List of Archived Posts

2016 Newsgroup Postings (02/01 - 03/14)

Thanks Obama
3270 based ATMs
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Cyberdumb
The Deep State
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Cyberdumb
The Deep State
What Will the Next A-10 Warthog Look Like?
Bill Black: How Many Lies Can the WSJ Pack into a Chart on Liar's Loans?
Thanks Obama
Ancient History (OS's) - was : IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
Ancient History (OS's) - was : IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
DEC and The Americans
Ancient History (OS's) - was : IBM Destination z
IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?
DEC and The Americans
DEC and The Americans
How Many Raspberry PI's Would It Take To Emulate The Human Brain's Neural Network?
IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033
AW: Re: You thought IEFBR14 was bad? Try GNU's /bin/true code
SS Trust Fund
Big computers, big hair: the women of Bell Labs in the 1960s
Qbasic
Qbasic
Qbasic
Qbasic
Putin holds phone call with Obama, urges better defense cooperation in fight against ISIS
Query: Will modern z/OS and z/VM classes suffice for MVS and VM/370
IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033
Here's Why (And How) The Government Will "Borrow" Your Retirement Savings
Qbasic
Ransomware
Ransomware
Ransomware
Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles
Here's The New Study The Fracking Industry Doesn't Want You to See
Ransomware
Nobody saw the economic mess coming last decade
Ransomware
Windows 10 forceful update?
Ransomware
Early Unixes requirements
ASCII vs. EBCDIC (was Re: On sort options ...)
Windows 10 forceful update?
Corporate malfeasance
A National Infrastructure Program Is a Smart Idea We Won't Do Because We Are Dysfunctional
Windows 10 forceful update?
MVS Posix
Trump Is Right, Bush Lied: A Little-Known Part of the Bogus Case for War
CMS\APL
How to Kill the F-35 Stealth Fighter; It all comes down to radar ... and a big enough missile
History of Computing 1944 and the evolution to the System/360
Introducing the New z13s: Tim's Hardware Highlights
Wall Street strikes back against Bernie Sanders
Qbasic
When Did AMD Fall Behind?
Qbasic
The NSA's back door has given every US secret to our enemies
Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Qbasic
Qbasic
Catching Up on the OPM Breach
Qbasic
Eric Hunsader Explains To CNBC That "Markets Are Always Rigged"
Fibre Channel is still alive and kicking
Qbasic
Qbasic
Qbasic
Qbasic
Fibre Channel is still alive and kicking
Another Private-Equity LBO Queen Bites the Dust
Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Microcode
Asynchronous Interrupts
Asynchronous Interrupts
Asynchronous Interrupts
Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Trump vs. Hillary
Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Cloud Computing
Computers anyone?
Computers anyone?
Computers anyone?
Computers anyone?
Computers anyone?
Computers anyone?
Google joins Facebook's game-changing project that's eating the $140 billion hardware market
Computers anyone?
Computers anyone?
Computers anyone?
Computers anyone?
Qbasic - lies about Medicare
You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
Ray Tomlinson, inventor of modern email, dies
You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
Qbasic
You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
Computers anyone?
Computers anyone?
Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Qbasic
Bimodal Distribution
The Koch-Fueled Plot to Destroy the VA
You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

Thanks Obama

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Thanks Obama
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 2016 09:21:36 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#92 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#93 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#94 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#102 Thanks Obama

another in the on-going saga of "deferred prosecution" and nobody held responsible ... money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists

Report on HSBC's rocky road to reform in US to be made public
http://www.icij.org/blog/2016/01/report-hsbcs-rocky-road-reform-us-be-made-public

money laundering posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering
too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

the joke is that fines in "deferred prosecution" are so small compared to the amounts involved ... it is becoming viewed as cost of running criminal operation.

some past "deferred prosecution" posts (I'm still working on getting garlic webpages updated since 17apr2015).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#10 Instead of focusing on big fines, law enforcement should seek long prison terms for the responsible executives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#80 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#23 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#44 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 Do we REALLY NEED all this regulatory oversight?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#37 LIBOR: History's Largest Financial Crime that the WSJ and NYT Would Like You to Forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#57 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#61 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#31 Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#44 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#47 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#65 Economic Mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#10 25 Years: How the Web began

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

3270 based ATMs

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: 3270 based ATMs
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 2 Feb 2016 10:47:22 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#100 3270 based ATMs

other trivia:

A Brief History of the ATM
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/03/a-brief-history-of-the-atm/388547/
The company seemed poised to overwhelm its competitors until executives decided to deploy a new model "the IBM 4732 family" which were incompatible with previous models, including the already-successful and widely deployed IBM 3624.

...
IBM's move soured banks, inadvertently, opening the ATM market to new cashpoint manufacturers. Eventually, IBM abandoned payment-technology systems entirely.

...
IBM's returns fell short of its expectations, in part due to the growth in local processing architectures, which had invalidated IBM's strategy to link ATMs to its expensive mainframes. ... snip ...

There are articles about OS/2 lingering on in ATM market long after it had disappeared elsewhere

The ticking time bomb inside your bank ATM
http://www.fiercefinanceit.com/story/ticking-time-bomb-inside-your-bank-atm/2013-07-31

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 2016 13:05:03 -0800
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
I suspect that another cause of abrupt lane changes is people who depend so totally on their GPS that they're not aware that their exit is coming up. Suddenly they get the warning from their GPS and they're in the left lane - so they abruptly cut across two or three lanes to get to the exit. Better hope they miss you.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#4 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#9 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#60 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#62 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#70 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#87 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#98 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#99 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

and everybody slamming on their brakes as people are cut off.

no they do it on purpose .... get as far as possible in the outside lane and cut across at the last moment. simplest version is to stay in through lane and then cut in at the very last moment of the off-ramp lane. past discussion in a.f.c. on the characterristic is that it only takes less than one percent of people doing this to change (heavy) traffic from near speed limit to stop&go. in past, there has been news about road rage and shootings because of such behavior. some localities have gone to enormous trouble to engineer highway off-ramps to inhibit such behavior because it has such disastrous effects on highway efficiency and throughput (like "through" lanes with physical barrier separating "local access" lanes with off-ramps)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#66 When/why did "programming" become "software development?"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#4 What ever happened to Tandem and NonStop OS ?

and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#7 What ever happened to Tandem and NonStop OS ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#5 sorting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#12 sorting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#18 Traffic Jam Mystery Solved By Mathematicians
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#5 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#52 Current Officers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#64 Shockwave traffic jam recreated for first time

Shockwave traffic jam recreated for first time
http://technology.newscientist.com/article/dn13402-shockwave-traffic-jam-recreated-for-first-time.html

from above:
The mathematical theory behind these so-called "shockwave" jams was developed more than 15 years ago using models that show jams appear from nowhere on roads carrying their maximum capacity of free-flowing traffic - typically triggered by a single driver slowing down.

... snip ...

and frequently what forces that driver to slow down/brake is an aggresive driving lane change right in front.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 2016 13:15:07 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#98 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#99 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

note this one percent aggressive drivers can be sociopaths whos objective in life are to play win/loose (beat the other guy, weaving in&out of traffic and other areas of life) ... find it almost impossible to play win/win (like being responsible for dramatic switch from free-flowing to "shock-wave" accordian stop&go).

other posts mentioning sociopaths
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#77 Madoff Whistleblower Book
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#24 AMERICA IS BROKEN, WHAT NOW?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#30 Have you ever wondered why some people seem to get rich easily
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#80 How Pursuit of Profits Kills Innovation and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#4 The Myth of Work-Life Balance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#30 Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#16 Interview of Mr. John Reed regarding banking fixing the game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#99 New theory of moral behavior may explain recent ethical lapses in banking industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#1 Spontaneous conduction: The music man with no written plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#91 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#16 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#84 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#53 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#14 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#53 Retirement Savings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#76 Crowdsourcing Diplomacy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#1 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#1 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#39 Sale receipt--obligatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#37 Income Inequality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#15 Banking Culture Encourages Dishonesty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#15 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#22 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#10 25 Years: How the Web began

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Cyberdumb

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Cyberdumb
Date: 03 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Cyberdumb .... cyber security have leaked details on the major weapons systems last decade

Report: U.S. Weapons System Designs Breached by Chinese Cyber Attacks
http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2013/05/28/us-weapons-compromised-chinese-cyberspies/

... continuing

Pentagon can't check F-35 maintenance thanks to insecure database
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/02/03/pentagon_cant_check_f35_maintenance_thanks_to_insecure_database/
references DOD report, dated Jan2016
http://www.dote.osd.mil/pub/reports/FY2015/pdf/other/2015DOTEAnnualReport.pdf

cyberdumb also

Pentagon Test Report Points to F35 Combat Limits
http://aviationweek.com/defense/test-report-points-f-35-s-combat-limits-0
Unready for War: America's F-35 Gets a Bad Report Card
http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/unready-war-americas-f-35-gets-bad-report-card-15092
Pentagon's Office Of Testing And Evaluation: 'The F-35 Has Too Many Bugs'
http://warnewsupdates.blogspot.com/2016/02/pentagons-office-of-testing-and.html
The F-35's Terrifying Bug List
http://www.defenseone.com/technology/2016/02/f-35s-terrifying-bug-list/125638/?oref=DefenseOneTCO
Another F-35 setback
http://www.businessinsider.com/f-35-setback-2016-2

aggressive outsourcing to private-equity companies last decade, today OPM says it needs to hire 1,000 cyber security experts
http://www.fedcyber.com/2016/02/03/help-wanted-1000-cybersecurity-jobs-at-opm/

OPM Contractor's Parent Firm Has a Troubled History
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas/

but also "Spies like Us"
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

references Snowden affair and outsourcing to (especially private-equity) "for profit" companies:
So despite the promise of the cyber warfare and cloud capabilities Booz Allen is now marketing not just to Uncle Sam but also to Mideast governments and US banks and energy producers, resist the urge to buy the "Snowden dip." Booz Allen is an "Spiinvestment that works best for senior insiders and their paymasters at Carlyle. Everyone else is dispensable. Security risk is just one of the risks of this security."

also
Just this week, the NSA director testified that the agency would be implementing a "buddy system" requiring two authorizations for the download of classified information onto portable media.

... snip ...

note that "buddy system" was standard security requirement by at least the 80s. In the 90s, I designed a (payment) security chip and did an audit of a gov. certified chip foundry for security chips (that would build the chips) ... and it required "pairs of eyeballs" (nearly all actions required pairs of people as countermeasure to insider threats).

private-equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

and rapidly spreading culture of making more profit off failures (than successes), Success Of Failure
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

Success Of Failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

The Deep State: The Fall of the Constitution and the Rise of a Shadow Government (Mike Lofgren), pg38/loc630-31:
The Deep State Is More Than Just the Military-Industrial Complex

... snip ...

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
https://medium.com/war-is-boring/lets-face-it-its-the-cyber-era-and-were-cyber-dumb-30a00a8d29ad

Trivia: AMEX is in competition with KKR for private-equity take-over of RJR and KKR wins. KKR then runs into trouble with RJR and hires away the AMEX president to turn around RJR.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

IBM has gone into the red and is in the process of being broken up into the 13 "baby blues". The board then hires away the former president of AMEX to reverse the breakup and resurrect IBM. Uses some of same techniques at IBM that had been used at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

Later the former president of AMEX leaves IBM and becomes head of another large private-equity company which does LBO (among others) of company that will employ Snowden.

gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

When recent director of CIA resigned in disgrace, he is hired by KKR.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Deep State

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Deep State
Date: 03 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
The Deep State
http://www.amazon.com/Deep-State-Constitution-Shadow-Government-ebook/dp/B00W2ZKIQM/

pg77/loc1257-59:
When Rubin left to cash in on the repeal of Glass-Steagall, Clinton nominated Lawrence Summers to fill the post and reappointed Ayn Rand fanboy Alan Greenspan as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board.

pg77/loc1259-60:
When Brooksley Born, Clinton's chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, proposed to regulate the derivatives market, she was crushed by the troika of Greenspan, Rubin, and Summers.

... snip ...

#2 on times list of those responsible for financial mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

Responsible for GLBA and repeal of Glass-Steagall, Brooksley Born was quickly replaced by Gramm's wife blocking CDS regulation while Gramm got provision added that prevented CDS regulation (described as favor for Enron). She then resigns and joins ENRON board and the audit committee.

posts mentioning glass-steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
posts mentioning ENRON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

VP (former replacement CIA director) ... claims no knowledge of such activities
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

and another presides over the financial mess, 70 times larger than S&L crisis.

pg57/loc931-33:
It only remained for his Republican successor, George W. Bush, to push through further tax cuts and anesthetize the Securities and Exchange Commission by appointing as chairman a useful idiot, former Republican congressman Chris Cox, for the completion of the deregulation process.

... snip ...

Big change for tax cuts was in 2002 when congress allowed fiscal responsibility act (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue) to expire. 2010 CBO report was that then tax revenue cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T (for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsible budget).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAYGO

fiscal responsibility act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

#4 on times list of those responsible for financial mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877323,00.html

Rhetoric in Congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives and auditors did jail time, but it required that SEC do something. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of fraudulent public company financial filines, even showing increase after SOX goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime).

sarbanes-oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley

In the congressional Madoff hearings, they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC do something about Madoff.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Feb 2016 20:41:09 -0800
"Blanco" <rko4410@gmail.com> writes:
And high performance military aircraft can't even be flown manually its just not possible.

... fly by wire, in many ways is a drone ... except the human still happens to be along for the ride

Relaxed stability
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relaxed_stability
Fly-by-wire
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fly-by-wire
ARTIFICIAL STABILITY & FLY-BY-WIRE CONTROL
http://www.ausairpower.net/AADR-FBW-CCV.html

Technology and the F-16 Fighting Falcon Jet Fighter
https://www.nae.edu/Publications/Bridge/CentennialofAviation/TechnologyandtheF-16FightingFalconJetFighter.aspx
Because of the fly-by-wire, all-electronic, computer-based flight control system, some have called the F-16 the "electric jet" or "an airplane wrapped around a computer." I don't feel comfortable with that; I want the "smarts" to remain in the cockpit, to be vested in the pilot. The pilot uses his natural, inherent intellect to govern the airplane; he (or she) makes the airplane "obedient." It responds with minimum commands to the pilot's needs.

In conjunction with the fly-by-wire flight control system, we changed the dynamics of the airplane, which dramatically enhanced its capabilities. We adopted what we called relaxed static stability, which meant that, with the center of lift forward of the center of gravity instead of aft of it, the airplane would be statically unstable. No matter, though. With artificial stability, the airplane would be much more dynamic - as much as two and one-half times as dynamic as the F-4C Phantom. Relaxed static stability allowed the airplane to achieve an initial pitch rate of 5 g's per second with "deadbeat" damping-no overshoot. Maneuvers could be instantaneously initiated and precisely controlled - a very important factor.


... snip ...

Tribute To John R. Boyd
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/f16_article.html?item_id=156
Over the next six years, I participated in many all-night sessions in Washington DC with Boyd and his small elite group. The group came to be known as the "Fighter Mafia" because of its close-knit underground operation. The mafia dissected and analyzed every facet of air combat and its relevance to aircraft parameters. In the process, we defined a concept for what became known as the Lightweight Fighter, progenitor to the F-16.

... snip ...

This is tribute written for USNI Proceedings after Boyd passes ... for non-members it is here at the wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20011224132049/http://www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt

past posts and URLs from around the WEB
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Feb 2016 21:13:08 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#6 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)

goes into more history

F-16 Fighting Falcon
http://fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ac/f-16.htm

Boyd had a lot of stories about the internal Air Force political trying to block the fighter mafia's threat to the F15.

posts & URL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Cyberdumb

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Cyberdumb
Date: 03 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb

The Pentagon's New List of F-35 Bugs Is Predictably Awful
http://gizmodo.com/the-pentagons-new-list-of-f-35-bugs-is-predictably-awfu-1756826707

military-industrial complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Deep State

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Deep State
Date: 03 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#5 The Deep State

How Corruption Cripples America's Military
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-02-03/how-corruption-cripples-americas-military

military-industrial complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Will the Next A-10 Warthog Look Like?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: What Will the Next A-10 Warthog Look Like?
Date: 03 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
What Will the Next A-10 Warthog Look Like?
http://warisboring.com/articles/what-will-the-next-a-10-warthog-look-like/

Air Force has been about strategic bombing ... '43 Strategic Bombing Program had all money going to bombers. British observation was that Battle of Britain demonstrated the need for long-range fighters for bombing programs ... but the US insisted on relearning the lesson the hard way. F35 designed as "bomb truck" ... assuming F22 flying cover, handling air superiority role.

Burton (Pentagon Wars) talks about A10 followon, five barrel gun, smaller, simpler, cheaper, large numbers, capable being forward deployed, serviced/maintained ... however would now more likely be drone ... analogous to Army version of Predator
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/04/29/young_usaf_predator_pilot_officer_slam/

military-industrial complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

some past posts Burton & A10:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#83 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#36 IBM Historic computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#46 The Pentagon Wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#68 A-10 Attack Jets Rack Up Air-to-Air Kills in Louisiana War Game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#90 A Drone Could Be the Ultimate Dogfighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#31 The Designer Of The F-15 Explains Just How Stupid The F-35 Is
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#98 Friden Flexowriter equipment series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#68 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#59 A-10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#42 No, the F-35 Can't Fight at Long Range, Either
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#43 No, the F-35 Can't Fight at Long Range, Either
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#88 The Pentagon's Pricey Culture of Mediocrity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Bill Black: How Many Lies Can the WSJ Pack into a Chart on Liar's Loans?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Bill Black: How Many Lies Can the WSJ Pack into a Chart on Liar's Loans?
Date: 05 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Bill Black: How Many Lies Can the WSJ Pack into a Chart on Liar's Loans?
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2016/02/bill-black-how-many-lies-can-the-wsj-pack-into-a-chart-on-liars-loans.html

and
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2016/02/lenders-lies-liars-loans-rigorous-underwriting.html
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2016/02/many-lies-can-wsj-pack-chart-liars-loans.html
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2016/02/long-take-wsj-lie-liars-loans-two-sentences.html
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2016/02/liars-loans-plus-loan-brokers-equals-fraud-heaven.html

Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages. In the late 90s, I was asked to try and help prevent the coming economic mess by looking at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures. Then lenders were securitizing loans&mortgages and paying for triple-A ratings. Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments, largely enabling over $27T done 2001-2008. In the Oct2008 congressional hearings into the role that the rating agencies played, there was testimony that both the rating agencies and the sellers paying for the triple-A ratings, knew that they weren't worth triple-A.
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

posts (triple-A) toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

#2 on times list of those responsible for financial mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

Responsible for GLBA and repeal of Glass-Steagall; Brooksley Born (for suggesting CDS regulation) was quickly replaced by Gramm's wife blocking CDS regulation while Gramm got provision added that prevented CDS regulation (described as favor for Enron). She then resigns and joins ENRON board and the audit committee.

posts mentioning glass-steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
posts mentioning ENRON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

Rhetoric in Congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives and auditors did jail time, but it required that SEC do something. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of fraudulent public company financial filines, even showing increase after SOX goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime).

sarbanes-oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley

In the Madoff congressional hearings, they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff. SEC's hands were forced when Madoff turned himself in (later speculation was that Madoff had defrauded some unsavory characters and turned himself in looking for gov. protection).

Madoff posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

Not as well known, Sarbanes-Oxley also required SEC to do something about the rating agencies (selling triple-A rating was the major factor in doing over $27T 2001-2008) ... and SEC didn't do anything about that either.
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

Recent "Deep State" explanation for SEC not doing anything, pg57/loc931-33:
It only remained for his Republican successor, George W. Bush, to push through further tax cuts and anesthetize the Securities and Exchange Commission by appointing as chairman a useful idiot, former Republican congressman Chris Cox, for the completion of the deregulation process

... snip ...

Hillary, the Banksters Committed "Fraud" not "Shenanigans"
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2016/02/hillary-banksters-committed-fraud-not-shenanigans.html

too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Thanks Obama

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Thanks Obama
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 Feb 2016 11:25:56 -0800
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
In the "socialist" countries the politicians promised many things but delivered few. The US Government is delivering lots of things but is having trouble paying for them.

congress allowed the fiscal responsibility act (required spending couldn't exceed tax revenue) to expire in 2002.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAYGO

2010 CBO did an analysis since the act expired, tax revenue was cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T (for $12T budget gap compared to the fiscal responsibility budget). They also looked at the increase in spending for DOD & two wars; finding that besides the other increases, there was also a DOD increase of little over $1T that couldn't be accounted for ... somehow disappearing into the pockets of the military-industrial complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

That doesn't include things like the $60B+ in pallets of shrink wrapped $100 bills air lifted to Iraq that disappears.

More recent the long term costs of the two wars is between $5T and $6T (and it is the only time that taxes were reduced to not pay for the wars rather than increasing taxes to pay for wars).

In the 90s, congress passed a bill requiring all agencies pass financial audits ... it is two decades since all other agencies pass audits ... but not DOD. There was some speculation that DOD might have passed a financial audit in 2017, but there is increasing doubts that will happen.

The first major bill after the fiscal responsibility act was allowed to expire, was medicare part-d. CBS 60mins did an expose of the 18 repulicans & staff responsible for shepherding the bill. At the last minute they insert a one line sentence that prevents competitive bidding and prevent CBO from distributing a report analysing the effects of the change. CBS 60mins show identical drugs under part-D and competitive bidding that are 1/3rd the cost (of those under part-D). After it passes, all 18 have resigned and are on drug industry payroll.

part-D posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#medicare.part-d

middle of last decade, US Comptroller General starts including in speeches that nobody in congress can do middle school arithmetic (for how badly they were savaging the budget) and that part-d comes to be a long term $40T totally swamping all other budget items (enormous congressional gift to the drug industry).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

Besides the trillions increase in "legal" tax evasion created last decade ... there has also been a big increase in the illegal tax evasion. Spring of 2009, IRS says that it is going after $400B in taxes on illegal income stashed offshore by 52,000 wealthy individuals. In 2011, the new congress says that it was cutting the budget on the IRS department responsible for recovering those funds. Since then there have news reports of a few billion in fines on the too big to fail institutions reponsible for enabling that illegal tax evasion, but nothing about the recovery of the $400B.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

too big to fail have a increasing list of illegal activities for which they haven't been prosecuted ... giving rise to the references to too big to prosecute and too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

One of the growing federal budget items is the interest paid on the federal debt. Middle of last decade, there was article explaining why Federal Reserve also backed getting rid of the fiscal responsibility act. As a gift to too big to fail, Federal Reserve would provide tens of trillions in ZIRP funds, the too big to fail could then turn around and buy treasuries (federal debt) getting an "easy" $300B/year.

There is an estimate that the too big to fail have been fined an aggregate of $300B since 2008 for their illegal activity .... but besides the enormous profits on illegal activity, it is more than offset by the $300B/annum they can make with ZIRP funds off federal debt.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ancient History (OS's) - was : IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Ancient History (OS's)  - was : IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 5 Feb 2016 12:01:36 -0800
blester@OFIGLOBAL.COM (Lester, Bob) writes:
Yeah. Worst mistake Gary Kindall ever made. Just think, if he'd hadn't "blown off" IBM, I'd be cursing his memory (he's deceased) instead of Bill Gates. Or maybe not, I ran CP/M-80 back in the day. I really enjoyed it. But, then, I enjoyed everything more back then. <sigh> everything was bright, shiny, and new <sigh/>

before ms/dos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS-DOS
there was seattle computer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Computer_Products
before seattle computer there was cp/m,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/M
before cp/m, kildall worked with cp67/cms (precursor to vm370) at npg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Postgraduate_School

other trivia ... after 64, commodore did amiga ... which ran ARexx
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARexx
ARexx is an implementation of the REXX language for the Amiga, written in 1987 by William S. Hawes, with a number of Amiga-specific features beyond standard REXX facilities. Like most REXX implementations, ARexx is an interpreted language. Programs written for ARexx are called "scripts", or "macros"; several programs offer the ability to run ARexx scripts in their main interface as macros.

... snip ...

more trivia ... acorn group in Boca kept claiming that they wouldn't going to do any software and an IBM group was formed in silicon valley to write software for acorn. Then at some point the Boca group changed their mind and wanted responsibility for all software ... if necessary contracting with outside groups (some viewed as eliminating internal competition).

some past mentioning acorn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#79 Coulda, Woulda, Shoudda moments?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#19 PC history, was PDP10 and RISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#24 What ever happened to Tandem and NonStop OS ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#8 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#29 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#5 Is computer history taugh now?

reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Personal_Computer#Project_Chess

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ancient History (OS's) - was : IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Ancient History (OS's) - was : IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 5 Feb 2016 22:11:48 -0800
linda.lstsrv@COMCAST.NET (Linda) writes:
I had an Apple ][ with an acoustic coupler. It auto dialed over a regular telco dial tone line using a program loaded from a cassette player, or if one could afford it, from an early floppy drive. The college I went to had a Univac 90/70d. The were 4 student dialup numbers. I could get into one of those much like the scene from War Games. It was fun.

TYMSHARE made their CMS-based online computer conferencing available free to SHARE as VMSHARE starting in Aug1976 ... archives:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

In the 70s, I started trying to get IBM to let me put all the VMSHARE files up on internal systems ... including the world-wide sales&marketing support HONE system. One of the biggest battles I had with IBM was the lawyers were afraid that customer information would contaminate IBM employees.

My brother was Apple regional marketing rep at the time (largest physical region in CONUS) and I started trying to get him to setup up an apple that would do terminal emulation for copying all the files down from TYMSHARE ... he never quite got around to doing it ... although over the years ... when he would come into town for business meetings I would get invited to dinners ... and even got to argue with the MAC developers about design (before MAC was announced).

I eventually had to resort to getting montly tapes mailed from TYMSHARE ... that dumped all VMSHARE files (later added all PCSHARE files). misc. old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DEC and The Americans

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: DEC and The Americans
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Feb 2016 11:12:22 -0800
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
How odd. A lot of people have replaced their credit cards for debit cards in the US.

led to crisis for card associations ... interchange fee for credit card transactions is enormously larger than service fee for debit cards transations. card associations tried to counter it with the introduction of "signature debit" and forced it as default at point-of-sale ... worked just like credit, ran through the credit card network and had the same intercvhange fee as credit (but was debit account backend instead credit account ... which has some other problems).

Retail Merchant Assocation sued the card associations for it and eventually won .... getting several billion in damages (aka retail merchants were being forced to paying enormously larger fees when debit transaction ran througgh as signature debit through the credit card networks ... than they had to pay when it ran as pin debit through the debit networks). However, nearly all debit cards now have little (credit) card association logo on them ... enabling them for signature debit, running over the credit network and subject to credit transaction fees.

The other issue with credit transaction fees was that they were heavily prorated based on associated fraud rates. Introduction of strong anti-fraud technologies was resisted because it would eliminate the fraud surchange which was up to 90% of fees (cutting it to close to pin debit). A difference between EU and US is that in EU, these fees account for less than 10% of bank bottom line ... but for many major banks in the US, it accounts for 40-60% of their bottom line (the fraud surcharge has an enormous profit component).

To anticipate eventually having to deploy strong anti-fraud technologies, they have spent much of the last decade on "cash back" programs .... for electronic transactions ... the bank profit margin on the "cash back" fees charged merchants designed to replace the enormous profit on fraud surchanges ... that can be drastically reduced with deployment of strong anti-fraud technologies (periodically in the 90s and last decade, there have been discussions on how banks love card fraud because they've used it to justify such huge profits).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ancient History (OS's) - was : IBM Destination z

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Ancient History (OS's) - was : IBM Destination z ...
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 7 Feb 2016 11:18:03 -0800
0000000433f07816-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UA.EDU (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
(Topic drift on recreation) I found a fun Mandelbrot set viewer at:

other IBM Mandelbrot drift ... In the 80s, Mandelbrot resigned from IBM Research in protest over the elimination of research.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benoit_Mandelbrot

Mandelbrot left IBM in 1987, after 35 years and 12 days, when IBM decided to end pure research in his division.[20] He joined the Department of Mathematics at Yale, and obtained his first tenured post in 1999, at the age of 75.[21] At the time of his retirement in 2005, he was Sterling Professor of Mathematical Sciences.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 7 Feb 2016 17:27:43 -0800
tom@TOMBRENNANSOFTWARE.COM (Tom Brennan) writes:
Yep - I'm hoping they'll like the batch facilities in MVS which in my opinion are far beyond unix. This might be a spot where a history lesson is needed, but I wasn't around in the early days:

From what I've read, MVS started with nothing but batch jobs and later grew into online systems. So TSO is just another batch job that happens to communicate with a terminal. On the unix side though, it seems they started with online terminals first, so a batch (background) job was later created as a terminal session with no terminal.


I've pointed that out before ... CTSS was conversational online default from the start, then some of the people went to the 5th flr and did Multics (and folklore is that some of the Bell Labs people went back home and did a simplified Multics, calling it unix) ... and other of the people went to the science center on the 4th flr and did CP/40-CMS (making hardware modifications to 360/40 to support virtual memory), which morphs into CP/67-CMS when standard 360/67 with virtual memory standard comes available .... precursor to VM/370-CMS (cms originally stood for "cambridge monitor system" ... is renamed "converstational monitor system" for vm/370). some cambridge science center posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

I've periodically mentioned Kildall working with CP/67-CMS at NPG school, before doing CP/M, which then morphs at Seattle Computing, and leads to ms/dos.

os/360 assumed batch ... and had to provide increasing about of contingency handling capability ... while conversational started out assuming responsible human was there to handle the contigency cases.

we were working with director of NSF and were suppose to get $20M to tie together the the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget, some other things happen, and then they release an RFP ... but internal politics prevent us bidding on the RFP (director of NSF tries to help by writing the corporation a letter, but that just makes internal politics worse). As regional networks tie into the centers, it morphs into NSFNET backbone, precursor to modern internet some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

We do get TCP/IP product for mainframe but there are quite a few issues ... getting 44kbytes/sec using near full 3090 processor. I do the enhancements to support RFC1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research get full sustained channel speed throughput between 4341 and a Cray, using only a modest amount of 4341 (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#rfc1044

Late 80s, a senior disk engineer gets a talk scheduled at annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference, supposedly on 3174 performance ... but opens the talk with statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had strangle hold on datacenters with corporate strategic ownership of everything crossing the datacenter walls, and were fiercely fighting off distributed computing and client/server (trying to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm and install base). The disk division was starting to see data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to reverse the process, but were constantly being vetoed by the communication group. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

In the late 60s, increasing number of cp/67-cms customers were extending to 7x24 availability (including some number of commercial online service bureaus). One of the issues in the 60s mainframes were rented and initially, it was hard to promote offshit use enough to recover system costs. There was a lot of work done to reduce system costs (especially offshift). Part of system rental costs were based on the system meter that ran whenever the processor or any channel was running. All processor and channel activity had to be quiet for at least 400ms before system meter would stop. Special terminal CCWs were created to allow channel to stop ... but immediately start ondemand when characters were coming in ... some of the stuff sort of analogous being done for on-demand cloud computing (trivia long after mainframes had converted from rental to sales, MVS still had timer task that woke up every 400ms ... making sure that system meter never stopped).

Other stuff to further minimize offshift costs was eliminating operator requirements. Another early CP/67 enhancement in the 60s was automatic re-ipl after failure (system come up and available w/o needing any human intervention). In the early 70s, as environments became more complex, increasing amount of CP/67 services were provided by service virtual machines (analogous to demons ... the current cloud virtual machines are referring then to virtual appliances) that are not connected to any real terminal. In the early 70s, I do the autolog command for CP/67 ... which is used for a wide variety of automation ... including automatically bringing up service virtual machines at an automatic IPL (w/o human intervention).

At the IBM Pisa Science Center they implemented SPM for CP/67 ... which allowed software running in virtual machine to handle all interactions that would normally involve real terminal. This was used in conjunction with service virtual machines to implement automated operator. This was moved to VM/370 ... but for some reason was never released to customers. Over time, various VM/370 features were released to customers like IUCV and SMSG ... but in aggregate they are still a subset of the full SPM facility. A trivial example was that the author of REXX wrote a multi-user spacewar game that relied on SPM ... and since the internal network software supported SPM ... any number of players around the network could play. There was a problem that some number of people started writing player 'BOTs that would beat the human players. The game was then enhanced so that energy use increased non-linearly as time between moves decreased below some (human) threshold ... trying to level the playing field between BOTs and humans. old email about moving lots of stuff from CP/67 to VM/370 including SPM and autolog
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

By the early to mid-70s, vm/370 automated operator facilities and service virtual machines were getting increasingly sophisticated.

We leave IBM in the early 90s and later are brought in as consultants to a small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on the server (the two people responsible for the "commerce server", we had previously worked with when they were at Oracle and we were at IBM), the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". I had absolute authority on the server to payment network side ... but could only make recommendations on the browser side. A big part of my time was developing compensating processes to do various kinds of contingency automation (a lot of which were decades old from mainframe environment)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 7 Feb 2016 18:43:21 -0800
harris152@GMAIL.COM (Graham Harris) writes:
Doesn't deadline scheduling count?

as undergraduate in the 60s, I did dynamic adaptive resource management that was picked up and shipped in CP/67 (customers periodically referred to as fairshare scheduler or wheeler scheduler because default policy was fairshare).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

in the morph from CP/67 to VM/370 there was a lot of things dropped and simplified ... including all the scheduling stuff.

At the science center during the FS period, I continued to work on 360 & 370 stuff ... even periodically ridiculing the FS activity.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

with death of FS, there was mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipelines .... which contributed to decision to release some amount of the stuff I had been doing. Some of it was shipped in standard release.

Note that earlier in the 23Jun1969 unbundling announcement, ibm started to charge for se services, maintenance, (application) software ... but made the case that kernel software should still be free.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

During the FS period, the lack of 370 products is credited with given clone processors a market foothold. So part of resuming 370 efforts, the decision was made to also transition to start charging for all kernel software (likely motivated by 370 clone makers getting market foothold). The decision was made to make the scheduling work a guinee pig as separate charged-for kernal product (I had to spend a lot of time with lawyers and business people about kernel charging policies). After the transition was complete to charging for all kernel software in the 80s ... the next step was the OCO-wars (aka only shipping object code).

As part of the product review process somebody in Armonk said he wouldn't approve it unless it had customer setable parameters because everybody knew that the state of the art was setable performance parameters (MVS would have this huge array of setable parameters ... there would be lots of SHARE presentations about various tests of random walks of all the setable parameters with various workloads). I tried to explain to him what dynamic adaptive management met ... but eventually had to implement some customer setable parameters. However, there was a joke that I took from operations research and "degrees of freedom". The range of values for the manually setable parameters was less than what the dynamic adaptive calculations could do ... so effectively the dynamic adaptive calculations could compensate for human selected values.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?
Date: 07 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?
http://www.propublica.org/article/does-cybercrime-really-cost-1-trillion

and
https://plus.google.com/+LynnWheeler/posts/6nihxSU6WJU

Part of it is distractions from the tens of trillions looted by wallstreet and part of it is distraction that military-industrial complex is cyberdumb and have lost details of military weapons systems (some worth trillion) to cyber-attacks http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2013/05/28/us-weapons-compromised-chinese-cyberspies/

Over a decade ago, somebody gave a talk in the middle east and happened to mention that cybercrime was more than drug crime. This resulted in 15mins. of fame and generated online arguments that reverberated around the world. That night, I got an email request from the speaker to find non-classified source for the information. I tried the major law enforcement websites around the world, Pretty uniformly the sites had readily available stats on drug crime ... but all references to cybercrime required restricted authenticated access. I eventually found a univ. professor academic paper referencing a Lexis-Nexis article about cybercrime more than drug crime.

One issue is that some of the biggest cybercrime amounts have involved financial institutions who are extremely publicity shy about such events. at the financial critical infrastructure protection sessions, the biggest concern was about information sharing ISACs not being subject to FOIA ... crooks shared such details but they didn't want the public finding out.

past Cyberdumb posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#3 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#47 Stolen F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China's Stealth Fighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#49 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#0 Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#32 The dark side of digital banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#82 The NSA and Snowden: Securing the All-Seeing Eye
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#90 A Drone Could Be the Ultimate Dogfighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#18 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#25 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#31 The Designer Of The F-15 Explains Just How Stupid The F-35 Is
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#49 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#90 Friden Flexowriter equipment series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#12 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#20 US No Longer Tech Leader in Military War Gear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#22 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#23 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#28 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#34 UN to Five Eyes nations: Your mass surveillance is breaking the law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#65 New Military Gear Doesn't Have to Cost a Fortune
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#102 A-10 Warthog No Longer Suitable for Middle East Combat, Air Force Leader Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#8 Super Cane's Computers run Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#32 Univac 90 series info posted on bitsavers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#43 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#45 Is coding the new literacy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#76 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#6 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#10 NYT on Sony hacking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#11 NYT on Sony hacking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#55 Do we really?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#75 How Russia's S-400 makes the F-35 obsolete
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#9 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#20 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#21 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#34 The joy of simplicity?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#42 No, the F-35 Can't Fight at Long Range, Either
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#75 American Gripen: The Solution To The F-35 Nightmare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#8 Cyberdumb

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DEC and The Americans

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: DEC and The Americans
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 2016 10:01:19 -0800
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
For the last several new military aircraft, software has been the long pole in the tent. By leaps and bounds. The F-35 is flying and still has years of software work before it's production quality and fight-ready.

from ongoing cyber dumb theme .... F22 is 1.7M lines of code. For F35 things seem to be similar to F35 price quotes are just for airframe, engine is extra. F35 originally was suppose to be 5.7M LOCs but as increased to 8M LOCs ... but that appearently is just some subset ... claims are that full project is now 24M LOC ... and this is infrastructure which is claimed to have already cyber-leaked all F35 details (alternative explanation to cyber dumb ... is that the F35 is fake project that was leaked to adversaries on purpose).
http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2013/05/28/us-weapons-compromised-chinese-cyberspies/

F35 original design as bomb truck with stealth primarily optimized forward, assuming F22 flying cover and providing air superiority ... lots of the software my be vaporware given all the claims that they are now trying to make for F35. more details than you may ever want to know
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-JSF-Analysis.html

diagram 4 has stealth optimization at different frequencies and directions
http://www.ausairpower.net/XIMG/JSF-RCS-Qualitative-A-XLVHF.png
from this paper
http://ausairpower.net/APA-2009-01.html

one of the issues is that latest generation of high performance chips are able to extract real-time location and targeting info from multi-band radar (even with real stealth planes). A year ago, DOD put export control on such chips ... at supercomputer conference last fall, China showed that they were now producing their own (lots of the chips are also used in supercomputers and china currently has the largest).

also analysis is that such chips can enable reducing the 2000 transmit/receive pairs in F22 AESA radar by nearly factor of 100 w/o loss of capability (which would also reduce power requirement)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN/APG-77

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

past cyberdumb posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#3 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#47 Stolen F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China's Stealth Fighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#49 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#0 Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#32 The dark side of digital banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#82 The NSA and Snowden: Securing the All-Seeing Eye
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#90 A Drone Could Be the Ultimate Dogfighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#18 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#25 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#31 The Designer Of The F-15 Explains Just How Stupid The F-35 Is
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#49 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#90 Friden Flexowriter equipment series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#12 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#20 US No Longer Tech Leader in Military War Gear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#22 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#23 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#28 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#34 UN to Five Eyes nations: Your mass surveillance is breaking the law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#65 New Military Gear Doesn't Have to Cost a Fortune
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#102 A-10 Warthog No Longer Suitable for Middle East Combat, Air Force Leader Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#8 Super Cane's Computers run Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#32 Univac 90 series info posted on bitsavers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#43 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#45 Is coding the new literacy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#76 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#6 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#10 NYT on Sony hacking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#11 NYT on Sony hacking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#55 Do we really?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#75 How Russia's S-400 makes the F-35 obsolete
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#9 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#20 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#21 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#34 The joy of simplicity?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#42 No, the F-35 Can't Fight at Long Range, Either
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#75 American Gripen: The Solution To The F-35 Nightmare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#8 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#19 Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DEC and The Americans

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: DEC and The Americans
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 2016 11:45:21 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#20 DEC and The Americans

and of course ... their "tributes" to John Boyd

Fast Forward 'Fast Transients': John Boyd, the F-22 and F-35 in 2016
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-NOTAM-131210-1.html
Briefings - Colonel John R. Boyd, USAF
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-Boyd-Papers.html

I use to sponsor Boyd's presentations at IBM ... past posts and URLs from around the web
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

Boyd also wrote the fighter pilot training manual that was used by the US ... and then by many of the countries around the world. He told story about CIA getting a copy of the Soviet manual ... who claimed it was Boyd's translated to Russian and measures changed to metric.

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Many Raspberry PI's Would It Take To Emulate The Human Brain's Neural Network?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Many Raspberry PI's Would It Take To Emulate The Human Brain's Neural Network?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 2016 13:01:51 -0800
Emergent Chip Vastly Accelerates Deep Neural Networks
http://www.nextplatform.com/2015/12/08/emergent-chip-vastly-accelerates-deep-neural-networks/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033
Date: 08 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033
https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/3033/3033_intro.html

FS was going to completely replace 370 and was completely different During the FS period, they were killing off 370 efforts and the lack of 370 products is credited with giving clone processors market foothold. When FS imploded, there was mad rush to get products back into 370 pipeline. 303x and 3081 were kicked off in parallel; 3033 was remap of 168 logic to 20% faster chips from FS and 3081 used other left-over technology from FS ... more detailed analysis
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
The 370 emulator minus the FS microcode was eventually sold in 1980 as as the IBM 3081. The ratio of the amount of circuitry in the 3081 to its performance was significantly worse than other IBM systems of the time; its price/performance ratio wasn't quite so bad because IBM had to cut the price to be competitive. The major competition at the time was from Amdahl Systems -- a company founded by Gene Amdahl, who left IBM shortly before the FS project began, when his plans for the Advanced Computer System (ACS) were killed. The Amdahl machine was indeed superior to the 3081 in price/performance and spectaculary superior in terms of performance compared to the amount of circuitry.]

... snip ...

3033 was more like 1.5 times 168-3 ... the 20% faster chips had ten times the circuits/chip ... and they redid some logic to optimize more on chip operations. to get up to 1.5times.

Initial 3081D was 2processors was suppose to be same speed as 2processor 3033 ... but was more like 20% slower for many benchmarks. They doubled cache for 3081K got it up to about same as 2processor 3033. 3084 was two 3081s (4 processors total) but it took a big hit with 4-way performance.

The first new system was 3090.

oh, and reference to end of advanced computer system
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

there was issue that executives thought it might advance the state of the art too fast and they would loose control of the market. Bottom of the article it goes into ACS features that show up in ES/9000 more than 20yrs later.

3090 was much more followon hardware to 165/168 (modulo the side-step to do the quick&dirty 3033) ... and 3081 was filler machine using whatever stuff they happened to have handy.

At the time of the 3033, I had gotten involved in a 16-way SMP 370 machine that everybody thot was fantastic. We even suckered the processor engineers doing the 3033 to work on it in their spare time (which was lot more interesting that the 168-3 logic remap). That is until somebody mentioned to the head of POK that it might be decades before the POK favorite son operating system, MVS had effective 16-way SMP support. Then several of us were told to never visit POK again ... and the 3033 processor engineers to get nose to the grindstone and don't do anything else until 3033 was out the door. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

some of the 3090 processor engineers (previously 3033, & 168) complained about vector being pure marketing. They said they had worked very hard to make 3090 scalar floating point run as fast as the memory bus. one of the motivations for vector in the past was that floating point units were so slow ... that standard memory bus could keep large number of (vector) floating point units fed. (trivia the processor engineers would let me sneak into POK even tho I had been directed to never visit POK again)

the other thing added to 3090 was expanded store. to get all the memory they wanted, physical packaging increased access latency larger than processor profile. They created a very wide memory bus for expanded store that moved 4k bytes very efficiently with synchronous instructions between expanded store and (normal) processor memory.

Lots of scientific&vector market had moved to HIPPI (100mbyte/sec standards version of cray channel) and disk arrays. 3090 channels couldn't handle the 100mbyte/sec disk arrays ... the only thing that was fast enough was the expanded store bus ... so they kluged a HIPPI peak/poke API into the side of of expanded store with reserved addresses for doing HIPPI I/O data transfers.

I had gotten sucked into some industry efforts into different kind of channels in 1980. Then industry tried to get IBM to release the support to customers ... but there was a group in POK that objected (because they were afraid it might interfere releasing some stuff they were working on). Then I got sucked into some of the LANL standardization stuff for HIPPI and then in 1988 was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they had ... which quickly becomes fibre-channel sttandard (including some stuff from 1980). Finally the POK stuff is released with ES/9000 as ESCON when it is already obsolete.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#escon

Then some channel engineers become involved with defining a heavy weight protocol for fibre-channel that enormously cuts the native throughput that is eventually released as FICON.

More recently IBM published a mainframe peak I/O throughput benchmark that got 2M IOPS using 104 FICON (running on 104 fibre-channel). About the same time, a fibre-channel was announced for e5-2600 blade claiming over 1M IOPS native throughput (two such fibre-channel have higher throughput than 104 fibre-channel running as FICON). some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

The 3081 was suppose to be multiprocessor only. However ACP/TPF didn't have tightly-coupled SMP multiprocessor support and they were afraid that all the ACP/TPF customers would move to clone processors that were coming out with faster single processor machines. Finally they were forced to come out with 3083 (a 3081 with one of the processors removed). There was enormous amount of tweaking done for 3083 trying to make it attractive to the ACP/TPF market (although others also ordered it).

It turns out that the easiest would have been to remove the 2nd processor ... but it was in the middle of the box, which would have made the box dangerously top-heavy. They had to move the top processor to the middle of the box and do the appropriate rewiring.

In part because had been sucked into doing some fast I/O industry stuff in 1980 ... then also got con'ed into working with the director of NSF to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers in the early 80s ... and was suppose to get $20M from NSF. Some old email from period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

Then congress cut the budget, some other things happen and finally they release RFP (based on what we already had running, including requirement for T1 links). Internal politics prevent us from bidding. The director of NSF tries to help and writes the corporation a letter copying the CEO ... but that just makes the internal politics worse (including comments that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of RFP responses). The winning bid puts in 440kbit/sec links and then to make it look like they meet the RFP requirements, they put in T1 trunks with telco multioplexors running mulltiple 440kbit/sec links over T1 trunks. As regional networks connect into the centers, it morphs into the NSFNET backbone precursor to modern internet. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

The original mainframe TCP/IP product has some issue and only gets 44kbytes/sec using nearly whole 3090 cpu. I do the changes to support RFP1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research between Cray and 4341, get 4341 channel media sustained throughput using only modest amount of 4341 processor (about 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed) Some Some past RFC1044 posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

POK considered 4341 such a threat to 3033 that at one point they got corporate to cut the allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component in half. A datacenter cluster of 4341 had more processing and I/O capacity than 3033, was way cheaper and much smaller environmental and space footprint. The small environmental & space footprint also resulted in big explosion being placed out in departmental areas ... the leading edge of the distributed computing tsunami.

I was con'ed into playing disk engineer in bldgs 14&15. Bldg. 15 disk product test lab tended to get first engineering machines after the processor engineers, they had ver early 3033 and 4341. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

Because I did a lot of work for bldgs 14&15, I got a lot of privileges to play with their equipment ... In the 70s, I got con'ed into doing 4341 benchmarks (because I had better machine access than most of the people in Endicott) for LLNL that was looking at getting a compute farm of 70 4341s (sort of leading edge of the new supercomputer paradigm). some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

Later MVS wanted to play in the exploding distributed computing market ... however MVS only supports CKD (to this day even though there hasn't been real CKD manufactured for decades). The high-end disk was 3380 & CKD ... but the only mid-range disk for departmental areas was FBA 3370. They finally had to come out with 3375 simulated CKD on 3370. MVS still had hard time playing in the market, each MVS system requiring several humans for care&feeding .... while the distributed market was looking at large number of systems per human (rather than large numbers of humans per system).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

You thought IEFBR14 was bad? Try GNU's /bin/true code

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: AW: Re: You thought IEFBR14 was bad? Try GNU's /bin/true code
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 11 Feb 2016 11:53:58 -0800
dlc.usa@GMAIL.COM (David L. Craig) writes:
Does anyone else (Google doesn't) remember the ELHO acronym?

Equal - mask '8' Low - mask '4' High - mask '2' Overflow - mask '1'

Back in the days of no extended mnemonic opcodes it was quite the assembler programming aid.


I was involved in doing some of the original relational/sql "System/R", some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

where SQL does 2-value, true/false logic. It created big problem for unknowns and/or null values. Old discussion that null values in SQL tended to produce the opposite of the expected results ... making it all the more dangerous.

about the same time, I was brought in to do some of a different kind of relational implementation ... which had interface language that directly supported unknowns/null with 3-value logic.

old post in DBMS group discussing the dangers of unknowns/nulls in SQL and how it was handled in 3-value logic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#40 How to cope with missing values - NULLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#41 How to cope with missing values - NULLS?

Earlier in the first part of the 70s, I had written a PLI program to ingest assembler listing ... analyze the statements, creating higher level representation ... code paths, logic processes, "dead" code, possible register use before set, etc ... and generate representation using a psuedo-pascal statements.

some highly optimized cp67 kernel tmade liberal use of 3&4-way logic with branch conditions and would appear very straight forward ... the psuedo-pascal true/false if/then/else type logic could look very convoluted with nesting that could go 15-levels deep.

iefbr14
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEFBR14

got fixed with SR, then with eyecatcher name, also a couple other nits, "IEFBR14" on "END" statement, and "RENT" & "REUSE" in linkedit
http://hercules390.996247.n3.nabble.com/IBM-program-naming-question-td27674.html

from above:
Two more ...

First, because the RENT linkedit option wasn't specified.

Second, because the REUSE linkedit option wasn't specified.


... snip ...

past posts mentioning 70s PLI program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#12 360 "OS" & "TSS" assemblers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#36 Assembly language formatting on IBM systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#52 Review of Steve McConnell's AFTER THE GOLD RUSH
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#24 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#34 Macros and base register question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#21 REXX still going strong after 25 years
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#52 Where should the type information be?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#32 transputers again was: The demise of Commodore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#1 Greatest Software Ever Written?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#9 32 or even 64 registers for x86-64?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#31 To RISC or not to RISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#64 IBM System/360 DOS still going strong as Z/VSE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#48 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#32 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#37 Language first, hardware second
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#49 "How do you feel about 'gotos'"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#69 [Poll] Computing favorities

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SS Trust Fund

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: SS Trust Fund
Date: 12 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Baby Boomer (bubble) is four times larger than previous generation (and twice as large as following generation). While Baby Boomers were paying into SS Trust Fund, they were building up principal for their retirement. However, congress has been looting the fund for all excess over annual payouts (administration even increased SS payments in the 80s, so there was more to loot for military-industrial complex spending). With baby boomers retiring, the annual payments into the SS Trust Fund will be less than the annual benefits (which should be coming out of the accumulated principal ... unfortunately have been looted). To make up the difference, the general taxes on the following generation will have to be increased. The missing funds now amount to $2.8T
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_Trust_Fund

The other problem is in 2002, congress let the fiscal responsibility act expire (required spending not exceed tax revenue). In 2010, CBO did report that congress then cut tax revenue by $6T and increased spending by $6T for $12T budget gap (compared to the fiscal responsible budget, some references that last decade was the first time taxes was cut to not pay for wars rather than increasing taxes to pay for wars). By the middle of last decade, the US Comptroller General was including in speeches that nobody in congress is capable of middle school aritimatic (for how badly they are savaging the budget). The drastic cut in tax revenue (and increase in spending) has also resulted in debt payment pushing half trillion/year.

fiscal responsibility act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act
US comptroller general
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

One analysis attributed to Greenspan, was he wanted huge federal debt (and eliminating fiscal responsiblity act) as gift to too big to fail ... Federal Reserve provides tens of trillions in ZIRP funds to the too big to fail (aka loans at effectively zero interest), who then can turn around and buy treasuries (federal debt) ... making extra hundreds of billions.

too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

After Bernanke replaces Greenspan, he has press conference where he said that he assumed that too big to fail would use the tens of trillions in ZIRP funds to lend to mainstreet, when they didn't he had no way to force them to help mainstreet (but that didn't stop the ZIRP funds). However, supposedly one of the reasons that Bernanke was selected was he was student of the '29 crash and the great depression .... but the same thing happened then, so he should have had no expectations that anything different would happen this time.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

posts mentioning federal reserve chairman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

Disclaimer: Jan2009, I was asked to HTML'ize the Pecora Hearings (30s Senate Hearings into '29 crash that resulted in Glass-Steagall and criminal convictions) with lots of internal x-refs and URLs corresponding to what happened this time and what happened then (comments that the new congress might have appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call that it won't be needed after all (comments about capital hill totally buried under enormous mounds of wallstreet cash, somebody references that there may be only three honest members of congress).

posts mentioning Pecora Hearings &/or Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

recent posts mentioning SS Trust Fund
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#4 Mandated Spending
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#7 Mandated Spending
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#40 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#41 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#108 Occupy Democrats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#62 Medicare Part B premiums increasing up to 30%
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#66 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#68 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#75 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#82 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#37 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#64 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#75 prices, was Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#27 Federal Subsidies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#48 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#4 Decimal point character and billions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#48 Protecting Social Security from the Thieves in the Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#54 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#22 I Feel Old

posts mentioning ZIRP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#4 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#10 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#89 Forbes perspective on IBM's troubles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#94 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#95 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#2 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#3 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#4 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#6 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#11 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#23 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#29 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#43 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#58 Wall Street is Taking Over America's Pension Plans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#75 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#99 US Debt In Public Hands Doubles Under Barack Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#17 Cromnibus cartoon
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#28 Bernie Sanders Proposes A Bill To Break Up The 'Too Big To Exist' Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#69 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#70 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#76 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#41 Poor People Caused The Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#43 Poor People Caused The Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#44 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#82 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#93 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#96 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#16 Interactive Data Corp taps banks for sale or IPO -sources
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#27 Federal Subsidies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#53 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#16 Federal Deficits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#20 After 6 Years Of QE, And A $4.5 Trillion Balance Sheet, St. Louis Fed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#25 After 6 Years Of QE, And A $4.5 Trillion Balance Sheet, St. Louis Fed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#49 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#50 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#56 The long, slow death of the rule of law in America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#57 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#65 Michael Hudson's New Book: Wall Street Parasites Have Devoured Their Hosts -- Your Retirement Plan and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#70 AIG freezes defined-benefit pension plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#81 Now the DOJ Admits They Got it Wrong
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#86 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#19 Bernanke: Some Wall Street executives should've gone to jail over financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#25 Hillary Clinton's Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#44 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#46 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#47 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#48 Protecting Social Security from the Thieves in the Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#50 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#51 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#53 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#78 The Global Financial Crisis: Analysis and Policy Implications
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#8 Too Big To Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#26 1970--protesters seize computer center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#12 Thanks Obama

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Big computers, big hair: the women of Bell Labs in the 1960s

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Big computers, big hair: the women of Bell Labs in the 1960s
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2016 09:47:08 -0800
Big computers, big hair: the women of Bell Labs in the 1960s -- in pictures
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/gallery/2016/feb/13/future-women-the-bell-lab-computer-operators-of-the-1960s-in-pictures-women-in-computing

so picture is front panel of 360/50, not so large, largest memory size was 512kb, so either description is wrong or they had some sort of special add-on to get the other 512kb (IBM LCS 2361 came in 1mbyte increments)

360-50 functional characteristic
http://bitsavers.informatik.uni-stuttgart.de/pdf/ibm/360/funcChar/A22-6898-1_360-50_funcChar_1967.pdf

648MB ... would be three 8drive 2314 strings assuming 2314 drive is 27mbytes.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2016 19:28:08 -0800
hancock4 writes:
I don't know the internals of the "Big Blue" machines vs. Z architecture. My _guess_ is that Z is more intended to serve many users--thousands of CICS terminals--while Big Blue is intended to focus on heavy number crunching. I also guess that Big Blue can do math problems faster than Z.


z900, 16 processors, 2.5BIPS (156MIPS/proc), Dec2000
z990, 32 processors, 9BIPS, (281MIPS/proc), 2003
z9, 54 processors, 18BIPS (333MIPS/proc), July2005
z10, 64 processors, 30BIPS (469MIPS/proc), Feb2008
z196, 80 processors, 50BIPS (625MIPS/proc), Jul2010
EC12, 101 processors, 75BIPS (743MIPS/proc), Aug2012


z13 published refs is 30% more throughput than EC12 (or about 100BIPS) with 40% more processors ... or about 710MIPS/proc

part of the issue is that memory latency when measured in count of processor cycles ... is compareable to 60s disk access when measured in count of 60s processor cycles.

earlier press is that half the per processor improvement from z10 to z196 is introduction of features like out-of-order execution, branch prediction, etc. that have been in other chips for decades ... aka masking/compensation for increasing mismatch between memory latency and processor speed. per processor z196 to ec12 has more features.

e5-2600v1 blade about concurrent with z196 ... 400-500+ BIPS (depending on model). A e5-2600v3 blade is rated at 2.5 times a e5-2600v1 blade, and e5-2600v4 blade is rated at 3.5 times a e5-2600v1 blade ... or over 1.5TIPS (single e5-2600v4 blade with processing power of fifteen max. configured latest z13 mainframes?)

4341 was leading edge of distributed computing tsunami (large corporations ordering hundreds at a time for placing out in departmental areas) as well as datacenter 4341 clusters had much more processing power and I/O capacity, much lower price, much less physical and environmental footprint. At one point head of POK felt it was such a threat to 3033, that he convinced corporate to cut allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component in half. Before 4341s first shipped, I was con'ed into doing a benchmark on 4341 engineering machine in disk product test lab (bldg. 15) for LLNL who was looking at getting 70 for compute farm (leading edge of new supercomputing and cloud computing paradigm). some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341
past posts getting to play disk engineer in bldgs14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

in 1980, IBM STL was growing fast and had to move 300 people from the IMS group to offsite building (with computer access back into the STL datacenter). They looked at "remote" 3270 support ... but found the human factors totally unacceptable. I got sucked into do channel extension support for local channel attached 3270 controllers at the remote building. Optimization with downloading channel programs to the remote end for execution help eliminate enormous latency in channel protocol chatter ... and they didn't notice between "local" 3270 channel operation at the remote end ... and "local" 3270 channel operation in STL. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

The hardware vendor tried to get IBM to release my support for the channel extender ... but there was group in POK that objected ... they were afraid that it would make it harder to justify getting some serial stuff they were playing with, released.

In 1988, I'm asked to help LLNL get some serial stuff they had standardized, which quickly morphs into fibre-channel standard ... including lots of stuff to minimize round-trip protocol chatter latency.

Then the POK engineers (from 1980) finally get their stuff released as ESCON with ES/9000 when it is already obsolete. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#escon

Later some POK engineers get involved in fibre-channel standard and define a heavy-weight protocol that drastically reduces native throughput, which is finally released as FICON. IBM publishes a "peak i/o" benchmark for z196 that uses 104 FICON (over 104 fibre-channel) getting 2M IOPS. About the same time, there is a fibre-channel announced for e5-2600v1 blade claiming over 1M IOPS (two such fibre-channel have higher throughput than 104 FICON running over 104 fibre-channel). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

old posts referencing jan1992 meeting in Ellison's conference room on (commercial/DBMS) cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

also was working with national labs (including LLNL) on cluster scaleup for numeric intensive and filesystems ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

within a month of the ellison meeting, cluster scaleup is transferred, we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors and it is announced as supercomputer, 17Feb1992 article announcement for scientific and technical "only"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
11May1992 article that national lab interest in cluster scaleup caught company by "surprise" (modulo going back to 1979 and 4341 compute farm/cluster)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

recent posts mention e6-2600:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#35 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#36 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#39 [CM] IBM releases Z13 Mainframe - looks like Batman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#46 Why on Earth Is IBM Still Making Mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#78 Is there an Inventory of the Inalled Mainframe Systems Worldwide
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#82 Is there an Inventory of the Installed Mainframe Systems Worldwide
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#29 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#30 IBM Z13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#93 HONE Shutdown
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#39 Remember 3277?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#14 Clone Controllers and Channel Extenders
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#0 What are some of your thoughts on future of mainframe in terms of Big Data?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#5 Can you have a robust IT system that needs experts to run it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#35 Moving to the Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#93 Miniskirts and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#19 Linux Foundation Launches Open Mainframe Project
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#42 20 Things Incoming College Freshmen Will Never Understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#93 HP being sued, not by IBM.....yet!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#96 TCP joke
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#2 More "ageing mainframe" (bad) press
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#108 25 Years: How the Web began
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#110 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#114 Between CISC and RISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#15 Dilbert ... oh, you must work for IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#19 Fibre Chanel Vs FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#23 IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Feb 2016 09:48:05 -0800
David Wade <dave.g4ugm@gmail.com> writes:
IBM already had CMS which uses human understandable commands like "COPYFILE" "ERASE" and is pretty similar to MS-DOS in many ways. However don't think even that doesn't well in 256K memory.

some of the CTSS people
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System

went to the 5th flr and did Multics (some bell labs people were also involved, but then went back home a did unix ... billed as a simplified multics), others went to the science center on the 4th flr and did cp40/cms (on modified 256kbyte 360/40 with virtual memory hardware added), and then cp67/cms (when standard virtual memory 360/67 became available), GML, and bunch of other stuff. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

CP67/cms eventually morphs into vm370/cms (changing name of cambridge monitor system to conversational monitor system). for quite some time, default virtual memory size for cms was 256kbyte ... and originally cms would run on 256kbyte real 360 (w/o cp40 or cp67).

before ms/dos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS-DOS
there was seattle computer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Computer_Products
before seattle computer there was cp/m,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/M
before doing cp/m, kildall worked with cp67/cms (precursor to vm370) at npg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Postgraduate_School

some cp67/cms ran on 256kbyte 360/67, but more typically 512kbyte or 768kbyte. cp67 kernel was getting a little bloated ... and i did modifications the summer of 1969 to make part of the cp67 kernel pageable ... reducing fixed real storage requirements, making it more efficient on smaller real memory machines (but never shipped in the standard cp67/cms to customers). Morph to vm370/cms simplified a bunch of cp67/cms and dropped many of the things I had done in the 60s ... but did pick up the pageable kernel changes ... however, other things bloated, so that it was only officially approved for minimum 512kbyte machines. For some 370/125 customers, I did do some of the additional cp67/cms pageable kernel changes that made it run better in 256kbyte machine.

Les sent me paper copy of his cp40 presentation at 1982 SEAS that I scanned and converted to text
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt

some wiki history with lots of refs:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_CP/CMS
This is a little confused since IDC formed after NCSS by several people from MIT Lincoln Labs (which had been the 2nd cp67/cms installation after the science center, univ. I was at in the 60s was the 3rd)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_CP/CMS#1964.3F.E2.80.9372.3F:_IDC.27s_use_of_CP.2FCMS

this references that I continued working on CP67 and then VM370 all during the Future System period (even ridiculing FS activity) and had two co-op students from BU helping.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

After FS imploded
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

and mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipeline contributed to decision to pick up a lot of the stuff that I had been doing and release in standard product ... except for CMS paged mapped filesystem some of the more complex stuff moving managing virtual memory, including moving additions vm370 data structures structures to paging store. One of the BU students graduates and joins IDC where he re-implements the page mapped filesystem, virtual memory management and moving VM370 kernel data structures to paging store. He also did added single system image cluster support and the ability to migrate running CMS users between loosely-coupled systems in cluster complex. This was in the days when IBM scheduled maintenance required taking systems offline ... migrating running users made it possibly to have 7x24 operations and non-disruptive take systems offline for maintenance.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#online

both NCSS and IDC had quickly moved up value chain offering financial services. I've commented that IDC was briefly mentioned in Jan2009 when there was still the fiction that TARP funds were to buy too big to fail off-book toxic assets and IDC would help value those assets ... however, only $700B had been appropriated for TARP and just the four largest too big to fail were still carrying $5.2T at the end of 2008 (wasn't enough to buy at face value, almost enough to buy at the going rate of 22cents on the dollar, but then all those institutions would have to be declared insolvent and be liquidated).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

some of the stuff mentioned done by NCSS for VP/CSS, I had already done for CP67/CMS as undergraduate at the univ.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_CP/CMS#1968.E2.80.9386.3F:_VP.2FCSS

Summer of 1968, the science center gives a week cp67/cms class in Century City (california) which the univ. sends me to. Primary person to give CP67 classes gave notice the friday before that he was leaving to join NCSS. When I arrive on Sunday, science center asks me to give part of the cp67 class.

another early virtual machine based online commercial service was Tymshare
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymshare

in Aug1976, they make their CMS-based online computer conferencing systems free to (ibm user group) SHARE as VMSHARE ... archives
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Feb 2016 10:15:14 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
VM needs a LOT less memory than MVS. My guess is that you could run a reasonable system in 64K (Lynn?) I know that on the same size machine VM ran much better than MVS/TSO.

Part of CMS issue was that it got increasingly bloated over the years ... and was also dependent on mainstream OS/360(MVS) applications ported to CMS. Endicott did XT/370 ... a couple 68k processors emulating some part of 370 running modified vm370 (with CMS) ... I/O was done by interprocessor messages with cp88 running on the 8088 processor ... it initially only had 384k "real memory". I did some number of "benchmarks" show extreme page thrashing ... because of the bloated memory requirements for compilers and assemblers. As a result they kludged an extra 128k on the memory card ... giving 512kbytes ... which helped to reduce the worst of the page thrashing.

However, the 370 applications still tended to be relatively disk instensive (even w/o page thrashing) ... running on xt/370 compared poorly with applications implemented for the pc/xt environment. A CMS disk i/o required interprocessor message to cp88 which then did the i/o on the native XT 100ms/access hard drive. Applications native for PC/XT optimized for much less disk i/o per operation.

MVS/TSO was significantly more bloated than VM370/CMS, much longer pathlengths, much less efficient system algorithms. CMS had some number of much more efficient native applications like editor ... but the compilers and assemblers were just ported to CMS from os360/MVS.

CMS (& CP67 & vm370) I/O was much more efficient than OS360/MVS (but applications mainframe disks were much faster than PC disks ... so applications weren't as sensitive to optimization).

Late 70s, IBM San Jose Research had environment with MVS 370/168 and VM370 370/158 with all 3330 disk strings connected to both machines ... but strict rules that MVS 3330 disks would never be mounted on vm370 "strings". One day they accidentally violated the rule and the datacenter almost got phone calls from users complaining about CMS response horribly degraded. The issue is os360/MVS environment makes heavy use of multi-track search ... which can tie-up channel, controller and disks for up to 1/3sec at a time. MVS multi-track search on VM370 string will lockout the vm370 "dedicated" controller ... having disastrous effects on CMS response. We immediately demanded that the MVS 3330 disk be moved to MVS string ... and MVS operations said they would do it 2nd shift (this was around 10am).

We had enormously optimized VS1 for running under vm370 ... that ran faster under loaded vm370 on 370/158 than MVS ran on 370/168. We put its 3330 up on MVS string and were able to bring the MVS system to its knees with multi-track searches (and CMS response almost returns to normal). MVS operations then agreed to immediately move the MVS 3330, if we moved the VS1 3330.

Besides all the significant performance issues with MVS/TSO ... a significant part of TSO response is significantly hurt by the underlying MVS use of multi-track search. Some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 Feb 2016 12:01:41 -0800
from
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#18 Folklore references to CP67 at Lincoln Labs

from Melinda's vm370 history
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/

footnote on 360/67 SLT instruction
"The 360/67 SLT instruction RPQ was designed at Lincoln by Jack Nolan. He was interested in using it for database list processing. Once it was implemented, IBM found use for it to process lists in the CP nucleus. I don't know if it was ever used by TSS or for any applications program." (J.M. Winett, private communication, 1990.)

... snip ...

footnotes on two cp67 commercial timesharing companies (Arnow was director of computing at Lincoln):
Almost immediately after that, two "spinoff" companies were formed by former employees of Lincoln Lab, Union Carbide, and the IBM Cambridge Scientific Center, to provide commercial services based on CP/CMS. Dick Bayles, Mike Field, Hal Feinleib, and Bob Jay went to the company that became National CSS.

Harit Nanavati, Bob Seawright, Jack Arnow, Frank Belvin, and Jim March went to IDC (Interactive Data Corporation). Although the loss of so many talented people was a blow, the CSC people felt that the success of the two new companies greatly increased the credibility of CP-67
... snip ...

Bob Seawright was from Union Carbide and his wife was IBM SE on the account, they both are assigned to Cambridge Science Center for CP67/CMS. Bob does a customized version os/360 for running in cp67 virtual machine ... somewhat CMS'ized with some cms-style commands and interactions at the os/360 "operetor's console".

Disk Balyes, Mike Field, and Harit Nanavati were at science center.

science center posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

cms originally could run on real 256kbyte 360/40 machine w/o cp/40 or cp/67.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Putin holds phone call with Obama, urges better defense cooperation in fight against ISIS

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Putin holds phone call with Obama, urges better defense cooperation in fight against ISIS
Date: 14 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Putin holds phone call with Obama, urges better defense cooperation in fight against ISIS
https://www.rt.com/news/332428-putin-obama-talk-syria/

is Harvard responsible for the rise of Putin?:

John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html
If you are unfamiliar with this fiasco, which was also the true proximate cause of Larry Summers' ouster from Harvard, you must read an extraordinary expose, How Harvard Lost Russia, from Institutional Investor. I am told copies of this article were stuffed in every Harvard faculty member's inbox the day Summers got a vote of no confidence and resigned shortly thereafter.

... snip ...

How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html

Mostly, they hurt Russia and its hopes of establishing a lasting framework for a stable Western-style capitalism, as Summers himself acknowledged when he testified under oath in the U.S. lawsuit in Cambridge in 2002. "The project was of enormous value," said Summers, who by then had been installed as the president of Harvard. "Its cessation was damaging to Russian economic reform and to the U.S.-Russian relationship."

... snip ...

Russian Military Politics and Russia's 2010 Defense Doctrine
http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1050

it sounds straight out of "Economic Hit Man" ... how US treats the rest of the world (when it can), "victimize and loot":
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessions_of_an_Economic_Hit_Man

and "War is Racket" by Smedley Butler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

note Summers also active in gov. "swinging door", characterized as protegee of Robert Rubin who played factor in economic mess (part of joke that Dept. of Treasury is Goldman Sachs branch office in Washington through numerous administrations) ... also shows up here
http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2014/04/21/140421crbo_books_lepore?currentPage=all
Larry Summers explains Washington to Elizabeth Warren in one sentence:

"In the spring of 2009, after the panel issued its third report, critical of the bailout, Larry Summers took Warren out to dinner in Washington and, she recalls, told her that she had a choice to make. She could be an insider or an outsider, but if she was going to be an insider she needed to understand one unbreakable rule about insiders: 'They don't criticize other insiders.'"


... snip ...

posts mentioning Summers:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#51 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#30 Why DOJ Deemed Bank Execs Too Big To Jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#35 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#57 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#13 Jack Lew Shows His True Colors By Forcing Deregulation of Derivatives on the CFTC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#52 Lehman Brothers collapse: was capitalism to blame?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#64 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#2 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#21 Thomas Piketty Is Right About the Past and Wrong About the Future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#98 Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#1 do you blame Harvard for Puten
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#2 do you blame Harvard for Putin
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#5 Swiss Leaks lifts the veil on a secretive banking system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#6 do you blame Harvard for Putin
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#8 Shoot Bank Of America Now---The Case For Super Glass-Steagall Is Overwhelming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#32 Larry Summers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#30 Analysis: Root of Tattered US-Russia Ties Date Back Decades
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#44 No, the F-35 Can't Fight at Long Range, Either
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#73 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#5 The Deep State

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Query: Will modern z/OS and z/VM classes suffice for MVS and VM/370

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Query: Will modern z/OS and z/VM classes suffice for MVS and VM/370
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 15 Feb 2016 18:43:07 -0800
RichA@LIVINGCOMPUTERMUSEUM.ORG (Rich Alderson) writes:
We are currently in the process of restoring a 4341 to operating condition. We have just last week corrected a fault in the power system, and are able to power the system up and IML it from floppy.

We are now deciding what operating system to run on the restored system. Most likely, we will run VM/370, but possibly we will run an MVS guest as well. I used to be an MVS systems programmer, but that was more than 30 years ago, and even the rust has eroded away.

I would like to brush up on operations and systems programming, which would be much simpler if a modern z/OS and/or z/VM course would suffice for the older operating systems. Have the operator commands and programming utilities changed radically since 1984 (JES2, CMS)?

Please feel free to reply privately if you wish to tell me how foolish this sounds.

Thanks, Rich Alderson


Hercules comes with 4341 era vm370
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hercules_%28emulator%29

vast majority of 4341s were shipped with FBA disks ... you would need some sort of CKD disks in order to bring up MVS.

huge percentage of 4341s went out into departmental areas with 3370 FBA disks, sort of leading edge of distributed computing tsunami ... not requiring datacenter provisioning.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033
Date: 15 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#23 IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033

4341 was leading edge of distributed computing tsunami (large corporations ordering hundreds at a time for placing out in departmental areas) as well as datacenter 4341 clusters had much more processing power and I/O capacity, much lower price, much less physical and environmental footprint. At one point head of POK felt it was such a threat to 3033, that he convinced corporate to cut allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component in half. Before 4341s first shipped, I was con'ed into doing a benchmark on 4341 engineering machine in disk product test lab (bldg. 15) for LLNL who was looking at getting 70 for compute farm (leading edge of new supercomputing and cloud computing paradigm).

Late 80s, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at communication group world-wide internal annual conference supposedly on 3174 performance ... however he opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had strangle hold on datacenters with its corporate strategic ownership of everything that crossed the datacenter wall and was fighting off distributed computing and client/server trying to preserve its (emulated) dumb terminal paradigm and install base. The disk division was seeing data fleeing to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to reverse the trend, but they were constantly vetoed by the communication group. A few short years later the company has gone in the red and was being reorganized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company (the board then brings in new CEO to resurrect the company and reverse the breakup).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#emulation

towards the mid-80s one of the POK executives gave presentation that 11,000 vax sales should have been 4341. Note however (as mentioned upthread), POK had felt that 4341 clusters in datacenters were such a threat to 3033s, at one point they convinced corporate to cut allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component in half (4341 cluster had much more processing power & I/O capacity than 3033 at much lower cost as well as significantly less floor space and environmental requirements).

Old post with email about AFDS early in 79 looking for 20 4341s but by that fall it grows to 210 4341s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#15
other 4341 email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Here's Why (And How) The Government Will "Borrow" Your Retirement Savings

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Here's Why (And How) The Government Will "Borrow" Your Retirement Savings
Date: 15 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Here's Why (And How) The Government Will "Borrow" Your Retirement Savings
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-02-15/heres-why-and-how-government-will-borrow-your-retirement-savings

Or that just 45-days ago a new law went into effect authorizing the government to strip you of your passport if they believe in their sole discretion that you owe them too much tax.

... snip ...

Which is interesting since after congress allows the fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002, they radically cut taxes ($6T 2003-2010; at same time increasing spending for wars, $12T budget gap 2003-2010 compared to fiscal responsibility budget, those taxes have yet to be restored, possibly only time taxes were cut to not pay for wars instead of increasing taxes to pay for them).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAYGO

In spite of the huge amount of legal tax evasion, in 2009 IRS said that they were going after 52,000 wealthy Americans guilty of $400B in (illegal) tax evasion by hiding income overseas. In spring of 2011, the new congress said that it was cutting the IRS budget for recovering that $400B. Since then there has been reports of the too big to fail paying several billions in fines for illegally moving trillions overseas (but nothing about recovery of $400B in unpaid taxes on those trillions).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2016 12:48:28 -0800
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
32-bit x86 processors supported 36 bits of PA, since the pentium pro, if not earlier. Thats 16GB of RAM on the computer. Granted, a single application was limited to a 4GB address space, but there were ways around that (e.g. Unixware had a windowing scheme).

Gimick used in late 70s with 3033 & 3081. 370 page table was 16 bits, 12bit (4kbyte) page number, 2 flag bits and two unused/reserved bits. 370 was 24bit addressing ... but MVS bloat and increasing need to use real memory for caching to compensate for disks relative system throughput decreasing ... they were banging against the 16mbyte (real limit).

They scavanged the two unused pagetable bits and prefixed it to the page number to get 14bit page number of 64mbytes real storage. They then used fullword IDALs ... which were originally introduced to get around timing problem with scattere/gather ... IBM channel protocol specified no CCW prefetch and CCW only had 24bit address field ... it CCW was executed synchronously before chaining to the next CCW. 360 used chained data to scatter/gather ... but had lots of timing issues. Move to all virtual memory resulted in nearly every CCW that previously was contiguous could no morph into scatter/gather because of crossing virtual page boundary ... and the virtual pages not contiguous in real memory. IDALs addresses could be prefetched to eliminate the timing problems with synchronous data chaining CCWs. Fortunately for 64mbyte feature, IDALs were fullword so it was easy to extend to doing I/O in the >16mbyte area.

There was still an issue that the actual CCWs (and IDALs) had to reside in the <16mbyte area ... but could do I/O (especially paging) into the >16mbyte area.

Each virtual address space was still limited to 16mbytes ... and virtual & real addresses were limited to 16mbytes ... but pagetables could morph a 24bit/16mbyte virtual address into a 26bit/64mbyte real address ... but there could be a large number of different virtual address spaces.

VM370 had an issue since the kernel still had issue with accessing parts of virtual address pages in kernel real address mode ... and it would be unable to access contents of virtual page in the >16mbyte area. The vm370 group developed a "bring-down" strategy where they would move a virtual page from >16mbyte area below the line to the <16mbyte area ... by writing the page out (above the line) to disk and then reading it back in below the 16mbyte line. I then gave them a hack which filled in a dummy pagetable with address of the page above the 16mbyte line and page below the 16mbyte line ... dropped into virtual mode and MVCL of the page from above the line to below the line and then returned to real mode. More complicated was hack to play games with kernel accessing in virtual mode the virtual page information.

They also had other problems modifying how they treated the above and below line areas for page replacement.

base architecture for 370-xa had 31bit virtual addressing and access registers ... which allowed code running in one address space to access areas in other address spaces. Eventually a subset of access registers was also retrifitted to 3033 as "dual-address space mode".

past posts mentioning above >16mbyte line:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#2 Why is there only VM/370?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#82 "all-out" vs less aggressive designs (was: Re: 36 to 32 bit transition)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#23 Linux IA-64 interrupts [was Re: Itanium benchmarks ...]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#38 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#19 address space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#30 HASP/ASP JES/JES2/JES3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#13 VM maclib reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#2 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#27 Old Hashing Routine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#23 Multiple mappings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#39 Wylbur and Paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#56 CSA 'above the bar'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#71 308x Processors - was "Mainframe articles"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#74 308x Processors - was "Mainframe articles"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#67 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#84 locate mode, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#87 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#87 'smttter IBMdroids
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#126 Deja Cloud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#18 Memory versus processor speed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#22 Complete 360 and 370 systems found
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#46 Connecting memory to 370/145 with only 36 bits

past posts mentioning dual-address space mode:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#17 Black magic in POWER5
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#18 Black magic in POWER5
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#51 Handling variable page sizes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#57 Handling variable page sizes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#53 Reviving Multics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#69 unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#13 Page Table - per OS/Process
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#29 SR 15,15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#53 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#26 PCIe as a chip-to-chip interconnect
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#54 CKD Disks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#18 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#57 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#3 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#53 The mid-seventies SHARE survey
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#63 intel's Vanderpool and virtualization in general
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#62 Misuse of word "microcode"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#7 new Enterprise Architecture online user group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#57 Moving assembler programs above the line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#18 address space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#19 address space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#41 Instruction Set Enhancement Idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#48 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#39 What happens if CR's are directly changed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#25 Multiple address spaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#28 Multiple address spaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#0 About TLB in lower-level caches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#33 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#10 What part of z/OS is the OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#26 A Day For Surprises (Astounding Itanium Tricks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#32 MIPS architecture question - Supervisor mode & who is using it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#42 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#23 threads versus task
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#23 Multiple mappings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#16 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#39 Multiple mappings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#59 IBM to the PCM market(the sky is falling!!!the sky is falling!!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#14 Some IBM 3033 information
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#27 user level TCP implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#28 IBM 360 Model 20 Questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#71 IBM 360 Model 20 Questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#10 IBM 8000 series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#21 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#68 Direction of Stack Growth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#56 CSA 'above the bar'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#16 segmentation or lack thereof
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#75 T3 Sues IBM To Break its Mainframe Monopoly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#33 New Opcodes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#35 New Opcodes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#69 Regarding the virtual machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#14 Kernels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#33 IBM Preview of z/OS V1.10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#60 Different Implementations of VLIW
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#29 DB2 & z/OS Dissertation Research
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#52 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#45 z/OS BIND9 DNS Vulnerable to Cache Poisoning Attack Problem?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#83 old 370 info
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#53 Old XDS Sigma stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#40 Opsystems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#31 TOPS-10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#59 Why do IBMers think disks are 'Direct Access'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#74 Best IEFACTRT (off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#58 Rudd bucks boost IBM mainframe business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#41 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#81 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#75 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#76 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#83 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#2 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#10 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#13 OS/400 and z/OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#68 PL/1 as first language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#21 Dataspaces or 64 bit storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#72 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#17 New job for mainframes: Cloud platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#39 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#61 Joint Design of Instruction Set and Language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#45 segments and sharing, was 68000 assembly language programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#100 5 Byte Device Addresses?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#57 How will mainframers retiring be different from Y2K?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#26 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#27 Simulated PDP-11 Blinkenlight front panel for SimH
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#21 8-bit bytes and byte-addressed machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#30 Regarding Time Sharing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#26 Mainframes are still the best platform for high volume transaction processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#22 Is Microsoft becoming folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#81 Still not convinced about the superiority of mainframe security vs distributed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#62 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#71 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#62 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#22 Complete 360 and 370 systems found
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#82 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#46 Connecting memory to 370/145 with only 36 bits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#116 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ransomware

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ransomware
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2016 16:43:39 -0800
usenet@only.tnx (Questor) writes:
We have been there for over forty years. I have seen two supposedly identical mainframe machines, with identical software builds, and the same general user load, behave in two distinctly different manners. Computers are still finite, but their complexity in terms of being able to reliably predict all outputs from given inputs surpassed us long ago.

One of my criticsm of "state-of-the-art" mainframe systems when I did dynamic adaptive resource management when I was an undergraduate in the 60s ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

... was that policy decisions tended to be indirectly connected with activities ... they used indications that were only loosely correlated with activity ... which tended to work one way when the correlation held and totally different ways when there were small changes and the relationships weren't valid.

I spent a lot of time making sure that the policy decisions were based on direct measures of activity ... which went a long ways towards eliminating random results.

Work was picked up and shipped in standard cp67. In the morph of cp67 to vm370, a lot of stuff was simplified and dropped from cp67 ... including my dynamic adaptive resource management.

I continued to work on 360/370 stuff all during the FS period ... even periodically ridiculing FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

and eventually migrated a bunch of stuff from cp67 to vm370 ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

I also did a whole lot of work on automated benchmarking so I could specify a huge variety of different kinds of workloads and configurations to validate everything was working correctly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#benchmark

there was a whole lot of other performance related activity, modeling, simulation, algorithms, workload profiling, etc at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

some of it eventually evolves into capacity planning. another part was analytical performance model implemented in APL. A version of this was made available on the worldwide online sales&marketing support HONE system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

as the performance predictor ... a IBM customer support person could enter chatacterization of the customer's workload and configuration ... and enter what-if scenarios about what happens when the configuration and/or workload changes.

With the failure of FS, there was mad rush to get things back into 370 product pipelines ... which contributed to picking up some of the stuff I had been doing and releasing to customers. Part of the stuff was picked up and shipped in standard vm370 version 3.

The 23Juna1969 unbundling announcement started to charge separately for lots of stuff, including software ... however they managed to make the case that kernel software should still be free
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

The lack of products during the FS period is credited with giving the clone processor makers a market foothold. With death of FS (mid-70s) and resumption of 370 products (and rise of clone processors) there was decision to transition to charging for kernel software. My dynamic adaptive resource management was selected to be guinea pig for this ... packaged as a separately charged for kernel component.

As part of getting reading for release of this "resource manager" we ran a set of 2000 benchmarks that took three months elapsed time. To start with a complex array of observed internal and customer configurations and workloads was defined ... sort of represented as a multiple axis irregularly shaped sphere. We chose regular set of configurations and workloads that regularly covered the inside of this sphere plus a large number of configurationn+workloads that were way outside all observed points ... for the first 1000 benchmarks. All of this was feed into a modified version of performance predictor ... which would compare its predicted benchmark results against the measured results. Then performance predictor was modified to chose the final 1000 configuration+workload benchmarks ... based on results of the previous benchmarks ... searching for possible anomolies.

trivia: early in the vm370 automated benchmarking with initial convesion from cp67 ... the extreme benchmarking with configuration&workloads way outside normal operations would regularly crash vm370. I had to completely rewrite the vm370 serialization mechanisms before I was able to reliable run extreme vm370 benchmarks (which was included in the "resource manager" product when it shipped).

other trivia: doing some performance work at a (very) large mainframe customer (several dozen of max. configurated IBM mainframes) around the turn of the century ... I ran into somebody that was using a descendant of the performance predictor in performance consulting business. After IBM problems of the early 90s, IBM was spinning off all sorts of things. This person had obtained the rights to a descendant of the performance predictor and ran it through a APL->C language convertor.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ransomware

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ransomware
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2016 18:09:52 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
Look at the current Apple vs. FBI dustup. Apparently the FBI expects Apple to develop code to break the encryption on an iPhone. I think I come down on the side of privacy, but the other side has some valid arguments too.

in the past hardware reverse engineering technologies have been used to to recover such information ... and for single use should be less expensive than what they are asking Apple to do. It would seem to be justified assuming they were planning on wide spread use.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ransomware

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ransomware
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2016 18:39:35 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
The Target thing was an inside job by the company that supported their POS terminals (IIRC). I think someone inserted a trojan into a software update.

we had been brought in as consultants to small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server, they had also invented this technology they called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now somewhat called "electronic commerce".

Somewhat for having done "electronic commerce", in the mid-90s we were asked to be on the x9a10 financial standard working group that had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for all retail payments. as part of that effort we did end-to-end threat and vulnerability analysis on number of different kinds of payments. We eventually came up with a financial transaction standard that slightly tweaked the current paradigm and eliminated the ability to use information from previous electronic transaction to perform fraudulent financial transactions ... and therefor eliminated the need to encrypt or hide that information as well as threat of information being stolen in breaches (I've periodically posted here possible explanations about why it has yet to be deployed).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

Since then we were tangentially involved in the (original) cal state breach notification legislation ... we had been brought in to help wordsmith the cal. state electronic signature act and lots of the players were heavily involved in privacy issues and had done detailed public surveys.

The #1 issue was fraudulent financial transactions (as result of breaches, skimming, etc taken from previous transactions) about which little or nothing was being done. The issue is institutions normally take security and countermeasures in self-defense ... however in this case, the institution wasn't at risk, it was the public. It was hoped that the (adverse) publicity from the breach notifications would motivate corrective action.

dating back to well into last century, there have been cases of criminal organizations compromising makers of POS terminals and ATM cash machines and inserting skimming at time of manufacture.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles
Date: 17 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/failure-as-a-way-of-life/
This completes the loop in what is a classic closed system, where the outside world does not matter and is not allowed to intrude. Col. John Boyd, America's greatest military theorist, said that all closed systems collapse. The Washington establishment cannot adjust, it cannot adapt, it cannot learn. It cannot escape serial failure.

... snip ...

URL and posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html
military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

... and the rapidly growing Success Of Failure culture has lots on the list
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

20yrs ago we had effectively consulted (almost) for free with Census on dataprocessing modernization for yearr 2000 census (when they got audited, I had to stand up in front of the room all day answering questions). We then offered to do something similar for Veterans ... we met with the head congressional staffer for VA ... VA was just coming off couple billion dollar failed dataprocessing modernization effort and gearing up for another. However, such offers can be one of the greatest threats to beltway bandits.

In 2002, we get a call asking us to respond to unclassified BAA released by IC-ARDA (since renamed IARPA) which was closing that day and had no other responses; basically said that none of the tools they had did the job. We get in a response and then have a number of meetings demonstrating that we could do what was required (a little stilted since I don't have a clearance) ... and then all goes quiet, no more communication. Later when Success Of Failure comes out, we figure we were on the "wrong" side of the issue.

Director shelves working $3M ThinThread for multi-billion dollar Trailblazer that doesn't work
http://www.whistleblower.org/bio-william-binney-and-j-kirk-wiebe

MIC wanted a war so badly that corporate reps were telling former eastern block countries that if they voted for IRAQ2 invasion in the UN, they would get membership in NATO and (directed appropriation) USAID (for purchase of modern US arms).
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

then there is Chuck's Domestic Roots of Perpetual War (sort of along the lines of Eisenhower's warnings about Military-Industrial complex)
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html
and economic "hit man"
http://www.amazon.com/Confessions-Economic-Hit-Man-ebook/dp/B001AFF266

perpetual war posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

which has an large overlap with "is Harvard responsible for rise of Putin": John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html
If you are unfamiliar with this fiasco, which was also the true proximate cause of Larry Summers' ouster from Harvard, you must read an extraordinary expose, How Harvard Lost Russia, from Institutional Investor. I am told copies of this article were stuffed in every Harvard faculty member's inbox the day Summers got a vote of no confidence and resigned shortly thereafter.

... snip ...

How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html
Mostly, they hurt Russia and its hopes of establishing a lasting framework for a stable Western-style capitalism, as Summers himself acknowledged when he testified under oath in the U.S. lawsuit in Cambridge in 2002. "The project was of enormous value," said Summers, who by then had been installed as the president of Harvard. "Its cessation was damaging to Russian economic reform and to the U.S.-Russian relationship."

... snip ...

there is "Smedley Butler"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smedley_Butler
with "War Is a Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

from member of congress a century ago: Triumphant plutocracy; the story of American public life from 1870 to 1920
http://archive.org/details/triumphantpluto00pettrichhttp://archive.org/details/triumphantpluto00pettrich

loc6265-74:
XXX. THE LEAGUE TO PERPETUATE WAR The war has just begun. I said that when the Armistice terms were published and when I read the Treaty and the League Covenant I felt more than ever convinced of the justice of my conclusion. The Treaty of Versailles is merely an armistice -- a suspension of hostilities, while the combatants get their wind. There is a war in every chapter of the Treaty and in every section of the League Covenant; war all over the world; war without end so long as the conditions endure which produce these documents.

... snip ...

perpetual war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

John Foster Dulles played major role in rebuilding Germany's economy and military during 20s&30s. The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War,

loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc873-79:
Sullivan & Cromwell floated the first American bonds issued by the giant German steelmaker and arms manufacturer Krupp A.G., extended I.G. Farben's global reach, and fought successfully to block Canada's effort to restrict the export of steel to German arms makers.

loc905-7:
Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Here's The New Study The Fracking Industry Doesn't Want You to See

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Here's The New Study The Fracking Industry Doesn't Want You to See
Date: 17 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Here's The New Study The Fracking Industry Doesn't Want You to See
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-02-17/heres-new-study-fracking-industry-doesnt-want-you-see

n 1970, I did customer call at oil company datacenter in colorado. Local news articles were that they were discontinuing pumping liquid into ground as part of oil recovery because of the earthquakes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_fracturing
Hydraulic fracturing began as an experiment in 1947, and the first commercially successful application followed in 1950.

---
Massive hydraulic fracturing (also known as high-volume hydraulic fracturing) is a technique first applied by Pan American Petroleum in Stephens County, Oklahoma, USA in 1968

... snip ...

Magnitude-5.1 northern Oklahoma quake produces aftershocks over a surprisingly broad 5 by 8 mi area
http://blog.temblor.net/oklahoma_472/?ct=t%28Oklahoma2_13_2016%29

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ransomware

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ransomware
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2016 23:15:17 -0800
"hgww" <hgww@gmail.com> writes:
That isn't reverse engineering, there is no reverse involved, it's just disassembly.

original post was "reverse engineering technologies" ... which starts with pealing all the pieces apart (or disassembly). getting down to chips ... they may even very carefully peal away chip layers and measuring charges in cells.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Nobody saw the economic mess coming last decade

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Nobody saw the economic mess coming last decade
Date: 17 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Somebody on Bloomberg this morning commented that nobody saw the economic mess coming last decade.

Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild were office bldgs in Dallas/Ft.Worth area that turned out to be empty lots). In the late 90s, I was asked to try and help avoid the coming economic mess by looking at improving the integrity of supporting documents as countermeasures (FED LEOs explained that many of the investment bankers walking away clean from the S&L crisis were then involved in manipulating Internet IPOs and were predicted to get into mortgages next). Then loan originators were securitizing loans&mortgages and paying for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans. Being able to pay for triple-A eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality, they could sell off (all loans as fast as they could be made) to customers restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds, claim is it accounts for 30% loss in funds and trillions shortfall for pensions), largely enabling the more than $27T done 2001-2008
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

In the early part of the century, rhetoric in congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives (and auditors) did jail time, however it required SEC to do something. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing something, it started doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings, even showing uptic after SOX goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime). SOX also required that SEC to do something about the rating agencies (major factor in creating economic mess), but SEC did about as much about the rating agencies as they did about public company fraudulent financial filings.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

Jan2009 (a decade after being asked to try and help prevent the coming economic mess), I was asked to HTML'ize the Pecora Hearings (30s senate hearings into the '29 crash, resulted in Glass-Steagall and lots of criminal convictions) with lots of internal cross-refs and URLs between what happened then and what happened this time (comments that the new congress might have appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call that it won't be needed after all (reference to capital hill totally buried under enormous piles of wallstreet cash, and there now be only 3 honest members in congress).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

S&L crisis had 30,000 criminal referral and 1,000 criminal convictions. The economic mess was 70 times larger than the S&L crisis has had no criminal convictions (proportionally there should have been 70,000 criminal convictions).

Last decade, the administration regulatory agencies turned blind eye to all the criminal behavior. This decade the whole federal infrastructure is pretending it didn't exist. Local DC press will now sometimes refer to congress as Kabuki Theater ... what you see publicly is just facade (including party bickering) and has little to do with what is really going on.

i've familiar with lots of stuff related of the "Big Short" book. however it glosses over some of the stuff. There was over $27T in (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs done 2001-2008 (when sellers were paying for triple-A ratings even when both seller and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A).
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

Initially the triple-A rating eliminated any reason to care about borrowers qualifications or loan quality (one way or another). But then they realize that they could specifally design toxic CDOs to fail, buy triple-A rating, sell to their victims and then take out CDS gambling bets that they would fail (creating enormous demand for dodgy loans).

When things imploded the sec. of treasury supposedly convinced congress to allocate $700B for TARP funds to purchase toxic assets. However, at the end of 2008, just the four largest too big to fail were still carrying $5.2T in toxic assets "off-book" (that had been selling at 22cents on the dollar). The $700B doesn't even come close to buying the $5.2T at face value ... and if bought at 22cents on the dollar, the institutions would have to be declared insolvent and forced to be liquidated.

Also note that the largest holder of CDS gambling bets was AIG and negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar, when the sec. of treasury steps in, says that they have to sign a document that they can't sue those making the bets and forced to take TARP funds to pay off at face-value. The largest recipient of TARP funds is AIG and the largest recipient of face-value payoffs is the firm formally headed by the sec. of treasury (which may have been the purpose of TARP funds all along).

To real bailout was the Federal Reserve loaning the too big to fail tens of trillions in ZIRP funds (zero interest) and buying their trillions in off-book toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

There was something of head fake in Jan2009 when there was still a facade that they would use TARP to buy the off-book toxic assets. They were complaining that it was enormously difficult to value CDOs because the number of complicated mortgages all packaged together. But one of the biggest reasons that they were hard to "value" was that they were no-documentation, liar loans ... and w/o documentation it is almost impossible to figure out what it is you are dealing with.

The Deep State
http://www.amazon.com/Deep-State-Constitution-Shadow-Government-ebook/dp/B00W2ZKIQM/

pg77/loc1257-59:
When Rubin left to cash in on the repeal of Glass-Steagall, Clinton nominated Lawrence Summers to fill the post and reappointed Ayn Rand fanboy Alan Greenspan as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board.

pg77/loc1259-60:
When Brooksley Born, Clinton's chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, proposed to regulate the derivatives market, she was crushed by the troika of Greenspan, Rubin, and Summers.

... snip ..

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman

#2 on times list of those responsible for financial mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

Responsible for GLBA and repeal of Glass-Steagall, Brooksley Born was quickly replaced by Gramm's wife blocking CDS regulation while Gramm got provision added that prevented CDS regulation (described as favor to ENRON which was playing with CDS at the time). She then resigns and joins ENRON board and the audit committee. CDS gambling was later responsible for changing triple-A rated toxic CDOs from not caring about loan quality to designing toxic CDOs to fail and taking out CDS gambling bets that they would fail.

VP (former replacement CIA director) ... claims no knowledge of such activities
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

and another presides over the financial mess, 70 times larger than S&L crisis.

pg57/loc931-33:
It only remained for his Republican successor, George W. Bush, to push through further tax cuts and anesthetize the Securities and Exchange Commission by appointing as chairman a useful idiot, former Republican congressman Chris Cox, for the completion of the deregulation process.

... snip ...

Big change for tax cuts was in 2002 when congress allowed fiscal responsibility act (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue) to expire. 2010 CBO report was that then tax revenue cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T (for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsible budget, first time that taxes were cut to not pay for wars rather than increasing taxes to pay for war).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAYGO
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

#4 on times list of those responsible for financial mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877323,00.html

Rhetoric in Congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives and auditors did jail time, but it required that SEC do something. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of fraudulent public company financial filines, even showing increase after SOX goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime).

In the congressional Madoff hearings, they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC do something about Madoff (SEC's hands were forced when Madoff turned himself in, later speculation was that Madoff had defrauded some very unsavory characters and was looking for gov. protection).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ransomware

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ransomware
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2016 17:58:12 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#36 Ransomware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#37 Ransomware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#38 Ransomware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#41 Ransomware

Yes, the feds can hack your iPhone. No, it isn't easy.
http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2016/02/17/the-fbi-wants-to-set-a-legal-precedent-not-break-into-an-iphone/

It's possible, of course, for authorities to physically open the phone, pull out the computer chips and bombard them with lasers or radio frequencies to get at the information they need

...snip ...

pealing chips and using scanning electron microscope for reverse engineering has been an issue for a number of decades. Past couple decades discussions have been about using the technique for attacks to compromise security chips. IBM Los Gatos VLSI lab had originally pioneered the technique for debugging chips (as opposed to reverse engineering). trivia, long ago and far away, I use to have a wing of offices and labs at the Los Gatos lab.

Ex-NSA, CIA chief Michael Hayden sides with Apple in FBI iPhone encryption fight
http://theweek.com/speedreads/606641/exnsa-cia-chief-michael-hayden-sides-apple-fbi-iphone-encryption-fight

trivia: 90s, I was saying that I would take a $500milspec chip, cost reduce it by 2-3 orders of magnitude while making it more secure. I was on panel discussion with several CSOs in ballroom standing room only at:
http://csrc.nist.gov/nissc/1998/index.html

then top technical director for the information assurance directorate DDI (reporting to Hayden) is chairing panel discussion in the trusted computing track at the Intel Developer's Conference asks me to be on the panel to talk about my security chip work
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

Earlier in the 90s, the gov. was pushing hard for Key Escrow ... all keys had to be registered. I was member of the Key Escrow committee ... one of the last meetings was where I showed that private keys for digital signature use couldn't be escrowed because it would violate fundamental "PAIN" requirements, their response was people could cheat and use digital signature private keys for encryption. That was about the end of Key Escrow effort.

past los gatos scanning electron microscope reference/posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#2 Crypto to defend chip IP: snake oil or good idea?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#16 Computer of the century
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#55 Multics hardware (was Re: "Soul of a New Machine" Computer?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#3 Ping: Anne & Lynn Wheeler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#54 An entirely new proprietary hardware strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#16 US fiscal policy (Was: Bob Bemer, Computer Pioneer,Father of ASCII,Invento
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#29 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#39 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#47 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#53 Drums: Memory or Peripheral?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#7 "Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked - PCWorld
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#3 "Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked - PCWorld
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#83 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#43 Interesting presentation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#50 The Credit Card Criminals Are Getting Crafty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#7 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#94 Silicoin
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#0 By Any Other Name
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#24 UEFI?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Windows 10 forceful update?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Windows 10 forceful update?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 11:30:53 -0800
Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:
I did download drivers for my Brother printer from their site, commercial linux software seems to be mostly download and activate but certainly compared to the downloadable crud for Windows there's very little and what there is tends to be high quality.

i recently got new epson scanner and downloaded the drivers ... but my linux software didn't have some features that the apple scanning software has (place multiple negatives on the scanner, automatically recognize the different negatives and split into different image files). however, the apple software on cdrom that came with the scanner wouldn't work, so he had to download the latest version anyway.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ransomware

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ransomware
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 16:53:45 -0800
Ibmekon <Ibmekon> writes:
Frightening though to consider, Snowden suggested that some 4 million Americans, maybe half a million contractors, had security clearance to read all the worlds emails.

part of the problem was Snowden was an employee of private-equity (former AMEX president and former head of IBM, left IBM to head up the private equity entity) subsidiary and security clearances and background checks had been outsourced to other private-equity subsidiaries ... which were found to just filling out paperwork and not actually doing background checks. Private-equity subsidiaries have been found to be under enormous pressure to generate money every way possible.

recently still 70% of the budget and over half the employees:
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Early Unixes requirements

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Early Unixes requirements.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 20:34:29 -0800
"Charles Richmond" <numerist@aquaporin4.com> writes:
Edwin Land was a genius and a great manager. He was able to obtain lots of disparate parts and substances needed to create his SX-70 film packs, and some substances today would be "unobtainium". When there was an effort to re-create SX-70 film, a new formulation had to be designed.

You should check out Edwin Land's articles in the "Scientific American" magazine.

Land was a hero of Steve Jobs. ISTM that Steve actually got to sit next to Land at a special group dinner somewhere.


trivia ... our offices on 4th flr 545 tech sq ... overlooked Land's 2nd flr balcony in the two story bldg in the center of tech sq. once he was doing a demo on the balcony of what turned out to be the sx70 (before it was announced).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

ASCII vs. EBCDIC (was Re: On sort options ...)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Re: ASCII vs. EBCDIC (was Re: On sort options ...)
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Sun, 21 Feb 2016 11:57:30 -0800 (PST)
0000000a2a8c2020-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UA.EDU (Tom Marchant) writes:
ASCII was seriously considered for the initial System/360 design. Amdahl, Blaauw and Brooks published an article in the IBM Journal in April, 1964, titled "Architecture of the System/360" in which many of the design trade-offs were described. One place where the article can be found is
http://web.ece.ucdavis.edu/~vojin/CLASSES/EEC272/S2005/Papers/IBM360-Amdahl_april64.pdf

<quote> ASCII vs BCD codes. The selection of the 8-bit character size in 1961 proved wise by 1963, when the American Standards Association adopted a 7-bit standard character code for information interchange (ASCII). This 7-bit code is now under final consideration by the International Standards Organization for adoption as an international standards recommendation. The question became 'Why not adopt ASCII as the only internal code for System/360

The reasons against such exclusive adoption was the widespread use of the BCD code derived from and easily translated to the IBM card code. To facilitate use of both codes, the central processing units are designed with a high degree of code independence, with generalized code translation facilities, and with program-selectable BCD or ASCII modes for code-dependent instructions. Nevertheless, a choice had to be made for the code-sensitive I/O devices and for programming support, and the solution was to offer both codes, as a user option. Systems with either option will, of course, easily read or write I/O media with the other code. </quote>


IBMer Bob Bemer ... "father of ASCII" ... EBCDIC and the P-Bit (The Biggest Computer Goof Ever).
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM

Who Goofed?

The culprit was T. Vincent Learson. The only thing for his defense is that he had no idea of what he had done. It was when he was an IBM Vice President, prior to tenure as Chairman of the Board, those lofty positions where you believe that, if you order it done, it actually will be done. I've mentioned this fiasco elsewhere. Here are some direct extracts:


... snip, see reference for a whole lot more ...

There as been problems with my ISP this weekend, so apologize if this shows up multiple times

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Windows 10 forceful update?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Windows 10 forceful update?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 21 Feb 2016 11:52:03 -0800
Bob Martin <bob.martin@excite.com> writes:
All the major banks in London have IBM mainframes running variations of MVS.

Lots of overnight Cobol batch settlement systems from the 60s & 70s. In the late 70s, some of these started to be front-ended with real-time transactions ... but final settlement was done in the overnight batch.

I've periodically mentioned that in the 90s that billions were spent to move off overnight Cobol batch settlement to straight through processing with large numbers of "killer micros" (motivated by globalization both increasing the workload and decreasing the size of overnight window). Turns out these implementations were using standard parallization libraries that had 100 times the overhead (compared to cobol batch). I got to point this out to some large implementations but was totally ignored. In general they all waited to pilot implementations before seeing them go down in flames (overhead totally swamped anticipated throughput improvements with large numbers of killer micros).

Middle of last decade ... I got involved with some new technology that involved high level definition of business rules that they generated fine grain SQL statements that were parallelized by cluster RDBMS implementations (most RDBMS had done enormous work on efficient cluster RDBMS parallelization) ... was able to show mirrored transactions as straight through processing from large ibm mainframe operations that used dozens of max configured mainframe systems doing cobol batch ... in less elapsed time. These efficient cluster RDBMS implementations included significant amounts of redundancy and all sorts of recovery.

We took it to major financial industry associations and initially got lots of positive interest ... then all stopped and hit a brick wall. We were finally told that there were still quite a few executives that bore the scars of the 90s failures and were quite risk adverse ... it would take another generation before new attempts would be made.

tribute for somebody I worked with at IBM Research
http://web.archive.org/web/20080616153833/http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/IPRO/JimGrayTribute/pressrelease.html

Gray is known for his groundbreaking work as a programmer, database expert and Microsoft engineer. Gray's work helped make possible such technologies as the cash machine, ecommerce, online ticketing, and deep databases like Google.

... snip ...

i.e. DBMS ACID properties gave auditors increased assurance that they could trust computer records.
http://www.tpc.org/information/who/gray.asp

lots past posts mentioning moving off overnight batch failures:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#51 Transactions for Industrial Strength Programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#40 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#31 Quote from comp.object
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#15 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#20 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#36 Future of System/360 architecture?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#19 Distributed Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#21 Distributed Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#37 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#44 Distributed Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#61 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#19 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#27 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#64 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#69 Controlling COBOL DDs named SYSOUT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#72 whats the world going to do when all the baby boomers retire
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#81 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#74 Too much change opens up financial fault lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#92 CPU time differences for the same job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#30 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#31 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#73 Price of CPU seconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#87 Berkeley researcher describes parallel path
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#89 Berkeley researcher describes parallel path
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#55 performance of hardware dynamic scheduling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#50 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#56 Long running Batch programs keep IMS databases offline
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#26 What is the biggest IT myth of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#30 Automation is still not accepted to streamline the business processes... why organizations are not accepting newer technolgies?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#7 If you had a massively parallel computing architecture, what unsolved problem would you set out to solve?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#87 Cleaning Up Spaghetti Code vs. Getting Rid of It
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#43 Business process re-engineering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#14 Legacy clearing threat to OTC derivatives warns State Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#55 Cobol hits 50 and keeps counting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#1 z/Journal Does it Again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#2 z/Journal Does it Again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#21 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#23 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX? (Are settlements a good argument for overnight batch COBOL ?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#26 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#30 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#38 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#43 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX? (Are settlements a good argument for overnight batch COBOL ?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#57 IBM halves mainframe Linux engine prices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#81 A Faster Way to the Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#13 UK issues Turning apology (and about time, too)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#81 big iron mainframe vs. x86 servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#57 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#67 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#35 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#47 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#77 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#16 How long for IBM System/360 architecture and its descendants?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#19 STEM crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#77 Madoff Whistleblower Book
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#56 Handling multicore CPUs; what the competition is thinking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#37 16:32 far pointers in OpenWatcom C/C++
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#47 COBOL - no longer being taught - is a problem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#78 Software that breaks computer hardware( was:IBM 029 service manual )
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#41 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#3 Assembler programs was Re: Delete all members of a PDS that is allocated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#14 Age
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#13 Is the ATM still the banking industry's single greatest innovation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#37 A Bright Future for Big Iron?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#71 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#48 WikiLeaks' Wall Street Bombshell
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#19 zLinux OR Linux on zEnterprise Blade Extension???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#42 Looking for a real Fortran-66 compatible PC compiler (CP/M or DOSor Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#35 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#15 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#19 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#91 Mainframe Fresher
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#93 Itanium at ISSCC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#32 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#5 Home prices may drop another 25%, Shiller predicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#8 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#25 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#52 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#15 Is the SEC Covering Up Wall Street Crimes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#70 New IBM Redbooks residency experience in Poughkeepsie, NY
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#71 Don't Dump the Volcker Rule Just Because It's Not Perfect
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#1 Banks Awash in Cash, Which Isn't Good News
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#10 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#23 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#9 John R. Opel, RIP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#79 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#8 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#12 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#49 No internet in 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#13 Study links ultrafast machine trading with risk of crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#25 Goldman Sachs P.R. Chief's Accidental Exit Interview
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#49 US payments system failing to meet the needs of the digital economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#0 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#24 Time to competency for new software language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#69 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#77 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#19 X86 server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#31 X86 server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#47 I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#18 System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#24 System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#42 COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#30 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#42 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#49 Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#35 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#80 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#29 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#81 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#83 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#22 US Federal Reserve pushes ahead with Faster Payments planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#90 Why do bank IT systems keep failing ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#10 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#78 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#38 Meet Cobol's hard core fans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#76 This Was the Very First Website In the US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#71 Decimation of the valuation of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#119 Holy Grail for parallel programming language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#170 IBM Continues To Crumble
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#78 Is there an Inventory of the Inalled Mainframe Systems Worldwide
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#65 A New Performance Model ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#2 More "ageing mainframe" (bad) press
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#112 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#25 1976 vs. 2016?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Corporate malfeasance

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Corporate malfeasance
Date: 21 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
June1940, Germany had a victory celebration at the Waldorf-Astoria with major industrialists. Lots of them were there to hear how to do business with the Nazis, Intrepid:
http://www.amazon.com/Man-Called-Intrepid-Incredible-Narrative-ebook/dp/B00V9QVE5O/
One prominent figure at the German victory celebration was Torkild Rieber, of Texaco, whose tankers eluded the British blockade. The company had already been warned, at Roosevelt's instigation, about violations of the Neutrality Law. But Rieber had set up an elaborate scheme for shipping oil and petroleum products through neutral ports in South America. With the Germans now preparing to turn the English Channel into what Churchill thought would become 'river of blood,' other industrialists were eager to learn from Texaco how to do more business with Hitler.

... snip ..

They had gotten such a bad reputation for the depression and supporting Hitler and Nazis, at national conference held later that year, there is proposal for big propaganda campaign to equate corporations and Christianity

How Corporate America Invented Christian America; How one reverend's big business-backed crusade altered the political landscape.
http://www.amazon.com/One-Nation-Under-God-Corporate-ebook/dp/B00PWX7R56/
In December 1940, as America was emerging from the Great Depression, more than 5,000 industrialists from across the nation made their yearly pilgrimage to the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City, convening for the annual meeting of the National Association of Manufacturers.

... snip ...

"Under God" added to the pledge of allegiance Summer 1954 ... coincides with McCarthy (& Nixon) "red scare" witch hunts.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pledge_of_Allegiance

Industrialists and Wallstreet during the 20s&30s

How Bush's grandfather helped Hitler's rise to power
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/sep/25/usa.secondworldwar

John Foster Dulles played major role in rebuilding Germany's economy and military during 20s&30s. The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War, loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc873-79:
Sullivan & Cromwell floated the first American bonds issued by the giant German steelmaker and arms manufacturer Krupp A.G., extended I.G. Farben's global reach, and fought successfully to block Canada's effort to restrict the export of steel to German arms makers.

loc905-7:
Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism

... snip ...

For the 1943 US Strategic Bombing Program of Germany, they needed military and industrial target locations, they got locations and detailed plans from wallstreet.

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Thyssen (from Prescott Bush references) ... my wife's father was command of engineering combat group and out in front towards the end (frequently ranking officer in enemy territory, had collection of German officer daggers from surrenders ... all his WW2 stuff disappeared in a home breakin a few years ago). I found his WW2 status reports in National Archives (College Park, his China reports seem to be some other location):

On 28 Apr we were put in D/S of the 13th Armd and 80th Inf Divs and G/S Corps Opns. The night of the 28-29 April we cross the DANUBE River and the next day we set-up our OP in SCHLOSS PUCHHOF (vic PUCHOFF); an extensive structure remarkable for the depth of its carpets, the height of its rooms, the profusion of its game, the superiority of its plumbing and the fact that it had been owned by the original financial backer of the NAZIS, Fritz Thyssen. Herr Thyssen was not at home.

Forward from the DANUBE the enemy had been very active, and an intact bridge was never seen except by air reconnaissance. Maintenance of roads and bypasses went on and 29 April we began constructing 835' of M-2 Tdwy Br, plus a plank road approach over the ISAR River at PLATTLING. Construction was completed at 1900 on the 30th. For the month of April we had suffered no casualties of any kind and Die Gotterdamerung was falling, the last days of the once mighty WHERMACHT.


... snip ...

The purpose of patents in the constitution was to promote innovation and protect individuals from institutions attempting to preserve the status quo. Increasingly large institutions have perverted the patent system to preserve their status quo and protect monopolies.

Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty
http://www.amazon.com/Why-Nations-Fail-Prosperity-ebook/dp/B0058Z4NR8

pg33:
Between 1820 and 1845, only 19 percent of patentees in the United States had parents who were professionals or were from recognizable major landowning families. During the same period, 40 percent of those who took out patents had only primary schooling or less, just like Edison. Moreover, they often exploited their patent by starting a firm, again like Edison. Just as the United States in the nineteenth century was more democratic politically than almost any other nation in the world at the time, it was also more democratic than others when it came to innovation. This was critical to its path to becoming the most economically innovative nation in the world.

... snip ...

inequality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A National Infrastructure Program Is a Smart Idea We Won't Do Because We Are Dysfunctional

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: A National Infrastructure Program Is a Smart Idea We Won't Do Because We Are Dysfunctional
Date: 21 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
A National Infrastructure Program Is a Smart Idea We Won't Do Because We Are Dysfunctional
http://gawker.com/a-national-infrastructure-program-is-a-smart-idea-we-wo-1759903952

Most of the money is disappearing into US pockets (even money that first goes overseas but then comes back ... sort of a version of legal? money laundering). A civil engineering professor is talking to Volcker about (long term) disappearing civil engineering programs in US universities because of the lack of infrastructure work and lack of work means no jobs, and no jobs mean no students are signing up for civil engineering, From "Confidence Men":
"Well, I said, 'The trouble with the United States recently is we spent several decades not producing many civil engineers and producing a huge number of financial engineers. And the result is s*tty bridges and a s*tty financial system!'"

... snip ...

it approx. coincides with this graph starting around 79/80
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html

US companies that recently did some infrastructure projects with stimulus funds were having to hire Chinese civil engineering firms

inequality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

Recently I posted "How to Build a Culture of Originality"
https://hbr.org/2016/03/how-to-build-a-culture-of-originality

which includes a Boyd book in the recommended list. I use to sponsor Boyd's briefings at IBM and he would talk about a plane he would like to do. When he was head of lightweight fighter plane at the Pentagon, he was behind redesign of the F15 (cutting weight in half and vastly improving performance, F16, F18, and A10). The F16 became heavier and less performance than he wanted. He talked about a much less expensive, simpler, less maintenance per flying time ... something like 10times the flying hrs per dollar (combination of more fighters per dollar and more flying hrs/fighter). Later the F20/Tigershark that comes close to matching his requirement. They knew that USAF would never buy it, but figured that they sell it overseas. However, for every candidate country, the military-industrial complex got congress to approve "directed appropriation" USAID that could only be used to buy F16s. The countries would say that the F20 would be much better for their purposes, but the choice was either using their own money to buy F20s or get F16s "for free" (with USAID).

Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War; pg9/loc205-11:
The grass was wet and the air was clean and sweet. The crowd gathered at Section Sixty, grave site number 3,660. The Marine colonel took from his pocket a Marine Corps insignia, the eagle globe and anchor. He marched out of the crowd, kneeled, and placed the insignia near the urn containing Boyd's ashes. Someone took a picture. In that frozen moment the light of the flash sparkled on the eagle globe and anchor, causing it to stand out sharply against the bronze urn and green grass. The black insignia drew every eye. As one, and without a command to do so, the young lieutenants snapped to attention. Placing the symbol of the U.S. Marine Corps on a grave is the highest honor a Marine can bestow. It is rarely seen, even at the funeral of decorated combat Marines, and it may have been the first time in history an Air Force pilot received the honor.

... snip ...

The shrines in the lobby of Gray Research Center - Library of the Marine Corps, Boyd's is the only non-Marine
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1640474247359&set=a.1064746094515.10882.1101890183

URL and posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

"The Fall of the Roman Empire",
http://www.amazon.com/Fall-Roman-Empire-Barbarians-ebook/dp/B000SEI0JQ

It has region got so big it divided into administration centers/capitals ... rome was symbolic/ceremonial pg28:
As late as AD 249 there were still only 250 senior bureaucratic functionaries in the entire Empire. By the year 400, just 150 years later, there were 6,000. Most operated at the major imperial headquarters from which the key frontiers were supervised: not in Rome, therefore, but, depending on the emperor, at Trier and/or Milan for the Rhine, Sirmium or increasingly Constantinople for the Danube, and Antioch for the east. It was no longer the Senate of Rome, but the comitatensian commanders, concentrated on key frontiers, and the senior bureaucrats, gathered in the capitals from which these frontiers were administered, who settled the political fate of the Empire.

... snip ...

vandals/alans cross into western africa from spain at gilbralter and then over a period of years made their way towards Carthage (apparently undetected), pg273:
Carthage and its agricultural hinterland were responsible for feeding the bloated capital of Empire. But keeping the capital fed was no more than a specific application of a much more general point. By the fourth century AD, North Africa had become the economic powerhouse of the Roman west

... snip ...

At a point when most of the military had been pulled from Carthage for some campaign ... the vandal/andals take advantage to take Carthage and the west's food basket and economic engine. The west then had to sign a treaty to keep up the flow of food ... but lost the taxes. They had been using Carthage finances to pay tribute/bribes to tribes on the northern boundaries as well as pay for mercenaries stationed on the northern border, as well as eliminate taxes on the 1%. With the fall of Carthage, they lost all that revenue and had to try and renew taxes on the 1%. It wasn't enough to keep up the tribute/bribes and pay for mercenaries.

In the Iraq war, they air shipped $60B in shrink-wrapped pallets of $100 bills for tribute, bribes and mercenary pay ... but a lot of it also disappeared into US pockets, however tribute/bribes/mercenaries account for some reduction in hostilities during the "surge".

My son-in-law 1st tour was foot patrol 2004-2005 Fallujah and then 2nd tour was "mounted" 2007-2008 in Baqubah which is described as much worse than Fallujah. However, since the official line was that things were much better, it didn't get much coverage.

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Windows 10 forceful update?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Windows 10 forceful update?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 22 Feb 2016 12:40:38 -0800
hancock4 writes:
I think I mentioned that back in the 1980s Arthur Andersen & Co. (of Enron fame) was hired by my employer at the time to rewrite a major system. They introduced a 'productivity' framework, "Programmers Workbench". Supposedly it sped up coding and made junior programmers right out of school productive. But it introduced a lot of overhead and they had to get a more powerful mainframe to handle the load. Also, later on they discovered it wasn't Y2K compatible, and also had some problems with newer releases of IMS. In the end, it all had to be scrapped and a huge bunch of programs rewritten.

When AA collapsed after Enron, it was a shame that a lot of good people lost their jobs. But it was hard to feel sorry for AA&Co as they were extremely arrogant and difficult to deal with. Management was convinced they were gods and whatever they said was gospel, even if they were flat out wrong. Talented staff members with long experience were ignored when they pointed out potential problems, and they turned out to be right.


AA had two parts, auditing and consulting.

Long ago and far away, we were brought into consultants to small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server, they had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now frequently referred to as "electronic commerce". The bldg next door was a warehouse and the small client/server startup had put in cubicles full of AA (consulting) programmers.

Turn of the century, rhetoric in congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives (and auditors) did jailtime ... however it required SEC to do something. Joke at the time was Sarbanes-Oxley with its increased audit requirements was really a gift to the audit indusry ... nothing would actually change. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe that SEC was doing anything, it starts doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings, even showing the reporting fraud increased after Sarbanes-Oxley goes into effect (and nobody doing jailtime)

ENRON posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
Sarbanes-Oxley posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
Fraudulent Financial Filing post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

#2 on times list of those responsible for the financial mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

GLBA that includes repeal of glass-steagall, posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

However, when the chair of CFTC suggests regulating CDSes (heavily used by ENRON), the chair is quickly replaced by Gramm's wife, until Gramm can get legislation passed that prevents regulation of CDSes, then his wife resigns and joins the ENRON board and audit committee (characterized as gift to ENRON).

Later of course, the sellers of triple-A rated (that were paid for even when rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A) CDOs go from not caring about loan quality and borrower's qualifications to doing triple-A rated CDOs designed to fail, pay for triple-A, sell to their victims, and then take out CDS gambling bets that they would fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

Turns out that Sarbanes-Oxley also calls for SEC to do something about rating agencies, but SEC did about as much about rating agencies as they did about the public company fraudulent financial filings.

The largest holder of the CDS gambling bets was AIG and is negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar when the secretary of treasury steps in and says that they have to sign a document that they can't sue those making the gambling bets and forced to take TARP funds to pay off the CDS gambling bets at face value. The largest recipient of TARP funds is AIG and the largest recipient of face value payoffs is the firm formally headed by the secretary of treasury.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

MVS Posix

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: MVS Posix
Date: 22 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Mainframe hardware had been bringing in 4% of the revenue ... but whole mainframe division (with software and services) have been bringing in 25% of revenue and 40% of the profit.

I remember GPD/AdStar vp of software funding a lot of MVS POSIX work as well investing in non-IBM solutions for mainframe use (he would periodically invite us in to discuss companies he was interested in). Issue was he was in intense battle with the communication group (and was into all sort of work arounds to corporate politics)

Late 80s, a senior disk engineer gets a talk scheduled at annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference, supposedly on 3174 performance ... but opens the talk with statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had strangle hold on datacenters with corporate strategic ownership of everything crossing the datacenter walls, and were fiercely fighting off distributed computing and client/server (trying to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm and install base). The disk division was starting to see data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to reverse the process, but were constantly being vetoed by the communication group.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Trump Is Right, Bush Lied: A Little-Known Part of the Bogus Case for War

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Trump Is Right, Bush Lied: A Little-Known Part of the Bogus Case for War
Date: 22 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Trump Is Right, Bush Lied: A Little-Known Part of the Bogus Case for War
https://theintercept.com/2016/02/18/trump-is-right-bush-lied-a-little-known-part-of-the-bogus-case-for-war/

MIC wanted a war so badly that corporate reps were telling former eastern block countries that if they voted for IRAQ2 invasion in the UN, they would get membership in NATO and (directed appropriation) USAID (for purchase of modern US arms).
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

The Jeb Bush Adviser Who Should Scare You
http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/05/jeb-bush-adviser-paul-wolfowitz

When director of CIA won't agree to "Team B" Soviet analysis justifying huge increase in military spending, he is replaced by somebody that would
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_B

Rumsfeld white house chief of staff (74-75), after replacing CIA director he becomes SECDEF (75-77), and replaced by one of his staffers, Dick Cheney. He is again SECDEF 2001-2006
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Rumsfeld

When Rumsfeld was white house chief of staff 74-75, Cheney was on his staff. Cheney then becomes white house chief of staff when Rumsfeld becomes SECDEF. Cheney is then SECDEF from 89-93 and VP 2001-2009
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Cheney

another "Team B" member
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Wolfowitz

He is a leading neoconservative.[4] As Deputy Secretary of Defense, he was "a major architect of President Bush's Iraq policy and ... its most hawkish advocate."[5] In fact, "the Bush Doctrine was largely [his] handiwork."

Team B was also involved in supplying Saddam with weapons
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_War
including WMDs
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war

team b posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#team.b

NY Times series from 2014 (the decommission WMDs had been found a decade earlier, but the information was classified)
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html
Reached recently, Mr. Duelfer agreed that the weapons were still a menace, but said the report strove to make it clear that they were not "a secret cache of weapons of mass destruction."

"What I was trying to convey is that these were not militarily significant because they not used as W.M.D.," he said. "It wasn't that they weren't dangerous."


... and ...
The publicly released information also skirted the fact that most of the chemical artillery shells were traceable to the West, some tied to the United States.

These shells, which the American military calls M110s, had been developed decades ago in the United States. Roughly two feet long and weighing more than 90 pounds, each is an aerodynamic steel vessel with a burster tube in its center


... snip ...

part of the issue is by destroying the government ... any responsible control over these decommissioned weapons was lost (as well as more recent consequences)

one of the documents referenced by Oct2014 article (dated 1996) "Iraq's Disclosed of Chemical Weapons Findings to U.N."
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/iraqs-disclosure-of-chemical-weapons-findings-to-un.html

last decade, cousin of Bush White House chief of staff Card ... was dealing with the Iraqis at the UN and was given evidence that WMDs had been decommissioned. She wrote a book about then getting locked up in Texas military hospital when she tried to take it public.
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

CMS\APL

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: CMS\APL
Date: 22 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
As part of virtual machines, cp40/cms, cp67/cms, gml, script and lots of other stuff, science center also ported apl360 to cms for cmsapl.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

Before the 23june1969, SEs got training as part of large groups at customer sites ... which went away with unbundling.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

In response, DPD put in several cp67 datacenters for branch office SEs to run operating systems online in virtual machines (HONE).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

They also start deploying CMSAPL based sales and marketing support tools. One of the issues is that apl360 was typically limited to 16kbyte workspaces and no system service API's like file i/o. CMSAPL open workspace to virtual memory size and added system service API ... including file i/o ... opening up CMSAPL to a lot of real world applications. Eventually sales and marketing support came to dominate all HONE activity ... and virtual operating system use dwindles away. HONE migrates to vm370 ... but there are constant battles for decades with failed attempts to migrate HONE to MVS, periodically blaming me because I provide HONE with enhanced cp67 and vm370 systems that no MVS can match.

science center had also done a lot of performance technology, monitoring, simulation, analytical modeling, workload & configuration profiling ... some of which turns into capacity planning. One of the APL-based analytical models then is enhanced and becomes the Performance Predictor on HONE. Customer support people could enter customer's workload&configuration information and then ask "what-if" questions about what happens if workload and/or configuration is changed.

In the mid-70s the US HONE datacenters are consolidated in Silicon Valley (trivia, when facebook moves into silicon valley, it is into a new bldg, next door to the old HONE datacenter). By the late 70s, HONE VM370 is enhanced to be single-system image loosely-coupled cluster of large mainframe multiprocessors (largest in the world) with fall-over and load-balancing. Another incarnation of the APL-based analytical model is used to make the load balancing decisions for front-end login routing.

I had done dynamic adaptive resource management as undergraduate in the 60s, which was picked up and shipped in CP67 product.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

In the simplification morph from cp67 to vm370, a lot of things were dropped including my dynamic adaptive resource management. First part of 70s, there was Future System project which was different than 360/370 and going to completely replace 370 ... and internal politics was shutting done 370 activity. I continued to work on 360/370 stuff during the FS period, even periodically ridiculing FS activity.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#futuresys

In the 23June1969 unbundling, they start to charge for (application) software, but manage to make the case with the government that kernel software should still be free. The lack of 370 products during FS is credited with giving clone processor makers a market foothold. When FS implodes, there is mad rush to get stuff in 370 product pipelines including decision to release a bunch of stuff I had been doing all during FS period. Some of my stuff goes into vm370 release 3. The market foothold of clone processors results in decision to start charging for kernel software ... my dynamic adaptive resource manager then becomes separate kernel component as guinea pig for transition to charging for all kernel software.

I had also done automated benchmarking and as part of product release do 2000 benchmarks that take 3 months elapsed time. The first 1000 benchmarks are defined to cover all points on the domain of observed customer workload and configurations with a another modified version of the (apl-based) Performance Predictor ... predicting what the results will be and then comparing its predicted results with each benchmark actual result. For the last 1000 benchmarks the Performance Predictor dynamically selects workload&configuration based on all previous results ... looking for possible anomalous operating conditions.
http://www.garilc.com/~lynn/submain.html#benchmark

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How to Kill the F-35 Stealth Fighter; It all comes down to radar ... and a big enough missile

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: How to Kill the F-35 Stealth Fighter; It all comes down to radar ... and a big enough missile
Date: 23 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
How to Kill the F-35 Stealth Fighter; It all comes down to radar ... and a big enough missile
http://warisboring.com/articles/how-to-kill-the-f-35-stealth-fighter/

Claims are that the latest chips can do signal processing for real time tracking and targeting, even reducing the number of transmitter/receiver pairs in F22 AN/APG-77
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN/APG-77
by nearly a factor of 100 times w/o loss of capability ... also reducing power requirements and making it much easier to operate in missiles (above claims 20kW peak power for AN/APG-77). A year ago last spring, DOD puts the chips on export control list, last fall China demonstrates their own at Supercomputer conference (such chips are also used in large scale supercomputers, which China has the largest).

The other side is DOD has flagged a major threat is that increasingly the electronics it needs for advanced weapon systems are being built in china.

... implication is that both sides have advanced radar state-of-the-art to the point that F35 stealth is obsolete.

The analysis is that F35 was significant cost reduced bomb truck ... assuming that F22 flying cover to handle threats. The F35 stealth optimized forward but compromised in most other directions.
http://www.ausairpower.net/XIMG/JSF-RCS-Qualitative-A-XLVHF.png
subject is F35 stealth and it would take much less effort "to kill" than real stealth
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-2009-01.html

More Ambiguous F-35 Remarks by USAF's Gen. Hostage
http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articles-view/release/3/154510/usaf%E2%80%99s-gen-hostage-speaks-again-on-f_35.html
Gen. Hostage, head of the US Air Force's Air Combat Command, gained some fame earlier this year when he said that "If I do not keep that F-22 fleet viable, the F-35 fleet frankly will be irrelevant [as] the F-35 is not built as an air superiority platform. It needs the F-22."

... snip ...

Reference to F35 RCS is less than F22 ... can be from the front just because F35 is smaller airframe ... but has more problems from every other direction.

Gen. Hostage reference says he would need eight F35 with advanced networking to do the job of two F22. Also F35 advanced networking can be a vulnerability. That is possibly reason for the most recent scenario using a very large airframe loaded with huge number of missiles to compensate for F35 limitations.

digital signal processing is basically well-understood, straight-forward number of calculations ... doing it in real-time then is calculations/second ... and for particular environments, calculations/watt (along with time-power tradeoffs). Significant technology advances have spilled over into areas other than tracking/targeting ... like self-driving cars and autonomous drone swarms.

Well there is the extraordinarily long lead times and delays for the F35 and opponents have danced through our networks several times extracting detailed designs for advanced weapon systems (including F35). Numerous times and ways it has been stated that F35 isn't air superiority (for enemy area penetration role), requires F22 to fly cover, future will be purely long-range missiles and targeting technologies (also the theme of massive airframe with huge numbers of missiles to compensate for F35 deficiencies). In the enemy area penetration role, it isn't one-to-one dog fight ... its up against enemy defense infrastructure ... including advanced networked, multi-band/frequency tracking & targeting systems.

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

History of Computing 1944 and the evolution to the System/360

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: History of Computing 1944 and the evolution to the System/360
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 Feb 2016 22:24:26 -0800
charlesm@MCN.ORG (Charles Mills) writes:
My *recollection* is that the S/360 30 came with up to 48K, or 64K by RPQ. I could be off, but 1MB sounds incredibly high to me.

ga24-3231-7, 360-30 functional characteristics pg14 (from bitsavers)

c30 8kbytes d30 16kbytes dc30 24kbytes e30 32kbytes f30 64kbytes

....

univ had 709/1401 and was sold 360/67 replacement (for tss/360) ... pending delivery of 360/67, transition replaced 1401 with 64kbytes 360/30 ... gave univ. chance to get acquated with 360 ... but 360/30 could be also be run in 1401 hardware emulation mode.

tss/360 never quite came to production fruition ... so 360/67 ran most of the time as 360/65 with os/360.

IBM offered 2361 large capacity storage
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_2361_Large_Capacity_Storage

models came in 1mbyte and 2mbyte for models 50, 65, and 75.

i also remember ampex (and other vendors) offering LCS up to 8mbytes, also additional memory for 30s & 40s.

search engine turns up other vendors offering addon semiconductor/monolithic memory for 360s in the 70s with larger sizes at cheaper prices.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Introducing the New z13s: Tim's Hardware Highlights

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Introducing the New z13s: Tim's Hardware Highlights
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 Feb 2016 22:45:15 -0800
edgould1948@COMCAST.NET (Ed Gould) writes:
Remember the *OLD* days there was a 16MB max on (even) an MP? Never mind the cost of $10K per meg (if memory serves me on a 168). Yes the newer machines have more memory but in reality you really don't get all that more functionality, and yes there are bells and whistles for the z genation.

Significant MVS bloat by 3033 was causing a number of problems ... real storage requirements was banging hard at the 16mbyte limit. 16bit 370 PTE was 12bit (4kbyte) page number, 2defined bits and 2undefined/unused. They took 2undefined/unused bits then used them to prefix the (real) page number ... allowing 14bit page number or up to 64mbytes of real pages ... allowing lots of application virtual pages to reside above the 16mbyte line.

os/360 significant pointer passing API paradigm was making 16mbyte virtual address space limit a problem. Transition from SVS to MVS gave each application its own 16mbyte virtual address space ... but pointer passing API paradigm required 8mbyte image of the MVS kernel in each application virtual address space. Then because subsystems services were in their own virtual address space, pointer passing API required 1mbyte CSA (in each virtual address space) for passing parameters. CSA size requirements were proportional to subsystems and applications ... for large 3033s was 5-6mbytes and threatening to become 8mbytes (leaving none for applications). Subset of "access registers" was then retrofitted to 3033 as dual-address mode (allowing subsystems to access application virtual address space w/o needing CSA).

problem was that 4341 clusters had more processing power than 3033, more aggregate memory and I/O throughput, much lower cost and significantly less physical and environmental footprint. Folklore is that head of POK felt so threatened that corporate was convinced to cut allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component in half.

4341 had significant improvement price/performance as well as physical and environmental footprint resulted in corporations ordering hundreds at a time for placing out in departmental areas ... sort of the leading edge of distributed computing tsunami.

Before 4341s shipped, I got roped into benchmarking engineering 4341 for national labs for big compute farm ... sort of the leading edge of the coming supercomputer paradigm

internet+distributed computing+compute farms ... evolves into cloud with hundreds of thousands of systems and millions of processors in each cloud megadatacenter (system&software costs have dropped to such a level that power&cooling are starting to dominate cloud costs).

old email about air force data systems coming out to talk about 20 4341s, spring of 1979 (they had a few mainframes in their datacenter), but by the time they got around to caming out fall of 1979, it had jumped to 210 4341s.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404b

other 4341 related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Wall Street strikes back against Bernie Sanders

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Wall Street strikes back against Bernie Sanders
Date: 24 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
Wall Street strikes back against Bernie Sanders
http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/wall-street-strikes-back-against-bernie-sanders/ar-BBpT1SZ

Gramm #2 on times list of those responsible for the financial mess, including GLBA & repeal of Glass-Steagall
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

However, when the chair of CFTC suggests regulating CDSes (heavily used by ENRON), the chair is quickly replaced by Gramm's wife, until Gramm can get legislation passed that prevents regulation of CDSes (characterized as gift to ENRON), then his wife resigns and joins the ENRON board and audit committee. posts mentioning ENRON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

Later of course, the sellers being able to buy triple-A rating for mortgage backed CDOs (even when rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony, largely enabling over $27T done 2001-2008), go from not caring about loan quality and borrower's qualifications to doing triple-A rated CDOs designed to fail, pay for triple-A, sell to their victims, and then take out CDS gambling bets that they would fail (creating enormous demand for bad loans) posts (triple-A) toxic CDOs
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

Rhetoric in congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives (and auditors) would do jail time, but it requires SEC to do something. Possibly because GAO doesn't believe SEC is doing anything, it starts doing reports of fraudulent public company financial filings, even showing increase after SOX goes into effect (and nobody doing jail time).Turns out that Sarbanes-Oxley also calls for SEC to do something about rating agencies, but SEC did about as much about rating agencies as they did about the public company fraudulent financial filings. sarbanes-oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
financial report fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

The largest holder of the CDS gambling bets was AIG and is negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar when the secretary of treasury steps in and says that they have to sign a document that they can't sue those making the gambling bets and forced to take TARP funds to pay off the CDS gambling bets at face value. The largest recipient of TARP funds is AIG and the largest recipient of face value payoffs is the firm formally headed by the secretary of treasury.

Jan2009 I'm asked to HTML'ize the Pecora Hearings (senate hearings from the 30s into '29 crash that resulted in criminal convictions and Glass-Steagall, had been scanned fall of 2008) with lots of internal xrefs and URLs between what happened this time and what happened then (comments that the new congress might have appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call that it won't be needed after all (comments that capital hill is totally buried under enormous piles of wallstreet cash). posts mentioning glass-steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

They were told that they could afford the no-down, no-documentation liar loans. The largest fines so far have been for the robo-signing mills to produce documents for fraudulent foreclosures, those $50B plus fines were suppose to go to operations setup to help the victims of the fraudulent foreclosures. However, most of the operations setup somehow manage to vanish most of the money ... little making it to the victims.

Since the crash, the too big to fail have been fined something like a total of $300B .... however, it wasn't just for the CDOs (over $27T 2001-2008), CDSs (with CDOs designed to fail) and foreclosures. but also a lot of other criminal activity, money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists, LIBOR and commodity manipulation, facilitating criminal tax evasion, etc. Lack of prosecution gave rise to the too big to fail also being considered too big to prosecute and too big to jail. The lack of prosecution also referred to as "moral hazard" where the individuals and institutions see little downside to dealing in extensive criminal activity. too big to fail (too big to prosecute, too big to jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
money laundering posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering
LIBOR posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#libor
tax evasion posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

Besides "moral hazard", the joke is that because the $300B aggregate in fines is so small compared to the too big to fail criminal activity, it is just being viewed as the cost of doing criminal business.

Some of the same people originating loans were also speculating in real estate (one of the similarities between the economic mess and the 29 crash). A no-down, no-documentation, liar loan with 1% variable rate mortgage, would see 2000% ROI in some of the hot markets that were seeing 20% inflation (with the speculation further driving the hot inflation(. The slight difference between what they were doing in manipulating commodities ... was they could pump&dump on the way up ... but then turn around at short sell ... when they change to driving the price down (instead of up). Their move into commodities required driving volatility.

Griftopia has chapter on CFTC had rule that required significant commodity position to play because speculators resulted in wild, irrational price swings. Then there were 19 secret letters that went out allowing certain speculators to play ... results included the huge spike in oil (and gas) prices summer of 2008. Later Sanders releases the transaction details showing which speculators caused the huge spike in oil. Sanders then gets lambasted in the press for violating the privacy of the institutions doing the speculation responsible for the huge irrational price swings (which were the major too big to fail institutions involved in economic mess last decade). Griftopia posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#griftopia

The other issue is TARP was originally justified for buying the too big to fail toxic assets being carried "off-book", but only $700B was allocated ... while just the four largest too big to fail were carrying $5.2T in off-book, toxic assets the end of 2008. TARP is then used for other purposes (which may have been what was intended all along), and the federal reserve is bailing out the too big to fail with tens of trillions in ZIRP funds and buying the toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar (when the toxic assets had been doing for 22cents on the dollar fall of 2008; they could have used all the TARP funds for that @.22cents/dollar but then the institutions would have been declared insolvent and had to be liquidated). A little while later, Bernanke holds a press conference and says he original thought that the too big to fail would use the ZIRP funds to lend to mainstreet, but when they didn't, he had no way to force them (but that didn't stop the ZIRP funds). They were using ZIRP funds to buy US treasuries and making $300B/year (compared to all total fines since the economic mess of $300B). Now supposedly Bernanke was selected in part because he was a depresssion era scholar. However, the federal reserve tried the same thing in the depression with the same exact results, so he shouldn't expected them to do anything different this time. federal reserve posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
ZIRP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

Glass-Steagall prevented risky investment houses (and off-book toxic assets) from being merged with federally regulated depository institutions. Once that happens, the federal government not only has to keep the federally regulated depository institutions alive ... but also their toxic, criminal businesses.

One of the analysis is that Greenspan backed letting the fiscal responsibility act expire in 2002 (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue). 2010 CBO analysis was that by then, tax cuts had reduced revenue by $6T and increase in spending was $6T for $12T budget gap (compared to fiscal responsible budget). Since then there has been nothing to restore the tax cuts and only small dents in the spending increases .... so that interest on the federal debt is now pushing half trillion dollars/yr ... making it possible for a $300B/yr subsidy to the too big to fail (i.e. too big to fail use the tens of trillions in federal reserve ZIRP funds to buy treasuries). If the fiscal responsibility act had been left in place, there would be no federal debt to run the scam. fiscal responsibility act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2016 08:11:21 -0800
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
wrt "extra overheads". The belief that extra overheads are associated with the old system doesn't fly because it assumes the doctors and other people that claim to treat the ill are trustworthy - false billing is still false billing. The childish Medicare system doesn't even tell patients what bills are being paid in their name. Talk about an attractor for greedy people!

I was asked to look at medicaid "up billing" and "fraud" estimated to be 25-30%. Federal pays 50% for state run operation. CMS (feds) were offerring to increase to 60% the fed. percentage funding for states that would pass legislation that would significantly cut fraud. Lots of states wouldn't pass the legislation because they were heavily lobbied by medicaid industry. State legislators got money from the industry for not passing the legislation ... they didn't get anything for passing the legislation ... even though it would save billions for states and the feds. the cut in overall billing would be more than the 20% increase that FEDs would pay (from 50% to 60%, actually reducing the total that FEDs paid) ... and the benefit to the state would be enormous 20% cut (from 50% to 40%) of a much smaller billing. Big win for everybody except for the legislators and the medicaid industry that are skimming tens of billions (and which totally swamps cases of individuals scamming the medicaid system).

past posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#61 Health Care
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#14 Health Care
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#19 Another "migration" from the mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#7 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#34 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#35 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#98 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#17 Michigan industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#71 "Rat Your Boss" or "Rats to Riches," the New SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#34 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#37 WHAT, WHY AND HOW - FRAUD, IMPACT OF AUDIT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#12 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#31 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#37 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#6 We are on the brink of a historic decision [referring to defence cuts]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#69 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#81 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#86 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#66 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#64 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#38 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#44 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#45 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#107 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#108 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#6 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#77 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#49 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

When Did AMD Fall Behind?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: When Did AMD Fall Behind?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2016 14:14:16 -0800
"Rick C. Hodgin" <rick.c.hodgin@gmail.com> writes:
I had reason to install OS/2 Warp 4 this past week, and I was reminded what a smooth operating system it was compared to Windows NT. I wish IBM would've persisted in the OS business and continued developing OS/2.

there was joke in the 90s about IBM loosing $5 on every PS2 but it was planning on making it up in volumes.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2016 17:08:33 -0800
sidd@situ.com (sidd) writes:
Sometime during the crisis in 2007-2008, in a moment of inattention I watched Charlie Rose, as is his wont, earnestly fellating Jamie Dimon. Before i could turn him off, I heard Jamie utter his famous line, "There's a difference between buying a house, and buying a house on fire." To which I mentally replied, "Who set the fire, Jamie ?"

As I mentioned before, the president of AMEX was in competition to be the next CEO. The looser takes his protegee and leaves, going to Baltimore and taking over what has been described as loan sharking business. They take over some number of other firms, eventually acquiring CITI in violation of Glass-Steagall. Greenspan gives them an exemption while they lobby congress for repeal of Glass-Steagall (enabling too big to fail)... lobbying some number of people in washington to assist including secretary of treasury (former head of goldman-sachs) ... once they have it underway, the secretary of treasury resigns and becomes, what at the time is described as co-CEO of citi. The protegee leaves and becomes CEO of JPMorgan/Chase, another too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
paying for triple-A ratings on toxic CDOs that they knew eren't worth triple-A (largely enabling doing over $27T 2001-2008) .... included toxic CDOs designed to fail
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

AMEX is in competition with KKR for LBO/private-equity take-over of RJR and KKR wins.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco
the industry had gotten such a bad reputation during the S&L crisis that they change the name to "private equity" (and junk bonds become high-yield bonds)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

IBM has gone into the red and is in the process of being reorged into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breakup. The board then hires away the former president of AMEX to reverse the breakup and resurrect IBM. Uses some of same techniques at IBM that had been used at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

Later the former president of AMEX leaves IBM and becomes head of another large private-equity company which does LBO of company that will employ Snowden:
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

over half corporate defaults have been companies currently or previously owned by private equity
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

Recent director of CIA left in disgrace is hired by KKR.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The NSA's back door has given every US secret to our enemies

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The NSA's back door has given every US secret to our enemies
Date: 28 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
JOHN MCAFEE: The NSA's back door has given every US secret to our enemies
http://www.businessinsider.com/john-mcafee-nsa-back-door-gives-every-us-secret-to-enemies-2016-2
So, while the NSA was monitoring our perceived Middle Eastern enemies, the Chinese and Russians, and god knows who else, were making off with every important secret in the US, courtesy of the NSA's back door. The NSA failed to notice that 50% of Jupiter Network users were American, and the majority of those were within the US Government.

... snip ...

We were tangentially involved in this, but didn't know it at the time, beltway bandits have found that they make more money off series of failures
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

success of failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

70percent of intelligence budget and over half the people outsourced to mostly private-equity subsidiaries ... including Snowden's employer (OPM contractor's parent, and some number companies that had subcontracted clearances that were found to just filling out the paperwork and not actually doing background checks)
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
Director shelves working $3M ThinThread for multi-billion dollar Trailblazer that doesn't work
http://www.whistleblower.org/bio-william-binney-and-j-kirk-wiebe

whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

OPM Contractor's Parent Firm Has a Troubled History
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas/
How Private Contractors Have Created a Shadow NSA; A new cybersecurity elite moves between government and private practice, taking state secrets with them (also references oil rig company that was transformed into one of the largest defense contractors after former SECDEF and future VP becomes CEO, including no-bid contracts in Iraq)
http://www.thenation.com/article/how-private-contractors-have-created-shadow-nsa/

2002 we get a call ... there is unclassified BAA (by IC-ARDA since renamed IARPA) that nobody has responded to and we are asked to write a response before it closes that day. Basically the BAA says that none of the tools they have do the job. We get in a response and then have meetings demonstrating that we can do what is needed ... and then we don't hear anymore. It isn't until the Success Of Failure article that we figure we had got called in on the loosing side.

triva ... companies in the private-equity mill are under enormous pressure to cut corners and generate revenue for their parent every way possible ... not just with government contracts. This is account of over half the corporate defaults are by firms that are currently or previously in the private-equity mill
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

I use to sponsor John's briefings at IBM, Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War pg281/loc4905-6:
He stalked the office, staring at his underlings, then suddenly walking up to them, sticking a bony finger into their chest, and saying things such as, "If your boss demands loyalty, give him integrity. But if he demands integrity, then give him loyalty."

past posts and URLs from around the WEB
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic - lies about Medicare

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2016 21:04:33 -0800
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
The NSA, an agency of the U.S. government, actually created a Linux distribution, Security-Enhanced Linux, which (ironically!) offers as its main feature a security level attribute for data files which is of the same kind that Multics originally had as one of its unique key features.

about long-ago and far away ... i didn't learn about them until way later ... gone 404, but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

crypto museum use to have a video on MLS ... and I asked them if I could get a copy because I wanted to do a voice over parady/ridicule
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Cryptologic_Museum

As I've noted before, some of the CTSS people
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System

went to the 5th flr and did multics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics

.... others went to the science center on the 4th flr ... some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

and did virtual machines, the internal network, gml and a whole bunch of other stuff.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2016 22:06:33 -0800
"Sangmo" <ju410@gmail.com> writes:
The reason is that that is what the voters have decided the govt should be doing.

modulo being able to buy congress. 2002 congress lets fiscal responsibility act expire (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue). 2010 CBO has by then congress has cut tax revenue by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsibility act (which would have had zero federal debt). It is the only apparent time that congress has radicully cut taxes to not pay for wars instead of increasing taxes to pay for wars. CBO also reported that 1+ Trillion of the spending increase went to DOD for which they couldn't find anything to show for (unrelated to the increase in DOD spending for the wars).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act
military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

middle of last decade, US Comptroller General was starting to include in speeches that nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmetic for how badly they were savaging the budget.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

in addition to the tax evasion that was legalized last decade, in 2009, IRS announced there was still another $400B in unpaid taxes on money illegally hidden off-shore and were going after the 52,000 wealthy americans responsible. Then in 2011, the new congress announces it was cutting the budget of the IRS department responsible for recoverying the funds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

since then there has been no news about recoverying any of the $400B ... but there has been announcement about a couple billion in fines on the too big to fail that facilitated the tax evasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

20 years of data reveals that Congress doesn't care what you think
http://www.upworthy.com/20-years-of-data-reveals-that-congress-doesnt-care-what-you-think
Their study took data from nearly 2,000 public-opinion surveys and compared what the people wanted to what the government actually did. What they found was extremely unsettling: The opinions of the bottom 90% of income earners in America has essentially no impact at all.

...
How could it be that our government, designed to function as a representative democracy, is only good at representing such a small fraction of the population? Just follow the money.

Why? Because purchasing political influence is 100% legal


... snip ...

inequality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 29 Feb 2016 08:58:00 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
20 years of data reveals that Congress doesn't care what you think
http://www.upworthy.com/20-years-of-data-reveals-that-congress-doesnt-care-what-you-think

Their study took data from nearly 2,000 public-opinion surveys and compared what the people wanted to what the government actually did. What they found was extremely unsettling: The opinions of the bottom 90% of income earners in America has essentially no impact at all.

...

How could it be that our government, designed to function as a representative democracy, is only good at representing such a small fraction of the population? Just follow the money.

Why? Because purchasing political influence is 100% legal


inequality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

Early spring 2011, new speaker of the house on local DC radio interview commented that he was placing new "tea party" party darlings on the tax and revenue committee because those committee members get the most "contributions" from special interests.

Still the Best Congress Money Can Buy
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/28/opinion/28rich.html
The Best Congress Money Can Buy
http://www.commondreams.org/views/2015/03/15/best-congress-money-can-buy
The Best Congress Money Can Buy?
http://www.realclearmarkets.com/articles/2012/04/16/the_best_congress_money_can_buy__99617.html
The Best Congress the Banks' Money Can Buy
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bill-moyers/the-best-congress-the-ban_b_1412451.html
The Best Congress Money Can Buy
http://ericmargolis.com/2015/03/the-best-congress-money-can-buy/

I've referenced before televised round table at annual economist conference proposing "flat tax" as remedy to the enormous corruption in washington (major reason behind congress being considered the most corrupt institution on earth). The "flat tax" discussion was that besides eliminating the enormous corruption by special interests for tax exemptions, it would also save around 6% in GDP ... 3% because of non-optimal business decisions made to conform with tax code and 3% in overhead lost in dealing with the enormously (and growing) complex tax code.

"tax avoidance", "tax havens", "tax loopholes", "tax evasion"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

past posts about economist round table & justification for "flat tax"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#39 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#88 taking down the machine - z9 series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#14 Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#20 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#80 A Close Look at the Perry Tax Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#4 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#14 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#33 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#57 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#14 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#3 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#1 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#133 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#52 Report: Tax Evasion, Avoidance Costs United States $100 Billion A Year
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#48 These are the companies abandoning the U.S. to dodge taxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#80 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#96 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#10 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#13 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#13 1970--protesters seize computer center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#18 1970--protesters seize computer center

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Catching Up on the OPM Breach

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Catching Up on the OPM Breach
Date: 29 Feb 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#62 The NSA's back door has given every US secret to our enemies

Catching Up on the OPM Breach
http://krebsonsecurity.com/2015/06/catching-up-on-the-opm-breach/
The audit also found that multi-factor authentication (the use of a token such as a smart card, along with an access code) was not required to access OPM systems. "We believe that the volume and sensitivity of OPM systems that are operating without an active Authorization represents a material weakness in the internal control structure of the agency's IT security program," the report concluded.

... snip ...

Disclaimer, end of last century i design a security chip for multi-factor authentication token. I'm on panel discussion in standing-room only ballroom at
http://csrc.nist.gov/nissc/1998/index.html and make semi-facetious

and reference to taking a $500 milspec part, cost reduce it by 2-3 orders of magnitude while increasing its integrity and security.

I also get into some dustup with some in gov. over the chips selected for the CAC-card

Later at 2001 Intel IDF I'm asked by TD to DDI (information assurance directorate) to describe it in detail in panel discussion in the trusted computing track ... URL gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

some number of related patents (all assigned)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadssummary.htm
refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

Jim (worked with him at IBM SJR) and I are keynotes at NASA dependable computing meeting ...
http://web.archive.org/web/20011004023230/http://www.hdcc.cs.cmu.edu/may01/index.html

then Jim cons me into interviewing for chief security architect in Redmond. The interview drags on for a couple weeks, but we can't quite come to agreement.

poats mentioning assurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#assurance

private-equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Mar 2016 10:12:36 -0800
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
Any tax reform will have to eliminate these exceptions and ensure that they do not return.

Try reissuing the entire income tax law each year, possibly as part of the budget. Limit changes to taxes to special tax laws.


one problem for congress outright selling tax exemptions for special interest ... is that it was one time payment. congress had to come up with a couple strategies to keep money flowing every year 1) facade ("kabuki theater") of conflict between different factions trying to revoke/keep tax exemptions and 2) limit exemption lifetime that have to be renewed.

"tax avoidance", "tax havens", "tax loopholes", "tax evasion"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion
"kabuki theater"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

John Boyd's Art of War; Why our greatest military theorist only made colonel.
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/john-boyds-art-of-war/
Here too Boyd had a favorite line. He often said, "It is not true the Pentagon has no strategy. It has a strategy, and once you understand what that strategy is, everything the Pentagon does makes sense. The strategy is, don't interrupt the money flow, add to it."

... snip ...

Not only applies to Pentagon but also Congress, military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Boyd posts & URLs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

One of the scenarios that saw enormous upswing last decade is outsourcing to for-profit companies (especially owned by private-equity firms) ... it is illegal to contribute/lobby congress by agencies ... but private companies have less restrictions (it is illegal to use funds from gov. contracts to lobby congress ... but they have all sorts of ways to cook their books, it is one reason beltway bandits and other gov. contractors need to have at least one source of revenue that doesn't come from the gov).

70% of intelligence budget and over half the people now outsourced to for-profit companies
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
especially those owned by private-equity firms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

The subsidiary revenue may all come from the gov., but its private-equity owner can have other sources of revenue ... and the private-equity owner does the lobbying.

As referenced in the "spies like us" article, security checks had been outsourced to for-profit subsidiaries of private-equity firms and were just filling out the paper work and not actually doing the background checks.

OPM Contractor's Parent Firm Has a Troubled History
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas/
After huge OPM hack, Pentagon budgets $615m for new background check IT system; The Pentagon is looking to spend about $615m on a new IT system that will manage and protect government security-clearance data.
http://www.zdnet.com/article/after-huge-opm-hack-pentagon-budgets-615m-for-new-background-check-it-system/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Eric Hunsader Explains To CNBC That "Markets Are Always Rigged"

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Eric Hunsader Explains To CNBC That "Markets Are Always Rigged"
Date: 01 Mar 2016
Blog: Facebook
Eric Hunsader Explains To CNBC That "Markets Are Always Rigged" And What He May Spend His $750,000 Prize On
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-03-01/eric-hunsader-explains-cnbc-markets-are-always-rigged-and-what-he-may-spend-his-7500

Winning $750,000 Whistleblower Award http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-03-01/congratulations-prominent-anti-hft-critic-eric-hunsader-winning-750000-whisteblower

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

.. i.e. HFT Whistleblowing award ... but then before HFT really took off ...

Cramer reveals a bit too much
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

... "the strategy - while illegal - was safe enough" ...

whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

some past HFT posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#54 Pensions, was Re: Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#82 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#89 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#28 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#29 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#43 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#56 Royal Pardon for credit unions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#65 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#7 N.Y. Barclays Libor Traders Said to Face U.K. Charges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#93 New York seeks curbs on high-frequency trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#18 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#60 FBI Investigates High-Speed Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#72 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#3 Three Expensive Milliseconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#20 HFT, computer trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#25 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#41 System Response
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#70 Obama Administration Launches Plan To Make An "Internet ID" A Reality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#1 HFT is harmful, say US market participants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#54 Has the last fighter pilot been born?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#64 HFT is harmful, say US market participants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#107 The SEC's Mary Jo White Punts on High Frequency Trading and Abandons Securities Act of 1934
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#109 SEC Caught Dark Pool and High Speed Traders Doing Bad Stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#64 Dark Pool Greed Drove Barclays to Lie to Clients, N.Y. Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#106 only sometimes From looms to computers to looms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#132 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#58 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#26 What were the complaints of binary code programmers that not accept Assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#36 IBM CEO Rometty gets bonus despite company's woes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#17 Robots have been running the US stock market, and the government is finally taking control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#28 Bernie Sanders Proposes A Bill To Break Up The 'Too Big To Exist' Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#78 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 Do we REALLY NEED all this regulatory oversight?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#53 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#46 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#47 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#48 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#53 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#66 Michael Hudson's New Book: Wall Street Parasites Have Devoured Their Hosts -- Your Retirement Plan and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#23 It A "Liquidity Mirage": New York Fed Finally Grasps How Broken The Market Is Due To HFTs

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fibre Channel is still alive and kicking

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Fibre Channel is still alive and kicking
Date: 01 Mar 2016
Blog: LinkedIn
Fibre Channel is still alive and kicking
http://www.networkworld.com/article/3039364/lan-wan/fibre-channel-is-still-alive-and-kicking.html

In 1980, I was con'ed into doing support for channel extender for STL that was moving 300 people from the IMS group to offsite bldg with remote access back into the STL datacenter. The vendor then tried to get IBM to release my support, but there was group in POK working on some serial stuff that block it because they were afraid that it would make it more difficult getting their stuff released.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

In 1988 (almost 30yrs ago) I was asked to help standarize some serial stuff that LLNL was working with which quickly becomes fibre-channel standard (including stuff from 1980). In 1990, the POK serial stuff is finally released as ESCON when it is already obsolete. Then some POK engineers become involved and define a heavy-weight protocol for fibre-channel that drastically cuts the native throughput which is eventually released as FICON.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

9333 was done in Hursely with 80mbit serial copper. We used them in HA/CMP (last product we did at IBM)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

and wanted them to evolve into inter-operable with fibre-channel .... instead they evolved into non-inter-operable SSA. Old post about HA/CMP cluster scaleup meeting in Ellison's conference room in Jan1992 (also mentioning SSA)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

within a few weeks of the Ellison meeting, cluster scaleup is transferred, announced as IBM supercomputer (for scientific and technical only) and we are told we can't work with anything that has more than four processors. We had been working with national labs on scientific and technical ... but also with RDBMS vendors on commercial. Some old email for the period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

we then decide to leave.

Early in the RS/6000, one of the engineers took the ESCON technology, tweaked it with number of enhancements (full-duplex, 220mbits/sec, etc) and it ("SLA") was released about the same time ESCON shipped. Problem was that it was incompatible with ESCON and everything else in the world. We then convinced him to join the fibre-channel standards group (rather than doing 800mbits/sec version of "SLA").

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Mar 2016 15:13:16 -0800
Testimony in the Oct2008 congressional hearings into the pivotol role that the rating agencies played in the economic mess last decade ... was that they were selling triple-A ratings on toxic CDOs when they knew they weren't worth triple-A.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

TV news commentator during the hearings said that it would be unlikely that the rating agencies would ever be federally prosecuted because they were able to blackmail the federal government with downgrading the government credit rating.

Other testimony was that it is enormously more difficult to regulate something when it is incented to do the wrong thing. Prevously rating agencies were paid by the buyer ... so it was in the interest of the rating agencies to do as good as a job as possible for the benefit of the buyer. Then the rating agencies changed to the seller paying for the ratings ... and they become susceptable to the seller willing to pay more to get a higher rating.

The triple-A ratings largely enabled being able to do over $27T 2001-2008 .... and also enalbed opened up being able to sell to operations restricted to only dealing in "safe" investments like large pension funds (claims that it accounts for 30% loss in many funds and trillions shortfall in being able to pay pension benefits).
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

There is the joke if you use a gun to steal several hundred ... its a felony and you can be put away for a long time. But if its wallstreet stealing trillions of dollars and ruining tens of millions of lives ... you can buy congress and walk away free.

There is problem now with for-profit prisons resulting in the US having the highest incarceration rate in the world.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_incarceration_rate

The issue is the for-profit prison industry has heavily lobbied for large numbers of non-violent offenders getting long prison sentences ... they get paid per head and non-violent offenders having the lowest prison overhead/expense costs. When that isn't enough they bribe judges to send them lots of non-violent juvenile offenders (even lower overhead/expense cost/head).

There is also gimmicks being used for effectively doing debtors prison which are theoritically not legal in the US ... but non-violent, not being able to pay is also attractive to the for-profit prison industry
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debtors%27_prison#United_States_of_America

past posts mentioning (for-profit) prison lobby:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#51 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#43 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#82 copyright protection/Doug Englebart
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#10 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#85 prices, was Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#27 OT: efforts to repeal strict public safety laws
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#4 Decimal point character and billions

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Mar 2016 15:45:44 -0800
Ibmekon <Ibmekon> writes:
Just so. The popular current context is the Derivatives market, unregulated but estimated at $1.2 quadrillion. Advocates say the size is immaterial, it is a "zero sum game". Of course if an Irish bank, eg AIB lost a few tens of billions to a German bank, eg Deutsche, the effect on the Irish taxpayer is not zero.

In the "The Big Short", the guy who was first to realise the impending CFD CDO housing meltdown around 2007 was asked how he could predict this. He said there are signs before a market collapse - one indicator is when the financial products get ever more complex. It is a sign that Wallstreet is hiding the sh1t in an opaque wrapper.

Carl Goldsworthy -- Derivatives is a "zero sum game" - "The Big Lie".


securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages. Early 1999, I'm asked to look at improving the integrity of mortgage supporting documents as countermeasure. A FED LEO explains that many of the investment bankers walked away "clean" from the S&L crisis and they were currently manipulating the INTERNET IPO market mill and they were predicted to get into mortgages next.

The problem then is that they find they can pay the rating agencies for triple-A rating (when both the sellers and the rating agencies know they weren't worth triple-A from Oct2008 congressional testimony) on toxic CDOs; triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation, liar loans.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

during the first part of the century up through the crash ... there are periodic industry articles about how complex the math is to correctly value these products ... which is largely obfuscation since valuation is dependent on valid supporting documents ... which they didn't have. During this period there were periodic comments about the enormous amounts of money to be made playing the game ... but it was a little like musical chairs ... you had to know when to get out just before the music stops (they knew it would meltdown, it wasn't if, it was when).

from the law of unintended consequences ... the biggest fines on the too big to fail (for all this) have been for the robo-signing mills that were fabricating the documents for the no-documentation liar loans ... in order to file foreclosers. Note they were able to scam that also. They setup the firms that were supposed to administer the fines for the benefit of the foreclosure victims ... and little of the money actually make it to the victims.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

When the chair of CFTC suggests regulating derivatives, the forces are marsheled and the chair is replaced with the wife of #2 on times list of those responsible for the financial mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

while the senator gets law passed prevented regulating derivatives (billed as gift to ENRON who is heavily playing in derivatives), the wife then resigns and joins the ENRON board and audit committee.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

Originally triple-A rating on toxic CDOs eliminated any reason to care about borrower's qualification or loan quality. Then they realize that they can design toxic CDOs to fail, pay for triple-A, sell to their customer victims, and take out CDS/derivative gambling bets that they would fail (they now have reason to care about loan quality, they want large numbers that are as bad as possible)

The largest holder of the CDS gambling bets was AIG and is negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar when the secretary of treasury steps in and says that they have to sign a document that they can't sue those making the gambling bets and forced to take TARP funds to pay off the CDS gambling bets at face value. The largest recipient of TARP funds is AIG and the largest recipient of face value payoffs is the firm formally headed by the secretary of treasury.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Mar 2016 16:27:36 -0800
Late 80s, calculations on CITIs ARM mortgage portfolio shows that minor rate changes can result in bringing the bank down. At the time, CITI was the largest player in the market, it then gets out of the mortgage market, sells off its portfolio and requires private bailout (Saudi prince) to stay in business. old long-winded post touching on it and other subjects from Jan1999
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm

Black-Scholes is major model for calculating risk for these triple-A rated toxic CDO ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black%E2%80%93Scholes

the person responsible for the CITI portfolio calculations publishes a number of industry articles in 2006 time-frame showing the Black-Scholes calculations aren't accounting for the various kinds of CDO risk (not even taking into account that the triple-A ratings aren't accurate/correct and the lack of documentation on which to base risk calculations).

Despite CITIs experience from late 80s ARM mortgage portfolio, last decade, CITI is one of the four largest too big to fail players
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

some more of citi
http://wallstreetonparade.com/2012/08/the-untold-story-of-the-bailout-of-citigroup/

Earlier, president of AMEX "wins" competition to be the next CEO. The looser takes their protegee and leave, going to Baltimore taking over what is described as loan sharking business. They make some number of other acquisitions and eventually take-over CITI in violation of glass-steagall. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

Greenspan gives them an exemption while they lobby congress for repeal. some Greenspan (and other FED chairman) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#greenspan

They get lots of help from the then secretary of treasury (and former head of goldman sachs) with repeal of glass-steagall ... who resigns afterwards and joins CITI, at the time described as co-CEO. The protegee then leaves and becomes CEO of another of the four largest too big to fail.

AMEX is in competition with KKR for LBO, private-equity take-over of RJR and KKR wins
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco
the industry gets such a bad reputation during the S&L crisis that they change the industry name to "private equity" (and junk bonds become "high yield" bonds), some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

KKR then runs into trouble and hires away the president of AMEX to turn it around. IBM has gone into the red and is being reorganized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation to breaking up the company. The board then hires away the former president of IBM to reverse the breakup and resurrect the company ... using some of the same techniques used at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 03 Mar 2016 01:02:58 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Greenspan gives them an exemption while they lobby congress for repeal. some Greenspan (and other FED chairman) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#greenspan


note when chair of CFTC suggested regulating derivatives/CDSs, Greenspan participated in getting the chair replace (with wife of senator that is #2 on time's list of those responsible for economic mess, after senator gets legislation passed preventing CDS regulation ... characterized as gift to ENRON, his wife resigns and joins ENRON board & audit committee).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

Reports are Greenspan supported congress letting fiscal responsibility act (spending can't exceed tax revenue) expire in 2002 because he was concerned about effect it would have had eliminating all federal debt. 2010 CBO report has tax revenue cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap (compared to fiscal responsibility act). Since then the tax revenue hasn't been restored and only modest efforts on reducing the spending ... so federal debt has further balooned and interest on federal debt is approaching half trillion.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

Note that just the four largest too big to fail were still holding $5.2T in off-book toxic assets the end of 2008 ... so there was no possibility that the $700B appropriated for buying toxic assets in TARP would make more than small dent in the problem. Instead TARP is used for other purposes ... and the Federal Reserve is buying toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar and providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Bernanke holds a press conference not long after the Federal Reserve looses the long drawn out legal proceedings to force it to divulge what it was doing for bailout (including ZIRP funds) ... and says that he assumed that the too big to fail would use the ZIRP funds to lend to mainstreet, but when they didn't, he had no way to force them ... instead they were buying treasuries (federal debt) and taking in avg. of $300B/annum (compared to aggregate of $300B in fines for all illegal activity since economic mess). Supposedly one of the choices of Bernanke (to replace Greenspan) was he was a depression era scholar, but the FED had tried something similar then with the same results, so Bernanke should have had no expectations that they would do something different this time. In any case, w/o the explosion in the federal debt, the too big to fail wouldn't have safe place to park ZIRP funds for the $300B/annum.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

latest in the deferred prosecution sagas (gov. & HSBC fighting to prevent disclosure of all the charges & settlement) ... part of the reason that too big to fail are now also referred to as too big to prosecute and too big to jail ... and the fines (small compared to the amounts involves) are viewed as the cost of doing criminal business

How The U.S. Government And HSBC Teamed Up To Hide The Truth From A Pennsylvania Couple
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-03-02/how-us-government-and-hsbc-teamed-hide-truth-pennsylvania-couple

including money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering

older case
http://www.businessinsider.com/how-wachovia-laundered-billions-in-mexican-drug-money-2011-4
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2011/04/wachovia-paid-trivial-fine-for-nearly-400-billion-of-drug-related-money-laundering.html

past posts mentioning deferred prosecution:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#10 Instead of focusing on big fines, law enforcement should seek long prison terms for the responsible executives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#80 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#23 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#44 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 Do we REALLY NEED all this regulatory oversight?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#37 LIBOR: History's Largest Financial Crime that the WSJ and NYT Would Like You to Forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#57 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#61 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#31 Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#44 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#47 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#65 Economic Mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#10 25 Years: How the Web began
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#0 Thanks Obama

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Fibre Channel is still alive and kicking

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Fibre Channel is still alive and kicking
Date: 03 Mar 2016
Blog: LinkedIn
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#69 Fibre Channel is still alive and kicking

Stuff I did in 1980 was totally unrelated to what became ESCON (and in fact the POK serial people did their best to block what I was doing).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

The stuff at LLNL (national lab) was done in the mid-80s w/o any knowledge of the serial stuff going on in POK (which became ESCON, or the enhanced SLA version for RS/6000).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

Most recent peak i/o benchmark published by IBM was for z196 that got 2M IOPS using 104 FICON (running over 104 fibre-channel). About the same time as the z196 peak I/O benchmark, a fibre-channel was announced for e5-2600 blade claiming over million IOPS ... two such fibre-channel have higher throughput than 104 FICON (running over 104 fibre-channel).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

In the early/mid 80s, LANL (a different national lab) does standardized version of 100mbyte/sec cray channel as HIPPI. Somewhat in parallel with fibre-channel, the HIPPI group is working on standardization of fiber serial version of HIPPI channel (all at time when the already obsolete ESCON is announced).

Besides serial-HIPPI and fibre-channel, about same time (Stanford) SLAC is standardizing (serial fiber) SCI (scalable coherent interface) ... defined for SCI is multiprocessor memory bus (used by DG, HP/CONVEX, Sequent, SGI) ... but SCI also has a scsi disk i/o protocol defined. All of these are running gbit full-duplex (concurrent transfers in both direction, aggregate 2gbit) at time ESCON is announced. ESCON is 200mbit half-duplex (full-duplex would be 400mbit but half-duplex isn't even 200mbit because overhead of handshake protocol latency, the RS/6000 SLA version was full-duplex 220mbit, capable of 440mbit).

The SCI scsi I/O work influences both future i/o and next generation i/o which evolves into infiniband
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InfiniBand#History

I had been involved with LLNL, LANL, and SLAC.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Another Private-Equity LBO Queen Bites the Dust

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Another Private-Equity LBO Queen Bites the Dust
Date: 03 Mar 2016
Blog: Facebook
Another Private-Equity LBO Queen Bites the Dust
http://wolfstreet.com/2016/03/03/sports-authority-private-equity-lbo-bankruptcy/
over half corporate defaults have been companies owned or previously owned by private equity
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

Lehman was raiding state employee pension funds. Lehman paid Jeb Bush $1.4M consulting contract for help with Florida state employee pension funds and Kasich was Lehman guy in Ohio after the Ohio state employee pension funds
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2010/04/21/lehman-holdings-cost-ohio-pensions-480m.html
http://www.examiner.com/article/huge-lehman-brother-payouts-report-recalls-ohio-gov-kasich-s-time-at-the-firm
Former Congressman John Kasich clearly was not a banker, but he found a home at Lehman nonetheless. As a one-time Ohio State Senator and then as a Congressman for 18 years, Kasich had easy access to many doors. Among them were doors to Ohio pension funds.

According to published reports at the time, Kasich opened doors for Lehman Brother's private equity department and investment officials at the Ohio Police & Fire Pension and the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System in 2002. Kasich made the case that Lehman would be a good broker for real estate and other investments.


... snip ...

The industry got such a bad reputation during the S&L crisis that they changed the industry name to "private equity" (and junk bonds become "high yield" bonds).

more private equity ...

Mitt Romney Is The Real Super-Fraud: Here's The Proof, Chapter And Verse
http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/mitt-romney-is-the-real-super-fraud-heres-the-proof-chapter-and-verse/
During his 16-years at Bain Capital, fully one-fourth or $600 million of the firms cumulative $2.5 billion of profits were scalped from companies which went bankrupt soon after Mitt and his partners got out of town with the loot.

... snip ...

AMEX is in competition with KKR for LBO (private-equity) take-over of RJR and KKR wins. KKR then runs into trouble with RJR and hires away the AMEX president to turn around RJR.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

IBM has gone into the red and is in the process of being reorged into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breakup. The board then hires away the former president of AMEX to reverse the breakup and resurrect IBM. Uses some of same techniques at IBM that had been used at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

He then leaves IBM to head up the private-equity company that does LBO take-over of the company that will employ Snowden
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic - lies about Medicare

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Mar 2016 20:36:05 -0800
hancock4 writes:
When independent companies began to develop their own peripherals for S/360, didn't they also have to develop device drivers for their devices? Or, were their devices exact clones of IBM devices, so they looked the same to the machine and program?

Also, when independents, for example Syncsort, develop mainframe utilities, don't they do fancy stuff at a low level in order to optimize performance?


CP67 was installed at the univ. in jan 1968 ... it had 1052 and 2741 terminal support and did automatic terminal identification ... using the terminal controller SAD (CCW) command to switch the line-scanner for a port ... as part of automatic terminal identification for each port.

The univ. had a number of TTY/ascii terminals ... so one of my tasks was to add TTY support to CP67 ... including extending the automatic terminal identification (using SAD command to select between the three different types of linescanners for each port).

I then wanted to have single dialup phone number with "hunt group" allowing any kind of terminal come into any line. It turns out that IBM had taken a shortcut ... while it was possible to switch the linescanner for every port/line ... but the line speed for a a port/line was hardwired. So some ports/lines would be hard wired for 110baud and other lines for 134baud ... and could switch 2741 linescanner for 110baud line ... but couldn't change the line speed. As a result had to have one dialup number with pool of lines for 134baud hunt group and a different dialup number with pool of lines for 110baud hunt group.

Somewhat as a result, the univ. started a clone controller project built a channel interface board for a Interdata/3 programmed to emulate the IBM terminal controller ... but the Interdata/3 could dynamically determine terminal speed for each line and adjust accordingly. Later it evolved into an Interdata/4 for the channel interface and a cluster of Interdata/3s for the port/line interfaces. Four of us get written up as responsible for (some part of) clone controller business. Later Perkin-Elmer buys interdata and sells the boxes under the PE logo. In the late 90s, I ran into one of these boxes in a large datacenter handling majority of the dial-up point-of-sale terminals for the eastern part of the country.

some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic - lies about Medicare

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2016 09:59:07 -0800
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Any decent company would have written you up as the discoverer of a short coming in the existing product line that needed to be corrected ASAP.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#76 Qbasic - lies about Medicare

I was still undergraduate at the univ (before I joined Boeing and then IBM). Close as I can tell they hardwired the line speed to each port on purpose ... because there was no easy way to dynamically change line speed. The interdata was programmed to strobe the signal rise/fall to determine terminal speed.

standard IBM operating system support (other than cp67) didn't even bother with dynamic termeinal type identification ... "sysgen" required terminal type explicitly defined for each line/port.

getting written up as responsible for (some part of) the clone controller business.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

note that the description of ibm's (failed) future system project here
http://www.ecole.org/en/seances/CM07
says that the major motivation for FS, was the rise of clone controllers.

internal politics during the FS era was shutting down 370 efforts, which is credited with given clone processors market foothold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

Then as FS was failing, Ferguson/Morris 1993 "Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World"
http://www.amazon.com/Computer-Wars-The-Post-IBM-World/dp/1587981394

has account of the effects of the failure of the future system effort in the 70s resulted in shift in the culture with top executives trying to save face (make no waves and sycophancy under Opel and Akers, in place of open debate of the Watsons), thereafter IBM lived in the shadow of that defeat.

After the failure of FS, there was mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines, including some of the 360/370 stuff that I had been doing all during the FS period (including periodically ridiculing FS activities, which wasn't exactly career enhancing) some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

The 23Jun1969 unbundling announcement started charging for software (and other things). However they made the case with the government that kernel software should be free.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

The rise of clone processors then first results in starting to charge for kernel software and then later object-code-only (eliminating community access to source, a long time major source of innovation and growth) trying to protect the status quo (a combination of trying to protect both executive and corporate status quo).

Some of my stuff went into standard product release, put the dynamic adaptive resource manager was selected to be separately packaged as kernel add-on and guinea pig to start charging for kernel softare.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

For a period kernel software was the "free base" with increasing amount of charged-for kernel add-ons ... until they finished the transition and all kernel software was charged-for.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Microcode

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Microcode
Date: 06 Mar 2016
Blog: Facebook
The architecture "red book" was one of the first IBM documents moved to CMS script. The full document could be printed or with a command line parameter just the "Principles of Operation" subset. The full "red book" had lots of engineering notes and implementation trade-offs ... overall and sections for each instruction. Implementation trade-offs included stuff about how implementation might be different on different current models and possibly in the future ... as well as alternatives and justifications.

Low & mid-range machines were vertical microcoded ... sort like the Hercules 370 emulator implemented in native I86 instructions. High-end machines were horizontal microcode, much faster ... butt also significantly more difficult to program. FS was going to completely replace 370 and during the FS period, 370 efforts were being shutdown ... which is credited with giving clone processors a market foothold. After FS implodes there is made rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipeline. POK kicks off 3033 (remap of 168-3 logic to 20% faster chips) and 3081 in parallel. Some more discussion here (including describing how non-competitive they were)
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

Somewhat in response to clone competition, they start making little incompatible tweaks to 3033 hardware with new releases only being able to run with those tweaks. Clone competition getting tired of constantly having to deal with the tweaking ... develop a new implementation strategy called "macro-code" ... looks a lot like 370 assembler but is possible to implement constant flow of new IBM processor tweaks with significantly less effort than what is required doing in horizontal microcode.

They then use the capability to implement the hypervisor function (precursor to modern LPAR) .... and it takes a long time before 3090 is able to respond with PR/SM because it has to be done in native horizontal microcode.

Part of Endicott response to the death of FS is first 138/148 ... as added feature they migrate part of kernel supervisor pathlengths into (vertical) microcode. These machines are avg. ten native instructions (microcode) per 370 instruction. I get con'ed into doing studies of what system software pathlengths are redone in native (microcode) .... getting 10:1 speedup. I'm told that I have 6kbytes of microcode instruction space available ... but finally am able to identify the parts of kernel operating system pathlengths that account for nearly 80% of kernel execution time that will fit in 6kbytes of microcode (and get a 10:1 speedup). This approach doesn't work for the 3033, since it is already avg. one 370 instruction per machine cycle (in horizontal microcode).

I was involved in 370 16-way multiprocessor effort and we con some of the 3033 processor engineers into working on it in their spare time. Everybody thot it was great until somebody tells the head of POK that it might be decades before the POK favorite son operating system had effective 16-way support and then some of us are told to never visit POK again (they still let me sneak in and go bike riding with the processor engineers). After the 3033 is out the doors ... the 3033 engineers move over to 3090 (trout1.5) in parallel with the continuing 3081 effort.

SIE on 3081 was never intended to be used for customers ... purely for internal operating system development. As a result, the implementation was pretty horrible. The 3081 only had a limited amount of extra microcode space .... and so the SIE microcode had to be paged/swapped.

By the time 3090 rolls around, it was established that SIE was part of standard customer production .... and would be eventually enhanced with PR/SM layered on top (basis for modern LPARs). old email discussing some of the diff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#email810630
(including to trout/3090 not paging its microcode). and discussion of trout1.5/3090 cache
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#email831118

Note that part of the (3033 & 3081) Q&D efforts there was the 303x channel director. It was the 158 integrated channel microcode w/o the 370 microcode. A 3031 is then a 158 engine with the 370 microcode and no integrated channel microcode and a 2nd 158 engine with the integrated channel microcode (and no 370 microcode). A 3032 is 168-3 configured to use channel director for external channels. A 3033 is 168-3 logic remapped to 20% faster chips (with a little extra optimization) and 1-3 channel directors for external channels.

I'm then at IBM San Jose Research ... and they let me play disk engineer across the street in bldgs 14 (disk engineering) and 15 (disk product test). Bldg 15 usually gets the 3rd or 4th engineering processor machine to start disk i/o testing (they get the 3rd 3033 engineering machine). I'm doing some disk I/O latency tests and as might be expected the channel director (being 158 integrated channel microcode) is much slower than the original 168 external channels

trivia: high-end 360/370s and 3830 disk controller had horizontal microcode tended to try and have multiple concurrent things going on. as such 370 efficiency tended to be measured in machine cycles per instruction. this is compared to low & mid-range machines that had vertical microcode ... which looks very much like standard assembler/machine instructions (like the hercules 370 emulator implemented on I86 processors). 165 avg. 2.1 machine cycles per 370 instruction. 168-1 got faster memory and optimization, 168-3 doubled the processor cache size and more optimization and was down to 1.6 machine cycles per 370 instruction. 3033 started out as 168-3 logic mapped to 20% faster chips ... but also got additional optimization that got it down to close to one machine cycle per 370 instruction (reaching approx 1.5 times throughput of 168-3)

The 138/148 and 4331/4341 did ECPS ... moving highly used operating system pathlengths into microcode on approx 1:1 basis getting 10:1 speedup. However that approach didn't work for 3033 since the microcode implementations were so different. However, for 3033 they did a series of "microcode" tweaks anyway that were required by latest versions of software as countermeasure to clone processors (even in cases where the microcode tweak might be slower than the original 370 code). Reference to selecting code paths selected for ECPS, 6kbytes accounted for 79.55% of kernel processing time.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist

In late 70s, there was the internal Iliad/801 project ... converge the large number of different internal CISC microprocessors (s/38 followon, as/400, low-end & mid-range 370s, controllers, etc) to common Iliad/801 chips where all the "microcode" was native 801 risc instructions. For various reasons the Iliad/801 efforts floundered and company returned to doing traditional CISC (microcode) microprocessor chips (and saw various 801/risc chip engineers going to other vendors to do RISC projects).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

disclaimer: the 4341 followon was the 4381 and originally was going to be one of these Iliad/801/RISC implementations. However I helped with the analysis that showed VLSI state-of-the art had advanced to the point where nearly all of 370 could be directly implemented in VLSI chip needing very little microcode.

Somewhere inbetween IBM processors and clone makers there was SLAC&CERN (sister high-energy physics labs) did 168E circa 1979 followed by 3081E. These were processors that implemented 370 problem state instructions sufficient to run Fortran H. Large numbers of these were placed at sensors along the accelerator line for initial data reduction.

Early in REX(X) (before shipping to customers), I wanted to demonstrate that it wasn't just a another pretty scripting language. IBM had large application, IPCS that was used for debugging software, and examining system dumps diagnosing problems/failures .... which was implemented in large amount of assembly/machine language. My REX(X) demonstration was to implement an IPCS implementation in REXX taking half-time over three months that had ten times the function and ran ten times faster (some trick since REXX is interpreted and normal IPCS was bare metal). Turns out that I finished early, so I started doing automated library that would look/diagnose for majority of common failure modes.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

I had expected that it would be released to customers ... but some reason that it wasn't ... even tho it came to be used by majority internal datacenters and customer support PSRs. I eventually got approval to describe "DUMPRX" at various user group conferences ... and afterwards, customer implementations started appearing within a few months.

One of the features was pseudo decompile ... could have assembler dsect macro and would format area of storage according to the dsect macro ... also resolve addresses symbolicly

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Asynchronous Interrupts

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Asynchronous Interrupts
Date: 06 Mar 2016
Blog: Facebook
Check sorter had timing dependent interrupt processing ... couldn't work with MVS because pathlength was too long. .... even in standard channel end appendage

After I transferred SJR, they let me wander around San Jose area including the disk engineering lab and STL development lab.

In the disk engineering lab they were running stand-alone testing with development disks, pre-scheduled 7x24 with a variety of mainframes. They had once tried MVS to get some concurrent testing but found MVS had 15min MTBF requiring manual re-ipl in that environment. I offered to rewrite the I/O supervisor so it was bullet proof and never fail enabling them to do on-demand, concurrent testing ... greatly improving productivity.

Later I wrote a (internal only) report of what needed to be done and the increase in productivity ... unfortunately I happened to include a reference to the MVS 15min MTBF ... which brought the wrath of the MVS group down on my head. They weren't able to get me fired, but they promised to do everything else they could ... including petty stuff like not signing off on any sort of corporate award for the disk engineering work. getting to play disk engineer in bldgs 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

The other result is that disk engineers would have a tendency to blame my software if things weren't working correctly ... which resulted in my having to shoot a lot of their hardware development bugs.

One problem that turned up was that in the change from the 3830 disk controller (with "fast" horizontal microcode) to 3880 disk controller, they decided to move to a much slower "JIB-prime" vertical microcode processor. IBM had requirement that new boxes shouldn't be more than 10-15% slower than old boxes. Turns out that at end of channel program, 3880 was taking much longer to finish up before presenting interrupt. To try and fake it, the decided to present ending interrupt early, before 3880 had actually finished ... then if 3880 discovered a problem, it now had to present a "UNIT CHECK" error ... but it had already signaled end-of-operation .... so they tried presenting an "unsolicited unit check interrupt" ... which violates channel architecture. They claimed they didn't do anything wrong ... I had to diagnose what they were doing and then explain it was a violation of channel architecture .... after that they insisted that I had to sit in on conference calls with POK channel engineers (even tho I wasn't even in their division).

The other problem was they figured that early "finish" interrupt, that the 3880 controller could actually get finished before the software could redrive it with queued requests. When I did the I/O supervisor rewrite to be bullet proof and never fail, I also drastically cut the pathlength. The product test lab was also running the system and used it to put up an inhouse online service on their engineering 3033, that could run concurrently with device testing. They had 3830 with 16 3330 drives. One weekend they replaced the 3830 with 3880 and monday morning called to complain that I had done something over the weekend to the software because online throughput had gone into the dumpster. I eventually found out that they replaced the 3830 controller (after claiming they had made no changes). It turns out that my superfast pathlength would also try and restart any queued I/O after an interrupt .... faster than the 3880 could finish its cleanup work. As a result, under load, nearly every I/O operation was requiring two SIOs and two interrupts.

controller would signal ce+de after end of disk data transfer .... but before the 3880 controller finished all its channel program overhead processing (3830 controller would wait until its completely finished with final channel program operational overhead, not just end of data transfer). The 3880 people were hoping that signalling CE+DE early, it could overlap the 3880 controller overhead operations before the mainframe software could try and redrive the device with the next queued request. I would get CE+DE, do initial interrupt processing, dequeue a queued request and issue SIOF, the 3880 controller hadn't finished controller cleanup so it would respond CC=1, CSW stored with SM+BUSY (controller busy), i would have to requeue the request and wait for the CUE interrupt (indicating the 3880 had actually finished its internal controller overhead), at which point I would have re dequeue the queued request and try a 2nd SIOF (two interrupts, two SIOFs).

Now earlier, there were certain kinds of errors that would be identified during controller cleanup processing and the 3880 was now stuck with reflecting a unit check interrupt after it had already reflected an early CE+DE (before all of the controller operation overhead had finished ... trying to fake out that it was almost as fast as 3830 controller). If the mainframe was fast enough it could try to redrive and the 3880 could reflect the unit check as part of CC=1, CSW STORED. However, if there was no immediate next queued operation and everything went idle, they tried reflecting a unsolicited unit check ... which violated channel architecture. They eventually changed to only reflecting the "dangling" unit check to the next SIO (when it eventually happened) as CC=1, CSW STORED.

Note that in the late 70s, it was recognized that MVS interrupt/redrive overhead had gotten so horrible ... that disks were spending increasing percentage of the time idle (between the finish interrupt and start of next SIO) and as a result, lower throughput. SSCH part of 370xa was specifically part of trying to address this increasing MVS problem. Since I had already been told that the wrath of the MVS group had dropped on me, it didn't bother me to ridicule them about how horrible their pathlength was ... and it was requiring hardware architecture to compensate for the problem.

Note, I'm referring to having rewritten the operating system I/O supervisor and doing disk device I/O redrive of a queued request after ending CE+DE interrupt. The reasons for queued requests could be an application doing overlapped multiple buffering or totally different applications queuing requests for the same shared disk

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Asynchronous Interrupts

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Asynchronous Interrupts
Date: 06 Mar 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#79 Asynchronous Interrupts

In the mid-80s, I got asked if I could help IMS hotstandby. IMS hotstandby would shadow everything to standby so if there was outage ... the standby system could immediately take-over with no downtime ... or at least almost. The problem was SNA/VTAM had extremely high session startup and didn't do anything until one system had failed before it would try and do the session startup for the TP devices ... not only was SNA/VTAM session startup excessive ... but after IMS hot-standby, SNA/VTAM trying to do restart all at once, the overhead increased non-linearly ... in some IMS hotstandby fall-over cases, the SNA/VTAM startup could take 90mins.

Another kind of asynchronous processing is application wait/post ... like applications doing there own multitasking/multithreading. BDAM read/write with wait/post, CICS doing its own asynchronous processing, etc.

Charlie had invented compare&swap (chosen because CAS are his initials) instruction when he was doing fine-grain multiprocessing locking for CP67 at the science center. We then tried to get it added to 370 architecture and it was originally rebuffed.The POK favorite son operating system people claimed it wasn't needed because test&set was sufficient. The 370 architecture owners said that to get it added to 370, we had to come up with justification other than multiprocessing locking, thus was born the descriptions (still in principles of architecture appendix) how it can be used for multiprogramming by applications like CICS and large DBMS implementations (significantly more efficient than SVC operating system calls, used whether running on single processor or multiprocessor configurations). Later in the 80s, you find most other platforms running large DBMS implementing instructions with similar semantics.
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/DZ9AR004/A.6?SHELF=EZ2HW125&DT=19970613131822
mnemonic was changed from CAS to CS & CDS
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/DZ9AR004/A.6.2?SHELF=EZ2HW125&DT=19970613131822&CASE=

smp, compare&swap, multiprocessing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

disclaimer: when I was undergraduate, the university hires me fulltime to be support for mainframe system. The univ. library gets an ONR grant to do online catalog, the univ uses part of the money to get a 2321 datacell. The project is also selected to be one of the betatest sites for the original CICS product .... and I get tasked to (also) support CICS. One of the CICS bugs I had to shoot was in its original implementation at a customer site, there was some hardcoded support for a specific combination of BDAM parameters ... and the library had specified a different set of BDAM parameters.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#cics

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Asynchronous Interrupts

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Asynchronous Interrupts
Date: 06 Mar 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#79 Asynchronous Interrupts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#80 Asynchronous Interrupts

This article has recently generate lots of discussion in (closed) "Mission Command" military discussion group, I post a response related to the 3880 JIB-prime decision

The Office Hierarchy Is Officially Dead
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-03/the-office-hierarchy-is-officially-dead

Early 80s, first time I sponsored Boyd's briefings at IBM, he (just) did Patterns of Conflict ... the next briefing he wanted to do both Patterns of Conflict and Organic Design For Command and Control (which he was developing) on the same day. He would talk about WW2 required to deploy massive numbers with little or no experience and needed rigid top-down command&control to leverage few experienced resources available (as well as heavily, logistic based campaign). He would describe how US corporate culture was being contaminated as these former military officers climbed the corporate ladder (with their rigid top-down command&control training). At the time, we were having raging discussion about how some high level executives with accounting & MBA backgrounds were making engineering decisions with disastrous results. Disclaimer: I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s) in the late 70s and early 80s. Folklore was that when the corporate executive committee were told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.

Boyd also referred to the WW2 US military needed something like 4-5 times the number of officers for its rigid, top-down command&control compared to the WW2 german military. However, more important was that the rigid, top-down command&control fostered a culture that assumed only those at those at the very top knew what they were doing (and everybody else needed rigid supervision, semi-independent from the levels of management). Boyd would frequently refer to pushing decisions to the people that were closest and knew most about the problem.

IBM trivia: about the same time I was at Boeing, Boyd had been assigned command of "spook base" (possibly as punishment), Boyd biographies refer to "spook base" as a $2.5B windfall for IBM (in 1970 dollars). Reference to "spook base" gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

above even has reference to 2250 (except the picture is of no 2250 I ever saw). Boyd would refer to "spook base" having the largest air conditioned building in that part of the world.

boyd postings & URLs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
online computer conferencing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic - lies about Medicare

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2016 17:26:07 -0800
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
Your marketing department, which hasn't convinced the customers to want what you're selling.

part of recent thread over in facebook ibm retiree group

270x boxes were precursor to 3705. Up thread I refer to having done clone controller box as undergraduate in the 60s using interdata minicomputers. "UC" processor selected for 3705 was really slow and lacked feature/function. Science center suggested that they use (series/1) Peachtree processor for 3705 ... 3705 announced Mar1972
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_3705_Communications_Controller
which was well before series/1 was announced in nov1976
https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/vintage/vintage_4506VV4024.html

I also had a project started in the early 80s that I called HSDT ... that was doing T1 and faster speed links ... while 37x5 boxes were limited to 56kbit links. In 1986 I was having some equipment built on the other side of the pacific, the friday before I was leave for a visit, CPD sent out announcement for new online "high-speed" discussion group with the following definitions:
low-speed <9.6kbits medium-speed 19.2kbits high-speed 56kbits very high-speed 1.5mbits

the following monday morning on the wall of conference room
low-speed <20mbits medium-speed 100mbits high-speed 200-300mbits very high-speed >600mbits

hsdt postings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

CPD had generated a report for corporate executive committee that customers wouldn't be needing T1 speeds until well into the 90s. Their report was based on survey of customers using 37x5 "fat pipes" multiple 56kbit lines operated in parallel as single logical link. They found no customers using more than five 56kbit links in a "fat pipe". What they didn't know (or conveniently ignored) was that typical telco tariff for T1 was about the same as 5 or 6 56kbit links. By the time customer needed more than 5*56kbit, they would switch to full T1 and use a non-IBM controller. HSDT did trivial customer survey that found 200 T1 links connected to IBM mainframes.

HSDT was also working with the director of NSF and was supposed to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget, some other things happens and finally they release an RFP (largely based on what HSDT already had running, including requirement for T1 links). Internal IBM politics prevents us from bidding, the director of NSF tries to help writing the company a letter (copying the CEO) including references to what we already have running is at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses, but that just makes the internal politics worse. As regional networks connect into the centers, it morphs into the NSFNET backbone (precursor to the modern internet). As an aside the "winning" RFP response puts in 440kbit/sec links (not full T1/1.5mbit/sec).

nsfnet postings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

communication group was generating lots of mis-information internally ... they were also generating mis-information that sna/vtam could be used for tying together the NSF supercomputer centers. Somebody collected their mis-information about SNA/VTAM and forwarded it to us (heavily snipped and redacted to protect the guilty)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109

communication group issues don't just stop with 37x5 boxes limited to 56kbit/sec speed links. VTAM processing had significant issue with only allowing a limited number of bits in transit/flight. They eventually come out with 3737 to support a T1 link that spoofs VTAM as local channel-to-channel box. A 3737 has several 68k microprocessors and a whole boatload of buffer memory. The 3737 is constantly spoofing the local VTAM that the data has arrived so it will keep feeding it data. The local 3737 then is transmitting the data over the T1 link to remote 3737 (while the local VTAM thinks it has already arrived). The remote 3737 then is doing the spoof in reverse for the remote VTAM. A US T1 @1.5mbits/sec is aggregate full-duplex 3mbits/sec, A EU T1 @2mbits/sec is aggregate full-duplex 4mbits/sec. The enormous 3737 spoofing overhead limits it to about 2mbits/sec aggregate ... even with all the 68k processors.

old 3737 reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#75 We list every company in the world that has a mainframe computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#77 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?

with
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#email880130
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#email880606
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#email881005

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic - lies about Medicare

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:57:31 -0800
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Then the steel industry was unable to provide the different kinds of steel that manufacturers wanted. The small steel mills were able to adjust but not the big ones. The big ones also couldn't convince the union to change methods so they could only sell "one size fits all" steel.

much of the industry was looting revenue; not reinvesting in the business, and not fully funding pensions.

because they weren't reinvesting and keeping up with technology ... they start to see downturn (from competition) ... but it was accelerated because of pensions being paid out of current revenue. in downturn, it is possible for revenue to drop below the unfunded pension obligations. Having previously looted fully-funded pension obligations as profits ... then in any downturn they could reduce the number of current employees ... but they couldn't reduce past pension obligations. They eventually declare bankruptcy based on the unfunded pension obligation ... dumping the obligation off onto PBGC (no "clawbacks" of previous payouts as profit instead of funding pensions).
http://www.pbgc.gov/

dumping the obligations on the federal government is similar to employers paying below living wages and relying on government social programs to make up the difference.

another gimmick that industries used was changing the corporate structure so that profit was moved from heavy people intensive part of the business to subsidiary that required relatively few people. airline industry did this by structuring airline operations as break-even and moving profit to ticket (mostly computerized) subsidiary. The airline operations can be showing no profit while the parent company shows significant overall profit because the way it is booked with ticket sales. Showing no profit or even loss gives advantage in union/employee negotiations (even when parent company still shows significant profit because of the way books are done). They can even declare bankruptcy for the airline operations and dump the employee pension obligations on PBGC. A number of years ago, the parent company of one of the auto big three showed 5% of its profit from making cars, but 95% of its profit from financing the selling of cars (it was even possible for the making of cars shows loss while parent company is still showing significant profit).

the books are cooked so the profit from operation that involves large number of people making something are moved into a different subidiary ... so the people-intensive operation shows break-even or loss.

The latest gimmick is that the subsidiary (where the profits are being booked) is moved offshore ... so the profit shows up in an extremely attractive tax haven.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

in other times and places ... most of these activities could have been viewed as scams.

a few past PBGC posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#65 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#24 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#46 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#8 weird apple trivia

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Trump vs. Hillary

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Trump vs. Hillary
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Mar 2016 14:05:16 -0800
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Just heard some RWer the other day saying Hillary would bring back the bad old days of Bill Clinton. (Damn idiot wasn't sharing either.) Save us from 8 more years of prosperity and an almost balanced budget. We sure can't let that happen.

fiscal responsibility act ... can't spend more than tax revenue, initially passed 5nov1990, in effect fy1991-fy2002 (started before his presidency and continued for a little while after his presidency)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAYGO

congress lets fiscal responsibility act expire in 2002, if left in place all federal debt would have been gone by 2010. 2010 CBO report has that between end of the act and 2010, tax revenue was cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap (compared to fiscal responsibility act). Since then there has been no restoration of the tax revenue and only small dents in the spending ... so interest on the debt is now pushing half-trillion.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

middle of last decade, US comptroller general was including in speeches that nobody in congress knew how to do middle school arithmatic for how badly they were savaging the budget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

reports are that Greenspan wanted the act to expire because he favored significant federal debt and gov. paying interest on treasuries.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#greenspan

TARP was supposedly to bail out the too big to fail by buying their toxic assets ... but with only $700B it was maybe 10% needed (just the four largest too big to fail had $5.2T end of 2008).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

so TARP was used for other things and the Federal Reserve did real bailout behind the scenes (FED lost a long drawn out legal battle attempting to prevent making public what it was doing) ... buying toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar and providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds, with too big to fail also making something like $300B/year off buying treasuries with ZIRP funds. W/o the enormous federal debt, couldn't run the treasury interest/ZIRP scam.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

In addition to all the other scams, too big to fail were using the new tax loophools to squirral enormous amounts away offshore (major factor in the enormous drop in tax revenue)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic - lies about Medicare

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Mar 2016 08:18:33 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
The latest gimmick is that the subsidiary (where the profits are being booked) is moved offshore ... so the profit shows up in an extremely attractive tax haven.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#82 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#83 Qbasic - lies about Medicare

Democrats and Republicans Are Quietly Planning a Corporate Giveaway -- to the Tune of $400 Billion
http://www.thenation.com/article/democrats-and-republicans-are-quietly-planning-a-corporate-giveaway-to-the-tune-of-400-billion/

one of the poster child is heavy equipment maker that makes, sells, and delivers in the US; it changes to selling at cost to a new distributor subsidiary in Luxembourg, which sells to the buyers in the US (the equipment never leaves the US, delivered directly from US plant to US buyer). The difference is nearly all the profit is booked with the distributor in Luxemberg (where trivial tax has been negotiated)
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Cloud Computing

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Cloud Computing
Date: 07 Mar 2016
Blog: Facebook
There were a number of services expanding CP67/CMS into 7x24 online operations ... including a number of commercial service bureaus. Expanding CP67/CMS into 7x24 required a number of cost saving operations, being able to operate "dark room" w/o operators, stopping the system meter when there were no active users. This is somewhat analogous to current day cloud, system prices have dropped to such a point that power&cooling has become major cloud operational cost, provisioning for large number of "on-demand" (idle) processors required cloud operations pressuring chip makers to design processors to cut power to near zero when idle but come up to full operation instantaneous.

Some of the CP67/CMS equivalent was back then processors were leased and monthly charges were based on system meter ... that ran whenever processor and/or any channel was running. CP67 done special programming to cut the processing & channel when nothing was going on ... but be able to accept incoming characters. System meter did require that both processor and channels had to be all stopped for at least 400ms before it would stop. Note that MVS, long after market had moved to sales, had a timer event that woke up every 400ms guaranteeing that system meter never stopped.

science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

virtual machine online service bureaus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#online

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Mar 2016 07:27:52 -0800
Bob Martin <bob.martin@excite.com> writes:
When did this become the US politics newsgroup?

The Outrageous Adolescence of the F-16; The Viper was small, fast, and in your face
http://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/outrageous-adolescence-f-16-180949491/?no-ist

19yrs ago, John Boyd, January 23, 1927 - March 9, 1997, tribute in USNI Procedings, for those w/o membership ... it is here at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20011224132049/http://www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt
He used it to re-design the F-15, changing it from an 80,000-pound, swing-wing, sluggish behemoth, to a 40,000-pound fixed-wing, high-performance, maneuvering fighter. His crowning glory was his use of the theory to evolve the lightweight fighters that eventually became the YF-16 and YF-17 prototypes--and then to insist that the winner be chosen in the competitive market of a free-play flyoff. The YF-16, which won, is still the most maneuverable fighter ever designed. The production successors, the not-so-lightweight F-16 (Air Force) and the F/A-18 (the Navy-Marine Corps aircraft that evolved from the YF-17), together with the F-15, dominate the skies today.

... snip ...

by the time John passes, the air force has pretty much disowned him, it was the Marines that were at Arlington. Boyd had story how the F15 forces knew he was working on YF-16 design and tried to get the Air Force to charge him with theft of several million in gov. property; aka supercomputer time used for YF-16 design, however an audit of gov. computers failed to turn up the evidence. Hugh Laurie (TV House) wrote a novel about military-industrial-complex and how egregious MICC can be (and references Boyd).

disclaimer: I sponsored Boyd's briefings at IBM

Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War; pg9/loc205-11:
The grass was wet and the air was clean and sweet. The crowd gathered at Section Sixty, grave site number 3,660. The Marine colonel took from his pocket a Marine Corps insignia, the eagle globe and anchor. He marched out of the crowd, kneeled, and placed the insignia near the urn containing Boyd's ashes. Someone took a picture. In that frozen moment the light of the flash sparkled on the eagle globe and anchor, causing it to stand out sharply against the bronze urn and green grass. The black insignia drew every eye. As one, and without a command to do so, the young lieutenants snapped to attention. Placing the symbol of the U.S. Marine Corps on a grave is the highest honor a Marine can bestow. It is rarely seen, even at the funeral of decorated combat Marines, and it may have been the first time in history an Air Force pilot received the honor.

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Boyd postings &/or URLs from around the web
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Mar 2016 16:42:54 -0800
Jon Elson <jmelson@wustl.edu> writes:
Uhh, the Navy's F-14 was swing wing, the F-15 is fixed.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?

http://www.ausairpower.net/Profile-F-15A-D.html
The idea of an air-air fighter was under consideration as early as 1965, but the subsequent FX study generated by USAF Systems Command created the concept of a 60,000 lb swing wing machine much like the F-111, already under criticism for its inability to do what it wasn't built for.

At this stage a Major John Boyd was appointed to rework the FX study and generate a workable solution. Boyd was an outstanding air combat tactician and the originator of the concept of energy manoeuvrability. The concept revolves about the necessity for an aircraft to maintain a maximum amount of kinetic/potential energy in a dogfight, to be able to retain as much agility as possible.


... snip ...

http://www.flightsimbooks.com/jfs/page1.php
The FX program (Fighter eXperimental) was the result. The first FX proposals were very heavy (60,000 pounds) and employed the then-fashionable swing-wing design. This being too much like the ill-fated F-111 design, the momentum swung in the other direction, until in 1967 the conceived aircraft was down to 30,000 pounds.

...

boyd posts & URL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

after redoing the original FX (swing-wing) design for what becomes F15 ... he then starts on yf16/f16 (anticipating that the f15 forces would come after him and try and have him thrown in Leavenworth for the rest of his life, he leaves no trail of his supercomputer use involved in yf16 design).

The yf16/f16 is non-stable & fly-by-wire
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Dynamics_F-16_Fighting_Falcon#Negative_stability_and_fly-by-wire

The F-16 was the first production fighter aircraft intentionally designed to be slightly aerodynamically unstable, also known as "relaxed static stability" (RSS), to improve maneuverability.[66] Most aircraft are designed with positive static stability, which induces aircraft to return to straight and level flight attitude if the pilot releases the controls; this reduces maneuverability as the inherent stability has to be overcome. Aircraft with negative stability are designed to deviate from controlled flight and thus be more maneuverable. At supersonic speeds the F-16 gains stability (eventually positive) due to aerodynamic changes

...
Unlike the YF-17, which had hydromechanical controls serving as a backup to the FBW, General Dynamics took the innovative step of eliminating mechanical linkages between the control stick and rudder pedals, and the flight control surfaces. The F-16 is entirely reliant on its electrical systems to relay flight commands, instead of traditional mechanically-linked controls, leading to the early moniker of "the electric jet". The quadruplex design permits "graceful degradation" in flight control response in that the loss of one channel renders the FLCS a "triplex" system.[72] The FLCC began as an analog system on the A/B variants, but has been supplanted by a digital computer system beginning with the F-16C/D Block 40.[73][74] The F-16's controls suffered from a sensitivity to static electricity or electrostatic discharge (ESD). Up to 70-80% of the C/D models' electronics were vulnerable to ESD.[75]

... snip ...

ARTIFICIAL STABILITY & FLY-BY-WIRE CONTROL
http://www.ausairpower.net/AADR-FBW-CCV.html

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Mar 2016 17:14:57 -0800
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
Note that that particular "sluggish behemoth" is so fearsome that one lighting off its radar will ground whole third-world air forces and when it was removed from service every single aircraft in the inventory was destroyed lest the one third-world air force that had a few of them get spare parts and thus do untold damage to the supposedly vastly superior lightweight fighters that can't force it to engage, can't run away from it, and can't shoot at it until long after it has killed them.

Oh, and I've seen a classified demo of the sluggish behemoth making maximum-performance maneuvers. I pity the fool . . .


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#88 Computers anyone?

random other bits

Edwards prepares for F-16 radar upgrade testing
http://www.afmc.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123457520

F22 AESA radar
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN/APG-77

As yet unconfirmed sources suggest that APG-77 has a 'typical' operating range of 193 km (120 mi) and is specified to achieve an 86% probability of intercept against a 1 m2 target at its maximum detection range using a single radar paint

... snip ...

Note last spring, DOD put advanced processing chips on export control list. Last fall, at supercomputer conference, china demonstrated that they were starting to make their own chips (besides used in advanced radar, enormous numbers are also used in large supercomputers).

There is estimate that latest generation of chips, the number of transmit/receiver pairs in the F-22 AESA radar could be reduced by nearly two orders of magnitude w/o loss of capability.

this is primary analysis of JSF (F-35) ... but towards the bottom shows some graphs for f-22, f-16, mig29, f-18, f-35 & f-15
http://www.ausairpower.net/jsf.html
another JSF analysis
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-JSF-Analysis.html

F-35 from monday
http://www.pogo.org/straus/issues/weapons/2016/the-f-35-still-failing-to-impress.html

Straus Military Reform Project at POGO was Boyd inspired
http://www.pogo.org/straus/issues/military-reform/

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Boyd postings &/or URLs from around the web
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Mar 2016 17:35:37 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
F-35 from monday
http://www.pogo.org/straus/issues/weapons/2016/the-f-35-still-failing-to-impress.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#88 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#89 Computers anyone?

a little more topic drift (one of the most critical has to do software) ,,, original plan was that f-35 would be ready for combat in 2010 ... now it might now be until 2022:
The report's candor about the airplane's problems is unique among the DoD's other reports about the performance of the F-35. It only exists because Congress created an independent operational testing office in 1983 to report only to the Secretary of Defense and Congress. Without this office, significant F-35 problems might never be revealed until failure in actual combat.

As damning as this report is, the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program Office quickly issued a statement disagreeing with the report's emphasis -- but acknowledging that every word of it is "factually accurate."


... snip ...

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Mar 2016 20:25:36 -0800
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
The F-35 is a fine example of why a committee should not be allowed to design airplanes, and more importantly why a committee containing representatives of the Air Force should not be allowed to participate in the design of naval aircraft.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#88 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#89 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#90 Computers anyone?

This is F-22: Can't Fly Won't Die
http://nypost.com/2009/07/17/cant-fly-wont-die/
Pilots call high-maintenance aircraft "hangar queens." Well, the F-22's a hangar empress. After three expensive decades in development, the plane meets fewer than one-third of its specified requirements.

...
Anyway, an enemy wouldn't have to down a single F-22 to defeat it. Just strike the hi-tech maintenance sites, and it's game over. (In WWII, we didn't shoot down every Japanese Zero; we just sank their carriers.) The F-22 isn't going to operate off a dirt strip with a repair tent.

But this is all about lobbying, not about lobbing bombs. Cynically, Lockheed Martin distributed the F-22 workload to nearly every state, employing under-qualified sub-contractors to create local financial stakes in the program. Great politics -- but the result has been a quality collapse.


... snip ...

finally ended F-22 ... but used same tactics with F-35 process.
http://www.dailytech.com/Defense+Secretary+Gates+Proposes+Ending+F22+Fighter+VH71+Helicopter+Production/article14776.htm

Originally F-35 design did cost(?) reduced compromise as bomb truck assuming F-22 flying cover and provide air superiority role.

this has long detailed discussion changes from original prototype and "true" stealth (analysis done before F-22 was terminated)
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-2009-01.html

diagram 4 has F-35 radar signature at different wavelengths. VHF/L can find/track but difficult for targeting. latest processing chips with multi-band radar ... for tracking&targeting.
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-2009-01.html#mozTocId269596

This is separate from design/weight penalty for enabling (F-35B) Marine corp version (short take-off/land).

besides "cyberdumb" in problems with the F-35 program
http://www.pogo.org/straus/issues/weapons/2016/the-f-35-still-failing-to-impress.html

there is lots of "cyberdumb" with adversaries dancing through our networks taking detailed designs of advanced weapons
http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2013/05/28/us-weapons-compromised-chinese-cyberspies/

The designs included those for the advanced Patriot missile system, known as PAC-3; an Army system for shooting down ballistic missiles, known as the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD; and the Navy's Aegis ballistic-missile defense system. Also identified in the report are vital combat aircraft and ships, including the F/A-18 fighter jet, the V-22 Osprey, the Black Hawk helicopter and the Navy's new Littoral Combat Ship, which is designed to patrol waters close to shore. Also on the list is the most expensive weapons system ever built -- the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which is on track to cost about $1.4 trillion.

... snip ...

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2016 09:04:31 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
This is F-22: Can't Fly Won't Die
http://nypost.com/2009/07/17/cant-fly-wont-die/

Pilots call high-maintenance aircraft "hangar queens." Well, the F-22's a hangar empress. After three expensive decades in development, the plane meets fewer than one-third of its specified requirements.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#88 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#89 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#90 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?

Part of F-22 "hangar empress" is stealth coating ... there are other references that now the coating maintenance bays are working around the clock overtime.
http://www.tyndall.af.mil/News/Features/Display/tabid/6651/Article/669883/lo-how-the-f-22-gets-its-stealth.aspx

and then regarding the tight embrace with congress & politics

This Map Shows Why The F-35 Has Turned Into A Trillion-Dollar Fiasco
http://www.businessinsider.com/this-map-explains-the-f-35-fiasco-2014-8
Flawed F-35 Too Big to Kill as Lockheed Hooks 45 States
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013-02-22/flawed-f-35-fighter-too-big-to-kill-as-lockheed-hooks-45-states

military-industrial(-congressional) complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Google joins Facebook's game-changing project that's eating the $140 billion hardware market

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Google joins Facebook's game-changing project that's eating the $140 billion hardware market
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:24:11 -0800
Big cloud megadatacenters have been claiming for over a decade that they assemble their own systems for 1/3rd the price of brand name systems ... this is further accelerating the commoditizing of computing

Google joins Facebook's game-changing project that's eating the $140 billion hardware market
http://www.businessinsider.com/google-joins-facebook-open-compute-project-2016-3

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2016 13:17:08 -0800
Jon Elson <jmelson@wustl.edu> writes:
DoD put out a request for the "F-X" and may have suggested it needed swing wings, but McD proved that they were not actually NEEDED to fill all the requirements, at least after several rounds of requests and proposals.

McDonnell-Douglas proposed a non-swing wing aircraft, and went on to build a prototype. I saw it fly in 1973 at Wallops Station, a guy flew over from Pax River with it. VERRRRY impressive handling and climb rate.

As far as I know, this became the F-15 with no large changes. They did make some modest changes to the control surface areas.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#88 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#89 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#90 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#92 Computers anyone?

dates off by nearly a decade.

FX early to mid-60s, all designs swing-wing and 60,000lbs or more , Boyd design early 1967, MD included in 1967 2nd phase selection using Boyd design/spec, MD final selection dec1969, 1st flt july 1972, full-rate production six months later

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McDonnell_Douglas_F-15_Eagle

An official requirements document was finalized in October, and sent out as a request for proposals (RFP) to 13 companies on 8 December 1965. Eight companies responded with proposals. Following a downselect, four companies were asked to provide further developments. In total, they developed some 500 design concepts. Typical designs featured variable-sweep wings, weighed over 60,000 pounds (27,000 kg), included a top speed of Mach 2.7 and a thrust-to-weight ratio of 0.75.[12] When the proposals were studied in July 1966, the aircraft were roughly the size and weight of the TFX, and like that aircraft, a design that could not be considered an air superiority fighter.[13]

...
This led to John Boyd's Energy-Maneuverability (E-M) theory, which stressed that extra power and maneuverability were key aspects of a successful fighter design, and these were more important than outright speed. Through tireless championing of the concepts, and good timing with the "failure" of the initial F-X project, the "fighter mafia" pressed for a lightweight day fighter that could be built and operated in large numbers in order to ensure air superiority.[16] In early 1967, they proposed that the ideal design had a thrust-to-weight ratio of near 1:1, a maximum speed further reduced to Mach 2.3, a weight of 40,000 pounds (18,000 kg) and a wing loading of 80 lb/ft².[17]


http://www.boeing.com/history/products/f-15-eagle.page

McDonnell Aircraft formalized the concept for the F-15 in 1967 when the company was selected to enter the second phase of the U.S Air Force's FX competition. Competing against Fairchild Hiller and North American Rockwell, McDonnell used lessons learned during the Vietnam War on the changing nature of jet age air-to-air combat, given that the F-4 Phantom II was earning its reputation as a formidable fighter. On Dec. 23, 1969, after more than two years of intensive testing and evaluation, the Air Force awarded McDonnell Douglas the F-15 Advanced Tactical Fighter contract. The McDonnell Douglas team had placed first among the three competitors in all phases of the competition and had the lowest contract price.

On June 26, 1972, James S. McDonnell, founder of McDonnell Aircraft, christened the F-15 "Eagle." Test pilot Irv Burrows took the first F-15 Eagle to the air on July 27, 1972, at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Six months later, the Air Force approved the Eagle for full-rate production.


...snip ...

for a whole lot more, declassified
F15 origins and development 1964-1972

http://www.afhso.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-120516-036.pdf

Boyd E/M discussion pgs.18-21 ...
"By the spring of 1967, through the efforts of Boyd and others, a 40,000-point F-X aircraft was 'popped out'".

pg28,
Point Design Studies, Meanwhile, the Air Force on 11 August 1967 had solicited bids from seven aerospace companies for second round of studies.

pg37, F-15 Demonstration Milestones ... starting Dec1969

military-industrial(-congressional) complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Boyd postings &/or URLs from around the web
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2016 13:44:18 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
This is F-22: Can't Fly Won't Die
http://nypost.com/2009/07/17/cant-fly-wont-die/

Pilots call high-maintenance aircraft "hangar queens." Well, the F-22's a hangar empress. After three expensive decades in development, the plane meets fewer than one-third of its specified requirements.
...
Anyway, an enemy wouldn't have to down a single F-22 to defeat it. Just strike the hi-tech maintenance sites, and it's game over. (In WWII, we didn't shoot down every Japanese Zero; we just sank their carriers.) The F-22 isn't going to operate off a dirt strip with a repair tent.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#88 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#89 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#90 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#92 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#94 Computers anyone?

not only are there lots vulnerabilities associated with extreme complexity of maintenance
http://www.tyndall.af.mil/News/Features/Display/tabid/6651/Article/669883/lo-how-the-f-22-gets-its-stealth.aspx

there is also vulnerabilities from loads of advanced electronic counterfeit parts

Probe finds 'flood' of fake military parts from China in U.S. equipment
http://security.blogs.cnn.com/2012/05/22/probe-finds-flood-of-fake-military-parts-from-china-in-u-s-equipment/
Flood of fake Chinese parts in US military gear - report
http://www.reuters.com/article/usa-defense-counterfeit-idUSL1E8GMMCV20120522
Fake Parts are Everywhere
http://www.defensetech.org/2012/05/22/fake-parts-are-everywhere/

there is also vulnerabilities where the advanced electronic parts aren't counterfeit ... they are sourced and produced in china ... that US military has to rely on.

Richard Clarke: All U.S. Electronics From China Could Be Infected
http://www.defensetech.org/2012/03/29/richard-clarke-all-u-s-electronics-from-china-could-be-infected/

and separate from the other cyberdumb issues.

military-industrial(-congressional) complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2016 19:28:10 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
This is F-22: Can't Fly Won't Die
http://nypost.com/2009/07/17/cant-fly-wont-die/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#88 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#89 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#90 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#92 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#94 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#95 Computers anyone?

another issue with F-35 ... even if it had no problems and worked as advertized and didn't have big budget and schedule overruns ... it was designed as a bomb truck with F-22 flying cover and providing air superiority

More Ambiguous F-35 Remarks by USAF's Gen. Hostage
http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articles-view/release/3/154510/usaf%E2%80%99s-gen-hostage-speaks-again-on-f_35.html

Gen. Hostage, head of the US Air Force's Air Combat Command, gained some fame earlier this year when he said that "If I do not keep that F-22 fleet viable, the F-35 fleet frankly will be irrelevant [as] the F-35 is not built as an air superiority platform. It needs the F-22."

... snip ...

other

Fast Forward "Fast Transients": John Boyd, the F-22 and F-35 in 2016
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-NOTAM-131210-1.html

declassified "Aerial Attack Study" by (then) Capt. John Boyd, 1Nov1963
http://www.dnipogo.org/boyd/pdf/boydaerialattack.pdf

Joint Strike Fighter; includes graph compares F-22A, T-50, J-20, F-35A, SU-35S
http://www.ausairpower.net/jsf.html

military-industrial(-congressional) complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
Boyd posts & URL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 10:37:31 -0800
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
A bomb pickup-truck perhaps--short range and small payload, vs the bomb 18-wheeler that is the B-52.

the F-35 stealth optimized for penetrating enemy ground-to-air defenses ... large numbers of F-35 then drop payload to take out all the ground-to-air defenses ... so they have nothing to worry about on their backside when returning ... and F-22 flying cover for any air-to-air threats.

problem is latest generation of advanced chips with multi-band radar can track & target stealth.

the B-52 hasn't been overlooked ... there are proposals using large flock of F-35s out in front trailed by fleet of B-52 stuffed entirely full ... with the F-35s providing targeting for the arsenal carried by the B-52s. I posted a snarky comment about the spin in the B-52 proposal wording as "complement/supplement the F-35" ... as opposed to "compensate for the F-35 shortcomings".

since the F-35 payload is so small, the trailing B-52s would provide the air-to-air and air-to-ground arsenal needed for the mission.

Pentagon "Arsenal Plane" Likely to be Modified B-52
http://www.scout.com/military/warrior/story/1650624-pentagon-arsenal-plane-likely-to-be-b-52
The Pentagon Is Building the "Arsenal Plane," a Giant Flying Battlewagon
http://www.popularmechanics.com/military/weapons/news/a19262/pentagon-announces-arsenal-plane-platform/

In theory, the F35 are manned "scouts" and the arsenal plane could be a drone (all part of justifying F35 and keeping it from being killed off).

This Map Shows Why The F-35 Has Turned Into A Trillion-Dollar Fiasco
http://www.businessinsider.com/this-map-explains-the-f-35-fiasco-2014-8
Flawed F-35 Too Big to Kill as Lockheed Hooks 45 States
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013-02-22/flawed-f-35-fighter-too-big-to-kill-as-lockheed-hooks-45-states
military-industrial(-congressional) complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

More realistic would be swarms of drone scouts with any humans back in the arsenal plane.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#88 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#89 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#90 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#92 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#94 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#95 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#96 Computers anyone?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic - lies about Medicare

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 11:40:00 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks


latest from Luxembourg leaks

Ministers agree to new EU rule to curb corporate tax dodging
http://www.icij.org/blog/2016/03/ministers-agree-new-eu-rule-curb-corporate-tax-dodging

cooking the books so that profit is moved offshore into subsidiary for tax evasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

... but can also play gimmicks where human intensive operations are manipulated so that they have little or no profit ... which plays factor in benefit negotiations ... but can also setup for declaring bankruptcy and dump the pension obligations on the government
http://www.pbgc.gov/

even while the parent company is making record profits.

and now they are working on congress being able to bring the offshore trillions back home with little or no taxes
http://www.thenation.com/article/democrats-and-republicans-are-quietly-planning-a-corporate-giveaway-to-the-tune-of-400-billion/

"private equity" (industry got such bad reputation during S&L crisis that they changed the industry name to "private equity" and junk bonds became "high-yield" bonds).

They borrow the money to buy company, put the money on the victim company books, loot the company and then sell it off (make enormous profits even if they sell the company for less than they paid). Analogy to house flipping ... except they don't have to pay off the original loan (it now belongs to the victim company). Over half corporate defaults are companies currently or formaly owned by private equity
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

They make out with enormous profits and in addition also bought special tax loopholes from congress for the scam (and the defaulted loans for some reason never show up in the credit rating of the private equity firms).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 12:04:42 -0800
from data file
11 says "Magic word XYZZY". 62 XYZZY

I had seen copy on tymshare vm370/cms, they had gotten copy from Stanford for their PDP10 ... and was working on getting copy transfered ... old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#email780321
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email780405
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email780405b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#email780414
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#email780517
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#email790912

i then distributed executable on the internal network inside ibm ... and would send source to anybody that acquired all points.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ray Tomlinson, inventor of modern email, dies

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ray Tomlinson, inventor of modern email, dies
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 16:09:18 -0800
hancock4 writes:
Based on inflation, if Western Union were around today, a telegram would cost about $25 for only fifteen words, and the message would be relayed over the phone, hard copy delivery cost extra. In 1975, you were basically paying for an official legal record of the message and faster transmission than via postal mail. Sadly, you were also paying for a lot of labor and obsolete technology.

Western Union attempted to provide an email service, called EasyLink, but it didn't work out, and helped bankrupt the company.


In early 90s, AMEX spun off a lot of its dataprocessing and other businesses (including Moneygram) as First Data, in the largest IPO up until that time. Later in the 90s, First Data merges with First Financial (which owns the troubled Western Union and FDC has to spin off Moneygram in the merger). However, by the middle of last decade, illegal workers sending money home have increased Western Union business until it was half of FDC's bottom line .... and Western Union is spun off in IPO. President of Mexico had earlier invited FDC executives for a Mexican visit and promised to throw them in jail (for what WU was charging).

A little later, FDC corporate hdqtrs is lopped off and the remaining FDC is taken private by KKR in the largest reverse-IPO/LBO up until that time.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

Much earlier, AMEX and KKR had been in competition for LBO of RJR and KKR wins
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

KKR runs into trouble with RJR, and hires away the president of AMEX to turn it around.

IBM has gone into the red and is in the process of being reorged into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breakup. The board then hires away the former president of AMEX to reverse the breakup and resurrect IBM. Uses some of same techniques at IBM that had been used at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

Later the former president of AMEX leaves IBM and becomes head of another large private-equity company which does LBO of company that will employ Snowden:
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

As mentioned above, companies in the private-equity mill are under intense pressure to generate income any way possible, including those that security clearances have been outsourced to ... which were found to be just filling out the paperwork and not doing the background checks (although as periodically mentioned, victim companies in the private-equity mill account for over half of corporate defaults).

Note it is illegal for (including beltway bandit) companies to use money from gov. contracts to lobby congress. However, a private-equity firm could lobby on behalf of their subsidiary which might not have any income other than gov. contracts (theoritically using money from other private-equity operations).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 16:37:08 -0800
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
For me, going from 300 to 1200 was the big jump - although going from there to 2400 was a welcome increase as well.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#99 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

For most of the 70s I had 2741 @134 (including one at home) replaced with 300 baud CDI miniterm (for a couple yrs)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/miniterm.jpg

home miniterm

and then to 1200 baud 3101 (ibm glass teletype, for a couple yrs) ... which included some stuff skipping long blank runs with cursor positioning ... internally also included being able to switch between glass teletype and 3270 simulation.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/home3101.jpg

home 3101

Then got IBM/PC with 2400 baud modem and ran internal "pcterm" 3270 simulator. The PC & host side did bit compression on the transmission and also kept character string caches ... it could transmit string location in cache as opposed to the actual (compressed) string.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/homepc.jpg

home pc

as miniterm picture shows, I had compact microfiche reader ... at work, it was possible to direct computer output (like large source listings, documentation, etc) to microfiche printer.

PC was at original announce on the employee purchase plan ... however by the time they started deliverying PCs on the employee purchase plan, the street price had dropped to less than the employee discount (I would have payed less if I had avoided the employee purchase plan and got it sooner).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 17:02:31 -0800
hancock4 writes:
Sorry to get political here, but part of the fallout of the tea- party movement has been an attack on business regulations and protection agencies. Governing Magazine has reported how agencies that once enforced wage/hour laws have been gutted with a loss of staff to process complaints, as well as revised regulations that allow for many loopholes.

predates tea-party ,,, includes globalization, chamber of commerce, etc, this has things changing 79-80 period
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

this details change of national "chamber of commerce" late 90s and then some number of local "chamber of commerce" cut ties with national

The Influence Machine: The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Corporate Capture of American Life
http://www.amazon.com/Influence-Machine-Commerce-Corporate-American-ebook/dp/B00NDTUDHA/

other past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

"The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism and Economic Dissolution of the West"
http://www.amazon.com/Failure-Laissez-Capitalism-Economic-Dissolution-ebook/dp/B00BLPJNWE/

This goes into lots of detail about how "globalization" was fabricated for offshoring industries to sell goods back into the US (as opposed to various claims that it increases world market for things made in the US and increasing US jobs). It also talks about fabricating the unfilled jobs number to justify H1B visas which are really a scam to replace US workers with lower paid foreign workers. Part of it is large special interests tying up economists in various ways ... highlighted by Inside Job.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inside_Job_(2010_film)

Large multinational corporations (like IBM) have made extensive use of this. Also cites major lobbying on part of special interests including Chamber of Commerce, Council on Competitiveness, and Business Roundtable. loc1762-64:
The reformulation of trade theory achieved by Ralph Gomory and William Baumol was published by MIT Press six years prior to Porter's report, but there is no mention of this seminal work in Porter's report. Just as Porter's report ignored the empirical evidence, it ignored the reformulation of trade theory.

... snip ...

Ralph Gomory is mentioned several times in the book, who before joining MIT Sloan School had been IBM senior VP and president of IBM Research.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_P._Sloan_Foundation#Gomory_and_Joskow_presidencies_.281989.E2.80.93present.29

In the early 80s, we had been working with the Director of NSF and were supposed to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget and some number of other things happen, and finally NSF releases an RFP (largely based on what we already had running). Internal politics prevent us from bidding; the NSF director tries to help by writting the company a letter, copying the CEO ... but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments that what we already have running is at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers it becomes the NSFNET backbone, precursor to modern internet. old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

As an aside, after the Director of NSF steps down, he goes to Council on Competitiveness (one of the K-street lobbying operations), and we would periodically drop by and talk to him there.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 18:02:36 -0800
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
We test PC code against mainframe code--different programs by different programmers on different architectures that are supposed to give the same results. It's fascinating to watch the PC grind away for 20 minutes and the mainframe, with an only slightly faster processor and several thousand users, spit the same calculation out in 20 seconds.

MIPS measured by Dhrystone ... is count of benchmark iterations compared to 370/158 assumed to be 1MIP processor
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Million_instructions_per_second

z900, 16 processors, 2.5BIPS (156MIPS/proc), Dec2000
z990, 32 processors, 9BIPS, (281MIPS/proc), 2003
z9, 54 processors, 18BIPS (333MIPS/proc), July2005
z10, 64 processors, 30BIPS (469MIPS/proc), Feb2008
z196, 80 processors, 50BIPS (625MIPS/proc), Jul2010
EC12, 101 processors, 75BIPS (743MIPS/proc), Aug2012


the z13 refs that I've seen published is that it has 30% more throughput than EC12 (or about 100BIPS) with 40% more processors ... or about 710MIPS/proc.

Claim was that at least half the per processor throughput improvement from z10->z196 was the introduction of cache miss compensation features that have been in other architectures for decades, out-of-order execution, branch prediction, speculative execution, etc. Further refinements supposedly contributes to further throughput improvement in EC12.

z196-era e5-2600v1 blade have ratings 400-500+ BIPS depending on model ... 16 processors (25BIPS-33BIPS/processor).

Current e5-2600v4 blade supposed to be 3-4 times e5-2600v1 ... somewhere around 1500BIPS (possibly 15 times that of z13)

e5-2600 blade can go for a couple thousand compared to around $30M for the mainframe.

e5-2600 can be configured with comparable configuration to z10, z196, ec12, z13, etc ... with fibre-channel with much higher throughput than mainframe FICON (running over fibre-channel) and industry fixed block disks as used by mainframes where they have overhead of CKD emulation on same industry fixed block disks

compareable e5-2600 server should have signifciantly better throughput than mainframe server at 1/10,000 (or less) the cost.

for unloaded PC to run 100 times slower than heavily loaded mainframe would have to mean that there are other factors at play.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2016 09:20:09 -0800
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
Yep, you're starting to "get it". How much overhead is there in Windows? How much in MVS?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#99 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#101 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#103 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

don't run windows, the cloud megadatacenters with servers mostly run linux, hundreds of thousands of systems with millions of processors in a cloud megadatacenters.

it has been long time since industry standard TPC & SPEC numbers manage to leak out for mainframe. IBM still publishes TPC numbers for non-mainframe but it has been ages since any numbers for mainframe
http://www.tpc.org/
similarly for SPEC
https://www.spec.org/

largely motivated by cloud megadatacenters benchmarks are starting to include energy efficiency per operation. system costs have been so commoditized, that for the cloud megadatacenters power & cooling has increasingly become major cost.

when there use to be mainframe TPC DBMS transaction benchmarks manage to leak out, unix&linux systems got ten times throughput or more than mainframe (and cost/transaction was off the chart).

most recent, there was peak i/o benchmark numbers leaked out for z196 ... it got 2M IOPS using 104 FICON (running on 104 fibre-channel). about the same time there was a single fibre-channel for e5-2600 blade claiming over million IOPS (two such fibre-channel having higher throughput than 104 FICON running on 104 fibre-channel).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

z196 has 14 system support processors dedicated for off loading some of the i/o processing (these are in addition to the "80" processors for execution). Published numbers are that all 14 processors run 100% busy doing 2.2M/sec SSCH (i/o) instructions ... however recommend operational characteristics is to keep the system support processors to 75% busy or 1.5M/sec SSCH.

So far I've only seen EC12 throughput expressed in approx. some percent more than z196, and similarly z13 throughput expressed in approx. some percent more than EC12 ... but no actual benchmarks ... and for z13, not even the previously quoted BIPS numbers.

really long ago and far away, did compare NFS 8kbyte packet transfer in UNIX at aggregate/total 5k instructions and equivalent operation in MVS with LU6.2 was 160kbyte instructions (at a time when MVS tcp/ip pathlength through VTAM was longer than the SNA pathlength through VTAM). At the time MVS pathlength for just interrupt processing was 10k instructions ... some part of which have since been offloaded to the system support processors (i.e. UNIX could completely do two NFS 8kbyte packet transfers in the instructions that it took MVS to just do processing for single interrupt; the MVS instructions didn't actually go away, just been offloaded into extra dedicated processors).

The one place that mainframe does have some advantage ... is calls between applications and subsystems. unix/linux have always been multiple different address spaces and operations had to be message passing through kernel calls. MVS history has forever been pointer passing API in the same address space (from os/360 days). This was an enormously tramantic moving to MVS with everything in different address space. Eventually they defined access registers and program call/return instructions. There are hardware tables for program call for the defined subsystems ... including their address space information. Access registers allow for multiply defined active virtual address spaces, primary and some number of alternates. The program call instruction will swap the application address space into a non-primary access register and load the called subsystem into the primary access register. The subsystem than has instructions to load/store from the non-primary (calling application) virtual address space. Then program return instruction will move the calling application virtual address space from non-primary virtual address space access register back into the primary virtual address space access register.

In non-mainframe hardware, a call to subsystem in different address space will require kernel call with lots of processing in the kernel (which is moved into hardware architecture in mainframe). For this to dominate in benchmark ... it would have to be nearly all kernel processing time (handling message passing calls back & forth between address spaces) ... since all the other MVS processing is taking significantly larger number of instructions on significantly slower processor.

past posts mentioning "access registers" (or the "dual address space" subset retrofitted to 3033):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#36 What is MVS/ESA?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#84 Is a VAX a mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#28 RS/6000 vs. System/390 architecture?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#58 Why not an IBM zSeries workstation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#28 Very CISC Instuctions (Was: why the machine word size ...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#73 Most complex instructions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#13 GETMAIN R/RU (was: An IEABRC Adventure)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#16 Minimalist design (was Re: Parity - why even or odd)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#51 Hardest Mistake in Comp Arch to Fix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#17 Black magic in POWER5
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#18 Black magic in POWER5
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#57 Handling variable page sizes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#58 IBM S/370-168, 195, and 3033
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#74 Everything you wanted to know about z900 from IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#1 Linux paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#13 Unused address bits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#53 Reviving Multics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#69 unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#0 Resolved: There Are No Programs With >32 Bits of Text
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#12 Resolved: There Are No Programs With >32 Bits of Text
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#13 Page Table - per OS/Process
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#29 SR 15,15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#6 If the x86 ISA could be redone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#27 [Meta] Marketplace argument
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#53 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#26 PCIe as a chip-to-chip interconnect
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#54 CKD Disks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#18 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#57 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#3 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#53 The mid-seventies SHARE survey
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#63 intel's Vanderpool and virtualization in general
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#62 Misuse of word "microcode"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#7 new Enterprise Architecture online user group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#41 Moving assembler programs above the line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#57 Moving assembler programs above the line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#18 address space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#19 address space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#41 Instruction Set Enhancement Idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#48 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#39 What happens if CR's are directly changed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#25 Multiple address spaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#28 Multiple address spaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#33 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#10 What part of z/OS is the OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#26 A Day For Surprises (Astounding Itanium Tricks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#32 MIPS architecture question - Supervisor mode & who is using it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#42 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#23 threads versus task
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#23 Multiple mappings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#39 Multiple mappings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#39 Wylbur and Paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#59 IBM to the PCM market(the sky is falling!!!the sky is falling!!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#14 Some IBM 3033 information
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#27 user level TCP implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#28 IBM 360 Model 20 Questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#71 IBM 360 Model 20 Questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#10 IBM 8000 series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#21 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#68 Direction of Stack Growth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#56 CSA 'above the bar'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#16 segmentation or lack thereof
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#75 T3 Sues IBM To Break its Mainframe Monopoly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#33 New Opcodes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#35 New Opcodes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#14 Kernels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#33 IBM Preview of z/OS V1.10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#60 Different Implementations of VLIW
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#29 DB2 & z/OS Dissertation Research
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#52 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#45 z/OS BIND9 DNS Vulnerable to Cache Poisoning Attack Problem?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#83 old 370 info
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#53 Old XDS Sigma stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#73 Addressing Scheme with 64 vs 63 bits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#40 Opsystems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#59 Why do IBMers think disks are 'Direct Access'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#74 Best IEFACTRT (off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#58 Rudd bucks boost IBM mainframe business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#41 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#81 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#75 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#83 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#2 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#3 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#8 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#10 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#13 OS/400 and z/OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#21 Dataspaces or 64 bit storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#72 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#17 New job for mainframes: Cloud platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#20 New job for mainframes: Cloud platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#39 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#11 History of byte addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#61 Joint Design of Instruction Set and Language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#45 segments and sharing, was 68000 assembly language programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#66 M68k add to memory is not a mistake any more
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#100 5 Byte Device Addresses?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#57 How will mainframers retiring be different from Y2K?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#26 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#27 Simulated PDP-11 Blinkenlight front panel for SimH
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#80 Slackware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#21 8-bit bytes and byte-addressed machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#30 Regarding Time Sharing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#26 Mainframes are still the best platform for high volume transaction processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#22 Is Microsoft becoming folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#81 Still not convinced about the superiority of mainframe security vs distributed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#71 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#62 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#40 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#22 Complete 360 and 370 systems found
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#36 1950: Northrop's Digital Differential Analyzer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#82 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#46 Connecting memory to 370/145 with only 36 bits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#60 ou sont les VAXen d'antan, was Variable-Length Instructions that aren't
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#116 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#35 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#57 Introducing the New z13s: Tim's Hardware Highlights

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2016 12:37:09 -0800
latest in discussion groups

finally somebody has decided to use
http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/ov-10-broncos-were-sent-to-fight-isis-and-they-kicked-a-1764407068

Instead of providing light support aircraft loaded with technology like the OV-10 Bronco, we spent billions fighting men in mud huts carrying rusty AK-47s with F-16s and F-15s costing tens of thousands an hour to operate. We literally flew the wings off our fighter fleet in the process.

...

the latest flavor
http://www.military.com/daily-news/2015/12/28/after-delays-a29-attack-aircraft-to-arrive-afghanistan-2016.html

of course there isn't trillions of dollars for the military-industrial(-congressional) complex. Part of the current cry is no matter how bad the F-35 is ... it is the only thing there is ... and if they can wear-out the current air fleet, it will accelerate the spending of trillions on the F-35.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

One of the comments was picture/reference to RAF&Rhodesian Hunter crews in 1954 practiced by shooting holes in trash can (which is compareable to what they are using F15s&F16s now).

GAO air power analysis of Desert Storm (42 days, only last 100hrs involved land warfare). One of the most effective were A10 with 30mm ... used a million 30mm @$13 ... or $13M (and enormously so in effectiveness/$$) ... one of the reasons that MICC doesn't like the A10.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#87 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#88 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#89 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#90 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#92 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#94 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#95 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#96 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#97 Computers anyone?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computers anyone?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computers anyone?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2016 18:34:14 -0800
hancock4 writes:
The whole idea of 'automated' personal computers was flawed. Remember, we had computer viruses even in DOS days.

Hardware and software designers should've learned from that, but they made things much worse.

Just like the Internet was designed 'too open', so were PCs. (Did they have viruses on CPM machines? CICS or TSO?) The computer industry was so hell bent on making machines super easy to use that they allowed too many vulnerabilities. They really should've known better.

Amazingly, now cell phones are at risk.

When I got Windows XP, which wasn't cheap, they said it was a secure system. But now they said its security is terrible. Go figure.

Today, when we add a new application to our PC, we don't have to do anything, it is totally automated. Perhaps it wouldn't kill us to have to follow some instructions and issue some DOS commands to allow a new application. Those commands could only be issued at the PC from the keyboard. Is this a bad idea?


PCs were stand-alone ("air-gapped") and small (safe) private business LANs. Lots of business applications with automated execution evolved in the small/safe private business LANs.

1996 MSDC at Moscone had banners saying "Internet" all over the place, but the slogon in all the sessions was "protect your investment" .... this was all the automated (basic) applications developed for the small/safe business environment carried over to the internet ... basically the same network support for local small/safe business network ... was expanded to support tcp/ip (and the anarchy of the internet) ... w/o any additional safeguards or countermeasures.

up until mid-90s, the major internet threat/vulnerabilities was buffer length exploits in c-language implemented softare. Going into the late 90s, the MS "automated execution" exploits grew until they were as common as the buffer length exploits.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#buffer

old 2004 post with some analyses did on CVE database, at the time I talked to the Mitre people about requiring classification keywords in the CVE reports, but they said that they were lucky to get the details they do get, if they started asking for better detail, some people might not bother with generating CVE at all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#43 security taxonomy and CVE

past '96 MSDC posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#49 Virus propagation risks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#45 Computer programming was all about:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#22 Why did TCP become popular ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#34 Next generation processor architecture?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#51 Specifying all biz rules in relational data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#50 DOS C prompt in "Vista"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#18 Oddly good news week: Google announces a Caps library for Javascript
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#87 CompUSA to Close after Jan. 1st 2008
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#26 realtors (and GM, too!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#43 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#63 who pioneered the WEB
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#66 What is the protocal for GMT offset in SMTP (e-mail) header
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#37 (slightly OT - Linux) Did IBM bet on the wrong OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#36 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#9 The IETF is probably the single element in the global equation of technology competition than has resulted in the INTERNET
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#40 The Great Cyberheist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#50 IBM and the Computer Revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#58 IBM and the Computer Revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#15 Identifying Latest zOS Fixes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#57 Are Tablets a Passing Fad?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#18 John R. Opel, RIP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#59 The lost art of real programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#141 With cloud computing back to old problems as DDos attacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#81 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#93 Where are all the old tech workers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#18 Zeus/SpyEye 'Automatic Transfer' Module Masks Online Banking Theft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#32 Zeus/SpyEye 'Automatic Transfer' Module Masks Online Banking Theft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#37 Simulated PDP-11 Blinkenlight front panel for SimH
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#93 Gordon Crovitz: Who Really Invented the Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#97 Gordon Crovitz: Who Really Invented the Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#45 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#68 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#10 It's all K&R's fault
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#11 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#23 weird trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#87 On a lighter note, even the Holograms are demonstrating
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#35 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#90 These hackers warned the Internet would become a security disaster. Nobody listened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#35 [Poll] Computing favorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#39 [Poll] Computing favorities

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic - lies about Medicare

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic - lies about Medicare
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2016 10:14:14 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks

latest from Luxembourg leaks

Ministers agree to new EU rule to curb corporate tax dodging
http://www.icij.org/blog/2016/03/ministers-agree-new-eu-rule-curb-corporate-tax-dodging

cooking the books so that profit is moved offshore into subsidiary for tax evasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion


27 Companies That Paid No Taxes
http://ritholtz.com/2016/03/27-companies-that-paid-no-taxes/
27 giant profitable companies paid no taxes
http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/markets/2016/03/07/27-giant-profitable-companies-paid-no-taxes/81399094/

other drift

It Turns Out the Koch Brothers Took an Interest in the VA Hospital System
http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/politics/news/a42938/koch-brothers-va-hospitals/

We consulted on dataprocessing modernization (replacing what was used for 1980 & 1990 census) for the 2000 census (essentially for out-of-pocket expenses). When census had all day audit on the effort, I was asked to stand in front of the room and answer all the questions. We then made an offer to do something similar for the VA, meeting with the head VA staffer on the hill ... VA was just coming off a multiple billion dollar dataprocessing modernization failure and gearing up for the next one. Turns out that such offers are major threat to the beltway bandits and their Success Of Failure culture (not limited to intelligence agencies)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

Last decade there was massive privatization going on ... intelligence saw 70% of the budget and over half the people (in addition to the rapidly expanding Success Of Failure culture)
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

Few may remember but a major plank in the original campaign of the current administration was to reverse the enormous privatization that occurred with the previous administration. It seems to have slowed down or stopped, but little evidence of being reversed. The "spies like us" makes reference to security clearances having been outsourced to subsidiaries of private-equity operations ... in the wake of the Snowden affair they were found to be filling out the paperwork, but not actually doing the background checks (operations in the private-equity mill are under extreme pressure to produce revenue). There were recent articles that there is an attempt to bring some of that back in-house. The contractor involved in the OPM breach was also a subsidiary of a private-equity operation ... but it is not clear that they just changed contractors.

private-equity posts

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

A big part of the problem was the MICC was actively lobbying that majority of the money go to large for-profit industry. MICC wanted a war so badly that corporate reps were telling former eastern block countries that if they voted for IRAQ2 invasion in the UN, they would get membership in NATO and (directed appropriation) USAID (for purchase of modern US arms).
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

But Military-Industrial-Congressional Complex didn't bother with increasing appropriations for taking care of the current and former members of the military. VA Administrative bonuses was based on things like service wait time. Unfortunately service wait times were exploding because congress failed to provide the necessary funding. While administrators starting fiddling the figures to get their bonuses, the enormously more egregious failing was congress not providing necessary funding in the first place. Now you see reports of industry lobbying in congress to make all sorts of cuts in military benefits because they want that money too.

military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

This report on "corruption" primarily comes down to administrators fiddling the numbers ... which can be considered obfuscation and misdirection, since it fundamentally comes to insufficient funding from congress to provide appropriate level of service.
http://time.com/2809158/veterans-affairs-scandal-eric-shinseki/

They lied about the numbers and got their bonuses. However, if they told the truth about the numbers and didn't get their bonuses ... it still would have made no difference in the service delays.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Qbasic

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Qbasic
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2016 11:25:32 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
in addition to the tax evasion that was legalized last decade, in 2009, IRS announced there was still another $400B in unpaid taxes on money illegally hidden off-shore and were going after the 52,000 wealthy americans responsible. Then in 2011, the new congress announces it was cutting the budget of the IRS department responsible for recoverying the funds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion


since then there has been news about a few billion in fines for the too big to fail that facilitated the tax evasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

... but nothing about recoverying the $400B. given the record on funding recovery of the $400B in tax evasion, what is the chance of this (recovery $134 for every dollar appropriated):

GAO to lawmakers: Spend money with us to save money governmentwide
http://federalnewsradio.com/hearingsoversight/2016/03/gao-lawmakers-spend-money-save-money/

and to further upset the military-industrial-congressional complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Pentagon Watchdog Changed Files Ahead of GAO Audit
http://www.pogo.org/straus/issues/military-reform/2016/letter-to-pentagon-watchdog.html
A Guaranteed Taxpayer Rip-Off?
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2016/03/a-guaranteed-taxpayer-ripoff.html

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#65 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#67 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#83 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#84 Trump vs. Hillary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#85 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#98 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#107 Qbasic - lies about Medicare

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Bimodal Distribution

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Bimodal Distribution
Date: 07 Mar 2016
Blog: Facebook
El-Erian is discussing bimodal distribution. The Only Game in Town: Central Banks, Instability, and Avoiding the Next Collapse (Mohamed A. El-Erian)
http://www.amazon.com/Only-Game-Town-Instability-Avoiding-ebook/dp/B0165I3V4C/

loc3334-36:
Remember the dominance of IBM on the eve of the personal computer (PC) revolution. The company had by far the most powerful brand in technology. Each year it deployed a large R&D budget. And it was profitable. By these metrics, it was in a very strong position to dominate the PC revolution.

loc3336-39:
Research shows that IBM executives were aware of the "disruptive technology" aspect of the PC. They discussed the issues involved, recognizing the potential for a bimodal outcome for mainframe customers, their bread-and-butter clientele. Some would be lost permanently to the PC while others would be interested in mainframe upgrades to support new requirements.

loc3340-41:
But when it came to implementation, IBM appeared to fall into the "active inertia" trap. Rather than pivot decisively to the new approach, they allowed their much more familiar historical behavior to overinfluence their future actions.

... snip ...

Late 80s, a senior disk engineer gets a talk scheduled at annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference, supposedly on 3174 performance ... but opens the talk with statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had stranglehold on datacenters with corporate strategic ownership of everything crossing the datacenter walls, and were fiercely fighting off distributed computing and client/server (trying to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm and install base). The disk division was starting to see data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to reverse the process, but were constantly being vetoed by the communication group.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

Trivia: The science center had developed a lot of performance technologies, monitoring, simulation, analytical modeling, workload&system profiling (evolves into capacity planning), etc.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

One of the APL-based analytical models was enhanced and offerred on the world-wide online sales&marketing support system HONE as Performance Predictor, sales support could enter workload&system profiles and ask change "what-if" questions.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

I had done dynamic adaptive resource management as undergraudate in the 60s, which was picked up and shipped in CP67.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

In the morph from CP67 to VM370 there was a lot of simplification and many features were dropped. During the FS period I continued to work on 360/370 stuff (even periodically ridiculing FS activity). VM370 customers were lobbying for re-introduction of my dynamic adaptive resource management and the with the implosion of FS and the mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines, contributed to decision to (re-)release my "Resource Manager".

I had also developed some automated benchmarking tools that could vary workload & configuration. As part of the release of the "Resource Manager", 2000 automated benchmarks were run that took 3months elapsed time. The first 1000 benchmarks were selected to methodically cover possible workload and configuration profiles. The last 1000 benchmarks workload&configuration profiles was selected by a modified version of the Performance Predictor which was fed results of all previous benchmarks. It would select workload/configuration, predict the results and then compare the benchmark results with the predicted. It would also search for optimal workload+configurations doing "hill climbing" searching for maximums and also attempting to differentiate from "local" maximums verses "real" maximums. This assumes that there might be an arbitrary number of optimal maximum solutions somewhat analogy to multi-modal (not just bimodal) distribution.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#benchmark

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Koch-Fueled Plot to Destroy the VA

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Koch-Fueled Plot to Destroy the VA
Date: 14 Mar 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#107 Qbasic - lies about Medicare

The Koch-Fueled Plot to Destroy the VA
http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2016/03/koch-fueled-plot-destroy-va
Bottom line: there were some problems in Phoenix, where employees had gamed the system for recording wait times. However, there was no evidence that this problem was widespread; there was no evidence that it caused any deaths; and there was no evidence that care had been compromised. In fact, a Rand study concluded that with the exception of patient communication with doctors and nurses, the VA performed as well as or better than private health care on nearly every measure:

...
VA outpatient care outperformed non-VA outpatient care on almost all quality measures. VA hospitals performed the same as or better than non-VA hospitals on most inpatient quality measures, but worse on others. VA performed significantly better, on average, on almost all 16 outpatient measures when compared with commercial, Medicare, and Medicaid HMOs. On average, VA hospitals performed the same or significantly better than non-VA hospitals on 12 inpatient effectiveness measures, all six measures of inpatient safety, and all three inpatient mortality measures, but significantly worse than non-VA hospitals on two effectiveness measures and three readmission measures. On most measures, Veteran-reported experiences of care in VA hospitals were worse than patient-reported experiences in non-VA hospitals.

... snip ...

Last decade the DOD budget was increased a couple trillion to send soldiers off to war ... but little for when they came back. In 2012 a neighbor in the mental health care profession, mentioned that VA finally got extra funding for mental health care which amounted to hiring every available person in the profession they could find. Their comment was it would take at least couple years to train the people to meet the demand. However VA is fighting with large arms merchants that want VA&benefits cut to provide them with more money. One of Colonel John Boyd quotes:
"People say the Pentagon does not have a strategy. They are wrong. The Pentagon does have a strategy; it is: Don't interrupt the money flow, add to it."

One of the side-effects of the lack of sufficient mental health care professionals is that they are prescribing highly addictive "maintenance" drugs that they may be on for the rest of their life (which seems to just be fine with the drug industry).

2002 congress let the fiscal responsibility act expire (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue). 2010 CBO report has in the interirm taxes were cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsibility act (which also had all previous federal debt paid off by 2010). Since then the taxes haven't been restored and only few dents in the spending to interest on the debt is approaching half trillion.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

First major bill after fiscal responsibility act as allowed to expired was medicare part-d. CBS 60mins did expose that 18 republicans responsible for the bill added one line sentence just before final vote and prevents CBO from distributing report on effect of the change (which prevents competitive bidding). Within six months after bill passes, all 18 have resigned and are on drug industry payroll. 60mins show drugs under medicare part-D that are three times the price of identical drugs from the VA (which allows competitive bidding).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#medicare.part-d

By 2005 the US Comptroller General is including in speeches that nobody in congress is capable of middle school arithmetic (for how badly they savage the budget) and part-D comes to be a long term $40T item totally swamping all other budget items.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

Billions in waste is bad ... but last decade they were doing tens of trillions ... 10,000 times (four orders of magnitude) as much.

There are similar numbers for the economic mess. Freddy & Fannie did something under $500B. However the too big to fail securitized mortgages designed to fail, paid for triple-A rating (when the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A) ... enabling them to sell over $27T .... including to funds restricted to dealing in "safe" investments (like large pension funds which lost something like 30% of their value). The non-GSE did between 50-100 times as much as the GSEs (Freddy & Fannie) but obfuscation and misdirection tries to divert attention to the role of the GSEs ... when nearly 100 times as much were done by too big to fail ... not involving the GSEs at all. End of 2008, just the four largest too big to fail were still holding $5.2T in toxic assets (of their own making) "off-book".
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

In 2010, CBO also looked at the DOD budget increase 2002-2009 ... which included a little over $1+T that they can't identify what it was used for. Of the budget increase that they can identify, it includes $60B in pallets of shrink-wrapped $100 bills that were airlifted to Iraq ... and apparently evaporated once it got there. Remember that the original justification the administration used for the Iraq war included it would not cost more than $50B ... and it is now well over trillion and counting (enormous amounts evaporating into the pockets of the military-industrial complex).

This only details $40B of it
http://www.cnbc.com/id/45031100

Part of the issue was with four largest TBTF carrying $5.2T end of 2008, the $700B in TARP funds for toxic asset purchase couldn't dent the problem. They came up with other ways to use the money and it was left to the Federal Reserve to do the real bailout. The FED fought long hard legal battle to prevent disclosure of what is really going on (with tens of trillions in ZIRP funds and buying toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar). Shortly after disclosure, Bernanke holds press conference and says that he had expected that the TBTF would use the tens of trillions to help mainstreet, but when they didn't he had no way to force them. Supposedly Bernanke was selected in part because he was a depression era scholar, however the FED had tried the same thing then with the same results, so Bernanke shouldn't really expected anything different this time.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

AIG was negotiating to payoff the CDS gambling bets at 50cents on the dollar when the SECTREAS steps in and forces them to sign a document that they can't sue those making the bets and to take nearly $200B in TARP funds to payoff the gambling bets at face value. AIG is the largest recipients of TARP funds and the firm formally head by SECTREAS is the largest recipient of facevalue payoffs.

So to try and aid the rest of the country, $787B; Tax Cuts - $288, Healthcare - $147.7, Education - $90.9, Environment - $7.2, Social Welfare - $82.5, Infrastructure - $80.9, Energy - $61.3, Housing - $12.7, Research - $8.9, Other investments - $18.1
http://www.investopedia.com/terms/a/american-recovery-and-reinvestment-act.asp

I can find that Hanford got $2B in stimulus funds that went to CH2M Hill for cleanup, but there were massive schedule and cost overruns ... seems to be Hanford problems with CH2M Hill going back to 1999.
https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/ch2m-hill-hanford-group-inc-admits-criminal-conduct-parent-company-agrees-cooperate-ongoing

Between 1999 and 2008, CH2M Hill had a Department of Energy contract to manage and clean 177 large underground storage tanks containing mixed radioactive and hazardous waste at the Department of Energy's Hanford Nuclear Site in southeastern Washington (the Tank Farms Contract)

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2016 17:17:40 -0700
Jon Elson <jmelson@wustl.edu> writes:
Higher level machines had wider data paths and somewhat faster memories. We had a 360/50 with LCS (Large Core Storage). It gave you a LOT of memory (for the time) but it was DOG slow, 8 us cycle time. We later got a 360/65 and knew not to make that mistake again, it had internal memory, and they could be interleaved, giving a substantial speed advantage.

some of the LCS installations instead of treating it like extension to memory, treated it as a kind of (3090) expanded store ... or simulated electronic disk. They would simulate read/write transfer operations moving data back&forth between LCS and "fast memory".

trivia ... 360/67 single processor was basically 360/65 with hardware address relocation (virtual memory).

360/65 multiprocessor was basically two single processor 360/65 with memory laid out as single entity ... but both processors had their own dedicated channels. all channels and both processors would contend for memory access. SMP I/O would be simulated by having two channel controllers ... that would be configured at same address on channels going to the two different processors.

360/67 multiprocessor had multi-ported memory

original 360/60 & 360/70 were going to have 1mic, interleaved memory. before they ship, memory is improved to 750ns (8byte) interleaved memory and the models are changed to 360/65, 360/67, and 360/75.

GA27-2719-2,
http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/pdf/ibm/360/funcChar/GA27-2719-2_360-67_funcChar.pdf

pg29:
Four independent storage buses can be attached to the 2365-12: one from each CPU and Channel Controller in a full duplex system.

pg36, figure8, model 67-1 has single bus to storage units

pg37, System Data Flow
In a Model 67-2 system, each CPU and each Channel Controller is connected, with separate bus, to each storage unit in the system. For example, a system with two CPUs and two Channel Controllers has four buses. Each bus can connect to as many as eight storage units. Conflicts that occur among the several buses connected to each storage unit are resolved at the storage unit.

pg38, figure10, model 67-2 two processors, four buses to storage units

pg47, Instruction Times goes into detail about additional latency added when storage isn't in the first 512kbytes (1st two storage units).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2016 19:31:35 -0700
Jon Elson <elson@pico-systems.com> writes:
The problem with 360's (and early 370's without DAT) was that programs were totally relocatable at load time, but as soon as you executed a few instructions, physical addresses ("pointers") and subroutine return addresses were stored in registers and memory locations, and the program could no longer be relocated. Not a big problem in the smallest machines, but in larger machines, and especially when on-line programming like TSO came into favor, you could have many hundreds of programs in some stage of work. Without the /67's relocation feature, swapping programs in and out of memory was essentially impossible, as it would have to be swapped back into the same address as it had been in before.

For the 360/67, IBM provided a very hacked OS called CP/67. Mostly they had to make every system service handle converting any addresses included as parameters from program space-relative addresses to physical addresses before the supervisor-state routines could work correctly. Not a terribly hard job, but required a huge amount of code to be changed. Also, no I/O could be left hanging when a program was swapped out.


APL/360 swapped workspaces because workspace contents were all interpreted ... no 360 address fields.

360/67 had segment and page tables ... 1mbyte segements and psw-mode controlled whether it was 24bit (16mbyte) or 32bit (4gbyte) addressing (and tables).

os/360 "relocatable" were RLD records which gave location of the address constant within the program that had to be "swizzled" after loading but before execution could begin.

Official system for 360/67 was tss/360 ... which created location independent execution image. Address space tables could be setup to point to the executable image on disk ... and at arbitrary, dynamically chosen virtual address ... w/o having to preload the image and swizzle all the RLD address constant.

science center did (virtual memory) cp/40 and cms on 360/40 that had been modified with virtual memory hardware. cms ran "stand-alone" on 360/40 in standard 360 mode. CMS was developed in parallel with development of cp/40 ... and some of it reflected the experience that many had on MIT's CTSS (some of the CTSS went to the 5th flr and did multics and others went to the science center on the 4th flr)

CTSS reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System
cp/40 history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt
past posts mentioning the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

when science center is able to replace their modified 360/40 with 360/67, cp/40 morphs into cp/67. Melinda has a lot more of that history ("VM History" about half-way down)
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/

One of the issues with CMS, was the science center adopted a lot of os/360 applications ... and needed to provide os/360 system services simulation in CMS ... and also acquired a lot of os/360 RLD address constant conventions. Every CMS had its own virtual address space and ran in a 360 virtual machine doing I/O with SIOs and channel programs (ran the same way on stand alone 360/40 as it did in cp/40 or cp/67 virtual machine). It did do a executable image that had all the ADCONS pre-swizzled ... but it resulted in them having to be loaded a fixed address.

Jan1968, three people came out and installed CP/67 at university where I was undergraduate. Over the next several months, I rewrote large parts of the CP/67 kernel code (including significantly reducing pathlengths) ... and presented some results at the '68 SHARE meeting ... part of that presentation:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/97.html#22 Pre S/360 IBM Operating Systems?

I also did dynamic adaptive resource management, added TTY terminal support, added order-seek disk arm queuing, dynamically chaining multi-I/O requests in single channel program for disks and 2301 drum (2301 optimized for maximum transfer per revolution), and redid the page replacement algorithm and page thrasing control operation. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock

After graduating and joining the science center ... I did a paged-mapped filesystem for CMS ... which had significantly higher throughput than the standard CMS filesystem ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

I also redid the CP/67 shared segment infrastructure ... so that could dynamically have multiple shared things at arbitrary locations in the virtual address space. Standard CMS executables transferred from standard filesystem to page mapped filesystem would have to be mapped at the pre-established fixed virtual address. For code to reside in shared segment (appear concurrently at different virtual address spaces) I usually had to do some amount of rewrite. For typical code that would be address independent (similar to tss/360), i usually had to do a whole lot more work. Lots of past posts about pain to get location independent and/or shared code for CMS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

Note that for CP/67 virtual machine SIO ... CCWTRANS would scan the channel program in the virtual machine, fixing/pinning the virtual pages involved in the I/O in real storage, and creating a copy of the channel program with the real page addresses (as opposed to the virtual page addresses), start the I/O with the copy channel program and when it finishes, "unpin" the virtual pages.

When they did OS/360 MVT for virtual memory OS/VS2 SVS, they initially borrowed CP/67's CCWTRANS and worked it into EXCP/SVC0 processing. MVT moving to virtual memory had to accept application channel programs built in virtual address space and passed in EXCP/SVC0 and do the same processing that CP/67 did for virtual machine SIO operation. That was by far the biggest amount of code that tehy needed in going from MVT to OS/VS2 SVS (OS/VS2 SVS startup would build a single 16mbyte virtual address space and fix MVT to believe it was running on 16mbyte real machine, then there was a little bit of code to handle page fault, page replacement and page i/o operation).

Note: since virtual memory was handled on individual 4k page basis, tasks could be dropped from queue and its pages replaced by some other activated task while I/O simulation was in progress (only the virtual pages actually involved in I/O were fixed, and they would be unpinned and become available as soon as i/o completed) ... dropping from queue can be done whether or not there was simulated I/O in progress.

During the early 70s, there was the internal Future System effort that was completely different than 360/370 and was going to completely replace it.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

I continued to work on CP/67 and would periodically ridicule FS. Part of this FS was doing some of the worst of tss/360 "single-level-store" and I would claim that I learned what not to do for my page-mapped CMS filesystem from IBM SE that would play with tss/360 at the univ (even tho tss/360 did location independent executable images correctly). During FS they were killing off 370 efforts, which is credited with giving clone processors market foothold. When FS implodes, there is made rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipelines ... which contributes to decision to release a lot of stuff I had been doing. Old email about having migrated my stuff from cp67 to vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970







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