of graduate computer security programs from universities in cal. Number one problem was the graudate students in computer security weren't interested in working on improving security design and implementation ... but were spending all their time looking for vulnerabilties because they got peer creds for finding the next exploit (no peer acknowledgement for designing and building better computer security ... which was also much harder and time consuming). Things haven't significantly changed since then (other than they are trying to better monetize discovery of exploits)

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#26 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#62 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#36 Builders V. Breakers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#15 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 11:03:22 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
... which was also much harder and time consuming). Things have significantly changed since then (other than they are trying to better monetize discovery of exploits)

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#26 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#30 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

fingerslip ... Things have NOT significantly changed since then (other than they are trying to better monetize discovery of exploits)

...

RFC Editor Postel (until he passed) used to let me help with the periodic published STD1. He also sponsored my talk on "Why Internet wasn't business critical dataprocessor" at ISI & the USC graduate network security program came over (it was standing room only in the largest room ISI had).

postel ref
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Postel

recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#21 Congratulations IBM for 'inventing' out-of-office email. You win Stupid Patent of the Month
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#24 elliptic curve pkinit?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#32 The very beginning of TCP/IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#92 Old hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#11 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#14 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#47 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#70 Domain Name System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#75 11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#100 Jean Sammet, Co-Designer of a Pioneering Computer Language, Dies at 89
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#14 Mainframe Networking problems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#18 progress in e-mail, such as AOL

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 11:21:13 -0700
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
But it is distressingly often that the hacker who is trying to warn about the problem discovers that shooting the messenger is looked on as the easiest fix.

On the one hand, the party that has the vulnerability gets a black eye in PR terms for having had the vulnerability, and has to spend time and money fixing the problem. On the other hand, the cops get an easy arrest and conviction. The solution is win-win for everybody except the hacker.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#26 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#30 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#31 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

also two decades ago, there were financial industry critical infrastructure protection meetings in the white house annex.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_infrastructure_protection

The biggest issue over the financial industry ISAC
https://www.fsisac.com/

was to make sure it wasn't a government operation and therefor not subject to FOIA
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_Information_Act_(United_States)

the concern was not about other criminals learning of attacks & exploits, they didn't want the public to learn how bad things were.

we had also been brought in to help wordsmith some cal. state legislation. they were working on electronic signature, data breach notification and opt-in personal information sharing. several of the participants had done detailed public privacy surveys and the number one issue was identity theft of the form of fraudulent financial transactions resulting from various kinds of data breaches.

There was little or nothing (then) being done about data breaches. The issue was that entities typical take security measures in self protection. The problem with most data breaches was that the institution wasn't at risk but the public. It was hoped that the publicity from the notifications would motivate corrective action (which undermined the effort to make sure ISACs weren't subject to FOIA).

Note since then there have been several federal (state pre-emption) bills, about evenly divided between those similar to the cal. legislation and those that would effectively eliminate notification (some cleverly written that notification is only required when a large combination of different personal information was involved ... where institutions would rarely or never have all of the information on the list).

data breach notification posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How DARPA, The Secretive Agency That Invented The Internet, Is Working To Reinvent It

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: How DARPA, The Secretive Agency That Invented The Internet, Is Working To Reinvent It
Date: 09 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
How DARPA, The Secretive Agency That Invented The Internet, Is Working To Reinvent It
https://www.fastcompany.com/40492472/how-darpa-the-secretive-agency-that-invented-the-internet-is-working-to-reinvent-it

internet posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internet

about former co-worker at the science center (also book at amazon) ... who was bullied as child because he was different ... "It's cool to be clever"
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cool-to-be-clever-edson-hendricks/id483020515?mt=8
It's Cool to be Clever: the true story of Edson C. Hendricks, the genius who invented the design for the Internet. Bullied as a child, Edson Hendricks went on to create the forerunner to the Internet. IT'S COOL TO BE CLEVER tells the true story of an inquisitive schoolboy in the 1950s who is bullied because he is so smart. He finds comfort in an imaginary world where he has machine parts, and no biological organs or emotions. Years later, Edson's strange capacity to "think like a machine" helps him create a way for computers to communicate. His "connectionless" network design is used in today's Internet.
... snip ...

Ed was also responsible for the internal network, larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

internal network posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

The technology was also used for the corporate sponsored university network (also larger than arpanet/internet for a time).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET

bitnet posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

I was blamed for online computer conferencing (precursor to social media) on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s. Folklore is that when the corporate executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. Then I got funding out of the sixth's office for something called HSDT (high-speed links). Part of this was working with the director of NSF for interconnecting the NSF supercomputer centers. We were suppose to get $20M, then congress cuts the budget, some other things happend, and finally releases RFP. Internal politics prevents us from bidding. The NSF director tries to help, writes the company a letter (with support from other agencies), but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments that what we already had working was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). Note as regional networks connect into the centers, it grows into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to modern internet.
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/401444/grid-computing/

NSFNET posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet
HSDT posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt
online computer conferencing posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

trivia: late 80s/early 90s, much of the federal government had a directive to do away with the internet, moving everything to OSI (GOSIP).

from long ago and far away
13 May 1986, 16:39:40 To: wheeler

Lynn,

We don't have a definite schedule for connection. There is a solicitation for proposals from NSF which has a June 1 deadline for fiscal 86 funding. Proposals received after June 1 will be considered for fiscal 87. It's not clear we would be ready before October anyway. We are running into several things which could delay connection. For example, we have potential for fairly easy communications to the U. of Washinton, but their connection to San Diego is MFEnet not TCP/IP which NSF plans to use for the rest of the network. Also, there is a group in the northwest that is trying to consolidate the requirements of most of the univeristies in the area into a joint proposal. We are also seeking help in installing a Vector Facility on the 3090. That could have an affect on when we would hook up.

It looks like a simpler interconnection is badly needed. So far, there doesn't seem to be an IBM:NSFnet connection that doesn't require products from five or six other vendors.

We would be interested in hearing what comes out of your June meetings.

... snip ... top of post, old email index

NSFNET related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

BBN was suppose to do the "official" DARPA TCP/IP implementation and CSRG being told that they couldn't to TCP/IP implementation (which became the most widely used implementation) ... verbally agreeing with DARPA that they weren't doing TCP/IP ... while totally ignoring them. original article went 404 ... but lieves on at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20050418032606/http://www.be.daemonnews.org/199909/usenix-kirk.html

from above:
He said (paraphrased) that every DARPA meeting ended up the same, with the Military coming in and giving CSRG (at UCB, the group that worked on BSD) a stern warning that they were to work on the Operating System, and that BBN will work on the networking. Every time, Bob Fabry, then the advisor of CSRG, would "Yes: them to death" and they'd go off and just continue the way they were going. Much to the frustration of the DARPA advisory board.
... snip ...

The original IBM mainframe TCP/IP product implementation was done in VS/Pascal (and didn't have the buffer problems that were epidemic in C language implementations). However, the communication group first fought hard to block its release. Finally when they couldn't completely block its release, they claimed that it had to be turned over to the communication group for release. What shipped to customers got 44kbytes/sec using nearly whole 3090 processor. I did the RFC1044 enhancements and in some tuning tests at Cray Research between 4341 and Cray got sustained channel throughput using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed).

RFC1044 posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

Later the communication group had contractor do TCP/IP implementation in VTAM. The initial demo was that it ran significantly faster than LU6.2. The communication group told the contractor that everybody knows that a "proper" TCP/IP implementation ran much slower than LU6.2 and they would only be paying for a "proper" implementation.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 09 Nov 2017 17:14:15 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
OS/360 _was_ device-independent as compared to many other systems. It was possible to swap one tape, dis, or unit-record device for another without needing to recompile your program, unlike, e.g. (IBM) DOS. The cost was that OS built the channel programs dynamically at open time.

On the other hand Burroughs MCP was about the same vintage and needed none of that nonsense. It may have been more limited in terms of devices supported or options (I don't know), but in most cases the programmer didn't care.


OS/360 SVC open/close was enormous heavy weight operation ... the code was implemented to run in SVC transient 2k-byte area ... so there could be sequence of a large number of open/close transient area routines that had to be pulled in serially (random access off disk). Besides device specific characteristics and open select the correct routines ... in addition there was large number of options ... like qsam or bsam. qsam handled serialization but could also support multiple concurrent buffering (read-ahead, write-behind). bsam required application to implement some serialization protocol ... allowed greater degree of concurrency & overlapped operation. It evolved not so much for software development, but for production applications that ran day after day with no programmer around (human operators for mounting required devices).

Early 360/65 running a student fortran compile, link/edit, execute ... could take over 30 seconds elapsed ... a large majority was elapsed time for loading the transient SVC open/close code segments. A big part of early OS/360 transaction processing systems ... was that they did all the opens at startup and ran for hours ... providing lightweight system services for transactions and minimized direct use of OS/360 (very heavyweight) native services.

The library routines selected by SVC open ... based on device and options ... would build real (device dependent) channel programs running in application space and privilege. It would then do SVC0/EXCP to pass channel program to supervisor for initiation. This represented significant problem for OS/360 moving to virtual memory. Execution of channel programs did transfers to/from real addresses. In move to virtual memory, application library built channel programs with virtual addresses. When this was passed to SVC0/EXCP for execution, required that a complete copy of the original channel program ... substituting real for virtual addresses (plus some misc. other things). This is similar to what virtual machine CP67 had to do for virtual machine channel programs. In fact, the original OS/360 move to virtual machine, borrowed the code from CP67 to add to EXCP processing. recent posts mentioning the biggest amount of code for OS/360 support virtual memory was borrowing CCWTRANS (from CP67).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#19 follow up to dense code definition
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#90 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#83 Mainframe operating systems?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#5 TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#59 64 bit addressing into the future

The official operating system (TSS/360) for virtual memory 360/67 implemented "single-level-store" virtual memory paradigm ... basically mapping files to virtual addresses and then page faulting (as necessary). This was aided by 360/67 had both 24bit addressing (standard 360 16mbyte addresses) and 32bit addressing (4mbyte addresses). TSS/360 had several problems, reliability not satisfactory for production work, extremely bloated fixed kernel size (occupied significant part of availabel real storage), serialized application execution with page faults, etc.

As undergraduate, univ. hired me fulltime to be responsible for os/360 production system running 360/67 as 360/65. Later, cp/67 was installed and I could play with it on weekends. The IBMer working with TSS/360 and I did a fortran edit/input (with simulated think time), compile, link, run benchmark. CP67/CMS running 35 simulated users had higher throughput and lower response than TSS/360 running 4 simulated users doing same benchmark.

In the 70s, I did a page-mapped filesystem, first for CP67/CMS and then moved to VM370/CMS ... and would claim I learned not how to implement it from TSS/360 ... could get 3-4 times the throughput than standard CMS filesystem. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

However at about the same time, Future System effort was going on and was doing a TSS/360-like single-level-store implemenation (and contributed to failure of FS). FS posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

there is the folklore that the later s/38 ... did a (TSS/360, FS) single-level-store implementation ... but the degraded throughput wasn't an issue in the s/38 market (ease of use and convenience was more dominant factor). trivia: s/38 did treat all disk drives and single pool of records, records for a file could be scatter allocated across all available devices ... which required all disks backed-up and restored as single entity. Single disk failure required complete filesystem restored. This could take 24hrs on s/38 .... and didn't scale for large mainframe configuration that might have 300 disks (any single disk failure required disk replaced and then all disks restored). Traumatic effects of single disk failure was major motivation for S/38 being early adopter of RAID.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 09 Nov 2017 17:25:20 -0800
Jorgen Grahn <grahn+nntp@snipabacken.se> writes:
I was far to the left at the time (and nineteen years old) so I saw the fall of communism as a loss. Capitalism was clearly broken, and I was hoping they'd eventually come up with something better that the rest of us could adopt.
... "Harvard Responsible For The Rise of Putin" .... Russia needed somebody to standup to the US kleptocracy capitalists.

John Helmer: Lunatic Russia-Hating in Washington Is 70 Years Old. It Started with Joseph Alsop, George Kennan and the Washington Post
https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2017/10/john-helmer-lunatic-russia-hating-washington-70-years-old-started-joseph-alsop-george-kennan-washington-post.html

In interview with fareed, Kissinger somewhat indirectly referred to theme about "Harvard being responsible for the rise of Putin" (i.e. Russia needed strongman to oppose the westerners that seemed intent on looting the country). John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html
If you are unfamiliar with this fiasco, which was also the true proximate cause of Larry Summers' ouster from Harvard, you must read an extraordinary expose, How Harvard Lost Russia, from Institutional Investor. I am told copies of this article were stuffed in every Harvard faculty member's inbox the day Summers got a vote of no confidence and resigned shortly thereafter.
... snip ...

How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html
Mostly, they hurt Russia and its hopes of establishing a lasting framework for a stable Western-style capitalism, as Summers himself acknowledged when he testified under oath in the U.S. lawsuit in Cambridge in 2002. "The project was of enormous value," said Summers, who by then had been installed as the president of Harvard. "Its cessation was damaging to Russian economic reform and to the U.S.-Russian relationship."
... snip ...

I was semi-involved, asked about plan for 5,000 bank branches around the country (@$1m, $5B total) as part of promoting democratic capitalism ... but then western capitalist kleptocracy in Russia implodes.

... going back a little further ...

John Foster Dulles played major role in rebuilding German military and industry from 20s up through early 40s. From the law of unintended consequences, when the 1943 US Strategic Bombing program needed coordinates of targets in Germany, they got them from wallstreet.
http://www.amazon.com/Brothers-Foster-Dulles-Allen-Secret-ebook/dp/B00BY5QX1K/

loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc905-7:
Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism
... snip ...

June1940, Germany had a victory celebration at the NYC Waldorf-Astoria with major industrialists. Lots of them were there to hear how to do business with the Nazis (and circumvent the neutrality laws)
http://www.amazon.com/Man-Called-Intrepid-Incredible-Narrative-ebook/dp/B00V9QVE5O/

sometime later 5000 industrialists from across the US had conference (also) at NYC Waldorf-Astoria and in part because they had gotten such bad reputation for the depression and supporting Nazi Germany, they approved a major propaganda campaign to equate capitalism with Christianity, in part in the early 50s, it leads to "In God We Trust" on money and "under God" in the allegiance.
http://www.amazon.com/One-Nation-Under-God-Corporate-ebook/dp/B00PWX7R56/

recent posts mentioning Putin and/or John Foster Dulles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#7 Malicious Cyber Activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#56 25th Anniversary Implementation of Nunn-Lugar Act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#63 One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#3 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#36 Trump's S.E.C. Nominee Disclosure Offers Rare Glimpse of Clients and Conflicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#91 Godwin's Law should force us to remember & fear our shared heritage with Nazi Germany
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#38 Imperial Hubris
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#55 Should America Have Entered World War I?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#22 Ironic old "fortune"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#23 Ironic old "fortune"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#60 The Illusion Of Victory: America In World War I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#69 The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#103 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#18 5 Naval Battles That Changed History Forever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#41 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#63 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#65 View of Russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#69 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#85 Early use of word "computer", 1944
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#78 This Afghan War Plan By The Guy Who Founded Blackwater Should Scare The Hell Out Of You
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#83 How can we stop algorithms telling lies?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#99 The Real Reason You Should See Dunkirk: Hitler Lost World War II There
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#3 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#39 Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#97 Business as Usual: The Long History of Corporate Personhood
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#98 endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#102 75 years ago, Hitler invaded Poland. Here's how it happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#28 WW2 Internment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#69 When Working From Home Doesn't Work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#74 When Working From Home Doesn't Work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#78 F-35 Multi-Role
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#82 Lunatic Russia-Hating in Washington Is 70 Years Old. It Started with Joseph Alsop, George Kennan and the Washington Post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#21 Norden bombsight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#24 What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 09 Nov 2017 17:55:38 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#35 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

other trivia: During "Battle of Britain", FDR's ambassador to Britain (papa Kennedy) was working with Nazis. FDR called him back to Washington and presented Kennedy with the proof and gave him an ultimatum. Kennedy mended his ways, even supporting FDR for reelection in speeches.
http://www.amazon.com/Man-Called-Intrepid-Incredible-Narrative-ebook/dp/B00V9QVE5O/

loc2645-52:
The Kennedys dined with the Roosevelts that evening. Two days later, Joseph P. Kennedy spoke on nationwide radio. A startled public learned he now believed "Franklin D. Roosevelt should be re-elected President." He told a press conference: "I never made anti-British statements or said, on or off the record, that I do not expect Britain to win the war."

British historian Nicholas Bethell wrote: "How Roosevelt contrived the transformation is a mystery." And so it remained until the BSC Papers disclosed that the President had been supplied with enough evidence of Kennedy's disloyalty that the Ambassador, when shown it, saw discretion to be the better part of valor.

... snip ...

and on the other side of the world, in asia ... how the OSS & the Army game China to the communists.

What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War? What would China's history look like if Chiang Kai-shek had ignored George C. Marshall's request in 1946?
https://thediplomat.com/2015/12/what-if-the-kuomingtang-had-won-the-chinese-civil-war/

Miles puts blame on OSS and Wedemeyer/Army (had been marshall's staff, then Marshall supported Wedemeyer) ... already had given China to Communists before end of WW2. OSS and Army factions can't wrest control of interface w/Nationalists from the Navy, so they setup with the communists (which they can claim sole credit) and do whatever they can to undermine the Navy. Lots in chapter "Wedemeyer Takes Over" pgs433-455 and SACO Deadend Kids Take The Coast, pg492-521.
https://www.amazon.com/different-kind-war-little-known-guerrilla/dp/B0007IYOFW
https://books.google.com/books/about/A_Different_Kind_of_War.html?id=U4pBAAAAIAAJ

Marine's account of SACO
https://www.mca-marines.org/gazette/2009/11/marines-china
Wedemeyer testimony Dec 1947, possibly realizes what was done wrong
http://web.archive.org/web/20110203103817/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,804381,00.html
this tries to absolve State dept. blame (when Marshall was SECSTATE, some excuse that Marshall was preoccupied with Europe during WW2 and then more Europe like Marshall Plan ... and so wasn't paying as much attention as he should)
https://archive.org/details/VanSlykeLymanTheChinaWhitePaper1949

However, assistant secretary of treasury Harry Dexter White was also operating on behalf of Stalin ... and did everything possible to divert congressional funds supporting Kuomintang. Stalin had also sent White draft demands for US to transmit to Japan ... in US Hull note (ultimatum) which was major factor in Japan to attack Pearl Harbor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Dexter_White#Venona_project
hull note
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hull_note#Interpretations

besides other reasons Miles refers to OSS/USArmy giving China to the communists, he describes the part of Chinese army that had cooperated with the Japanese ... towards the end tried to come over to the Nationalists but was vetoed by the US Army ... so they went over to the communists ... and it was largely these forces that show up later in Korea.

W/O OSS/Army giving China to the Communists (with some help from Harry Dexter White) ... you don't have Korea, w/o China&Korea, you don't have SE Asia domino theory and you don't have Vietnam. Also you don't have Korea, Pakistan, Iran nuclear situation.

more "The Dulles Brothers", loc2611-13:
In 1953, overthrowing Mossadegh had been the Dulles brothers' obsession. The next year it was Arbenz. Now they focused on Ho Chi Minh, the Communist leader of Vietnam's anticolonial movement. They singled him out not simply because of who he was, but where he was. Europe had settled into its Cold War pattern, and although Foster and Allen still considered it the center of the world, they believed the front line had moved to East Asia. They mistakenly saw China as a pawn of the Soviet Union, and Ho, also mistakenly, as a puppet of both. Crushing him, they decided, would be the most potent next blow they could strike against "international Communism."
... snip ...

.... which included things like disposing elected leader of Iran, supporting Shah and his dreaded SAVAK (trained by Schwarzkopf senior).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAVAK

Then there was something similar in Guatemala (US has had its share of banana republics and excessive repressive regimes).

Beetle: The Life of General Walter Bedell Smith
http://www.amazon.com/Beetle-General-Walter.../dp/B0078XFMVY

pg33/loc786-88:
Two days after his fifty-fifth birthday, on 7 October 1950, Smith inherited an organization in tatters. The agency's multiple failures, climaxing with the North Korean invasion, gave Smith the mandate to reform the intelligence agency.

pg47/loc1053-56:
In the period before the election, John Foster Dulles had engaged in some calculated maneuvers designed to remove any possibility of Smith's remaining at the CIA, intending to replace Smith with his brother Allen. Dulles talked about aggressively "rolling back" communism and envisioned a more proactive role for the CIA; during his tenure, Smith actively blunted many covert operation initiatives.
... snip ...

other recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#18 5 Naval Battles That Changed History Forever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#105 Iraq, Longest War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#68 Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#75 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#87 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#24 What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2017 09:12:05 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
The concept of setting up all the facilities needed by a job before starting it is good. JCL syntax is similar to assembler, which most programmers would have been familiar with in olden times. The biggest problem area (IMHO) is the plethora of DCB parameters, sub-parameters, sub-sub... well you get the idea, and these were a result of the huge number of different devices, access methods, etc.If you drop these out JCL would be a lot simpler.

At one point I thought about writing an interpreter for a job control language which would have faintly resembled Rexx, before Rexx was invented, but nothing ever came of it.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#26 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#30 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#31 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#32 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#34 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#35 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#36 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

in early years of os/360, job scheduler/JCL appeared to be going through quite a bit of evolution. switching to new release of os/360 required quite a bit of testing ... frequent problem was production JCL would stop working and required a lot of debugging to figure out what the problem was.

JCL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_Control_Language
some JES extensions
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_Control_Language#Job_Entry_Control_Language
complexity
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_Control_Language#Complexity
comments
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_Control_Language#Comments
JCL files can be long and complex, and the language is not easy to read. (JCL has been described as "user hostile".) OS JCL allows programmers to include two types of explanatory comment
... snip ...

JCL enhancements
https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/5things/entry/5_things_to_know_about_using_symbols_in_jcl_in_z_os_v2r1?lang=en
http://ibmsystemsmag.com/mainframe/tipstechniques/systemsmanagement/jcl_symbols/

JOB Scheduling
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_scheduler#History
Job Control Language (JCL) on IBM mainframes. Initially based on JCL functionality to handle dependencies, this era is typified by the development of sophisticated scheduling solutions (such as Job Entry Subsystem 2/3) forming part of the systems management and automation toolset on the mainframe.
... snip ...

JES2/JES3
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_Entry_Subsystem_2/3
JES3 Main Device Setup (MDS) has more control over data sets shared between systems than JES2, and JES3 Dependent Job Control (DJC) has more provisions for scheduling jobs with dependencies on each other than JES2. With the widespread use of sophisticated job scheduling software, DJC has become less important.
... snip ...

trivia, my wife did stint in gburg JES group and was one of the catchers for ASP turning it into JES3. She then was coauthor of JESUS (JES Unified System) design, all the features of JES2 & JES3 that the respective customers couldn't live w/o ... for various reasons, it never came to fruition.

past hasp, asp, jes2, jes3, NJI/NJE posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#hasp

other trivia, early in rex lifetime (before renamed rexx and released to customers), I wanted to show it wasn't just another scripting language. I chose as demo to rewrite IBM IPCS (large assembler utility) in rex, do it in half time over three months with ten times the (IPCS) function and running ten times faster (some slight of hand programming hacks). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

Batch processing history
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batch_processing#History
Batch Window
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batch_processing#Batch_window

recent posts mentioning overnight batch window (frequently also references financial industry moving to straight-through processing)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#82 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#58 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#63 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#39 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#43 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#11 The Mainframe vs. the Server Farm: A Comparison
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#17 Wall Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#32 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#3 Somewhat Interesting Mainframe Article

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2017 16:55:45 -0800
hancock4 writes:
It should be noted that IBM was criticized for not providing more facilities in System/360 to facilitate on-line processing (they did provide some important features). But IBM found that on-line processing was resource intensive, and serving more than a few terminals required considerable horsepower and complex management software. In batch processing, generally one program is involved, while in on-line processing, a variety of programs can get called in and out. Also, the same program may be at different stages handling different transactions.

The CICS we use today is far different and evolved than the CICS used 35 years ago. Far more robust and reliable, and applications are easier to program.


CICS required real storage because it provided system services much more efficient/faster than standard os/360 services. At startup CICS would acquire significant OS/360 ... including pre-openning files (that stayed open during CICS execution avoiding having to repeatedly extremely expensive os/360 SVC open/close) ... reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#34 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

CICS had very short pathlength multitasking, storage allocation/deallication, and other system services ... but not very sophisticated ... strictly single processor and didn't scale very well. Circa 2000, I was in datacenter with large multiprocessor mainframe that was running 130 instances of CICS.

Something similar happen to MVS (z/OS) ... that sophistication of operating system scaleup didn't keep pace with increasing power and number of processors. Nearly all mainframes now operate with multiple LPARs (subset of virtual machine function buried in the hardware) and multiple operating system copies. The 130 instances of CICS were partitioned across the multiple copies of MVS running in multiple different LPARs all on single real machine.

CICS was developed at customer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CICS
early history
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CICS#History

univ. library got ONR grant to do online catalog and used part of the money to get 2321 datacell. The effort was also selected to be betatest for the original CICS program product in 1969 and I got tagged to debug/support CICS.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CICS#Early_evolution
some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#cics

some more cics reference ... gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine

The Evolution of CICS: CICS and Multiprocessor Exploitation (2004)
http://web.archive.org/web/20041023110006/http://www.yelavich.com/history/ev200402.htm
and
http://web.archive.org/web/20050409124902/http://www.yelavich.com/cicshist.htm
and
http://web.archive.org/web/20071124013919/http://www.yelavich.com/history/toc.htm

other posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#26 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#30 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#31 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#32 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#35 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#36 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#37 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS
Date: 10 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#15 The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#26 The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS

all the original sql/relational was done on vm/145 at SJR. While IBM was preoccupied with the official new DBMS "EAGLE", managed to do System/R technology transfer to Endicott "under the radar" for SQL/DS on both DOS/VSE and VM. When EAGLE implodes, there is request about how fast could it be ported to MVS ... eventually coming out as DB2 for decision support *ONLY*. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr
more from 1995 SQL Reunion
http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/
a little EAGLE bashing
http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/SQL_Reunion_95/sqlr95-DB2.html

YKT also did QBE (query-by-example) for VM370. Old email about "father of QBE and arch-enemy of System/R" doing QBE presentation at SJR
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#email800310
QBE ref:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Query_by_Example

note predating SQL & QBE were 4th generation languages developed on CP67&VM370 for virtual machine based commercial online offerings. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#online

Mathematica original did RAMIS and ran on NCSS ... (virtual machine) CP67 spin-off from the IBM cambridge science center, some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subotpic.html#545tech

then came FOCUS available on TYMSHARE (later vm370-based online commercial system) ... and NCSS did NOMAD (as their own proprietary)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymshare

some online refs
http://archive.computerhistory.org/resources/text/Oral_History/RAMIS_and_NOMAD/RAMIS_and_NOMAD.National_CSS.oral_history.2005.102658182.pdf
http://www.decosta.com/Nomad/

FOCUS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOCUS
FOCUS is a computer programming language and development environment. It is a language used to build database queries, and is regarded as a fourth-generation programming language (4GL). Produced by Information Builders Inc., it was originally developed for data handling and analysis on the IBM mainframe.
... snip ...

more NOMAD
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomad_software
Martin provided a "dozen pages of COBOL, and then just a page or two of Mark IV, from Informatics." Rawlings offered the following single statement, performing a set-at-a-time operation, to show how trivial this problem was with Nomad:
... snip ...

RAMIS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramis_software
RAMIS was initially developed in the mid 1960s by the company MATHEMATICA on a consulting contract for a marketing study by a team headed by Gerald Cohen and subsequently further developed and marketed as a general purpose data management and analysis tool. In the late 1960s Cohen fell out with the management of MATHEMATICA and left to form his own company. Soon thereafter his new company released a new product called FOCUS which was very similar to RAMIS - even, it is rumored, having some of the same bugs.
... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers, comp.misc
Date: Sat, 11 Nov 2017 09:45:32 -0800
usenet@only.tnx (Questor) writes:
Again, MS-DOS/DR-DOS/PC-DOS does not have batch processing; .BAT files are scripts.

i would differentiate that online/interactive tended to have basic assumption that user was present running program ... while batch tended to assume that user wasn't present. batch processing tended to heuristically evolve more and more automation support over the years.

I got into this doing (unix) IBM's HA/CMP product and later with (unix-based) webservers when brought in as consultant at small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server (they had also invented this technology they called "SSL", the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce"). There was all sorts of things that needed automation that had been part of IBM batch systems for years.

recent reference to my wife having done stint responsible for loosely-coupled architecture (mainframe for cluster) but didn't stay long ... in part because of little uptake (except for IMS hot-standby ... until sysplex & parallel sysplex years later).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#28 Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS
past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

The guy responsible for one of the financial networks clearing large amounts of financial would like us to come by periodically to talk technology. He had attributed 100% availability for more than a decade to

1) replicated IMS hot-standby (at multiple geographically separated locations 2) automated operator

IMS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Information_Management_System
mentions large financial customer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Information_Management_System#Application

above also references pros/cons IMS versus DB2 ... which originated by the STL IMS group in the 70s criticizing the original sql/relational implementation System/R ... some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

had also run into this earlier when we were doing IBM's HA/CMP product some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

... when out doing marketing ... I had coined disaster survivability (to differentiate from disaster recovery) and geographic survivability. I had also been asked to write a section for the corporate continuous availability strategy document ... however it got pulled when both the rochester as/400 group and the POK mainframe group complained that they couldn't (then) meet the requirements. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

trivia: this is reference to Jan1992 meeting in Ellison's conference room on cluster scaleup.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

two of the people mentioned in the meeting, later left Oracle and were at small client/server startup responsible for something called "commerce" server when we were brought in as consultants because they wanted to do payment transactions on the server.

other triva: around turn of the century there was joint project between m'soft and financial processing company to do online banking services outsourcing. When it was figured out that NT wouldn't handle the load and SUN servers would have to be used ... I got tagged to explain the matter to Microsoft chairman. The day before I was scheduled to go in, some of the business people decided that (instead) online load would be managed to what could be handled by NT ... and then scaled up as NT was enhanced to handle increasing load (so they wouldn't have to raise the issue with the microsoft chairman).

posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#26 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#30 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#31 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#32 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#34 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#35 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#36 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#37 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#38 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

TYMSHARE @ CHM

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: TYMSHARE @ CHM
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:23:44 -0800
TYMSHARE @ CHM
https://medium.com/chmcore/someone-elses-computer-the-prehistory-of-cloud-computing-bca25645f89
"There is no cloud," goes the quip. "It's just someone else's computer."
... snip ...

In Aug1976, TYMSHARE made its VM370/CMS based online computer conferencing system "free" to IBM mainframe user group "SHARE" as "VMSHARE" .... archives here:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

trivia: I made deal with TYMSHARE to get dumped tape copy of all the VMSHARE files once a month for putting up on internal systems and the internal network. The biggest problem I had was with IBM lawyers who were concerned that IBM employees might be contaminated with information about customers.

more trivia: TYMSHARE had developed their own mainframe operating system that was more tailored to commercial online service bureau, GNOSIS.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOSIS
when M/D bought TYMSHARE, I was brought in to do a GNOSIS evaluation as part of spinning it off
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KeyKOS
and
http://www.cap-lore.com/Agorics/Library/KeyKos/Gnosis/keywelcome.html
http://cap-lore.com/CapTheory/upenn/Gnosis/Gnosis.html
some follow-on work
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extremely_Reliable_Operating_System
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CapROS

old VMSHARE related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare
internal network posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
virtual machine based commercial online posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#online

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers, comp.misc
Date: Sat, 11 Nov 2017 12:03:20 -0800
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
And while it is true that PC "batch processing" is a different critter than with mainframes, .BAT files could certainly be used for "user not present". PC BBS systems typically involved dozens of single-threaded programs controlled by long (many hundred lines of code) batch files that glued everything together. Often the stock MS command.com was replaced by 4DOS, which had more extensive logic controls and improved utilities. In my area, one BBS sysop died, but it was several weeks before online users noticed, because her BBS kept chugging right along answering calls and sending/receiving mail.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#40 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

part of old thread from 20yrs ago ... involved running some operations at small/client server started that wanted to do payment transactions on their server ... shell script ran sort where filled disk which didn't reflect error and eventually resulted in loss of data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#7 Why Do Mainframes Exist ???

in the commercial mainframe environment there is a lot of 7x24 procedural and automation infrastructure that has somewhat grown up thru trial and error over the past 30 years ... only some of it represented by hardware technology.

there is also a fundamental difference in a basicly "interactive" environment design point (where default tends to be having a person handle situations) and "batch" environment design point (where default tends to be automated applications handling situations and the corresponding instrumented infrastructure to support it).

a trivial example of infrastructure/design-point is what happens when a sort program runs out of temp space ... current os/mvs (as well as os/mft circa 1968) generates a specific error code for just about every condition ... and frequently there is an automated infrastructure that can handle each of the return codes and can take corrective/recovery action.

for how many of the newer operating systems is it possible to create a batch-procedure that based on sort utility return code ... recognize out of space condition and take automated corrective action?

there are some number of current commercial situations where the cost of a daily application failing once a year to not complete on schedule exceeds the cost of the hardware. more common is where the delta people costs that are involved in attempting to utilize an "interactive" operating system for a "batch" environment exceeds the cost of the hardware.

... snip ...

posts mentioning availability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available
posts mentioning assurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#assurance

also my pontification about internet isn't business criticl dataprocessing (RFC Editor Postel, before he passed, used to let me help with periodic STD1 also sponsored my talk on internet isn't business critical dataprocessing at ISI & also invited USC computer graduate students) and turning well designed & tested application can take 4-10 times the effort to turn into business critical "service".

past posts mentioning the 4-10 times effort to turn well designed/tested application into business critical "service":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#75 Test and Set (TS) vs Compare and Swap (CS)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#91 Buffer overflow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#93 Buffer overflow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#11 Wanted: the SOUNDS of classic computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#62 IBM says AMD dead in 5yrs ... -- Microsoft Monopoly vs. IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#15 A Dark Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#37 The BASIC Variations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#8 Mars Rover Not Responding
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#48 Automating secure transactions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#20 Vintage computers are better than modern crap !
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#49 "Perfect" or "Provable" security both crypto and non-crypto?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#23 Systems software versus applications software definitions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#63 Systems software versus applications software definitions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#64 Systems software versus applications software definitions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#40 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#42 Development as Configuration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#26 Data communications over telegraph circuits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#20 The System/360 Model 20 Wasn't As Bad As All That
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#37 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#51 IBM to the PCM market(the sky is falling!!!the sky is falling!!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#78 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#10 The top 10 dead (or dying) computer skills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#76 PSI MIPS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#77 PSI MIPS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#23 Outsourcing loosing steam?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#54 Industry Standard Time To Analyze A Line Of Code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#53 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#41 IBM announced z10 ..why so fast...any problem on z 9
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#50 fraying infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#53 Why Is Less Than 99.9% Uptime Acceptable?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#33 Mainframe Project management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#20 Michigan industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#35 Builders V. Breakers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#48 How much knowledge should a software architect have regarding software security?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#0 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#16 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#60 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#27 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#67 Somewhat off-topic: comp-arch.net cloned, possibly hacked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#44 Faster, Better, Cheaper: Why Not Pick All Three?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#31 DRAM is the new Bulk Core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#13 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#86 Economic Failures of HTTPS Encryption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#117 Are we programmed to stop at the 'first' right answer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#146 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#10 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#16 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#27 History of Mainframe Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#23 MVS vs HASP vs JES (was 2821)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#18 progress in e-mail, such as AOL

other posts mentioning working with Postel:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#65 IBM100 - Rise of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#10 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#4 OODA in IT Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#92 Old hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#11 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#14 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#70 Domain Name System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#75 11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#100 Jean Sammet, Co-Designer of a Pioneering Computer Language, Dies at 89
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#14 Mainframe Networking problems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#31 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 11 Nov 2017 13:19:54 -0800
hancock4 writes:
We did want to convert a process to output directly to a tape for microfiche processing. Everyone said it'd be easy. But in DOS, there was no device independence. I had to recompile the programs to write to tape with control characters. But once done, the microfiche processor did all the rest--including 'knowing' ran to eject to a fresh fiche and print indexing information at the top of the card. FWIW, I think we sent the tapes out to Burroughs for processing.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#40 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

we sent output from vm370 system in bldg 28 (san jose research) over the internal network to microfiche printer in bldg 26 (across the street on san jose plant site) and got 24hr turn around (output returned to the bldg. 28 datacenter printer output area)

home office circa 1977 with ibm tie-line, 300 baud cdi miniterm and compact microfiche viewer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/miniterm.jpg

home miniterm

ref my wife was in JES group and one of the catchers for ASP, turning into JES3.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#40 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

jes2/jes3 reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_Entry_Subsystem_2/3
JES3 Main Device Setup (MDS) has more control over data sets shared between systems than JES2, and JES3 Dependent Job Control (DJC) has more provisions for scheduling jobs with dependencies on each other than JES2. With the widespread use of sophisticated job scheduling software, DJC has become less important.
... snip ...

JES3
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_Entry_Subsystem_2/3#JES3
ASP evolved from the design of the 7094/7044 Direct Coupled System, using data channel to data channel communication. By attaching an IBM 7044 as a peripheral processor throughput was more than doubled.
... snip ...

past home office with microfiche viewer refs/posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#38 Baudot code direct to computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#51 Baudot code direct to computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#30 Timeline: 40 years of OS milestones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#45 Netbooks: A terminal by any other name
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#75 IBM and the Computer Revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#34 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#16 Unbuffered glass TTYs?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#21 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#101 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#3 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#42 Old Computing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core
Date: 12 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/12/us/nsa-shadow-brokers.html

spies like us (outsourcing 70% of the budget and over half the people to "for profit" companies, cutting lots of corners to increase profit)
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us
helping accelerating the rapidly spreading success of failure culture (series of failures is more profit)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

success of failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

and cyber dumb

Confidential report lists U.S. weapons system designs compromised by Chinese cyberspies
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/confidential-report-lists-us-weapons-system-designs-compromised-by-chinese-cyberspies/2013/05/27/a42c3e1c-c2dd-11e2-8c3b-0b5e9247e8ca_story.html
REPORT: Chinese Hackers Stole Plans For Dozens Of Critical US Weapons Systems
http://www.businessinsider.com/china-hacked-us-military-weapons-systems-2013-5
A list of the U.S. weapons designs and technologies compromised by hackers
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/a-list-of-the-us-weapons-designs-and-technologies-compromised-by-hackers/2013/05/27/a95b2b12-c483-11e2-9fe2-6ee52d0eb7c1_story.html
Report: China gained U.S. weapons secrets using cyberespionage
http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/28/world/asia/china-cyberespionage/

cyber dumb posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#3 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#47 Stolen F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China's Stealth Fighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#49 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#0 Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#32 The dark side of digital banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#82 The NSA and Snowden: Securing the All-Seeing Eye
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#90 A Drone Could Be the Ultimate Dogfighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#18 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#25 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#31 The Designer Of The F-15 Explains Just How Stupid The F-35 Is
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#49 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#90 Friden Flexowriter equipment series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#12 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#20 US No Longer Tech Leader in Military War Gear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#22 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#23 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#28 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#34 UN to Five Eyes nations: Your mass surveillance is breaking the law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#65 New Military Gear Doesn't Have to Cost a Fortune
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#102 A-10 Warthog No Longer Suitable for Middle East Combat, Air Force Leader Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#8 Super Cane's Computers run Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#32 Univac 90 series info posted on bitsavers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#43 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#45 Is coding the new literacy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#76 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#6 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#10 NYT on Sony hacking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#11 NYT on Sony hacking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#55 Do we really?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#75 How Russia's S-400 makes the F-35 obsolete
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#9 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#20 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#21 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#34 The joy of simplicity?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#42 No, the F-35 Can't Fight at Long Range, Either
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#75 American Gripen: The Solution To The F-35 Nightmare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#8 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#19 Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#20 DEC and The Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#95 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#17 Cybercrime
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#38 [BBC] US nuclear force 'still uses floppy disks'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#104 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#104 How to Win the Cyberwar Against Russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#17 Why Large Companies Can't Innovate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#0 Snowden
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#28 China's spies gain valuable US defense technology: report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#40 The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#67 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#76 The F-35 Stealth Fighter Is Politically Unstoppable----Even Under President Trump
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#62 Big Shrink to "Hire" 25,000 in the US, as Layoffs Pile Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#15 China's claim it has 'quantum' radar may leave $17 billion F-35 naked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#34 CBS News: WikiLeaks claims to release thousands of CIA documents of computer activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#47 WikiLeaks CIA Dump: Washington's Data Security Is a Mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#50 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#73 More Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#77 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#86 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#78 This Afghan War Plan By The Guy Who Founded Blackwater Should Scare The Hell Out Of You
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#51 Russian Hackers Stole NSA Data on U.S. Cyber Defense
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#56 China's mega fortress in Djibouti could be model for its bases in Pakistan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#78 F-35 Multi-Role

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Debate Over Ken Burns Civil War Doc Continues Over Decades

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Debate Over Ken Burns Civil War Doc Continues Over Decades
Date: 12 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Debate Over Ken Burns Civil War Doc Continues Over Decades
https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2017/11/04/arts/ap-us-ken-burns-civil-war.html
"Ken Burns always looks for varied voices and he always looks for characters, and Shelby Foote was certainly a character," Holzer says. "The most amazing thing he said was that the two great geniuses of the war were Lincoln and (Confederate Gen.) Nathan Bedford Forrest."
... snip ...

Generals South, Generals North: The Commanders of the Civil War Reconsidered
https://www.amazon.com/Generals-South-North-Commanders-Reconsidered-ebook/dp/B012A1WML6/

loc1837-39:
And the general Sherman most feared and hated, Nathan Bedford Forrest, the man he called a "devil" and the commander he considered more dangerous than any other in the South, had his own single-sentence definition of war: "War means fighting, and fighting means killing."
... snip ...

past references to Generals South/North:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#45 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#92 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#55 Comanche Empire

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Economists Turned Corporations into Predators

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: How Economists Turned Corporations into Predators
Date: 12 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
How Economists Turned Corporations into Predators
https://www.ineteconomics.org/perspectives/blog/how-economists-turned-corporations-into-predators
How Economists Turned Corporations into Predators
https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2017/10/economists-turned-corporations-predators.html
Since the 1980s, business schools have touted "agency theory," a controversial set of ideas meant to explain how corporations best operate. Proponents say that you run a business with the goal of channeling money to shareholders instead of, say, creating great products or making any efforts at socially responsible actions such as taking account of climate change. Many now take this view as gospel, even though no less a business titan than Jack Welch, former CEO of GE, called the notion that a company should be run to maximize shareholder value "the dumbest idea in the world." Why did Welch say that?
... snip ...

Economists and the Powerful: Convenient Theories, Distorted Facts, Ample Rewards
https://www.amazon.com/Economists-Powerful-Convenient-Distorted-Economics-ebook/dp/B01B4X4KOS/

pg127/loc2480-82:
On the face of it, shareholder value is the dumbest idea in the world. Shareholder value is a result, not a strategy… Your main constituencies are your employees, your customers and your products. —Jack Welch, 2009
... snip ...

Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present
http://www.amazon.com/Age-Greed-Triumph-Finance-ebook/dp/B004DEPF6I

pg199/loc3909-13:
GE Capital also enabled GE to manage its quarterly earnings, engaging in the last couple of weeks of every calendar quarter in various trades that could push earnings up on the last day or two before the quarter's end. It was an open secret on Wall Street that this was how Welch consistently kept quarterly earnings rising for years at a time. "Though earnings management is a no-no among good governance types," wrote two CNNMoney financial editors, "the company has never denied doing it, and GE Capital is the perfect mechanism."

pg200/loc3925-30:
The CNNMoney writers got it slightly wrong. GE was not exactly like the American economy. It was even more dependent on financial services. In the early 2000s, GE was again riding a financial wave, the subprime mortgage lending boom; it had even bought a subprime mortgage broker. GE borrowed still more against equity to exploit the remarkable opportunities, its triple-A rating giving it a major competitive advantage. By 2008, the central weakness of the Welch business strategy, its dependence on financial overspeculation, became ominously clear. GE's profits plunged during the credit crisis and its stock price fell by 60 percent. GE Capital, the main source of its success for twenty-five years, now reported enormous losses

pg200/pg3935-41:
He mostly stopped trying to create great new products, hence the reduction in R&D. He took the heart out of his businesses, he did not put it in, as he had always hoped to do. What made his strategy possible, and fully shaped it, was the rising stock market--and the new ideology that praised free markets even as they failed.
... snip ...

Why the "Maximizing Shareholder Value" Theory of Corporate Governance is Bogus
https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/10/why-the-maximizing-shareholder-value-theory-of-corporate-governance-is-bogus.html
One mantra you see regularly in the business and popular press goes something along the lines of "the CEO and board have a fiduciary duty to maximize shareholder value." That is untrue. Moreover, the widespread acceptance of that false notion has done considerable harm.

If you review any of the numerous guides prepared for directors of corporations prepared by law firms and other experts, you won't find a stipulation for them to maximize shareholder value on the list of things they are supposed to do. It's not a legal requirement. And there is a good reason for that.

Directors and officers, broadly speaking, have a duty of care and duty of loyalty to the corporation. From that flow more specific obligations under Federal and state law. But notice: those responsibilities are to the corporation, not to shareholders in particular.

... snip ...

"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
stock buybacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#stock.buybacks

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

America's Over-Hyped Strategic Bombing Experiment

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: America's Over-Hyped Strategic Bombing Experiment
Date: 13 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
America's Over-Hyped Strategic Bombing Experiment
http://warisboring.com/americas-over-hyped-strategic-bombing-experiment/

"Beetle: The Life of General Walter Bedell Smith" references the problems on Omaha Beach, pg628/loc12403-5:
Although things went unpredictably well at Utah, the American assault units on Omaha succeeded in carving out only a dangerously thin beachhead by early evening. With their coastal fortifications breached, the Germans methodically triggered their defense plans, which chiefly meant shifting reserves from one sector to another.

pg628/loc12411-12:
Serious holes remained between the sectors, particularly on either side of Omaha Beach.
... snip ...

"The European Campaign: Its Origins and Conduct" (no precision strategic bombing), loc2582-85:
The bomber preparation of Omaha Beach was a total failure, and German defenses on Omaha Beach were intact as American troops came ashore. At Utah Beach, the bombers were a little more effective because the IXth Bomber Command was using B-26 medium bombers. Wisely, in preparation for supporting the invasion, maintenance crews removed Norden bombsights from the bombers and installed the more effective low-level altitude sights.
... snip ...

GAO Desert Storm Air Power report has tactical air campaign (only last 100hrs were land war) so effective that Iraqis were walking away from their tanks (as sitting ducks) ... the later land war tank battles (with little or no coalition damage) doesn't mention whether the enemy tanks had anybody home. Claim is that for Iraq2, enemy had learned from Iraq1 to minimize exposure to US (tactical) air power.

Two-thirds of total US WW2 war spending went to air program. There were voices claiming that 1943 US strategic bombing program could win the war by itself (w/o having to invade Europe). They also insisted that all the money go to heavy strategic bombers and that long-range fighter escort wasn't needed. The British argued with them that the Germans had learned that lesson in the battle for britain ... but the US insisted on (re-)learning that lesson the hard way. As referenced in the failure of Omaha beach bombing ... high altitude precision bombing was a myth. There is some implication that lack of precision bombing helps account for strategic bombing switching to fire bombing cities (much harder to miss a whole city). McNamara was LeMay's staff blanning firebombing Gerrman and Japanese cities. After the war, leaves for auto industry but comes back as SECDEF for Vietnam where Laos becomes the most bombed country in the year (more tonnage than Germany and Japan combined).

MIC(C) past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

past posts referencing Bedell Smith and/or European Campaign
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#52 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#53 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#69 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#70 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#84 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#85 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#60 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#61 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#62 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#64 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#13 Fully Restored WWII Fighter Plane Up for Auction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#120 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#77 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#80 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#88 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#117 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#56 "One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#64 Strategic Bombing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#24 US Air Power
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#63 America's Over-Hyped Strategic Bombing Experiment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#34 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#80 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#3 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#38 Imperial Hubris
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#69 The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#55 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#61 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#77 Early use of word "computer", 1944
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#53 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#99 The Real Reason You Should See Dunkirk: Hitler Lost World War II There
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#3 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#21 Norden bombsight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#36 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How DARPA, The Secretive Agency That Invented The Internet, Is Working To Reinvent It

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: How DARPA, The Secretive Agency That Invented The Internet, Is Working To Reinvent It
Date: 13 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#33 How DARPA, The Secretive Agency That Invented The Internet, Is Working To Reinvent It

part of the online computer conferencing ... from IBMJARGON
Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.
... snip ...

Datamation put a slightly different spin on it, Emmett, R. 1981, "VNET or gripenet?" Datamation, Vol. 27, No. 12 (November), pp.48-58. Lots of online citations but web search doesn't turn up copy. They garbled it with the "gripenet" bit ... however, end of the article (pg58):
There is a rumor that Wheeler may leave IBM and join his former colleagues on the outside as consultant. "Right now he's pure gold whatever way you slice him up," says one source. "IBM needs him and the outside companies would probably pay anything to get him."

However you look at this tug of war, it can only be good news for IBM's VM users. "An enormous shop window is opening for them." said one observer. "And what they'll discover in that window is a very powerful tool to control their own destinies--and not have IBM do it."

... snip ....

internet posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internet
CMC posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

old post includes intro to the summaries
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#39 Vnet : Unbelievable

recent posts mentioning "Tandem Memos"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#39 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#84 Hottest Editors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#97 IBM revenue has fallen for 20 quarters -- but it used to run its business very differently
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#105 The IBM 7094 and CTSS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#33 Eliminating the systems programmer was Re: IBM cuts contractor billing by 15 percent (our else)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#51 Stopping the Internet of noise
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#55 Stopping the Internet of noise
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#56 What is the most epic computer glitch you have ever seen?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#67 What is the most epic computer glitch you have ever seen?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#94 AI Is Inventing Languages Humans Can't Understand. Should We Stop It?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#96 IBM Another Disappointment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#7 Tandem Memos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#29 Google Employee's Anti-Diversity Manifesto Goes 'Internally Viral'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#36 IBM Shareholders Need Employee Enthusiasm, Engagemant And Passions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#38 Bullying trivia

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2017 17:02:50 -0800
hancock4 writes:
Some of early the large computers had independent paths so that cards could be loaded directly to tape "offline" without involving the CPU. Likewise, output could be printed from tape without the CPU.

The IBM 1401, a popular small computer, was used both as a feeder to large machines like the 7090, and as a freestanding machine in small shops.

As to pre-computer tabulating machines, were units of work on them called "Jobs"?


machine shops
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_shop
19th century
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_shop#19th_century

The rise of machine shops and their specific manufacturing and organizational problems triggered the early job shop management pioneers, whose theories became known with as scientific management.

Job Shop
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_shop

even pre-360 computer ... might have job slips that includes tapes (and/or disks) that needed to be mounted as part of execution ... an/or special printer forms (akin to machine shop job setup).

then increasing amount of job slip setup moved to JCL. post mentioning JCL, job scheduling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#37 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

post mentioning precursor to (360) JES3/ASP ... precursor was 7094/7044 direct couple system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#43 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

my first student data processing job was to rewrite 1401 MPIO for 360/30. The univ. had 709/1401 with 1401 doing tape<->printer/unit record frontend with manual moving tapes between 709 & 1401. The 1401 was replaced with 360/30 as part of transition from 709/1401 to 360/67 and TSS/360. TSS/360 never quite made production quality so the 360/67 was used (mostly) as 360/65 running os/360.

some recent 709/1401/MPIO posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#50 Univ. 709
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#36 MVS vs HASP vs JES (was 2821)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#20 Programmers Who Use Spaces Paid More
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#49 System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)

some drift, (also) as undergraduate in the 60s, I rewrote (virtual machine) CP67 scheduling ("dynamic adaptive resource management", as well as lots of other parts of CP67) ... some past scheduling posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

in the product morph of cp67 to vm370, lots of features from cp67 were dropped and/or simplified. old email about moving lots of stuff from cp67 to vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

this was during the Future System period which was going to completely replace 370 with something differrent ... and internal politics were shutting down 370 efforts (also blameed for clone 370 processor makers getting market foothold). During the period I would periodically ridicule what they were doing (which wasn't exactly career enhancing activity). some futuresys posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

in the wake of future system failure there was mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipelines. This included kicking off 3033 & 3081 (370/xa) efforts in parallel ... a reference:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

23june1969 unbundling announcement started to charge for SE services, maintenance, software, etc (but they managed to make the case that kernel/system software should still be free). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

After the failure of FS (and the rise of clone processors), there was decision to starting to charge for system software. This was incremental as parts of new software was added to existing kernel software ... until all kernel software was free. The initial guinea pig was my resource manager ... reintroduced as separate priced product addon.

other posts in this thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#26 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#30 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#31 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#32 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#34 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#35 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#36 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#38 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#40 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#42 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 09:08:25 -0800
Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:
Some plants respond to day length by starting to flower when the days shorten, when grown under artificial light flowering can often be induced or postponed indefinitely by adjusting the 'day' length.

i remember reading article some 50yrs ago about calculating apple blossom festival ... it was approx some number of day*degrees above something like 40 degrees. past post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#89 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#91 360 programs on a z/10

the ref in above post gone 404 ... but lives on at wayback machine
https://web.archive.org/web/20050402185119/http://www.ncw.wsu.edu/treefruit/blomdeg5.html
The 1922 to present "official" bloom date site is the WSU Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center in Wenatchee. Red Delicious trees here have a historical average bloom date of April 29, 3 - 4 days later than at the early sites near Wenatchee, and about 7 days earlier than apples at the Airport. Bloom seems to be occuring ever-earlier over the past 15 years.
... snip ...

found current web page
http://treefruit.wsu.edu/news/full-bloom-dates-for-red-delicious-apples/
Daily high temperatures are used to predict bloom based on degree days (DD) above 43degrees. As of April 27, Bloom DD in Wenatchee (TFREC) were 778 DD and 902 DD in Mattawa which predict first pink and full pink. Actual maturity is first bloom in Wenatchee on the TFREC sentinel trees. 920 DD predict full bloom. This is significantly later than 2016 where Wenatchee was already at full bloom April 9. However, this is only slightly behind the long term average with full bloom at April 27 in Wenatchee. As always look at the trees. Models are never perfect.
... snip ...

other articles reference variation because of micro-climates in Wenatchee valley.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 1403 Printer Characters

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 1403 Printer Characters
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 09:26:19 -0800
Charles Richmond <numerist@aquaporin4.com> writes:
Can anyone post links to web pages... that have a large amount of sample printouts from an IBM 1403 printer??? I have googled this subject with little success.

I am interested in the sans serif monospaced font that seems to be the original 1403 font. I had access at university to a 1403 printer but was *not* prescient enough to save printouts...


also see all the cp67 documentation at bitsavers
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cms/
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cms/GY20-0591-1_CMS_PLM_Oct71.pdf
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cp67/
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cp67/GH20-0856-0_CP-67_Operators_Guide_Oct70.pdf
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cp67/GH20-0859-0_CP67_Version_3_Users_Guide_Oct70.pdf

the above have some of the IBM pages non-1403 ... but just about all the rest are 1403.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Einhorn: "None Of The Problems From The Financial Crisis Have Been Solved"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Einhorn: "None Of The Problems From The Financial Crisis Have Been Solved"
Date: 16 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Einhorn: "None Of The Problems From The Financial Crisis Have Been Solved"
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-11-16/einhorn-none-problems-financial-crisis-have-been-solved
Ah yes, the Fed-funded "deflation trade" which lowers prices for goods and services courtesy of ravenous investors who will throw money at any "growth" idea, without considerations for return or profit, because - well - more such investors will emerge tomorrow. After all, in this day and age of ZIRP, what else will they do with their money.
... snip ...

last year this date

Fed's Kashkari Releases Plan To End Too Big To Fail, Compares Banks To Terrorists
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-11-16/feds-kashkari-releases-plan-end-too-big-fail-compares-banks-terrorists

economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
ZIRP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zip
Too Big To Fail posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 1403 Printer Characters

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 1403 Printer Characters
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 13:35:47 -0800
hancock4 writes:
On Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 12:26:22 PM UTC-5, Anne & Lynn Wheeler wrote: Charles Richmond writes: Can anyone post links to web pages... that have a large amount of sample printouts from an IBM 1403 printer??? I have googled this subject with little success.

I am interested in the sans serif monospaced font that seems to be the original 1403 font. I had access at university to a 1403 printer but was *not* prescient enough to save printouts...

also see all the cp67 documentation at bitsavers
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cms/

In the above, on page 350, the listing looks very high quality, too good for a 1403 (the letters are well spaced). Could that have been printed on a 407?


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#51 IBM 1403 Printer Characters

big difference with printed output of ADT macro ... file pg227 (document pg216). Finished printing would use TN train/chain with high quality "film" ribbon (letter edges were crisper). The macro output looks like standard upper case only train/chain with standard fabric ribbon.

mentions (fabric) ribbons repeatedly reused
http://ibm-1401.info/1403Ribbons.html
film ribbons one time use
http://ibm-1401.info/1403Ribbons.html#FilmRibbons

quicky search web references on 1403 font
http://ibm-1401.info/1403Fonts.html
https://slantedhall.com/fonts/1403

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Testing Progressives, Centrist Dems Team Up with GOP to Deregulate Banks

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Testing Progressives, Centrist Dems Team Up with GOP to Deregulate Banks
Date: 17 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Testing Progressives, Centrist Dems Team Up with GOP to Deregulate Banks
http://prospect.org/article/testing-progressives-centrist-dems-team-gop-deregulate-banks
On Monday, news broke that Senate Banking Committee Chair Mike Crapo had struck a deal with a cadre of Wall Street friendly Senate Democrats to roll back regulations, including key parts of Dodd-Frank, on a large segment of the banking industry under the guise of providing new consumer protections and relief for struggling community banks.
... snip ...

A Week After Virginia Election Sweep, Democrats Join Republicans for More Bank Deregulation
https://theintercept.com/2017/11/14/bank-deregulation-bipartisan-senate-equifax/
The Senate Is Getting Ready to Erode Obama's Landmark Wall Street Law
http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2017/11/the-senate-is-getting-ready-to-erode-obamas-landmark-wall-street-law/
Trump, Wall Street and the "banking caucus" ready to rip apart Dodd-Frank
https://www.publicintegrity.org/2017/02/01/20645/trump-wall-street-and-banking-caucus-ready-rip-apart-dodd-frank
Trump Begins Assault on Dodd-Frank Financial Regulations
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/03/business/dealbook/trump-congress-financial-regulations.html

It became clear (to me) in the spring of 2009 that congress had no intention of doing anything substantive about wall street. January, 2009 I was asked to HTMLize(/web pages) the Pecora Hearings (30s congressional hearings into '29 crash, resulted in Glass-Steagall and criminal convictions with jailtime) with lots of internal HREFs and URLs between what happened then and what happened this time (comments that the new congress might have the appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call that it won't be needed after all (references to enormous mountains of wallstreet cash totally burying capital hill).

Pecora Hearings and/or Glass-Steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

there is: "Confidence Men" pg430:
But they were fighting on too many fronts. Carl Levin of Michigan and Jeff Merkley of Oregon had discovered that Dodd had discreetly gutted the Volcker Rule, and the two set to work trying to counteract Dodd's efforts. The Merkley-Levin Amendment articulated Volcker's idea fully -- and wrote it as law. No regulatory backsliding, once everything settled down.
... and "Age of Greed" pg370:
In addition, the Justice Department was now investigating reduced rate mortgages Mozilo allegedly sold to Senators Chris Dodd of Connecticut and Kent Conrad of North Dakota, as well as two former heads of Fannie Mae, Jim Johnson and Franklin Raines. They were known as "Friends of Angelo."
... snip ...

Angelo, #1 on times list of those responsible for the economic mess/financial crises
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877339,00.html

How Wall Street Killed Financial Reform; It's bad enough that the banks strangled the Dodd-Frank law. Even worse is the way they did it - with a big assist from Congress and the White House
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/how-wall-street-killed-financial-reform-20120510
How Wall Street Defanged Dodd-Frank; Battalions of regulatory lawyers burrowed deep in the federal bureaucracy to foil reform.
http://www.thenation.com/article/174113/how-wall-street-defanged-dodd-frank
Josh Rosner on How Dodd Frank Institutionalizes Too Big to Fail
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/05/josh-rosner-on-how-dodd-frank-institutionalizes-too-big-to-fail.html
Rosner focuses on Articles I and II of Dodd Frank and describes how their plans to deal with resolving large firms has only made matters worse. It' s key to understand that these two sections are somewhat at odds with each other. Dodd Frank peculiarly provides for two ways to wind up systemically important firms. Title I says they should prepare for bankruptcy. They need to clean up how they are organized and make sure activities fit or can be mapped into legal entities and prepare living wills, which are plans for how they would wind themselves up. But confusingly, banks can also be "resolved" which is more like "rescued with a little pain inflicted on investors" under Title II. Title II provides for a second way to deal with stressed financial firms, which includes having the government provide what amounts to debtor-in-possession financing while the bank is restructured. This, sports fans, is what is otherwise known as a bailout.
... snip ...

Are Treasury and the Fed at Odds Over Big Banks? Treasury Secretary Lew keeps hands off as Wall Street giants grow larger.
http://www.nationaljournal.com/politics/are-treasury-and-the-fed-at-odds-over-big-banks-20130524
But at his 2010 Senate confirmation hearing to become head of Office of Management and Budget, Lew also indicated that he didn't consider the deregulation of Wall Street to be a "proximate" cause of the financial crisis --an answer that put him at odds with his boss, who declared as a presidential candidate in 2008: "It's because of deregulation that Wall Street was able to engage in the kind of irresponsible actions that have caused this financial crisis."
... snip ...

Gretchen Morgenson on Why Banks Are Still Too Big To Fail
http://billmoyers.com/segment/gretchen-morgenson-on-why-banks-are-still-too-big-to-fail/
Dodd-Frank set up a system to unwind troubled institutions when they become troubled. But it requires regulators taking a really firm stand against large, politically-interconnected, and powerful companies ... I just think it's too easy to put the taxpayer on the hook and bail these people out
... snip ..

Deja Vu on the Hill: Wall Street Lobbyists Roll Back Finance Reform, Again
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/deja-vu-on-the-hill-wall-street-lobbyists-roll-back-finance-reform-again-20130521
Bank Lobbyists Writing the Rules for Wall Street
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/05/bank-lobbyists-writing-the-rules-for-wall-street.html
Banks' Lobbyists Help in Drafting Financial Bills
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/05/23/banks-lobbyists-help-in-drafting-financial-bills/
Bank Lobbyists Writing the Rules for Wall Street
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/05/bank-lobbyists-writing-the-rules-for-wall-street.html

some of the ploys involved in Dodd-Frank, email was uncovered that wallstreet lobbyists were providing provisions to be included in the Dodd-Frank draft. In some cases, they were blatant ridiculous, the added provisions would leak and then the same lobbyists would ridicule the provisions as part of discrediting the process. In other cases the provided provisions were enormously complex or fatally flawed, guaranteeing that it would take years attempting (or impossible) to come up with regulations. Part of the facade for letting wallstreet write provisions was that they were the only ones that understood their complex financial operations.

"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
Too Big To Fail posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
(Triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo
regulatory capture posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#regulatory.capture

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 11:07:49 -0800
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
And I once worked on some mortgage code where there was mention of some U.S. banks basing their calculations on a 360-day year.

there was internal discussion group from the early 80s discussing Y2K ... one of the people that worked on shuttle program posted ... mentions shuttle had 400 day year, previouly posted copies (usually in y2k threads)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#email841207
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#email841207
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#email841207
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#email841207
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#email841207
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#email841207
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#email841207

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 18 Nov 2017 10:25:22 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Miles puts blame on OSS and Wedemeyer/Army (had been marshall's staff, then Marshall supported Wedemeyer) ... already had given China to Communists before end of WW2. OSS and Army factions can't wrest control of interface w/Nationalists from the Navy, so they setup with the communists (which they can claim sole credit) and do whatever they can to undermine the Navy. Lots in chapter "Wedemeyer Takes Over" pgs433-455 and SACO Deadend Kids Take The Coast, pg492-521.
https://www.amazon.com/different-kind-war-little-known-guerrilla/dp/B0007IYOFW
https://books.google.com/books/about/A_Different_Kind_of_War.html?id=U4pBAAAAIAAJ


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#35 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#36 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

some of the things Miles complained about, Stilwell and the American Experience in China: 1911-1945
https://www.amazon.com/Stilwell-American-Experience-China-1911-1945-ebook/dp/B00KUQITNE/

loc3439-40:
Familiar with the plight of the Chinese peasant and unfamiliar with Marxism, Stilwell regarded the Communists as a local phenomenon and a natural outcome of oppression.

loc3444-46:
This analysis was a normal one of the time. Foreigners who would have considered Communists at home a vicious menace looked on them locally as an indigenous product of the ancient wrongs of China and as reformers who were trying to do something about it; "not Communists at all," as Consul Jarvis said to Stilwell.
... snip ...

other recent posts referencing "A Different Kind of War"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#18 5 Naval Battles That Changed History Forever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#105 Iraq, Longest War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#68 Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#75 WW II cryptography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#24 What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

About Unconventional warfare

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: About Unconventional warfare
Date: 18 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Miles puts blame on OSS & Wedemeyer/Army (had been marshall's staff, then Marshall supported Wedemeyer) ... already had given China to Communists before end of WW2. OSS and Army factions can't wrest control of interface w/Nationalists from the Navy, so they setup with the communists (which they can claim sole credit) and do whatever they can to undermine the Navy. Lots in chapter "Wedemeyer Takes Over" pgs433-455 and SACO Deadend Kids Take The Coast, pg492-521
https://www.amazon.com/different-kind-war-little-known-guerrilla/dp/B0007IYOFW
https://books.google.com/books/about/A_Different_Kind_of_War.html?id=U4pBAAAAIAAJ

Marine's account of SACO & (US/nationalist) guerilla operations
https://www.mca-marines.org/gazette/2009/11/marines-china

from above:
The SACO Agreement of 1943 called for the Navy to arm and train in excess of 50,000 Chinese guerrillas, known as the Loyal Patriotic Army, and to establish and maintain 1 5 training camps. Except for the several Marines who were coast watchers, all other Marines were involved in guerrilla training at the 15 established training camps located from the edges of the Gobi Desert to the Japanese occupied coast, almost within sight of Shanghai, the lights of which could be seen from the SACO guerrilla training camp on a clear night. Marines operated with small guerrilla units as American advisors, living with the Chinese troops in the field, eating the same chow as the Chinese guerrillas, and walking miles and miles through Japanese occupied territory.
... snip ...

other recent posts referencing "A Different Kind of War":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#105 Iraq, Longest War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#68 Ghost Riders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#24 What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#36 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#56 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Wall Street Wants to Kill the Agency Protecting Americans From Financial Scams

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Wall Street Wants to Kill the Agency Protecting Americans From Financial Scams
Date: 18 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Wall Street Wants to Kill the Agency Protecting Americans From Financial Scams
https://theintercept.com/2017/11/18/wall-street-wants-to-kill-the-agency-protecting-americans-from-financial-scams/
The rule's spectacular defeat marked a rare Wall Street victory over an agency created by Dodd-Frank, the sweeping financial reform law Barack Obama signed in 2010. The CFPB was barely five years old when Donald Trump was elected, promising to "do a number" on financial regulations.
... snip ...

Bad Ideas; Reknowned economist James K. Galbraith, one of our expert panelists, pulls no punches in talking about the damage wrought by financial innovation
https://www.gfmag.com/magazine/june-2017/bad-ideas
I could point to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. It provides at least one place in the government that is supposed to be looking at financial innovations with a skeptical eye. In my view, innovation in the financial sector is designed to get around public purpose.
... snip ...

posts mentioning economic mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess

recent posts mentioning "bad-ideas" article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#1 OT: book: "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#19 Financial, Healthcare, Construction, Education complexity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#49 Shareholders Ahead Of Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#79 Bad Ideas
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#1 OT: book: "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#116 The Real Reason Wages Have Stagnated: Our Economy Is Optimized For Financialization

recent posts mentioning Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#95 Trump, Wall Street and the "banking caucus" ready to rip apart Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#96 Trump, Wall Street and the "banking caucus" ready to rip apart Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#87 Dodd-Frank Was Designed to Fail - and Trump Will Make it Worse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#85 How can we stop algorithms telling lies?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#106 Jamie Dimon: You Make Us Embarrassed to be Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#108 Jamie Dimon: You Make Us Embarrassed to be Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#101 The Payoff: Why Wall Street Always Wins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#108 Iraq, Longest War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#38 Bullying trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#47 Retirement Heist: How Firms Plunder Workers' Nest Eggs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#72 When Working From Home Doesn't Work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#54 Testing Progressives, Centrist Dems Team Up with GOP to Deregulate Banks

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Wall Street Wants to Kill the Agency Protecting Americans From Financial Scams

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Wall Street Wants to Kill the Agency Protecting Americans From Financial Scams
Date: 18 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#58 Wall Street Wants to Kill the Agency Protecting Americans From Financial Scams

Treasury slams CFPB rule that empowers class-action suits against Equifax, Wells Fargo, others
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/treasury-slams-cfpb-rule-that-empowers-class-action-suits-against-equifax-wells-fargo-others-2017-10-23
'What in God's name were you thinking?' senators grill Wells Fargo CEO
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/what-in-gods-name-were-you-thinking-senators-grill-wells-ceo-2017-10-03
SEC fines Wells Fargo Advisors for failing to report on money laundering
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/sec-fines-wells-fargo-advisors-for-failing-to-report-on-money-laundering-2017-11-14

too big to fail posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
money laundering posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Windows 95 chime was created on a Mac
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 19 Nov 2017 12:34:49 -0800
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
In the minds of some, high-frequency trading _is_ a game.

somewhat from being involved in doing "electronic commerce", we were brought in to x9a10 financial standard working group (which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments). One of the participants was from NSCC who then brought us in to look at improving integrity of trading floor transactions. I work on it for awhile and then get a call saying that it was being suspended because a side-effect would have greatly improved transparency and visibility (anathema to wallstreet culture). This was before NSCC merges with DTC, becoming DTCC
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depository_Trust_%26_Clearing_Corporation

Rhetoric on flr of congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee executives and auditors did jail time, but it required SEC to do something. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings, even showing increase after SOX goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime) ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud
Sarbanes-Oxley posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submic.html#sarbanes-oxley
enron posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

this is interview about illegal activity goes on all the time and nobody has to worry about SEC (before HFT really kicks in)
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

In the congressional Madoff hearings they had person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff. Congress asked him if new regulations were needed. He replied that while new regulations might be needed, much more important would be transparency and visibility (possibly since SEC wasn't doing anything anyway) ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

HFT then really starts to kick in ... and frequenctly used to further obfuscate illegal activity. a number of more recent HFT posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#89 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#65 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#93 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#18 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#60 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#71 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#72 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#3 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#20 HFT, computer trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#41 System Response
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#1 HFT is harmful, say US market participants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#64 HFT is harmful, say US market participants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#107 The SEC's Mary Jo White Punts on High Frequency Trading and Abandons Securities Act of 1934
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#109 SEC Caught Dark Pool and High Speed Traders Doing Bad Stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#64 Dark Pool Greed Drove Barclays to Lie to Clients, N.Y. Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#58 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#26 What were the complaints of binary code programmers that not accept Assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#17 Robots have been running the US stock market, and the government is finally taking control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#58 Time to Fire Mary Jo White: SEC Covers Up for Bank Capital Accounting Scam Promoted by Her Former Firm, Debevoise
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#48 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#66 Michael Hudson's New Book: Wall Street Parasites Have Devoured Their Hosts -- Your Retirement Plan and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#23 It A "Liquidity Mirage": New York Fed Finally Grasps How Broken The Market Is Due To HFTs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#68 Eric Hunsader Explains To CNBC That "Markets Are Always Rigged"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#18 Bundesbank Confirms HFTs Reduce Liquidity, Contribute To Flash Crashes, Withdraw At Times Of "Market Stress"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#22 How do BIG WEBSITES work?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#23 How do BIG WEBSITES work?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
Date: 21 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#24 What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#35 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#36 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#56 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#57 About Unconventional warfare

from another stand point ... Volcker is in discussions with civil engineering professor, for at least past several decades, fed, state & local governments have been skimming/siphoning money from maintaining infrastructures ... this is resulted in lack of infrastructure projects needing civil engineers, lack of jobs has discouraged students from civil engineering programs, lack of students have institutions eliminating programs and professors.

Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President, Volcker quote,
http://www.amazon.com/Confidence-Men-Washington-Education-ebook/dp/B0089LOKKS

pg290:
Well, I said, 'The trouble with the United States recently is we spent several decades not producing many civil engineers and producing a huge number of financial engineers. And the result is s**tty bridges and a s**tty financial system!
... snip ...

The previous administration had stimulus funds for infrastructure projects. From the laws of unintended consequences, from what stimulus funds that did make it into infrastructure projects (that didn't get skimmed/siphoned off) resulted in the projects having to hire Chinese firms in order to get civil engineers.

American Society Civil Engineer infrastructure report card.
https://www.infrastructurereportcard.org/

past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#67 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#73 A question for the readership
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#74 Derivatives and free trade
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#79 Financial Crimes Bedevil Prosecutors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#83 Heading For World War III | Gerald Celente Trends Blog
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#88 Fed Report Finds Speculators Played Big Role in Housing Collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#91 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#17 What's your favorite quote on "accountability"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#44 Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#47 Avoiding a lost decade
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#11 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#43 Where are all the old tech workers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#47 Where are all the old tech workers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#63 The Economist's Take on Financial Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#13 The White House and Mortgage Fraud: So Far It's All Talk, No Action
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#66 Predator GE: We Bring Bad Things to Life
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#67 Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#83 Why Can't Obama Bring Wall Street to Justice?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#16 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#30 24/7/365 appropriateness was Re: IBMLink outages in 2012
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#48 Owl: China Swamps US Across the Board -- Made in China Computer Chips Have Back Doors, 45 Other "Ways & Means" Sucking Blood from US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#25 US economic update. Everything that follows is a result of what you see here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#31 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#77 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#1 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#6 Good article. Friday discussion type
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#86 Study: One in Five Firms Misrepresent Earnings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#36 Race Against the Machine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#40 Core characteristics of resilience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#79 Romney and Ryan's Phony Deficit-Reduction Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#48 The Payoff: Why Wall Street Always Wins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#53 CALCULATORS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#64 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#61 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#29 Jedi Knights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#57 Bull by the Horns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#3 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#60 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#33 War or Jobs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#105 only sometimes From looms to computers to looms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#106 only sometimes From looms to computers to looms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#80 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#75 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#48 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#4 Decimal point character and billions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#50 A National Infrastructure Program Is a Smart Idea We Won't Do Because We Are Dysfunctional
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#17 Destruction of the Middle Class
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#2 Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan official who helped beat Soviets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#72 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#79 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#47 The rise and fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#2 Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan official who helped beat Soviets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#101 The Payoff: Why Wall Street Always Wins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#108 Iraq, Longest War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#1 Any definitive reference for why the PDP-11 was little-endian?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#60 When Working From Home Doesn't Work

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
Date: 21 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#24 What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#61 What if the Kuomintang Had Won the Chinese Civil War?
related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#35 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#36 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#56 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#57 About Unconventional warfare

along with the propaganda campaign to equate capitalism with Christianity (blamed for depression and then many individuals, industries, and corporations supporting Hitler and Nazis up through early 40s),

i.e. 5000 industrialists from across the US had conference (also) at NYC Waldorf-Astoria and in part because they had gotten such bad reputation for the depression and supporting Nazi Germany, they approved a major propaganda campaign to equate capitalism with Christianity, in part in the early 50s, it leads to "In God We Trust" on money and "under God" in the allegiance.
http://www.amazon.com/One-Nation-Under-God-Corporate-ebook/dp/B00PWX7R56/

could they have been also involved in the "red scares" as distraction strategy.

Red Scares, Then and Now
https://www.project-syndicate.org/onpoint/red-scares-then-and-now-by-alexander-baunov-and-thomas-de-waal-2017-11
And yet, soon enough, congressional hearings and a television documentary exposed McCarthy as a liar and a demagogue. As in 1920, the Red Scare of the early 1950s faded almost as quickly as it had begun.
....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_McCarthy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Scare

other corporate "capitalism" propaganda campaign posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#32 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#33 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#49 Corporate malfeasance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#27 British socialism / anti-trust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#56 "One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#10 Separation church and state
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#63 One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#97 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#91 Godwin's Law should force us to remember & fear our shared heritage with Nazi Germany
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#55 Should America Have Entered World War I?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#23 Ironic old "fortune"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#60 The Illusion Of Victory: America In World War I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#41 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#55 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#102 pneumatic cash systems was Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#97 Business as Usual: The Long History of Corporate Personhood
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#98 endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#102 75 years ago, Hitler invaded Poland. Here's how it happened

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Sugar Industry Long Downplayed Potential Harms

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Sugar Industry Long Downplayed Potential Harms
Date: 21 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Sugar Industry Long Downplayed Potential Harms
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/21/well/eat/sugar-industry-long-downplayed-potential-harms-of-sugar.html
The campaign was orchestrated by John Hickson, a top executive at the sugar association who later joined the tobacco industry. As part of the sugar industry campaign, Mr. Hickson secretly paid two influential Harvard scientists to publish a major review paper in 1967 that minimized the link between sugar and heart health and shifted blame to saturated fat.
... snip ...

How the sugar industry tried to hide the health effects of its product 50 years ago
https://www.theverge.com/2017/11/21/16684448/sugar-industry-health-effects-research-funding-project-259-heart-disease-cancer

New evidence shows the sugar industry suppressed studies linking sugar to heart disease and cancer
http://www.businessinsider.com/big-sugar-heart-disease-cancer-link-went-unreported-2017-11

Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming
https://www.amazon.com/Merchants-Doubt-Handful-Scientists-Obscured-ebook/dp/B003RRXXO8/

past posts referencing "Merchants of Doubt"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#7 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#80 The REAL Reason U.S. Targets Whistleblowers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#31 An insider's story of the global attack on climate science
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#47 Stolen F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China's Stealth Fighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#22 $40 billion missile defense system proves unreliable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#73 10 Big Fat Lies and the Liars Who Told Them
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#100 OT: article on foreign outsourcing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#24 Forget the McDonnells. We're ignoring bigger, more pernicious corruption right under our noses
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#34 43rd President
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#63 12 Reasons America Doesn't Win Its Wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#1 Jeb: George W. Bush is a top foreign policy adviser
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#76 Pentagon remains stubbornly unable to account for its billions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#90 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#92 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#38 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#47 British socialism / anti-trust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#26 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#59 Breaking: Entire Nation Experiencing Collective Amnesia About Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#13 Merchants of Doubt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#55 How Economists Turned Corporations into Predators
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#84 "Worse Than Big Tobacco": How Big Pharma Fuels the Opioid Epidemic

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Wages and Productivity

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Wages and Productivity
Date: 21 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Increasing capital investment, increases productivity, increases wages??? ... except it didn't
https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/032615/how-does-total-capital-investment-influence-economic-growth.asp
https://fee.org/articles/wages-and-productivity/

something broke around 1980 ... from 2011
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

this also has reference to 2011 NYT graphic, updated through 2014

How GE, GM, Coca-Cola And Kodak Put Shareholders Ahead Of Employees
https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2017/06/29/how-ge-gm-coca-cola-kodak-put-shareholders-ahead-of-employees/
from here
http://www.epi.org/productivity-pay-gap/

Bad Ideas; Reknowned economist James K. Galbraith, one of our expert panelists, pulls no punches in talking about the damage wrought by financial innovation
https://www.gfmag.com/magazine/june-2017/bad-ideas

Wall Street Wants to Kill the Agency Protecting Americans From Financial Scams
https://theintercept.com/2017/11/18/wall-street-wants-to-kill-the-agency-protecting-americans-from-financial-scams/
The rule's spectacular defeat marked a rare Wall Street victory over an agency created by Dodd-Frank, the sweeping financial reform law Barack Obama signed in 2010. The CFPB was barely five years old when Donald Trump was elected, promising to "do a number" on financial regulations.
... snip ...

Bad Ideas; Reknowned economist James K. Galbraith, one of our expert panelists, pulls no punches in talking about the damage wrought by financial innovation
https://www.gfmag.com/magazine/june-2017/bad-ideas
I could point to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. It provides at least one place in the government that is supposed to be looking at financial innovations with a skeptical eye. In my view, innovation in the financial sector is designed to get around public purpose.
... snip ...

Treasury slams CFPB rule that empowers class-action suits against Equifax, Wells Fargo, others
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/treasury-slams-cfpb-rule-that-empowers-class-action-suits-against-equifax-wells-fargo-others-2017-10-23
'What in God's name were you thinking?' senators grill Wells Fargo CEO
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/what-in-gods-name-were-you-thinking-senators-grill-wells-ceo-2017-10-03
SEC fines Wells Fargo Advisors for failing to report on money laundering
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/sec-fines-wells-fargo-advisors-for-failing-to-report-on-money-laundering-2017-11-14

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality
"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

On the Business Models of War

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: On the Business Models of War
Date: 22 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
On the Business Models of War
https://thestrategybridge.org/the-bridge/2017/11/22/on-the-business-models-of-war

MBAs have become myopically focused on increasing profits every quarter ... one of reasons Eisenhower warned about military industrial complex. They frequently are also involved in reducing contingency and redundancy (for various kinds of failures) as ways of increasing profit. This shows up in outsourcing intelligence; 70% budget and over half people
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us
contributing to the rapidly spreading success of failure culture (more profit from series of failures)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

success of failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
MIC(C) past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

Some history has innovation occurring during competition ... military during conflicts, businesses potentially continuously. However large corporations have increasingly focused on maintaining status quo and inhibiting innovation ... MBA courses increasingly teaching how to monopolize markets, maintain status quo and block innovation.

The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future, pg35/loc1169-73:
In business school we teach students how to recognize, and create, barriers to competition -- including barriers to entry -- that help ensure that profits won't be eroded. Indeed, as we shall shortly see, some of the most important innovations in business in the last three decades have centered not on making the economy more efficient but on how better to ensure monopoly power or how better to circumvent government regulations intended to align social returns and private rewards.
... snip ...

Freefall: America, Free Markets, and the Sinking of the World Economy, pg271/loc5101-4:
Standard economic theory (the neoclassical model discussed earlier in this chapter) has had little to say about innovation, even though most of the increases in U.S. standards of living in the past hundred years have come from technical progress.56 As I noted earlier, just as "information" was outside the old models, so too was innovation.
... snip ...

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 24 Nov 2017 09:44:02 -0800
Jon Elson <elson@pico-systems.com> writes:
I think IBM was trying to crush the use of the old machine series to reduce their programming support effort. They were supporting FOUR major product lines before the 360, and they thought that effort was eating them alive. (14xx, 707x for business, and 1620 and 709x for scientific.) My THOUGHT comment refers to the effort of getting OS/360 variants running was so much bigger than they expected, that it dwarfed the earlier programming support. On the other hand, they delivered SO MUCH MORE software with the 360 series, where the program products on the earlier machines was really pretty limited. But, this was made possible because it was all for ONE architecture.

from old post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#44
I ran across this description at the time of the government anti-trust suit (in the early '70s) ... I never ran across any validation/repeat, so I don't know if it is real:

An "expert witness" representing one of the companies (that left the business) testified regarding the state-of-the-art in the late 50s. Supposedly in the late 50s ALL of the computer companies realized the SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT criteria to be successful in the computer business was to have compatibility across the whole computer line, from entry level to the largest machine. The witness went on to observe that only one company was successful in meeting this goal, all the other companies failed. The remaining companies failed to adequately deal with multiple plant operations (each responsible for a particular model in the product line) that locally optimized the hardware architecture/implementation for the specific model.

... snip ...

aka computer market issue more than software development cost.

account of end of ACS360 ... that executives were afraid that it would advance the state-of-the-art too fast resulting in loosing control of the market ... shortly later Amdahl leaves and starts his own clone compatible company
https://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

Early 70s, Amdahl gives talk in large MIT auditorium ... some students make an issue of him becoming agent of far east companies (owned half the company and did a lot of the manufacturing). He is also asked what justification did he use to get investment money for his new company. He made some reference that even if IBM was to completely walk away from 360 ... customers had invested large billions in 360 software, that it would keep him in business until the end of the century.

This was early in the FS period ... which was going to completely replace 360/370 and was completely different ... account of FS
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

later Amdahl claims he had no knowledge or awareness of FS ... but his comments at MIT sure seems to have overtones of FS reference. Note that during the FS period, internal politics were shutting down 360/370 efforts ... and the claim is that the lack of 360/370 products during the FS period gave clone processor makers a market foothold.

some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

total trivia: in the 80s, IBM TSS/370 group got contract with AT&T to do stripped down TSS/370 kernel (SSUP) with unix layered on top ... UNIX heavily leveraging low-level TSS/370 for hardware & device support. At the same time Amdahl had UNIX port running in VM370 virtual machine (GOLD/UTS) and IBM had UNIX work-alike, UCLA LOCUS as AIX/370 ... also running in VM370 virtual machine. At least in the AIX/370 case, mainframe hardware field support said that they wouldn't provide support if software didn't have full EREP support. The issue was that the cost to retrofit full mainframe EREP support to UNIX was several times the cost of straight-forward UNIX port to 370 (resulting in running under VM370 providing full EREP).

Somewhat looking at the TSS/UNIX effort, for some time in the mid-80s there was a project to do low-level mainframe kernel that provided EREP, device support, device error recovery, etc ... which would be common for IBM's four mainframe operating systems, MVS, VM370, VS1, DOS/VS (as development cost savings justification) ... at one point having something like 500 people ... but never getting much past writing specifications.

other post referencing to testimony about need for compatible product line:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#20 1401 series emulation still running?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#231 Why couldn't others compete against IBM?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#10 Is Al Gore The Father of the Internet?^
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#78 TSS ancient history, was X86 ultimate CISC? designs)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#33 Big black helicopters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#38 Big black helicopters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#39 Big black helicopters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#85 The demise of compaq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#0 Did Intel Bite Off More Than It Can Chew?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#71 Card Columns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#43 Computer folklore - forecasting Sputnik's orbit with
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#0 IBM/Watson autobiography--thoughts on?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#4 IBM/Watson autobiography--thoughts on?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#60 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#77 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#42 1960s: IBM mgmt mistrust of SLT for ICs?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#34 IBM 8000 ???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#8 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#63 Remembering the CDC 6600
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#45 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#14 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#21 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#57 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#69 Who was the Greatest IBM President and CEO of the last century?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#12 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#105 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#27 PDP-10 system calls, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#73 Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#50 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#66 PL/I advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#40 MVS vs HASP vs JES (was 2821)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#50 System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)

posts referencing TSS/SSUP/UNIX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#69 Operating systems are old and busted
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#17 Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#61 (slightly OT - Linux) Did IBM bet on the wrong OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#44 someone smarter than Dave Cutler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#2 TSS (Transaction Security System)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#0 Hashing for DISTINCT or GROUP BY in SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#73 Speed of Old Hard Disks - adcons
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#96 History of copy on write
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#85 SV: USS vs USS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#67 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#28 which one came first
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#34 Regarding Time Sharing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#24 Aging Sysprogs = Aging Farmers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#92 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#74 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#17 The SDS 92, its place in history?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#20 {wtf} Tymshare SuperBasic Source Code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#76 Mainframe operating systems?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#80 Mainframe operating systems?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#82 Mainframe operating systems?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#102 SEX

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

US to regain supercomputing supremacy with Summit

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: US to regain supercomputing supremacy with Summit
Date: 24 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
US to regain supercomputing supremacy with Summit
https://seekingalpha.com/article/4127284-ibm-nvidia-team-build-worlds-fastest-computer?source=facebook
Currently, the fastest supercomputer in the world is China's Sunway TaihuLight, capable of 93 PetaFLOPS, or 93 x 10^15 floating point operations per second. In 2018, the US plans to overtake Sunway with a new supercomputer now under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee. This computer, called Summit, will be capable of about 200 PetaFLOPS. A sister computer, Sierra, which is similar in design to Summit, is also being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.
... snip ...

There is story from early in the TCM days where there was thermal shutdown as well as flow sensor shutdown (on the inner-loop side). However there wasn't a flow sensor on the external water supply. There was situation where they lost flow on the external water supply ... by the time the thermal sensor tripped ... it was too late and fried TCMs. The issue was that there was so much energy/heat on the inside part of cooling, that by the time the thermal sensor was tripped, it was too late to stop the resulting heat buildup.

Long ago and far away, I got dragged into doing 4341 benchmarks for LLNL ... looking at getting 70 4341s for compute farm ... sort of leading edge of cluster supercomputer tsunami (at one point, POK 3033 were so threatened by 4341 clusters, that they got allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component cut in half).

Last product we did at IBM was HA/CMP.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_High_Availability_Cluster_Multiprocessing
HA/CMP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

We were working with RDBMS vendors on HA/CMP commercial cluster scaleup and with national labs (including LLNL) on HA/CMP technical/scientific cluster scaleup. Old reference to JAN1992 meeting in Ellison's conference room on commercial cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
old email on HA/CMP cluster scaleup including references to meetings with LLNL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

within a few weeks of the Ellison meeting, cluster scaleup was transferred, announced as IBM supercomputer and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors. We leave IBM a few months later. 11FEB1992 IBM press cluster supercomputing for technical and scientific *ONLY* (possibly because mainframe DB2 people were complaining that commercial cluster scaleup would be years ahead of them).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
11May1992 press, National lab interest in cluster supercomputing caught IBM by "surprise".
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

commercial ha/cmp cluster scaleup trivia: later two of the Oracle people mentioned in the Jan1992 Ellison meeting (that we had been working with), have left Oracle and are at a small client/server startup responsible for something called "commerce server". We are brought in as consultants because they want to do payment transactions on the server, the small client/server startup had also invented this technology they called "SSL"; the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce".

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The true story behind Thanksgiving is a bloody struggle that decimated the population and ended with a head on a stick

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The true story behind Thanksgiving is a bloody struggle that decimated the population and ended with a head on a stick
Date: 24 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
The true story behind Thanksgiving is a bloody struggle that decimated the population and ended with a head on a stick
http://www.businessinsider.com/history-of-thanksgiving-2017-11

"Why Nations Fail" deals with the subject better characterizing societies as inclusive/exclusive (rather than equality/inequality). One description is why (English) Jamestown almost starved to death. They had originally planned on emulating the Spanish model to enslave the natives to provide for them, but the North American natives weren't as easily coerced. The English then switched to sending over various groups of their own people as "slaves", pg27:
The clauses of the Fundamental Constitutions laid out a rigid social structure. At the bottom were the "leet-men," with clause 23 noting, "All the children of leet-men shall be leet-men, and so to all generations."
... snip ...

My wife's father (early Scottish settlers) was awarded a set of history books (from 1880s history lectures) for some distinction at West Point; that claimed that if it weren't for the mid-Atlantic Scotts prevailing over the English settlers, our form of government would have been a lot less democratic.

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

past "leet-men" refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#31 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#15 Imbecilic Constitution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#7 Is there a connection between your strategic and tactical assertions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#17 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#71 Is orientation always because what has been observed? What are your 'direct' experiences?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#61 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#84 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#29 the previous century, was channel islands, definitely not the location of LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#62 Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#38 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#123 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#12 Separation church and state
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#32 Star Trek (was Re: TV show Mannix observations)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#55 Comanche Empire
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#10 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#40 Equality: The Impossible Quest

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Harvard Business School: The U.S. Political System Has Been 'Hijacked'

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Harvard Business School: The U.S. Political System Has Been 'Hijacked'
Date: 25 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Harvard Business School: The U.S. Political System Has Been 'Hijacked'
https://www.themaven.net/theintellectualist/news/harvard-business-school-the-u-s-political-system-has-been-hijacked-mj-X8WUfskapGULM6GEKVg
A new case study by Harvard Business School asserts that U.S. politicians have rigged the system to such a degree that the U.S. is becoming a failed democracy. The authors of the case-study use the word 'hijacked' to describe what the political parties have done to governance in the United States.
... snip ...

New Research Exposes Why Competition in U.S. Politics Industry is Failing America
https://www.hbs.edu/news/releases/Pages/why-competition-us-politics-industry-failing.aspx
Katherine M. Gehl, former CEO and political innovation activist, and Harvard's Michael E. Porter reveal how the U.S. political system is no longer designed to serve the public interest, and how it has been reconfigured over time to benefit our major political parties and their industry allies. Report lays out a strategy for reinvigorating our democracy.
... snip ...

http://www.hbs.edu/competitiveness/Documents/why-competition-in-the-politics-industry-is-failing-america.pdf

Note: local DC news will periodically refer to it as "Kabuki Theater" ... what you see publicly has very little to do with what is really going on ... even the apparent conflict between the two parties ... more like Roman Circus, distraction for the public.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

US to regain supercomputing supremacy with Summit

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: US to regain supercomputing supremacy with Summit
Date: 25 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#67 US to regain supercomputing supremacy with Summit

other supercomputer related trivia: I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s) in the late 70s and early 80s. Folklore is that when the corporate executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network) 5of6 wanted to fire me. However the 6th then funded some number of projects out of his office. One was something I called HSDT ... including working with the director of NSF. We were suppose to get $20M for interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget, some other things happen and eventually NSF comes out with RFP (in part based on what we already had running). Internal politics prevents us from bidding and the NSF director tries to help by writing the company a letter with support from other agencies (copying the CEO). However that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into these centers, it grows into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to modern internet.
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/401444/grid-computing/

old nsfnet related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

online computer conferencing related posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc
internal network posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
nsfnet backbone posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 25 Nov 2017 17:03:45 -0800
hancock4 writes:
Also in the early 1960s was pressure from academics who wanted certain features, like timesharing, which were expensive to implement in hardware and software. One source said early time sharing efforts failed once a larger load was put on the system, and it took developers (I think MTSS) a lot longer then anticipated.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#68 The true story behind Thanksgiving is a bloody struggle that decimated the population and ended with a head on a stick
oops should be
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#67 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Some number of the 7094/CTSS people
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System
went to project mac on the 5th floor for multics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics
http://multicians.org/history.html
others went to the science center on the 4th flr ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
and did virtual machine cp40 for 360/50 modified with virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt
upgraded to cp67 when 360/67 became available. TSS/360 was suppose to be the "real" system for 360/67 ... but most of the machines were eventually running cp67.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS
http://multicians.org/thvv/360-67.html
Melinda Varian's history
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/neuvm.pdf

from above, Les Comeau has written:
Since the early time-sharing experiments used base and limit registers for relocation, they had to roll in and roll out entire programs when switching users....Virtual memory, with its paging technique, was expected to reduce significantly the time spent waiting for an exchange of user programs.

What was most significant was that the commitment to virtual memory was backed with no successful experience. A system of that period that had implemented virtual memory was the Ferranti Atlas computer, and that was known not to be working well. What was frightening is that nobody who was setting this virtual memory direction at IBM knew why Atlas didn't work.35

... snip ...

this is post discussing the reference to "not to be working well" referencing ATLAS used paging for large virtual memory ... but not multiprogramming (multiple concurrent address spaces)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#2 Multiple Virtual Memory

Virtual memory mods. to 360/40 was also associative memory (each real page tagged with its virtual memory address) but also contained 4-bit address space/process-id (supporting multiple concurrent processes)

other posts mentioning the "not to be working well"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#78 TSS ancient history, was X86 ultimate CISC? designs)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#10 VM: checking some myths.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#0 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#1 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#4 Robert Creasy, RIP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#30 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#1 Designing database tables for performance?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#51 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#64 CSA 'above the bar'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#54 new 40+ yr old, disruptive technology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#77 IBM Floating-point myths
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#81 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#37 S/360 architecture, was PDP-10 system calls
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#47 The Stack Depth

Initial CP67 installed Jan1968 didn't have page thashing control ... and very heavy weight dispatch multiprogramming control ... easily took 10% of processor with just 30-35 users. Next release had simple fixed page thrashing control (number of concurrent tasks based on amount of real storage) from MIT Lincoln Labs along with a simplified dispatch control ... but still quite a bit of overhead. Also, I/O was FIFO queud and one request at a time ... which tended to hit a brick wall for paging (especially when page thrashing control didn't work because workload was different than Lincoln Labs).

I rewrote page replacement algorithm that was much more efficient and a dynamic monitored page thrashing control. I rewrote dispatching&scheduling to be dynamic with default policy resource "fair share". I also implemented ordered seek queuing which degraded much more gracefully as load increased. I also did multiple page request chaining for both disk and fixed head device. Multiple page request chaining for 2301 paging drum increase peak throughput from 80/sec to 270/sec.

some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock.

I also significantly reduced critical pathlengths, part of old SHARE presentation ... regarding CP67 pathlengths rewrites for OS/360 MFT14 running in virtual machine.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18

Original OS/360 benchmark under CP/67 increased elapsed time from 322 sec to 787 secs (465 CP67 CPU time). Early pathlengths Rewrite reduced that to 435 secs (113 CP67 CPU time).

SHARE presentation also references having significantly optimized OS/360 throughput by careful STAGE2 sysgen, optimizing placement of files and PDS members for avg. seek access ... as well as multi-track PDS directory search time.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 26 Nov 2017 07:24:45 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#68 The true story behind Thanksgiving is a bloody struggle that decimated the population and ended with a head on a stick


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#71 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

copied wrong reference, should be the previous
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#67 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A-10

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: A-10
Date: 26 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
check GAO Desert Storm Air Power Effectiveness report. A10s were so effective taking out Iraq tanks (million A10 30mm shells) ... that crews were walking away ... also finding a lot of abandoned tanks after end of hostilities (stories of fierce tank battles with coalition forces taking no damage, don't mention if the Iraqi tanks had anybody home). Burton's "Pentagon Wars" has them getting A10 30mm cost reduced by nearly a factor of ten ... the desert storm million 30mm shells *ONLY* costing $13M. Burton also suggest a mini-A10 that could be forward deployed and maintained ... however these days increasingly likely to be autonomous (Burton would say that Boyd destroyed his career when Boyd challenged him to do what was right).
http://www.gao.gov/products/NSIAD-97-134
https://www.amazon.com/Pentagon-Wars-Reformers-Challenge-Guard-ebook/dp/B00HXY969W/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pentagon_Wars
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairchild_Republic_A-10_Thunderbolt_II
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairchild_Republic_A-10_Thunderbolt_II#A-X_program

other (pentagon wars) trivia, relative was fallujah 2004-2005 and then came back Baqubah 2007-2008, described as much worse than Fallujah, mounted Bradley M3 ... but they were loosing so many Bradleys (and Abrams M1) that they started getting mothballed Bradley DS (desert storm) replacements (w/o the communcation) ... he was doing everything possible to keep his M3 operational.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradley_Fighting_Vehicle
http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-Killing-Our-ebook/dp/B007VBBS9I/

Boyd would talk being very vocal about the electronic sensors on the trail not working, possibly as punishment he was put in charge of Spook Base. Spook Base reference ... gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine ... includes references to "Quacker" (pilotless drone)
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

Boyd would also talk about doing something much simpler than F16, 1/3rd the maintenance hrs and 1/5th the costs ... something along the lines of F20-Tigershark. Recognizing that USAF/MIC would never accept cost optimized so they tried targeting export market. They got undercut by F16/MIC forces lobbying congress to offer "directed appropriation" USAID (could only be used to buy F16s) to their candidate countries. The claim is from the candidate countries that F16 was less appropriate for their needs, but the choice was getting F16s for "free" (USAID) or having to spend their own money.

Boyd &/or OODA-loop posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html
military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A-10

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: A-10
Date: 26 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#73 A-10

https://www.thisdayinaviation.com/tag/yf-15a/
The F-15A is armed with one General Electric M61A1 Vulcan 20mm rotary cannon with 940 rounds of ammunition, four AIM-7 Sparrow radar-guided missiles and four AIM-9 Sidewinder infrared-homing missiles.
... snip ...

Boyd would talk about how he changed the original yf15 swing-wing design ... showing the benefits of the swing-wing were more than offset by the weight of the pivot mechanism. Then the F15 forces tried to get him put in Leavenworth for the rest of his life for working on YF-16. The justification was that he originally wasn't authorized for the YF-16 work, but was using tens of millions in supercomputer time as part of the YF-16 design work ... which could be construed as theft of gov. property. Fortunately the criminal investigation couldn't find evidence of his computer use (he had anticipated their actions).

Boyd also told story about being ask to review the latest USAF missile (before Vietnam). They showed him all the specs. and film of it hitting target (drone with flares) every time, claiming 100% hit rate. He asks them to replay the film and stopped it just before the missile hits the flare. He then had them stop the film and says it would also never hit and asks them what kind of guidance. They say heat-seeking. He asks what sort of heat-seeking and eventually gets them to say pin-point. He then asks them what his the hottest part of a jet. They say the engine. He says no, it is in the plume 30yrds behind. Roll forward to Vietnam and he is proved correct. The one-star in Vietnam grounds all planes and converts them to (Navy) sidewinders. He lasts 3months before being called on carpet in the Pentagon, he had violated basic rule, he was cutting USAF budget (by not using USAF missile) and increasing Navy budget (by using sidewinder).

John Boyd, January 23, 1927 - March 9, 1997, tribute in USNI Proceedings,
http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/1997-07/genghis-john
for those w/o membership ... it is here at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20011224132049/http://www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt
He used it to re-design the F-15, changing it from an 80,000-pound, swing-wing, sluggish behemoth, to a 40,000-pound fixed-wing, high-performance, maneuvering fighter. His crowning glory was his use of the theory to evolve the lightweight fighters that eventually became the YF-16 and YF-17 prototypes--and then to insist that the winner be chosen in the competitive market of a free-play flyoff. The YF-16, which won, is still the most maneuverable fighter ever designed. The production successors, the not-so-lightweight F-16 (Air Force) and the F/A-18 (the Navy-Marine Corps aircraft that evolved from the YF-17), together with the F-15, dominate the skies today.
... snip ...

http://www.ausairpower.net/Profile-F-15A-D.html
The idea of an air-air fighter was under consideration as early as 1965, but the subsequent FX study generated by USAF Systems Command created the concept of a 60,000 lb swing wing machine much like the F-111, already under criticism for its inability to do what it wasn't built for.

At this stage a Major John Boyd was appointed to rework the FX study and generate a workable solution. Boyd was an outstanding air combat tactician and the originator of the concept of energy maneuverability.

... snip ...

Boyd &/or OODA-loop posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A-10

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: A-10
Date: 26 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#73 A-10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#74 A-10

more:
http://www.ausairpower.net/Profile-F-15A-D.html
It was conceived in TAC's darkest hour, developed out of a revolutionary concept, designed without role compromise and created for its pilot above all. The F-15 Eagle has since matured and it is without doubt the world's foremost air superiority fighter, having destroyed scores of opponents, from Foxbats to F-4s, in aerial combat without ever sustaining losses. It is the Ultimate MiG-Killer.
....
The air-air kill ratio in the first offensive was only 2.3:1, however Linebacker even bettered that with a mere 2:1 exchange rate. The MiG-17s and MiG-21s were unsophisticated and crude aircraft in comparison with the F-105 and F-4, but many were well flown and this, coupled with their better turning ability and gun/heat-seeking missile armament, accounted for TAC's inability to effectively assert itself (the USN managed a 12.5:1 kill ratio in Linebacker I/II).
... snip ...

Boyd &/or OODA-loop posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 26 Nov 2017 09:00:33 -0800
On 2017-11-25, Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> wrote:
Step 1: Port CICS to Linux. Step 2: Validate.

See you next century.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#66 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#71 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#72 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

IBM lost much of the education market with the gov. litigation and steep discounts that it had been giving universities. The litigation also results in the 23Jun1969 "unbundling" announcement (charging for software, maintenance, SE services, et) some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

It tried to come back in the 80s with creation of ACIS (academic unit) that started with $300M for "grants" to educational institution. Saw $25M going to MIT Athena (joint with DEC also giving $25M) and $50M for CMU unit. The CMU work includes MACH (unix work alike) and CAMELOT transaction processing, andrew file system, etc

In the unix wars ... trying to offset the SUN/AT&T unix lashup
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Software_Foundation

includes trying to create something independent from SUN/AT&T ... OSF pulls together Athena, Andrew and LOCUS (ucla work-alike) pieces.

IBM also tries to offset AT&T TUXEDO
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuxedo_(software)

with its own UNIX transaction processing ... IBM funding spinoff of (CMUs) CAMELOT/ENCINA (and AFS) as independent business unit ... and then purchasing it outright ... for "unix-based CICS"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transarc

additional reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encina_(software)
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~abh/summary.html
https://www-01.ibm.com/common/ssi/cgi-bin/ssialias?infotype=OC&subtype=NA&htmlfid=897/ENUS5620-AYV&appname=totalstorage

part of the issue was CICS was highly optimized for 60s OS/360 environment ... that was extremely lightweight ... but didn't scale well (or easy to adapt to other environments). Around the turn of the century, I was in datacenter ... that was running something like 130 (separate) "instances" of CICS on large mainframe complex ... aka single CICS instance not scaling to support resources available. part of the issue was the instruction sequences were extremely highly optimized for internal single-thread operation (and couldn't utilize multiple processors). Finally in 2004, CICS gets some "multiprocessor exploitation"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CICS#Early_evolution

some more cics reference ... gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine

The Evolution of CICS: CICS and Multiprocessor Exploitation (2004)
http://web.archive.org/web/20041023110006/http://www.yelavich.com/history/ev200402.htm
and
http://web.archive.org/web/20050409124902/http://www.yelavich.com/cicshist.htm
and
http://web.archive.org/web/20071124013919/http://www.yelavich.com/history/toc.htm

trivia: univ library got ONR grant to do online catalog, part of the money goes to getting 2321 datacell. Effort was also selected as beta-test for original cics program product ... and I got tasked to support/debug activity. some past CICS (&/or BDAM) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#cics

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

U.S. Corporate Tax Reform

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: U.S. Corporate Tax Reform
Date: 26 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
U.S. Corporate Tax Reform
https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/us-corporate-tax-reform
In the United States, the role of corporate taxation has steadily declined since World War II. Corporate tax has fallen from a 1952 high of 32 percent of all federal tax revenue, representing over 6 percent of GDP, to accounting for less than 11 percent of revenue in 2016, or less than 2 percent of GDP.
... snip ...

There was 2008 TV broadcast of economist conference roundtable on flattax. Basically current tax system largely accounts for congress being considered the most corrupt institution on earth. Porposal for flat tax would supposedly save 6% in GDP (3% savings in effort managing/filing tax and 3% savings in non-optimal business decisions) which would more than offset loss of any beneficial tax loopholes (as well as eliminate the enormous graft & corruption in congress selling tax loopholes). They joked that major lobbying efforts against flattax was Ireland (eliminate loopholes allowing export of enormous amounts of US profits offshore to Ireland) and the tax preparation industry.

GAO: U.S. corporations pay average effective tax rate of 12.6%
http://money.cnn.com/2013/07/01/news/economy/corporate-tax-rate/index.html
Corporate Tax Cuts Don't Create Jobs, They Enrich CEOs A new study provides galling examples of this trend.
https://www.thenation.com/article/corporate-tax-cuts-dont-create-jobs-they-enrich-ceos/
27 giant profitable companies paid no taxes
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/markets/2016/03/07/27-giant-profitable-companies-paid-no-taxes/81399094/
Corporate Income Tax: Most Large Profitable U.S. Corporations Paid Tax but Effective Tax Rates Differed Significantly from the Statutory Rate
https://www.gao.gov/mobile/products/GAO-16-363

In 2002, congress allowed fiscal responsibility act (spending could not exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt) to expire (completely different republican congress than the republican congress that passed the act), first time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars. 2010, CBO report was that 2003-2009, taxes cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsibility act. Since then taxes not restored and only modest reduction in spending.

fiscal responsibility act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 26 Nov 2017 17:27:37 -0800
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
The paging worked but the performance was pretty bad. We didn't understand paging algorithms like working set and LRU until the mid 1960s.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#66 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#71 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#72 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#76 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

about the time I was doing global LRU (using page ref bits set & periodic reset) at the univ. ... there were papers published in ACM and academic journals on "local LRU" (original CP67 didn't use reference bits, replacement 1st for pages belonging to inactive tasks, and if there was none, basically became FIFO).

At SIGOPS (Asilomar, 14-16Dec81), Jim Gray asked me if I could help co-worker at Tandem get his Stanford PHD which involved global LRU. I had worked with Jim at SJR and he knew I had down a lot of work on global LRU and had apple-to-apple comparison between local and global LRU. Some of the "local LRU" forces were heavily lobbying Stanford to block awarding PHD involving global LRU.

Unfortunately, I had been blamed for online computering conferencing on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s) in the late 70s and early 80s. Folklore is that when the corporate executive committee were told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.

When I went to send information ... management said that I wasn't allowed to (even tho none of the information involved anything after joining IBM). I've commented that I hoped that it was done as punishment for online computer conferencing ... rather than they taking part in the global/local LRU academic dispute. Finally was allowed to send this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email821019
in this old post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#46 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?

posts mentioning working set, page replacement, and paging I/O algorithms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock

Note that the Atlas documentation that I've referenced said that paging was supported with associative value giving virtual address for each real address but w/o any process or address space id ... which implied that it provided single process at a time with virtual memory larger than real storage. As a result working set page thrashing controls wouldn't come into play ... just page replacement algorithm.

also note traditional straight LRU algorithms tend to degenerated to FIFO under heavy load &/or pathelogical conditions. In the early 70s, I did slight of hand coding trick that resulted in it degenerating to RANDOM rather than FIFO (which would outperform traditional LRU).

posts referencing the 19Oct1982 communication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#47 SVCs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#56 SVCs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#18 What to do with extra storage on new z9
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#65 No Glory for the PDP-15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#16 Kernels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#3 Fantasy-Land_Hierarchal_NUMA_Memory-Model_on_Vertical
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#70 New test attempt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#79 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#6 What is "timesharing" (Re: OS X Finder windows vs terminal window weirdness)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#32 squirrels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#7 Future architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#85 16:32 far pointers in OpenWatcom C/C++
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#0 16:32 far pointers in OpenWatcom C/C++
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#44 16:32 far pointers in OpenWatcom C/C++
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#18 How to analyze a volume's access by dataset
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#23 OS idling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#5 Memory v. Storage: What's in a Name?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#41 Central vs. expanded storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#70 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#8 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#88 Hillgang -- VM Performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#82 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#73 Wylbur, Orvyl, Milton, CRBE/CRJE were all used (and sometimes liked) in the past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#53 Odd variant on clock replacement algorithm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#17 5 Byte Device Addresses?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#21 Closure in Disappearance of Computer Scientist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#25 VM370 40yr anniv, CP67 44yr anniv
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#37 S/360 architecture, was PDP-10 system calls
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#18 interactive, dispatching, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#17 I do not understand S0C6 on CDSG
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#49 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#7 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#42 True LRU With 8-Way Associativity Is Implementable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#30 By Any Other Name
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#70 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#14 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#97 IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#98 z/OS physical memory usage with multiple copies of same load module at different virtual addresses
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#22 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#138 How hyper threading works? (Intel)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#39 Virtual Memory Management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#90 IBM Embraces Virtual Memory -- Finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#2 S/360 stacks, was self-modifying code, Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#40 Floating point registers or general purpose registers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#52 Some IBM Research RJ reports
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#66 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 26 Nov 2017 21:31:05 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#66 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#71 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#72 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#76 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#78 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

comment about Atlas not working well was by Les Comeau mid-60s, possibly 1964 or 1965 (I have looked for possible reasons for the comment). Not long later, he left science center in cambridge and went to gburg and for a time "owned" one of the Future System sections (where my wife reported to him, this was before we had even met).

In addition to be previous descriptions I found for associative/content addressable mapping of virtual to real w/o any address space/process identifier. This reference not only doesn't mention any page changed or reference bits ... implying that it wouldn't be able to implement any sort of LRU algorithm.
http://www.chilton-computing.org.uk/acl/technology/atlas/p002.htm
One-level Store Concept

Although the main-store of the machine is a combination of both drum and core stores, to the programmer it may be regarded as a one-level store, i.e. the core and drum stores have been unified and any location specified by the programmer can be in either. This unification is achieved by a set of registers in the V-store known as the page-address registers. These registers contain a list of all the blocks currently in the core store. When a particular store access is required, the page address registers are scanned extremely rapidly in parallel by special hardware as illustrated in Figure 8.

... snip ...

the hardware modifications adding virtual memory to 360/40 had associative lookup for each real page to see if it matched that virtual address ... it also had reference & changed bits and a four bit process id ... i.e. when task was dispatched the process id was also loaded ... and in addition to matching the virtual address, it also had to match the process id.

from reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt
The 64 words were designed to give us a relocate mechanism for each 4k bytes of our 256K bytes memory. Relocation was achieved by loading a user number in the search argument register of the associative array, turning on relocate mode and presenting a CPU address. The match with user number and address would result in a word selected in the associative array. The position of the word 0-64 would yield the high order 6 bits of a memory address. Because of a rather loose cycle time this was accomplished on the 360/40 with no degradation of the overall memory cycle. In addition to the translate function, the associative array was used to record the hardware use and changed statue and our software noted transient and locked conditions relative to a particular block of 4K bytes in the memory.
... snip ...

other trivia ... in addition to the issues of supporting multiple concurrent tasks in memory (each page taged as process/user id as in cp40) the one level store concept was also major performance problem for both tss/360 as well as the aborted/failed Future System effort, some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

I've periodically mentioned that when I did the CMS page mapped filesystem implemention ... I took into account what I learned what not to do from tss/360. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

The CP40 article also discusses that the 360/40 associative (content addressable) store doesn't scale up:
Since it appears logically that memory mapping. a la S/360/40, is superior to program mapping than why isn't it prevalent today? The answer is cost: the original array cost 35 times what a conventional memory cell did at that time and since then it seems that associative logic still is roughly 8 to 10 times what conventional logic cost. There has been little work done with IBM on associative technology and therefore there is little likelihood that it will ever become price competitive in our hardware. what we should now look at is absolute cost and what associative logic can give us in additional function.
... snip ...

360/40 was 256kbytes with 64 4kbyte pages. 360/67 could have 1-2mbytes ... 512 4kbyte pages. It had an 8-entry associative array that cached the most recently used virtual page addresses from segment/page tables in real storage (rather than each real page tagged with virtual address). 370/168 went to 128 entry table look aside buffer "cache", that was four-way associative that were five-bit indexed (bits from virtual page address). If the virtual address wasn't found in one of the four indexed entries, it would replace one of the four with real addresses loaded from segment/page tables.

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Here's why Warren Buffett is unloading IBM stock

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Here's why Warren Buffett is unloading IBM stock
Date: 27 Nov 2017
Blog: Facebook
Here's why Warren Buffett is unloading IBM stock
http://www.businessinsider.com/warren-buffett-unloaded-a-bunch-of-ibm-stock-heres-why-2017-11

Note AMEX and KKR were competing for private-equity LBO of RJR and KKR wins. KKR runs into trouble and hires away AMEX president to help with RJR. IBM has gone into the red and was being reorganized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company. The former president of AMEX is then hired away, halts the breakup and uses some of the same techniques used at RJR.
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

The former AMEX president then leaves IBM to head up one of the other large private-equity companies ... does acquisitions that will include the beltway bandit that will hire Snowden. One of the frequent issues is that private-equity will squeeze their companies to cut corners and any other way that will generate money for their owners ... also beltway bandits can't use money from gov. contracts to lobby congress ... but private-equity owners can, which saw an enormous uptic in gov. outsourcing last decade ... intelligence, 70% of budget and over half of the people http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us

private-equity owned companies that had outsourced contracts to do security clearances were found to be filling out the paperwork ... but not actually doing background investigations.

trivia: we had left the company ... but during the reorganization period in preparation for the breakup, we had got a call from the bowels of Armonk. One of the issues was that there were lots of supplier contracts that were being leveraged by organizations in other divisions ... with the breakup they would then be in different companies. We were asked to help inventory all the supplier contract MOUs in prepartion for turning them into separate contracts (new CEO was hired and breakup reversed before we got started).

posts mentioning private-equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity
posts mentioning former AMEX president, IBM CEO, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 27 Nov 2017 18:50:21 -0800
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Usually, the minis were used to collect raw data which was down-loaded to a mainframe for caluculations, analysis, etc.

SLAC & CERN did bit-slice 370 ... 1st 168Es that ran problem state 370 sufficient to execute fortran programs (at 370/168 throughput, 3mips) ... doing initial data reduction along line ... then upgraded to 3081E

slan/cern refs
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/cgi-wrap/getdoc/slac-pub-3069.pdf
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/cgi-wrap/getdoc/slac-pub-3680.pdf
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/cgi-wrap/getdoc/slac-pub-3753.pdf

in this (ibm-main mailing list) recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#78 Mainframe operating systems?

triva: this was about the time of xt/370 ... card with 68k programmed to emulate 370 sufficient to run highly modified version of vm/370 ... running at 100kips. A couple years later IBM Germany had small chipset that implemented full 370 running at 168speed (3mips). A german mainframe clone maker come into possession of a copy of the detailed specification (for the "ROMAN" chipset). They had partnered with Amdahl and when somebody from Amdahl saw it, it took possession of it and sent it to me (being illegal for it to be out of IBM's possession).

a few posts mentionin ROMAN
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#16 At least two decades back,
some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#46 A bit of IBM System 360 nostalgia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#72 zEC12, and previous generations, "why?" type question - GPU computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#77 zEC12, and previous generations, "why?" type question - GPU computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#172 Slushware

other past post mentioning 168Es
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#43 IBM 5100 [Was: First DESKTOP Unix Box?]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#8 The IBM 5100 and John Titor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#72 zEC12, and previous generations, "why?" type question - GPU computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#27 World's worst programming environment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#85 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#69 Remembrance of things past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#79 Ancient computers in use today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#87 a bit of hope? What was old is new again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#28 The joy of simplicity?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#52 The Stack Depth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#78 Microcode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#24 Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#10 SC/MP (1977 microprocessor) architecture

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 27 Nov 2017 23:10:54 -0800
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Usually, the minis were used to collect raw data which was down-loaded to a mainframe for caluculations, analysis, etc.

SLAC & CERN did bit-slice 370 ... 1st 168Es that ran problem state 370 sufficient to execute fortran programs (at 370/168 throughput, 3mips) ... doing initial data reduction along line ... then upgraded to 3081E

slan/cern refs
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/cgi-wrap/getdoc/slac-pub-3069.pdf
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/cgi-wrap/getdoc/slac-pub-3680.pdf
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/cgi-wrap/getdoc/slac-pub-3753.pdf

in this (ibm-main mailing list) recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#78 Mainframe operating systems?

triva: this was about the time of xt/370 ... card with 68k programmed to emulate 370 sufficient to run highly modified version of vm/370 ... running at 100kips. A couple years later IBM Germany had small chipset that implemented full 370 running at 168speed (3mips). A german mainframe clone maker come into possession of a copy of the detailed specification (for the "ROMAN" chipset). They had partnered with Amdahl and when somebody from Amdahl saw it, it took possession of it and sent it to me (being illegal for it to be out of IBM's possession).

a few posts mentionin ROMAN
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#16 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#46 A bit of IBM System 360 nostalgia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#72 zEC12, and previous generations, "why?" type question - GPU computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#77 zEC12, and previous generations, "why?" type question - GPU computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#172 Slushware

other past post mentioning 168Es
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#43 IBM 5100 [Was: First DESKTOP Unix Box?]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#8 The IBM 5100 and John Titor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#72 zEC12, and previous generations, "why?" type question - GPU computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#27 World's worst programming environment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#85 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#69 Remembrance of things past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#79 Ancient computers in use today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#87 a bit of hope? What was old is new again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#28 The joy of simplicity?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#52 The Stack Depth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#78 Microcode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#24 Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#10 SC/MP (1977 microprocessor) architecture

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ferranti Atlas paging

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ferranti Atlas paging
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2017 12:53:18 -0800
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
When compared with the competition to VM (e.g. Burroughs various flavors of MCP), VM (and MVS et alia) were very user and programmer unfriendly. CHS? SYSGEN? Really?

note that most of VM ... was CP40/CMS and then CP67/CMS (when 360/67 became available) came out of MIT CTSS. Some of the CTSS people
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System

had gone to the 5th flr to do multics.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics

others went to the science center on the 4th flr and did virtual machines, cp40/cms, cp67/cms, internal network, online applications, performance tools (some that evolve into capacity planning), invented GML, etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS
past posts mentioning science center, 4th flr, 545 tech sq.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

little relationship with the product groups doing the "mainline" batch systems.

When I was at the science center, I had little rivalry with 5th flr. The number of IBM customer batch systems were significantly larger than the number of Virtual Machine systems ... however, they were growing enormously inside of IBM for all development (including development for all the batch systems). Just comparing the number of internal IBM virtual machine systems against total number of Multics systems that ever existed ... still wasn't fair.

However, I had hobby of producing and supporting enhanced operating systems for internal datacenters ... and for some period, the number of my enhanced systems for internal datacenters was about 50% more than the total number of MULTICS systems
http://multicians.org/sites.html

CP67 & VM370 biggest "SYSGEN" issue was that they were shipped supporting full source maintenance ... and customers were given option of system build from full source (which a lot did) ... rather than using the distributed binaries. The full source maintenance option also resulted in large number of customers doing their own source modifications. At one point there was claim that the (user contribution) Univ. of Waterloo library had more lines of code than the official distributed system (although there was some amount of duplication of features in Waterloo library).

trivia: GML was invented at the science center in 1969. Then GML tag formating was added to CMS SCRIPT (which was a re-implementation of CTSS RUNOFF that used period/dot formating). A decade later GML morphs into ISO standard SGML ... and then after another decade it morphs into HTML at CERN. CERN was using the Waterloo implementation of CMS SCRIPT for SGML that mophs into HTML. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

Note that decision to redo CP67 for VM370, there was split off of people from the science center that initial moved to the 3rd flr. Then as the VM370 outgrew the 3rd flr, they moved out to the old SBS bldg at Burlington mall. Then with the failure of Future System project ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

there was mad rush to revive 370 efforts and 3033 and 3081 (& 370/xa) were kicked off in parallel. detailed description
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

the head of POK then managed to convince corporate to kill the vm370 product and move all the VM370 Burlington mall people to POK to work on MVS/XA (or supposedly he wouldn't be able to ship MVS/XA on schedule 7-8yrs later). The plan was to not inform the Burlington Mall people until just before the shutdown .... however, the information managed to leak and lots of people managed to escape. One of the jokes is that the head of POK was one of the biggest contributors to (DEC) VMS because of all the people that escape to DEC (and the move to POK).

Eventually Endicott (138/148, 4331/4341, etc) managed to save the VM370 product mission ... but Endicott had to reconstituted a development group from scratch ... which significantly impacted code quality for a time. Some of this shows up in VMSHARE conferencing, archives here
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

i.e. in the late 60s and early 70s there were some number of commercial service bureaus formed to offer CP67-based (and then VM370) online offerings ... some passed posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#online

NSCC was spinoff from the science center, IDC was mostly spinoff from MIT Lincoln Labs. Both NSCC & IDC quickly moved up the value stream to offering online financial information to wallstreet. Then there was TYMSAHRE on the west coast.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymshare

it was TYMSHARE that started offering their VM370/CMS based online computer conferencing system to (user group) SHARE as VMSAHRE in AUG1976.

other recent discussion was that 4th generation languages developed for deployment on CP67(&VM37) in the 60s & 70s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#29 Db2! was: NODE.js for z/OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#39 The complete history of the
IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramis_software
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomad_software
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomad_software#Development:_Late_1970s
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOCUS
also original SQL/Relational ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

Boeing also included CP67(& later VM370) online offerings in its BCS spinoff. I was one of the first half dozen people brought into Boeing (when I was still an undergraduate) to form Boeing Computer Services (consolidated all dataprocessing into independent business unit to monetize its investment, including offering dataprocessing to non-Boeing entities). This was out of corporate hdqtrs which had a single 360/30 at the time for doing payroll. The politics with Renton datacenter was interesting ... since they had something like $200M-$300M in IBM 360 mainframes (in 60s dollars) ... which I thot was possibly largest in the world. Then it was being replicated at new 747 plant up at Paine Field ... for disaster scenario where Mt. Rainer warms up and mudslide takes out Rendon.

Later I would sponsor Boyd's briefings at IBM ... and one of Boyd's biographies mentions he did a stint at spook base (about the same time I was at Boeing) which was $2.5B "windfall" for IBM (ten times renton). ref gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

Boyd would talk about being very vocal about sensors on the trail wouldn't work ... so putting him in charge of spook base was possibly punishment.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

VS/Repack

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: VS/Repack
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2017 13:22:11 -0800
web references that mention VS/Repack
https://archive.org/stream/bitsavers_ibm43xxGC280_19960176/GC20-0001-3_370_4300bib_Jan80_djvu.txt
http://www-01.ibm.com/common/ssi/ShowDoc.wss?docURL=/common/ssi/rep_sm/0/897/ENUS5749-010/index.html&lang=en&request_locale=en

CSC did a lot of paging behavior studies ... using both analytical models and simulators that used various kinds of real world traces.

Some of the simulators started out using full instruction traces using REDCAP (a POK developed program used for investigating instructions for processor optimization design). An early example was studying the port of APL/360 to CMS (for CMS\APL). APL/360 had storage management that allocated new storage for every assignment ... until it exhaused the workspace and then did garbage collection. This had little effect in the swapped, small APL\360 workspaces (16kbytes to 32kbytes). However, in the CMS large virtual address space, it exhibited page thrashing behavior. A CMS\APL program running for any period, regardless of program and/or data size, would frequently and repeatedly touch every page in the virtual address space. There were 6ft high printouts that ran down the hallway of the 4th flr (545 tech sq) with storage location on the vertical and time running horizontal down the hall. The storage change/references followed repeated sawtooth pattern ... storage accesses quickly rising from the floor to the ceiling during assignments and then sharp drop back to the floor during garbage collection. The trace & analysis also was used for early "hot-spot" analysis ... where was an application spending most of its time.

The analysis also involved to do semi-automated program reorganization ... given a map of modules in an application, it would use Bayesian cluster analysis to reorganize the module order in an application with objective of reducing the workset size as well as the number of page faults. This work was primarily done by Hatfield & Gerald
D. Hatfield & J. Gerald, Program Restructuring for Virtual Memory, IBM Systems Journal, v10n3, 1971

I did a special modification for Hatfield & Gerald, that instead of full instruction instruction trace, did a page use trace running in constrained real storage .... didn't provide the granularity of full instruction trace, but ran several orders of times faster and for many applications provided roughly the same analysis. Limit the number of valid virtual pages to 10-20, allow normal execution until it requested more pages than limit, then output the valid virtual page numbers and CPU used and invalidate all pages (but leaving in real storage) and start over. There would be a lot of page faults, but mostly satisified from the page already in real storage (but flagged invalid) ... so overhead usually didn't actually involve I/O operations to move pages.

This was used extensively by internal development groups moving applications from the OS/360 real storage environment to the 370 environments where everything was virtual memory. It was finally released in the mid-70s as the VS/Repack product.

The simulators and analytical models were also used to extensively study different page replacement strategies ... including my slight-of-hand coding trick where LRU whould degenerate to RANDOM rather than FIFO under stress and/or pathological conditions.

other refs:
L. Belady, A Study of Replacement Algorithms for a Virtual Storage Computer, IBM Systems Journal, v5n2, 1966
J. Rodriquez-Rosell, The design, implementation, and evaluation of a working set dispatcher, cacm16, apr73
L. Belady, The IBM History of Memory Management Technology, IBM Journal of R&D, v25n5
R. Carr, Virtual Memory Management, Stanford University, STAN-CS-81-873 (1981)
R. Carr and J. Hennessy, WSClock, A Simple and Effective Algorithm for Virtual Memory Management, ACM SIGOPS, v15n5, 1981
P. Denning, Working sets past and present, IEEE Trans Softw Eng, SE6, jan80


triva: Rodiquez-Rosell paper is modifications that the Gernoble Science Center did to CP/67 to support traditional local LRU implementation. GSC had 1mbyte (real storage, 256 real pages) 360/67, that had 155 available pageable pages (after fixed storage kernel requirements). For comparison, the Cambridge Science Center had 768kbyte (real storage, 192 real pages) 360/67 also running CP/67 with 104 available pageable pages (after fixed storage kenel requirements) but with global LRU page replacement algorithm. CSC with 75-80 CMS users had better throughput and response than GSC with 35-40 CMS users (running similar workload and online activity, but with 50% more real storage for paging).

other trivia: This is discussion about the decision to move all IBM systems to virtual memory ... basically MVT storage allocation was so poor, that application region sizes were reguired to be four times larger than was actually used, limited typical 370/165 1mbyte machine to four (application) regions. Remapping MVT to virtual memory would increase number of regions by factor of four with little or no paging. This would be little different than running MVT under CP/67 in 4mbyte virtual machine. Issue was larger systems were increasingly becoming more and more I/O bound, which required increasing the multitasking level to keep resources effectively utilized. VS2/Release 1 ("SVS") was little more than running MVT in CP/67 16mbyte virtual machine (mostly required doing channel program translation, and in fact, prototype started out crafting CP/67's CCWTRANS channel program translator into EXCP I/O processing).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

In early 70s, I got into big dustup with the POK group adding page replacement to MVT for SVS. They wanted to always replace non-changed page (that already had copy on disk) before selecting a change page for replacement (that would first require writing page to disk before being used). In the late 70s, somebody in POK got a big award for pointing out that MVS was (still) replacing high-used read-only shared LINKPACK pages before low-used, non-shared changed application data pages (aka page replacment strategy was not based on use or activity). At the time, they eventually excused it by saying SVS/MVS had never expected to do more than five page I/Os per second ... so quality of replacement selection wasn't that important.

past posts referencing science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
past posts referencing page replacement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock

some misc past posts mentioning vs/repack
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#7 IBM 7090 (360s, 370s, apl, etc)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#68 The Melissa Virus or War on Microsoft?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#30 Could CDR-coding be on the way back?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#8 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#73 Execution Velocity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#20 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#82 printer history Languages influenced by PL/1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#19 Assembler vs. COBOL--processing time, space needed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#20 Assembler vs. COBOL--processing time, space needed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#62 Suggestions Appreciated for a Program Counter History Log
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#81 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#71 assembler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#66 Messing Up the System/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#69 A New Performance Model ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#79 Limit number of frames of real storage per job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#92 ABO Automatic Binary Optimizer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#111 Definition of "dense code"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ferranti Atlas paging

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ferranti Atlas paging
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2017 14:48:51 -0800
Mike Causer <m.r.causer@gogglemail.com> writes:
Here is a start point:
http://elearn.cs.man.ac.uk/~atlas/


google search doesn't turn up anything there on "one level store", etc ... this is the reference that I've been using

this reference I've found the most information, etc
http://www.chilton-computing.org.uk/acl/technology/atlas/overview.htm
http://www.chilton-computing.org.uk/acl/technology/atlas/p002.htm
http://www.chilton-computing.org.uk/acl/pdfs/atlas-1-level.pdf
http://www.chilton-computing.org.uk/acl/technology/atlas/p019.htm

says 512 word "blocks" ... 16kwords core ... 32 blocks (pages)... compared to cambridge 768k 360/67 ... recent reference (compared to grenoble 360/67 with 256 pages or cp40 360/40 with 64 pages)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#84 VS/Repack
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt

each (real) page position has P.A.R. and does associative lookup for virtual address (akin to 360/40 implementation)

and 96k words (192 blocks-pages) of drum store split across four drums

Compared to 360/67 2301 drum ... that had 4mbytes. It is similar to 2303 drum but read/writes four heads in parallel for data rate of 1.2mbytes/sec. Could have multiple 2301 drums per controller. On CP/67, "overflow" paging (more than can be accomodated on drums) would be done to 2314 disks. A heavily loaded CSC CP/67 with 75-80 users, might have 10k-20k or more allocated pages on combination of drum and disks. One of the things I did at the science center was page migration for fixed head drums ... moving low used pages off fixed head drums to moveable arm disks.

I don't find any process id ... like used in the 360/40 implementation ... that greatly reduces overhead in context switching between concurrent processes ... as well as supporting multiprocessor operation (different processors could be sharing same real storage while concurrently running different processes). Using the lock bit hack to do psuedo invalidate when switching tasks drives the context switch up nonlinear (overhead increases proportional to the number of pages for every context switch). detailed 360/67 functional characteristics
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/funcChar/GA27-2719-2_360-67_funcChar.pdf

The 360/67 and smaller 370s had cached map ... typically 8 entries for fast lookup and translate virtual->real. If entry wasn't in cache, it would look up in the (active process specific) segment/page table entry and replace current entry. Process/task switch involved clearing cache. Larger 370s like 168, went to 128 entry table that was 32 indexed 4-way associative for virtual->real page mapping with entries STO (process specific segment table pointer) associative ... so table lookaside buffer didn't have to be reset on process/context switch ... i.e. each look-aside buffer entry had process specific tag ... not having to do a reset, in similar way that 360/40 had process id for each associative entry for virtual->real address mapping.

posts in this and related threads:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#66 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#71 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#72 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#76 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#78 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#79 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#81 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#82 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#83 Ferranti Atlas paging

trivia: for a time, before VM370 multiprocessor support they had a hack for pages concurrently shared across multiple address sapces ... that I fought against because went horrible in multiprocessor environment. Moving to multiprocessor, they had to have shared pages that were processor specific. If process was redispatched on different processor ... all its virtual memory tables had to be scanned and shared page entries changed to processor specific entries ... overhead that increased non-linearly as number of shared pages increased.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

VS/Repack

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: VS/Repack
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2017 15:03:36 -0800
Charles Richmond <numerist@aquaporin4.com> writes:
Sometimes you write "APL/360" an sometimes you write "APL\360"... so which is the correct way??? I've always thought it was "APL\360"...

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#84 VS/Repack

some topic drift, APL\360 is official way ... however I have some left over finger training from ebcdic keyboards ... 2741 and 3270s that didn't have reverse slash and had couple decades typing forward slash (although you could have apl keyboard switch layout ... but then you needed to be using APL)

some APL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/APL_(programming_language)

with keyboard layout ... forward slash is lowercase next to right shift, and backslash is uppercase of the same key. standard selectric/2741
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Selectric_typewriter

has "?" question mark above forward slash (instead of backslash) ... and no backslas ... same as current keyboard ... which has backslash above the enter key.

past posts mentioning APL (&/or HONE)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ferranti Atlas paging

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ferranti Atlas paging
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2017 18:25:40 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
trivia: for a time, before VM370 multiprocessor support they had a hack for pages concurrently shared across multiple address sapces ... that I fought against because went horrible in multiprocessor environment. Moving to multiprocessor, they had to have shared pages that were processor specific. If process was redispatched on different processor ... all its virtual memory tables had to be scanned and shared page entries changed to processor specific entries ... overhead that increased non-linearly as number of shared pages increased.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#85 Ferranti Atlas paging

the "problem" was because original the 370 virtual memory architecture had a lot more features ... including being able to do r/o shared segments ... either 1mbyte segments or 64kbyte segments (16 4kbyte pages or 32 2kbyte pages). for 370 shared pages, CMS was reorgnized into 64kbyte chunks for r/o shared code and data.

virtual memory had to be retrofitted to the existing non-virtual memory 370s. this was very straight forward for the lower end 370s ... but retrofitting virtual memory to 370/165 ran into lots of problems. Eventually 370/165 people said that virtual memory announcement would have to be delayed at 6months because of the problems ... but they could gain that back if a lot of features wee dropped ... including r/o shared segments. The OS/360 MVT->virtual memory VS2 (1st SVS and then MVS) group said they had no need for any of those features ... and so they got dropped ... the justification for moving all 370s to virtual memory was based on the poor application storage management in MVT ... referenced here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory
in this thread post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#84 VS/Repack

The full set of 370 virtual memory architecture was supported on internal 370/145s and lot of software had already been developed for the full architecture ... including vm370/cms shared segment. Then when the additional features were dropped (because of the 370/165), all software using those features then had to be redone ... and CMS comes up with real kludge for shared pages.

past posts mention 370/165 responsible for dropping full 370 virtual memory architecture (and sofware & other models already supporting full architecture, had to be reworked).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ferranti Atlas paging

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ferranti Atlas paging
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2017 08:50:30 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
Except that there have been a lot of changes: virtual memory, 31-bit addressing, now 64-bit, IEEE FP and now DFP, complete turnover of peripheral lines several times, ESCON and FICON channels, Sysplex, etc.

1980, I was con'ed into doing channel extender support for STL ... that was looking at moving 300 people from the IMS DBMS group out of STL to offsite bldg. They had tried "remote" 3270 but found the human factors totally intolerable (considering they were use to vm370/cms with local channel attached 3270 controllers). Then the hardware vendor tried to get IBM to let them release my support. There was a group in POK that were playing with some serial stuff, that got in veto'ed because they were afraid that if it was in the market, it would make it hardware to justify releasing what they were doing. past posts channel extender posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

then in 1988, I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff that they were working with which quickly becomes fibre channel standard (including some stuff I had done back in 1980 for I/O program latency compensation) finally in 1990, the POK people get their stuff released as ESCON with ES9000, when it was already obsolete.

Then some of the POK people start playing with fibre channel standard and define a heavy weight protocol that drastically reduces the throughput of the native fibre channel standard ... that is eventually released as FICON.

Most recent published peak I/O mainframe benchmark I can find is for z196 that gets 2M IOPS using 104 FICON (running over 104 fibre channel standard). About the same time as the z196 peak I/O benchmark, there was fibre channel announced for E5-2600 blade claiming over million IOPS (two native fibre channel getting higher throughput than 104 FICON). past FICON posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

IBM has announced TCW/zHPF that is a little bit like what I did in 1980 for channel extender ... but says its only 30% improvement over standard FICON (would possibly improve peak I/O 2M IOPS using 80 FICON instead of 104 ... compared to two native fibre channel standard).

also back in late 70s & early 80s, they would let me play disk engineer in bldgs 14&15 (across street from san jose research). IBM had come out with 3370 fixed block architecture for mid-range ... and was working on 3380 for high-end ... past posts getting to play disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

In the early 80s, mid-range 4341s were selling 100-1000 orders at a time to large corporations for placing out in departmental areas (conference rooms, stock rooms, etc) ... sorting of the leading edge of the coming distributed computing tsunami. MVS wanted to play in this market, but they only supported CKD DASD ... which was the high-end 3380. The only disk for non-datacenter mid-range was 3370 FBA. Eventually they came out with 3375 CKD which was simulated on 3370 FBA. It didn't really help MVS a lot ... company with 100-1000 distributed vm/4341s were looking at how many systems per support person ... while MVS was still stuck with how many support persons per system. zOS (MVS) still requires CKD ... but no real CKD have been made for decades, all being simulated on industry standard fixed-block disks.

I had offered MVS fixed-block support ... but they said even if I provided them with thoroughly tested and documented support, I needed an incremental $26M revenue business plan ($200M-$300M in incremental disk sales) to cover training and documentation. They claimed that since they were selling every disk as fast as it could be made, any switch from CKD to FBA would just be the same amount of disk and no incremental revenue. I wasn't allowed to use things like life time cost savings, etc. Past posts mentioning CKD dasd, multi-track search, FBA, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The 1970s engineering recession

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 1970s engineering recession
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2017 08:22:54 -0800
maus <mausg@mail.com> writes:
I remember that time, a newspaper headline something like "Will the last person to leave Seattle please turn off the lights".. Seen it several time since, about various cities, Didn't happen to Seattle, did it?.

i (graduated &) left boeing (seattle) for the scientific center in cambridge just before that happened ... but some of former co-workers told me about it. in the 60s, bunch of us high school kids would joke about Boeing had big upswing in hiring (eastern) MIT engineering graduates ... come out west, get a pickup with gun rack and go hunting for deer, but not able to distinquish a cow from a deer.

after IBM went into the red in the early 90s, I was reminded of it again when somebody distributed email saying would the last person to leave POK turn out the lights ... recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#51 [CM] What was your first home computer?

other recent posts referencing IBM had gone into the red and was being re-orged into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company; then IBM hires the former AMEX president as CEO ... who eventually reverses the breakup. past posts mentioning the AMEX president that IBM hires as CEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2017 09:25:22 -0800
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
I remember from contemporary articles in Datamation that IBM's virtual memory was seen as... a way to sell more core memory. It let users make use of programs with big memory requirements, getting them hooked, but since the performance would not be acceptable without adequate core memory, they would end up buying it. So it's clear enough that IBM's early VM had its problems.

360/67 typically had 768k-1m real storage, cp/67 something like 100-160 pageable pages (after real store requirements). 2301 & 2303 fixed head drums were similar with 4mbyte of storage ... except 2301 read/wrote four heads in parallel for 1.2mbyte/sec data transfer.

I've mentioned that I rewrote CP/67 page replacement algorithm, working set scheduling algorithm (for trashing control), lots of critical paths performance, multiple chained page transfers for both 2301 fixed head drum (increased 2301 throughput from 80pages/sec to 270pages/sec) and 2314 disk ... and implemented ordered seek queueing for 2314 (improving 2314 disk i/o throughput both for file i/o and page i/o).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#71 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

the "official" operating system for 360/67 was TSS/360 ... which also implemented one level store. TSS/360 never quite made it to production quality ... in part because of its performance. Early when CP67 came to the univesity ... the IBM SE supporting TSS/360 and I had to share dedicated machine time on the weekend (I was responsible for os/360 support as well as playing with cp67). Early in time-frame that CP67 was installed (before I got to rewrite a lot of stuff), we did a simulated fortran edit, compile, link & go script. It turns out that CP67 (before most of my performance improvements) supported 30-35 users with better throughput and interactiver response than TSS/360 did with four users.

Two big TSS/360 performance issues was 1) bloated fixed kernel size, leaving less pageable pages for running applications and 2) single level store that did synchronous 4k block transfers at a time (while application was blocked). This is compared to normal file i/o that can do contiguous allocation with multiple block transfers and multiple bufferred read-ahead and write-behind overlapped with execution ... significantly improving cpu use, file i/o throughput, and application throughput. This is also one of the problems with future system effort that also specified a TSS/360-like single level store and those performance issues contributed to its demise.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

As I mentioned previously, when I did CMS paged-mapped filesystem, I had learned what not to do from TSS/360 single-level store ... aka being able to support filesystem buffering non-blocking multiple page transfers with some other slight of hand coding tricks. While CMS normal filesystem I/O (similar to os/360 model) significantly outperformed TSS/360 single level store paradigm ... I could get three times filesystem throughput for moderately I/O bound workload (compared to standard cms filesystem) ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

a problem that I battled tho was that TSS/360 did address the (OS/360) problem of executables having (virtual) address specific binding. CMS used a lot of OS/360 did relied on the os/360 relocatable adcon convention that was updated at load time ... which gave me constant headaches in a real page-mapped paradigm ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

other posts in this thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#66 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#72 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#76 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#78 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#79 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#81 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#82 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#83 Ferranti Atlas paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#84 VS/Repack
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#85 Ferranti Atlas paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#87 Ferranti Atlas paging

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2017 09:53:00 -0800
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
In the case of IBM's virtual memory, tape was not included, but while there was an optional drum peripheral which it could include, mostly systems would have both core and disk.

So here good performance would be expected - something obviously slow like tape wasn't involved - but it wouldn't be inevitable, disks being significantly slower than drums.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#90 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

other trivia ... was IBM did do the 3850 mass storage system, which had virtual 3330s and real 3330s and staged (paged) a 3330 cylinder to/from tape.
https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3850.html
https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3850b.html

The MSS transferred data from a cartridge to the 3330 DASD drive when requested, in a process called "staging." Once staged, the data were treated the same as any other data resident on a 3330 disk file. Conversely, when additional 3330 space was needed for incoming data, a cylinder of 3330 data was automatically selected for "destaging" back to its data cartridge. Each cartridge was capable of storing 202 cylinders in the 3330 format.

... snip ...

even more trivia: In late 70s, I had done cmsback for internal systems ... that nightly backedup/archived new/changed data to tape. This went through a number of internal releases ... then Almaden enhanced it for release as "work station datasave" (i.e. in addition to supporting cms filesystems, it had network support for doing something similar for workstations & PCs that ran backup/archive app). computerworld ref
https://books.google.com/books?id=_4os_r4VnO4C&pg=PA53&lpg=PA53&dq=ibm+workstation+datasave&source=bl&ots=jlC0tGU-NG&sig=v1z2jvt6AU_1ffIhlBuFPWoSVs0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiCudGcq-TXAhUVzWMKHQznAwAQ6AEIUDAG#v=onepage&q=ibm%20workstation%20datasave&f=false

this was then enhanced and rebranded as ADSM ... adstar storage manager ... this was in period when IBM had gone into red and was being reorganized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company (later reversed by new CEO) ... and the disk division was the furthest along being rebranded as "adstar". However, while the general breakup was reversed ... "adstar" was eventually sold off
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adstar

... and ADSM was moved to the IBM Tivoli unit and rebrand as TSM.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Tivoli_Storage_Manager

old "CMSBACK" email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#cmsback
and past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#cmsback

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

mainframe fortran, or A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: mainframe fortran, or A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2017 10:42:02 -0800
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
IBM tried to make scientific mainframe computing work for a long time. I have a copy of the manual for the ESA/390 vector facility from the early 1990s, and the zSeries still has a similar vector facility, most recently updated to do vector decimal arithmetic. There is a full set of IEEE float vector instructions, too.

But it's been clear for quite a while that it's a lot more cost effective to build computational systems out of ordinary CPU chips without all of the expensive overhead of a mainframe.


IBM was trying to get back into the univ. market and in the early 80s had initially formed ACIS with $300M to spread around univ. recent ref
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017i.html#76 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

in the mid-80s, ... part of this was playing in NSF supercomputer centers (at univ) ... adding vector processing option to 3090. The engineers doing trout 1.5 (internal code name, announced as 3090) complained that they had so increased (scalar) floating point performance so that it ran at memory speed. They claimed a major motivation for vector in the past was that floating point was so much slower than memory ... that memory could support dozens of floating point units all running concurrently. Having speeded up (scalar) floating point to memory speed, they felt that only under very special conditions would 3090 vector have significantly higher throughput than scalar (since scalar was already running as fast as memory could feed it).

The guy at Palo Alto science center that had been involved in doing the APL microcode assist for 370/145 (ran APL with throughput of APL running on 370/168). In the early 80s, he was responsible for the FORTRAN-Q (internal reference) optimizations ... which eventually gets released as FORTRAN-HX (also doing a lot of work with SLAC up the road). In this time-frame SLAC (& CERN) had lots of activities ... recent reference SLAC/CERN doing their own 370 that ran FORTRAN
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#81 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

however, IBM then outsourced some amount of compiler work and there were a lot of internal complaints that the Q/HX optimization technology was given away free to the contractor. some recent posts mentiong Q/HX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#71 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#52 The Stack Depth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#35 high level language idea

In the late 70s and early 80s, I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s). Folklore is that when the corporate executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. computer conferencing posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc
internal network posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internal

however, the 6th then provided funding out of his office ... including for a project I called HSDT ... posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

which included working with the director of NSF on interconnecting the NSF supercomputer centers. HSDT was suppose to get $20M, but then congress cuts the budget, some other things happen, and finally NSF released RFP (in part based on what we already had running). Internal politics prevents us from bidding ... the NSF director tries to help writing the company a lettter (with support from other agencies) but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does statements that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of the RFP responses). As regional network connect into the centers, it morphs into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to modern internet.
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/401444/grid-computing/

old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

Part of HSDT included high-speed link into Clementi's IBM E&S lab in Kingston (not to be confused with the supercomputer effort in Kingston). Clementi's lab included a 3090 with vector processing facility, but also several Floating Point System boxes (which also had 40mbyte/sec disk array support). 3090VF and FPS post, including mention that cornell "supercomputer center" had 3090-400VF and five FPS boxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#73 Vector Processing on the 3090
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#74 Vector Processing on the 3090

other past posts mentioning Celementi's lab
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#4 IBM Plans Big Spending for the Cloud ($1.2B)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#63 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#72 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#35 curly brace languages source code style quides
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#95 IBM History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#50 System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)

we were then doing cluster scaleup for our HA/CMP product ... recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#67 US to regain supercomputer supremacy with Summit
past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

working with national labs and other on scientific/technical scaleup and with RDBMS vendors for commercial scalup ... old reference to JAN1992 meeting in Ellison's conference room
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

within a few weeks of the Ellison's meeting, cluster scaleup was transferred, announced as IBM supercomputer and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors (possibly in part because mainframe DB2 complained if this went ahead, it would be at least 5yrs ahead of them) ... some old email from the period until just prior to the transfer (including discussion of work with LLNL) ... we depart IBM a few months later.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

11FEB1992 press, announce for scientific and technical "ONLY"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
11MAY1992 press, IBM "caught by surprise" by interest in cluster supercomputing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

It's 1983: What computer would you buy?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: It's 1983:  What computer would you buy?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2017 12:20:43 -0800
hancock4 writes:
Let's imagine it's 1983. Your employer requires a network of 1,000 on-line terminals (basically 24x80 green-on-glass, as common at that time), for staff to service customers by mail, telephone, and in person. Most work will be done from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day, and the terminals are expected to be reasonably busy. The online programs will inquire upon existing records, create new records, and update existing records in a complex database. At 7 p.m., a large group of batch programs will executed, generating a volume of paper at the central site.

previously mentioned, large corporations were ordering 100-1000 4300s at time for distributed computing ... placing out in departmental areas (conference rooms, stock rooms, etc). Inside IBM, so many conference rooms were being converted to distributed 4300s ... that they became a scarce resource.

old post about AFDC wanting to visit spring 1979 to talk about 20 4341s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404b

by the time they get around to coming around that fall, order had grown to 210 4341s.

Early 1979, I was also con'ed into doing 4341 benchmarks for LLNL that was looking at getting 70 4341s for compute farm ... sort of leading edge of the coming cluster supercomputer tsunami. misc. (other) 4300 emails
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

the internal network was larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s. At the great change over from IMPs to internetworking protocol on 1Jan1983, there was approx. 100 IMP nodes and 255 connected hosts ... at a time the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes (which it passed a little later that year) ... largely fueled by the huge explosion in 4300s. old post with world-wide internal network nodes that added one or more nodes during 1983:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8 Arpa address

4300s sold into the mid-range market in about the same numbers as VAX for single or small unit numbers ... the big difference was large corporations ordering 100-1000 at a time. old post with decade of vax sales ... sliced and diced by year, model, US/non-us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0

other trivia, note that original sql/relational implementation System/R, done on vm370/145. One of the early installations was Bank of America with 60 4341s. When Jim Gray departs IBM/SJR for Tandem, he palms off bunch of stuff on me wanting me to take over BofA support (as well as IMS DBMS consulting). old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email800311b

trivia ... mid-80s, I got sucked into trying to help a (former) baby bell that implemented significantly enhanced SNA NCP/37x5 (along with a lot of VTAM) function on Series/1 clusters ... and wanted to look at turning it out as commercial product. They had configuration of 60,000 3270 terminals. A couple old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#67
and part of one of their presentation at (S/1) Common User Gropu meeting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#70

2000, I was in datacenter that provided nearly all the backend dataprocessing, outsourcing for nearly all of the US cable tv industry ... as well as things like sending out monthly customer bills, supporting allt he local office terminals ... as well as handling messages that were sent down to all the cable setop box updates. This was machine that had 130 instances of CICS running. recent reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#90 Stopping the Internet of noise
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#38 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#76 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

CICS (&/or BDAM) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#cics

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM does what IBM does best: Raises the chopper again

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM does what IBM does best: Raises the chopper again
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 29 Nov 2017 16:26:01 -0800
edgould1948@COMCAST.NET (Edward Gould) writes:
The latest buzz word is education on the computer. IBM tried that 40 years ago and it was an abysmal failure. Pretty soon they are going to make a pizza making MF. Now, how do you deliver a 20 ton computer with a flat top to a neighborhood that has narrow streets?

prior to gov. legal action, IBM steep educational discount and there was IBM mainframes in lots of universities ... then with the 23June1969 unbundling announcement ... those educational discounts went away. past posts/refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle
recent post referencing ACIS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#76 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

with relaxing of gov. pressure in the early 80s, IBM tried to get back into educational market, setting up ACIS ... initially with $300M for giving away to educational institutions ... MIT Project Athena got $25M (jointly with another $25M from DEC), CMU got $50M for various andrew efforts (MACH, unix work-alike, camelot/encina ... unix transaction processing, andrew fileystems, etc) ... lots of other institutions.

my brother was regional Apple marketing rep in this period (largest physical region in CONUS) with several univ. institutions. He would comment that he would fawn over any IBM coffee mugs at customer sites and say he liked them so much that he would be willing to trade two apple mugs for every IBM mug (selling appleII and MACs against IBM/PC).

sometime earlier, IBM had 1500
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_1500

picture of my (future) wife ... she had job at the Naval academy in Annapolis, programming IBM 1500 courses (before she joined IBM)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/1500.jpg

IBM 1500

1500 installations, gone but lives on at wayback machine
https://web.archive.org/web/20090604181740/http://www.uofaweb.ualberta.ca/educationhistory/IBM1500Systems_NorthAmerica.cfm

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

why VM, was thrashing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: why VM, was thrashing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 08:27:40 -0800
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
Yes, definitely. In the ensuing half century we've learned to use VM hardware to manage disk I/O (map the whole file into the address space and use page faults to trigger the actaul I/O.) It also lets you use shared libraries and shared data segments with the VM hardware managing what's shared among what processes. Even if everything's in RAM all the time, the VM is still useful for mangaging what's in what logical place in each address space, and for keeping programs from stomping and/or spying on each others.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#78 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#79 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#84 VS/Repack
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#85 Ferranti Atlas paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#90 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#91 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

I didn't find out these guys were using a lot of stuff I did as undergraduate until much later ... ref. gone 404, but lives on wayback machine.
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

we also had some rivalry between MIT project mac on 5th floor doing multics and science center on 4th floor doing virtual machines.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#71 A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#85 Ferranti Atlas paging
posts mentioning science center on 4th floor (of 545 tech sq)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

also USAF data systems (and some other gov. agencies) was big Multics customer
http://multicians.org/sites.html
so it was small feather when AFDS was getting 210 vm/4341s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#93 It's 1983: What computer would you buy?

as to TSS/360 for single level store, synchronous, blocking paging faults and then Future System single level store with similar enormous impact on throughput. Folklore is that with the implosion of FS, some of the FS people retreated to Rochester and did simplified version for S/38. However in the S/38 market place ... the poor throughput of single level store synchronous blocking paging faults was much less of an issue. FS posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys
other FS reference
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

This is separate from the thrashing issue with number of concurrent tasks simultaneously contending for real storage and driving up page fault rates.

Higher throughput filesystem models provide for contiguous allocation for larger multi-block transfers and concurrent, overlapped execution with multi-buffered transfers with read-ahead and write-behind. Part of my claim that I learned what not to do from TSS/360 single-level store when I was doing CMS paged-mapped filesystem ... posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

Note that there is another kind of problem shows up with running a LRU under a LRU. This shows up in early 70s with running one of the batch mainframe systems supporting virtual memory ... and some flavor of least-recently used replacement algorith (page that hasn't for used for the longest time is a page that is considered least likely to be used in the future) in a virtual machine that CP/67 was managing with a LRU algorithm (least recently used virtual machine page is considered to be the least likely to be used in the future). The LRU algorithm running in virtual machine is going to pick a real storage slot that contains a low-useage virtual page for replacement ... making it the next most likely to be used page. However, the virtual machine manager that is also running an LRU algorith, is likely to pick the least recently used virtual machine page (which appears as real page to the system running in the virtual machine). In any case an LRU algorithm running virtually under an LRU algorithm ... can invert the assumptions about least recently used is the least likely to be used in the future.

This then shows up for DBMS that have a cache of records (in operating system LRU managed stored) ... where the DBMS manages its own cache with LRU algorithm ... the least recently used cache record ... which the DBMS wants to use next ... is also the candidate that the operating system wants to replace next. This shows up in the mid-70s with the development of the original sql/relational (system/r) on 370/145 vm370 system at san jose research ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr
other history of original sql/relational
http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/

Something similar was seen with initial port of apl\360 to CMS (as CMS\APL) ... which used strategy that allocated new storage for every assignment ... is was guaranteed to quickly and repeatedly use every available virtual page. Major part of CMS\APL was redoing the APL storage managment (and garbage collection) to minimize unnecessary using large number of different virtual pages. recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#86 VS/Repack

a common strategy ... for large DBMS running in operating system LRU managed virtual memory ... is to have special pool of real storage for DBMS virtual memory cache that is fixed or semi-fixed ... biased to be very low as candidates for replacement. some past posts mentioning running DBMS LRU managed cache and/or operating system LRU managed store running in virtual machine ... running under operating system doing LRU managed store ... makes 2nd level LRU look like MRU (least recently used page is mostly likely to be used next, rather than least likely).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#66 Lock-free algorithms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#38 Determining processor status without IPIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#17 {SPAM?} DCSS as SWAP disk for z/Linux
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#15 {SPAM?} Re: Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#9 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#47 Capacity and Relational Database
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#63 Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation (Cambridge skunkworks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#17 5 Byte Device Addresses?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#13 Question concerning running z/OS LPARs under z/VM

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 08:54:36 -0800
Joe Pfeiffer <pfeiffer@cs.nmsu.edu> writes:
"Making memory look bigger" was always something of a red herring. The real advantage virtual memory gives you is the page table lets you control access to different parts of your program, lets you get away without relocatable code, and makes sharing memory between programs practical. That you could have the parts of your program marked as inaccessible not exist, and you could swap parts of your program to disk if your computer was underprovisioned, are just bonuses.

as previously mentioned, the justification for moving all IBM mainframe systems to virtual memory ... was the poor MVT storage management ... application regions had to be four times larger than would be used ... limiting typical 370/165 1mbyte machine to four application regions. Remapping MVT virtual memory ... could increase number of regions by factor of four times ... with little or no paging operations (increasing number of concurrent applications executing and therefor throughput).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#84 VS/Repack
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

of course, 370/165 1mbyte configurations was relatively quickly replaced by 370/168 4mbyte configurations ... but VS2/SVS (MVT layed out in single 16mbyte virtual address space) was also replaced by VS2/MVS ... giving each application its own virtual address space ... allowing much larger number of concurrent tasks ... in part trying to keep increasing the throughput of larger systems.

In mid-70s, I was starting to point out that systems were increasingly becoming I/O bottleneck ... to maintain aggregate system throughput required increasing the number of concurrent operations. Early 80s, I was saying that relative system disk throughput had declined by and order of magnitude over a period of 15yrs (disk throughput increase 3-5 times, but large system increased 40-50 times). Some disk division executive took exception with the comments and assigned the division performance group to refute my comments. However, after a few weeks they came back and said that I had slightly understated the problem. This is eventually respun for SHARE user group presentation about optimizing disk configurations for improved system throughput. Old references to Share B874 presentation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#68 DASD Response Time (on antique 3390?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#18 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#3 using 3390 mod-9s

posts refencing getting to play disk engineer in blgs 14 (division disk engineering) and 15 (division disk product test) ... across the street from bldg 28 (san jose research)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

why VM, was thrashing

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: why VM, was thrashing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2017 12:45:52 -0800
recent posts mentioning single-level store, blocking, synchronous page fault handling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#3 TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#39 MVS vs HASP vs JES (was 2821)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#50 MVS vs HASP vs JES (was 2821)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#87 How a few yellow dots burned the Intercept's NSA leaker
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#56 What is the most epic computer glitch you have ever seen?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#66 Is AMD Dooomed? A Silly Suggestion!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#102 SEX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#34 Tech: we didn't mean for it to turn out like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#90 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#95 why VM, was thrashing

OS/360 filesystem paradigm is large multi-block, multi-buffered, contiguous transfers overlapped with execution, including read-ahead and write-behind. related issues to blocking, synchronous page fault handling ... is large multithreaded DBMS ... whatever transaction responsible for a page fault (with blocking, synchronous page fault handling) could block the execution of overlapped execution of other transactions.

In the virtual machine environment, something similar applies to large multitasking virtual guest operating systems.

For 370 135/145 following, 138/148 they were doing microcode enhancements. I was told they microcode ran avg. ten native instruction for every emulated 370 instruction. They had 6kbytes of available microcode space and instructions would convert on about byte for byte basis. I needed to identify that highest executed 6kbytes of vm370 kernel for dropping into microcode for 10:1 performance improvement. The following ordered kernel instruction execution frequency ... 6kbytes was nearly 80% of kernel cpu
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist

Endicott then wanted to ship vm370 as part of every machine ordered (sort of like LPAR in current machines). However this was in period that POK was working on getting corporate to kill vm370 product and transfer all vm370 development to POK to support MVS/XA development.

Then there is issue with guest operating systen being blocked for any page fault. VS1 "handshaking" was developed that if VS1 was enabled for interrupts and virtual machine took a page fault, VM370 would reflect a psuedo pagefault to VS1 ... allowing it to switch tasks (overlapped while VM370 handled the page fault). When page fault handling was complete, then a psuedo page I/O complete interrupt would be reflecting to VS1 (allowing to switch back to the faulted task). This created tighter integration between guest VS1 running in virtual machine while letting vm370 do the page fault handling.

also contributing, at this time, vm370 was running my page replacement and page i/o that was significantly better and shorter pathlength than VS1 ... helping contribute to VS1 running faster in virtual machine under VM370 ... than on stand-alone native machine.

page replacement, page i/o, working set, thrasing management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock
Future System posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

recent posts mentioning POK working to kill VM370 product and transfer VM370 development to support MVS/XA development
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#79 VM370 Development
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#32 Virtualization's Past Helps Explain Its Current Importance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#36 IBM LinuxONE Rockhopper
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#51 CPU Timerons/Seconds vs Wall-clock Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#25 MVS vs HASP vs JES (was 2821)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#35 Hitachi to Deliver New Mainframe Based on IBM z Systems in Japan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#34 Programmers Who Use Spaces Paid More
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#68 MULTICS & VM370 History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#69 48-year-old Multics Operating System Resurrected

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OS-9

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OS-9
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2017 19:51:44 -0800
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
The real tragedy, though, is that the 8086 came out before the 68000. As someone quipped in rec.humor.funny years ago, "It's a good thing the iAPX432 never took off. Otherwise a horrible Intel architecture might have taken over the world."

iAPX432 gave talk at ACM SIGOPS Ascilomar conference ... documentation references some number of higher level function like s/38 (somewhat claimed to be mini-Future System) or buroughs) ... but they mentioned that they put lots of super sophisticated stuff directly in silicon (including masking multiprocessing ... somewhat transparent to software scheduling how many and/or which processor task executed on) ... and every bug required new silicon.

part of intro from iAPX 432 Architecture (171821-001):
The B5000 architecture had the right approach; it attempted to raise the level of the archtecture using the best available programming methodology, (c. 1960), which largely reduced to "use Algol", and the architecture supported Algol very effectively. But in the 1970s and 1980s problems have arisen for which Algol and the programming methodology of the early 1960s offer no solution. <br><br>

had more conventional architectures, to recognize the wisdom of raising the level of the hardware-software interface. Consider, for example, the IBM System 38, IBM's most recent architecture. Not only have the designers of the System 38 followed the Burroughs approach to architecture support for high-level languages, they have also included most of the operating system in the hardware as well. It seems inevitable that the fundamental problems facing the computer industry will force more and more manufactuers to take this approach.

... snip ...

posts referencing iAPX 432 Architecture (171821-001)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#48 Famous Machines and Software that didn't
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#42 Why is zSeries so CPU poor?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#18 Microprocessors with Definable MIcrocode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#40 Faster image rotation

a couple years earlier I had done something similar for VM/370 with (five) multiprocessor machine ... but it was done in microcode ... not in m'code ... so bug fixes was lot simpler than having to do new silicon.

some past 5-way SMP VAMPS processor posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#bounce
Future System posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

some past posts mentioning iAPX432 presentation at ACM SIGOPS conference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#57 iAPX-432 (was: 36 to 32 bit transition
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#2 Minimalist design (was Re: Parity - why even or odd)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#27 iAPX432 today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#11 computers and alcohol
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#54 Reviving Multics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#23 Intel iAPX 432
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#60 Will multicore CPUs have identical cores?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#64 Will multicore CPUs have identical cores?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#73 Athlon cache question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#31 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#35 Two views of Microkernels (Re: Kernels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#52 Lack of bit field instructions in x86 instruction set because of patents ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#13 Microprocessors with Definable MIcrocode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#1 IA64
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#45 IA64
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#7 RISCversus CISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#65 Architecture / Instruction Set / Language co-design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#2 68000 assembly language programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#40 history of Programming language and CPU in relation to each other
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#75 Bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#63 PL/I advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#115 IBM History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#38 British socialism / anti-trust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#61 Typesetting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#28 Eliminating the systems programmer was Re: IBM cuts contractor bil ling by 15 percent (our else)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OS-9

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OS-9
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 02 Dec 2017 06:22:00 -0800
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Of course, while this made sense with the technology of the time, today conventional architectures and stripped-down architectures apparently give the best performance.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#98 OS-9

part of intro from iAPX 432 Architecture (171821-001):
The B5000 architecture had the right approach; it attempted to raise the level of the archtecture using the best available programming methodology, (c. 1960), which largely reduced to "use Algol", and the architecture supported Algol very effectively. But in the 1970s and 1980s problems have arisen for which Algol and the programming methodology of the early 1960s offer no solution.

These problems have led other manufactuers, whose earlier computers had more conventional architectures, to recognize the wisdom of raising the level of the hardware-software interface. Consider, for example, the IBM System 38, IBM's most recent architecture. Not only have the designers of the System 38 followed the Burroughs approach to architecture support for high-level languages, they have also included most of the operating system in the hardware as well. It seems inevitable that the fundamental problems facing the computer industry will force more and more manufactuers to take this approach.

... snip ...

I've periodically commented that "father of risc" ... John Cocke, was a least partially motivated to do 801/risc in the mid-70s ... by going to the opposite of the enormously complex (failed) Future System project, past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

John also really liked to stay up most of the night drinking, there were times when I was lucky to make it back to hotel (for a time, I lived on west coast but reported to YKT on the east coast and communted a couple times a month).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cocke
Perhaps the project where his innovations were most noted was in the IBM 801 minicomputer, where his realization that matching the design of the architecture's instruction set to the relatively simple instructions actually emitted by compilers could allow high performance at a low cost.
... snip ...

801/risc, pc/rt, rs/6000, etc posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The 1970s engineering recession

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: "Anne and Lynn Wheeler" <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 1970s engineering recession
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 5 Dec 2017 08:19:38 -0800 (PST)
On Tuesday, December 5, 2017 at 7:38:22 AM UTC-8, Peter Flass wrote:
There was something, but I don't recall exactly. Banks were forced to mak e loans to bad risks or in bad areas to avoid being accused of discrminatio n.

Actually, though, I recently read a study which showed that it wasn't the poor people who defaulted in large numbers, but the wealthy.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#89 The 1970s engineering recession

CRA community reinvestment act ... banks ... regulated depository instituti ons, 2001-2008 something like $300B total ... not that different from prior years ... raising the issue was obfuscation and misdirection

After turn of century, non-regulated institutions found that they could get into mortgages ... securitizing, paying for triple-A rating (when rating a gencies knew they weren't worth triple-A) and immediately sell into (effect ively) bond market ... doing over $27T 2001-2008 (CRA volume was about 1% o f the triple-A securitization). Triple-A rating trumps lending standards, they could start doing no-down, liar loans and no longer have to care about borrowers' qualifications and/or loan quality.

Then they find they can design securitized mortgages designed to fail, pay for triple-A, sell off to the market, and take out CDS gambling bets that t hey would fail. Now they cared about borrowers' qualification and/or loan q uality ... but not in the traditional way.

Later, AIG was the largest holder of the CDS gambling bets and negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar when the SECTREAS steps in says that ca n't pay off at less than face value, has AIG sign a document that they can' t sue those making CDS gambling bets and to take TARP funds to pay off at f ace value. The largest recipient of TARP funds was AIG and the largest reci pient of face-value payoffs was firm formally headed by SECTREAS.

"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
Too Big To Fail posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
(Triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The 1970s engineering recession

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: "Anne and Lynn Wheeler" <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 1970s engineering recession
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 5 Dec 2017 16:54:12 -0800 (PST)
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#89 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#100 The 1970s engineering recession

... CRA community reinvestment act ... around since 1977 ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_Reinvestment_Act

as previous post, total during economic mess, 2001-2008 ... something like 1% of the (some $300B compared to over $27T) triple-A rated toxic instrume nts done during the mess (triple-A rating also allowed them to sell to inst itutions restricted to only dealing in "safe" investments ... like large in vestment funds ... claimed they took an avg 30% hit to their funds because of these instruments). Bringing up CRA as part of economic mess was obfusca tion and misdirection .... on the order of 1% of the triple-A rated toxic C DOs done during the period ... and then with the triple-A rating and CDS ga mbling bets ... there was motivation to purposefully making toxic CDOs to fail ... and finding people they knew couldn't pay ... totally unrelated to any CRA.

Even if every bit of the $300B CRA had failed ... it still wouldn't have re sulted in the trillions and trillions of economic mess losses.

"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
Too Big To Fail posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
(Triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The 1970s engineering recession

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: "Anne and Lynn Wheeler" <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 1970s engineering recession
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 05:55:02 -0800 (PST)
On Wednesday, December 6, 2017 at 1:20:03 AM UTC-8, Simon Turner wrote:
Formally or formerly? There's a big difference.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#89 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#100 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#101 The 1970s engineering recession

oops both .... He had been head of GS before becoming SECTREAS after turn of the century ... so many GS people were then brought into treasury there was this joke that treasury was the GS branch office in Washington. When the crash happened SECTREAS heavily pressured congress to pass TARP ... supposedly for the purchase of trillions in offbook toxic assets, however with only $700B appropriated, it would have hardly would have been a dent in that problem. He then used the largest amount for AIG to payoff the CDS gambling bets at face value (the largest payout for face value CDS gambling bets went to the SECTREAS company) ... and then what was left was used for other things while the Federal Reserve behind the scenes provided the trillions to buy offbook toxic assets and tens of trillions in ZIRP funds.

The Federal Reserve fought long legal battle to prevent disclosing what it was doing. When they lost, the Fed chairman then held a press conference to say that he thought the too big to fail would use the ZIRP funds to help main street but when they didn't, he had no way to force them (they were using ZIRP funds to buy treasuries and clearing something like $300B/annum on the spread). Note that supposedly the chairman had at least partially selected on the basis of being a depression scholar ... however the FED had done something similar then with similar results ... so he should have had no expectation that the too big to fail were going to help mainstreet.

economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
(triple-A rated) toxic CDO posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo
ZIRP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp
Too Big To Fail ("too big to prosecute", "too big to jail")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
FED Chairman posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

why VM, was thrashing

From: "Anne and Lynn Wheeler" <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: why VM, was thrashing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 06:20:45 -0800 (PST)
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#78 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#79 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#84 VS/Repack
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#85 Ferranti Atlas paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#90 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#91 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#95 why VM, was thrashing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#96 thrashing, was Re: A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#97 why VM, was thrashing

in the wake of the 23june1969 unbundling announcement ... and starting to charge for things, software, maintenance, .... including SE services ... they had problem with SE training ... which had been sort of apprentice program as part of large group of SEs at customer shop ... with unbundling, they couldn't figure out how not to charge for the apprentice SEs.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

Solution eventually was providing branch office online access to HONE virtual machines (running guest operating systems) for SEs to practice operating system skills (first CP/67 and then VM/370). However, science center had also done part of APL\360 to cms for CMS\APL ... and they also started offering online APL-based sales and marketing tools on HONE ... eventually the APL-based sales and marketing tools came to dominate all HONE activity and the virtual guest operating system use (by SEs) faded away. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

trivia: HONE was one of my early (and long time) internal customers for enhanced operating systems ... recent reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#95

In addition to the other performance work done at the science center ... one was an APL-based analytical system model. This was enhanced for the Performance Predictor on HONE for sales&marketing. Branch people could enter customer configuration and workload information (include system monitoring information) and ask "what-if" questions about changes to workload and/or configuration.

Then in the mid-70s, the US HONE datacenters were consolidated in Palo Alto (trivia, when facebook 1st moved into silicon valley, it was into a new bldg built next door to the HONE datacenter). By the late 70s, this had grown to eight POK 2-way processor SMP machines all connected to shared disk farm (aka cluster, loosely-coupled) ... supporting load balancing and failure fall-over in a "single-system-image" complex. A version of the original APL-base analytical system model (also used for the Performance Predictor) was modified for deciding load balancing decisions.

Trivia, such a VM370 capability for VM370 wasn't released to customers until 30yrs later.

In wake of early 80s earthquake, fall-over was extended to replicated datacenter in Dallas and then a 3rd in boulder.

I mentioned before about in the initial morph of CP67 to VM370, a lot of stuff was simplified and/or dropped, including most of my CP67 system enhancements. Then I got around to moving the stuff from to VM370 ... old email ... although some stuff like CMS paged mapped filesystem was subset because of restrictions.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

with the failure of Future System and the mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipelines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

... a subset of these changes were selected to be released in customer product ... mostly the dynamic adaptive scheduling, page replacement algorithm and numerous other page related performance enhancements ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#clock

also included significant restructuring of the vm370 kernel for supporting multiprocessor operation (which had also been dropped in the cp67->vm370 morph) ... but not the actually SMP support itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

As part of the performance work, we had also developed automated system benchmarking, build a kernel, reboot the machine, run synthetic workload, repeat. My initial morph to vm370 included some workloads that were significantly heavier than any actually seen in real world environments ... which consistently crashed vm370. I then had to redo the internal VM370 kernel serialization mechanism to keep the system from constantly crashing. We had years of performance monitoring data for hundreds of internal machines ... and as part of preparing for product release ... we designed a series of 1000 automated benchmarks that uniformly covered the workload and configuration spectrum (from the real world monitor data). We then modified the APL-based analytical model to do another 1000 automated benchmarks to hunt for anomalous conditions .... taking into account data from all previous benchmarks ... trying to select configuration and workload that might present problems. It would also predict what the system should do ... and after the benchmark was completed compare the prediction with the actual. In preparation for product release, did over 2000 automated benchmarks that took 3months elapsed time to run. past posts mentioning automated benchmarking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#bench

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Now Hear This-Prepare For The "To Be Or To Do" Moment

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: "Anne and Lynn Wheeler" <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Now Hear This-Prepare For The "To Be Or To Do" Moment
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 06:49:20 -0800 (PST)
Now Hear This-Prepare For The "To Be Or To Do" Moment
https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2017-12/now-hear-this%E2%80%94prepare-be-or-do-moment

I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network (larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s) in the late 70s and early 80s. Folklore is that when the corporate executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. Possibly affecting that was one of my hobbies was doing enhanced operating systems for internal datacenters .... including HONE (worldwide online sales and marketing systems). From IBMJARGON:

Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.


A little later, I met John Boyd and sponsored his briefings at IBM.

another To Be or To Do version:
There are two career paths in front of you, and you have to choose which path you will follow. One path leads to promotions, titles, and positions of distinction.... The other path leads to doing things that are truly significant for the Air Force, but the rewards will quite often be a kick in the stomach because you may have to cross swords with the party line on occasion. You can't go down both paths, you have to choose. Do you want to be a man of distinction or do you want to do things that really influence the shape of the Air Force? To be or to do?, that is the question. Colonel John R. Boyd, USAF 1927-1997

From the dedication of Boyd Hall, United States Air Force Weapons School, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. 17 September 1999


John Boyd, January 23, 1927 - March 9, 1997, tribute in USNI Proceedings,
http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/1997-07/genghis-john for
those w/o membership ... it is here at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20011224132049/http://www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt

Datamation put a slightly different spin on "Tandem Memos", Emmett, R. 1981, "VNET or gripenet?" Datamation, Vol. 27, No. 12 (November), pp.48-58. Lots of online citations but web search doesn't turn up copy. They garbled it with the "gripenet" bit ... however, end of the article (pg58):
There is a rumor that Wheeler may leave IBM and join his former colleagues on the outside as consultant. "Right now he's pure gold whatever way you slice him up," says one source. "IBM needs him and the outside companies would probably pay anything to get him." However you look at this ug of war, it can only be good news for IBM's VM users.

"An enormous shop window is opening for them." said one observer. "And what they'll discover in that window is a very powerful tool to control their own destinies--and not have IBM do it."

... snip ...

When still undergraduate, I was one of 1st half dozen employees hired into Boeing hdqtrs to help form Boeing Computer Services (consolidate all dataprocessing into independent business unit to better monetize the investment) ... had mid-level title and could park in hdqtrs lot at Boeing field. There was lots of politics, the CFO running the effort, at the time only had 360/30 for doing payroll ... and had to contend with the head of Renton datacenter. I thought that Renton may have had the largest operation at the time with something between $200M-$300M (60s dollars) in IBM 360s. When I started, 360/65s were arriving in Renton faster than they could be installed, constant boxes staged in the hallways around the machine room.

Later I would sponsor Boyd's briefings at IBM. He would say that he was vocal about the sensors on the trail wouldn't work ... so possibly as punishment, they put him in charge of "spook base" (about the time I was at Boeing) ... he would say it had the largest air conditioned bldg. in that part of the world. One of Boyd's biographies says that "spook base" was $2.5B "windfall" for IBM (again 60s dollars, ten times Boeing Renton). "Spook Base" reference gone 404, but still lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

Boeing also had plan to replicate Renton up at the new 747 plant at Paine field ... there was disaster scenario where Mt. Rainer heats up and a resulting mud slide takes out the Renton datacenter (the cost to Boeing being w/o the datacenter for week would be more than the cost of the datacenter).

cmc posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc
internal network posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
Boyd posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The 1970s engineering recession

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 1970s engineering recession
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 07:28:13 -0800 (PST)
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#89 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#100 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#101 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#102 The 1970s engineering recession

1999, I had been asked to help prevent the coming economic mess. Securitize d mortgages had been used during the S&L crises to obfuscate fraudulent mor tgages (posterchild were office bldg mortgages in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots). I was told there were some investment banker s had walked away "clean" from the S&L crises and were then running Interne t IPO mills (invest a few million, hype for year or two, IPO for a couple b illion, should then fail leaving the field clear for the next round of IPOs ). They were then predicted to next get into securitized mortgages (again).

I was to improve the integrity of the securitized mortgages supporting docu ments as countermeasure. However, they then find that they can pay rating a gencies for triple-A (even when rating agencies knew they weren't worth tri ple-A). Triple-A trumps supporting documents and they can start doing no-do cumentation, liar loans, securitize, pay for triple-A and sell off into the market (initially as fast as they can be made) .... enabling over $27T 200 1-2008.

"economic mess" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
(Triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The 1970s engineering recession

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 1970s engineering recession
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 10:15:11 -0800 (PST)
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#89 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#100 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#101 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#102 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#105 The 1970s engineering recession

Later SEC trivia ... SEC wasn't enforcing Sarbanes-Oxley about jailing executives and auditors for public company fraudulent financial filings ... didn't do anything about SOX provisions to do something about credit rating agencies which played the major role in the economic mess selling triple-A ratings for things they knew weren't worth triple-A, major factor enabling over $27T in (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs.

Later in the congressional Madoff hearings, they had testimony from the person that had tried unsuccessfully to get SEC to do something about Madoff. They asked him if new regulations were needed. He said that while new regulations might be needed, more important (possibly since SEC wasn't enforcing existing regulations) would be transparency and visibility.

In 2002, congress did let the fiscal responsibility act lapse (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all Federal debt). 2010 CBO report that 2003-2009, tax revenue was cut $6T and spending increased $6T for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsibility act (first time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars, completely different republican congress than the republican congress that had originally passed the act).

Report also included that of the increase in DOD spending there was over one trillion that they couldn't find anything to show for (this is totally different than things like the $60B in pallets shrink wrapped $100 bills airlifted to Iraq ... and disappears after arriving in Iraq). Since then the republican house tax & budget committees haven't restored the tax and only modest cuts in spending so deficit continued to increase at about $1T/year (down from the nearly $2T/year deficit increase 2003-2009) ... so deficit is now $20T.

This was possibly confluence of Federal Reserve and wallstreet wanting huge deficit, DOD wanting huge spending increase, and special interests wanting huge tax cuts. W/o the huge federal debt, the too big to fail wouldn't be able to use trillions in Federal Reserve ZIRP funds to buy trillions in treasuries.

Enron posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
Sarbanes-Oxley posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes.oxley
Financial reporting fraud posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud
Fiscal Responsibility Act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act
ZIRP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The 1970s engineering recession

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 1970s engineering recession
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 10:23:16 -0800 (PST)
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#89 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#100 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#101 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#102 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#105 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#106 The 1970s engineering recession

Also last decade ... last decade there was enormous increase in outsourcing to for-profit companies ... especially those that had been bought by private-equity companies ... as in the case of the OPM breach as well as Snowden's employer and companies that were suppose to be doing security clearances (but found to be filling out the paperwork but not actually doing the background checks). Companies in the private-equity mills are under intense pressure to cut corners and turn over as much money as possible to their owners. Part of it is also that beltway bandits can't use money from gov. contracts to lobby congress .... however private-equity companies found that they could buy up gov. contractors and do as much lobbying as they wanted (on behalf of the companies they bought)

Just the intelligence community ... 70% of the budget and over half the people
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us
which significantly contributes to the rapidly spreading success of failure culture (more profit from series of failures)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

The private-equity that owned the OPM contractor was also getting billions in no-bid IRAQ contracts last decade.
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas

Dataprocessing triva: AMEX was in competition with KKR for private-equity take-over of RJR, and KKR wins. KKR runs into trouble and hires away president of AMEX to help
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

IBM goes into the red and was being organized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company. The board then hires the former AMEX president who reverses the breakup using some of the same techniques used at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

Barbarians at the Capitol: Private Equity, Public Enemy
http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2007/10/barbarians-capitol-private-equity-public-enemy/
Lou Gerstner, former ceo of ibm, now heads the Carlyle Group, a Washington-based global private equity firm whose 2006 revenues of $87 billion were just a few billion below ibm's. Carlyle has boasted George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, and former Secretary of State James Baker III on its employee roster
... snip ...

Which acquires beltway bandit that will employ Snowden.

at least by the 80s, financial & gov. were using multi-party operations as countermeasure to insider threats for high value operations. A couple months after the Snowden event, the NSA director mentioned something about having to move to multi-party operations (apparently having been eliminated in the move to outsourcing to private-equity for-profit companies ... looking to increase their profit margin)

posts mentioning private-equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity
posts mentioning former AMEX president, IBM CEO, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
success of failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The 1970s engineering recession

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The 1970s engineering recession
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 11:07:29 -0800 (PST)
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#89 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#100 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#101 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#102 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#105 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#106 The 1970s engineering recession
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#107 The 1970s engineering recession

Former CIA director and then VP repeatedly claimed that he knew nothing about
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

another family member presides over the economic mess last decade, 70 times larger than the S&L crises. S&L crisis had 30,000 criminal referrals and 1000 criminal convictions with jailtime, proportionally the economic mess should have 2.1M criminal referrals and 70,000 criminal convictions.

S&L crises post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#S&L.crisis
economic mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess

not just S&L crisis and the economic mess ...

Earlier, "team b" had done Soviet military analysis justifying huge US defense spending increase, but CIA director Colby wouldn't agree. Then White House Chief of Staff Rumsfeld replaces Colby with somebody that will agree (future VP and then Pres).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_B

Rumsfeld then resigns to become SECDEF and is replaced by his assistant Cheney. Then during the 80s, Rumsfeld was playing major role supporting Iraq. US was supporting Iraq in the Iran/Iraq war including WMDs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war

Last decade, son of former CIA director, VP, and President, is now President, Rumsfeld is SECDEF (again) and Cheney is VP (had been SECDEF when father was president). One of the former "team b" members is now asst. SECDEF and primary architect of Iraq strategy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Wolfowitz

Military-Industrial complex wants the Iraq invasion so badly that they are telling former soviet block countries if they vote for the Iraq invasion in the UN they will get NATO membership and directed appropriation USAID (that can only spent to buy US military arms)
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

White House Chief of Staff Card's cousin was dealing with Iraq in the UN and given proof that the WMDs (tracing back to the US in Iran/Iraq war) were decommissioned. The cousin supplied the information to the white house and then was locked up in military hospital. The cousin finally gets out and publishes a book in 2010
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

The decommissioned WMDs had been found early in the invasion, but the information was classified until fall of 2014 (four years after Card's cousin published book about the decommissioned WMDs).
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html

From the law of unintended consequences, in the Iraq invasion, military was told to bypass ammo dumps looking for (the non-existent/decommissioned) WMDs. When they get around to going back, over a million metric tons had disappeared. Later large artillery shells in IEDs were taking out convoys, Bradleys, even Abram M1 tanks.

related IRAQ posts, WMDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmds

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

It's 1983: What computer would you buy?

From: Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: It's 1983: What computer would you buy?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 11:27:39 -0800 (PST)
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017j.html#93 It's 1983: What computer would you buy?

online worldwide sales & market support HONE system was in large part (mostly implemented in APL) configurators ... in fact starting around mid-70s ... it wasn't possibly to place a mainframe order w/o having run it thru configurators.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

recent HONE post earlier today in "A Computer That Never Was: the IBM 7095", VM thrashing thread .... also the (APL analytical system model) performance predictor ... enter detail configuration and workload (even system monitor information) ... and then ask "what if" questions about changing configuration and/or workload

I used communication group 37x5 configurator to match baby bell configuration where they had implemented SNA/VTAM/NCP emulation on Series/1. (aggregate 2700 3270 messages/sec) old post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#67

the communication group then tried a lot of FUD to invalidate the comparison ... but their effort became increasingly difficult when I should them it used their 37x5 configurator (while a HONE APL configurator group did most of the APL implementation ... all the information came from the product groups as well as the product groups had to verify and sign off on the implementation)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970






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