List of Archived Posts

2013 Newsgroup Postings (03/14 - 03/29)

Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
"JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
Grid Computing (from 1May2002)
Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
Y2K hacks
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
"JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
a long time ago, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
Bank Holiday In Cyprus
A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
Computer Simulations Reveal Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
The Madness of King George Revisited
Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
"JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes Economic History Bizarre?
IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet >>>and more
Inside IBM's $67 billion SAGE, the largest computer ever built
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 14 Mar 2013 13:58:37 -0700
edgould1948@COMCAST.NET (Ed Gould) writes:
I worked a DC in downtown Chicago in the 70's and 80's and we were supposedly 24X7 shop. We had power problems+ and we could not afford a UPS in fact at the time we would have needed a HUGE UPS to get us through power outages. I guess these were intermittent rather than lengthy. Our biggest thorn in out side was a solid state paging device as when it lost power you had to re-init it and re define the PLPA page data set. Vsam at the time was a PITA as you couldn't delete the pagespace unless it was already there so we ended up with 5 or 10 page data sets cataloged on the volume that was empty. (and no noscratch was ignored most of the time). Since we only used it for PLPA we had to IPL delete/define PLPA and update parmlib and then re ipl with CLPA this became a weekly occurrence until the big boss got tired of the extra outages and got rid of solid state device (sorry do not remember the vendor).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#90 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

recent post about providing online 7x24 service starting in the 60s, some of the hacks that were done to get the "cpu meter" to stop when activity was otherwise idle (back in the days when mainframes were rented and monthly lease was based on "cpu meter" reading):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#91 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

recent post about trying to get multiple exposure support (multiple device addresses per real device ... aka like on 2305 fixed-head disk that came with 8 logical device addresses) for 3350 with fixed-head option ... so I could overlap data transfer from the fixed head area while disk arm was moving for non-fixed head area
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#74 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

I got shotdown by "Jupiter" project in POK ... which was planning on shipping a solid state device ... and thot that I might be competition. They were never able to announce ... since customers started buying all the memory chips that IBM could turn out as processor memory (and memory chips in processors had higher profit than same memory chips in solid state device).

Internally they then started providing "IBM 1655" solid state paging devices (initially 2305 simulation) ... 1655s were really from another vendor ... that had developed a way to use memory chips that had failed standard processor memory tests ... in solid state paging devices. Power outages were no problem since had procedure that would come up and automatigically reclaim these devices w/o requiring manual intervention or re-ipl.

misc. past posts mentioning the (internal) 1655:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#17 database (or b-tree) page sizes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#53 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#31 index searching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#17 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#40 Do any architectures use instruction count instead of timer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#15 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#17 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#55 HASP assembly: What the heck is an MVT ABEND 422?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#39 S/360 undocumented instructions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#73 DASD Architecture of the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#3 Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#5 He Who Thought He Knew Something About DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#51 winscape?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#38 Is VIO mandatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#1 Multiple address spaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#46 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#57 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#36 REAL memory column in SDSF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#30 Why magnetic drums was/are worse than disks ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#59 FBA rant
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#26 Tom's Hdw review of SSDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#9 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#4 Remembering the CDC 6600
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#15 Flash memory arrays
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#54 August 7, 1944: today is the 65th Anniversary of the Birth of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#11 Mainframe Executive article on the death of tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#22 Mainframe Executive article on the death of tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#55 Mainframe Executive article on the death of tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#82 [OT] What is the protocal for GMT offset in SMTP (e-mail) header time-stamp?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#78 Software that breaks computer hardware( was:IBM 029 service manual )
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#75 I'd forgotten what a 2305 looked like
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#9 program coding pads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#43 history of Programming language and CPU in relation to each

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 14 Mar 2013 15:49:31 -0700
arnoldt@US.IBM.COM (Todd Arnold) writes:
IBM had three channel-attached crypto units for the mainframes.

1977 - IBM 3845 DES encryption unit

1979 - IBM 3848 DES encryption unit - faster than the 3845, and added Triple-DES (yes, IBM already had Triple-DES in its products in 1979!)

1989 - IBM Transaction Security System (TSS) which included the 4753. The 4753 was the first product to offer the CCA architecture, and it is the ancestor of all of the other crypto processors such as the Crypto Express cards.


in part to be used with IBM ATM machines
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_3624

in conjunction with PIN processing and authorizing financial transactions
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_identification_number

3624 pin processing had a weakness that could be exploited by an attacker if they had access to the banks computers

discussed in more detail here (also referencing ibm 4758)
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/UCAM-CL-TR-560.pdf

disclaimer ... even tho I was in research at the time, I also had offices and labs in the Los Gatos lab ... mentioned in the 3624 wiki reference ... which also references one of my old postings from 2004.

recent ibm reference
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/zos/v1r11/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm.zos.r11.csfb300/pinkeys.htm

in the mid-80s, I was involved in doing another kind of twist on DES ... and the product crypto group (responsible for those IBM mainframe DES units) complained that I had seriously weakened DES ... however, after spending 3months in debate ... finally convinced them it was significantly stronger than standard DES (instead of weaker) ... it was hollow victory ... finding out that (at the time) there were 3-kinds of crypto: 1) the kind they don't care about, 2) the kind you can't do, 3) the kind you can only do for them (aka I was told I could build as many boards as I wanted ... but there was only one customer that they could be sold to).

I was doing this HSDT effort ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

and spending arm&leg on T1 full-duplex DES crypto units (about 300kbyte/sec aggregate). I wanted a board that could do sustained channel speed DES crypto (ten times faster), being able to even change key on every packet (traditional DES chips tended to have high latency on key change) and cost less than $100.

old email mentioning that software standard DES ran at 150kbytes/sec on 3081 processor ... aka both 3081k processors would be required to support full-duplex T1 (150kbytes/sec concurrent in each direction)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#email841115

other old email mentioning crypto
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#crypto

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 14 Mar 2013 17:02:32 -0700
martin_packer@UK.IBM.COM (Martin Packer) writes:
Interesting you mention "Jupiter Project"...

... In the late 1980's as a young SE I supported one of the "Jupiter Council" customers in their roll out of what something called "Jupiter" turned into: DFSMS.

I'm wondering if your mentioned SSD was another part of a grander plan - incorporating storage management and hardware.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#0 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future</a>

reuse of code names ... POK solid state Jupiter was late 70s. HSM&DFSMS was west coast disk division ... although JUPITER (DFSMS) was in progress in STL by at least early 1983. There was effort in this timeframe to do a totally different kind of vm370 system (unrelated to then current vm370 or the internal vmtool that would become vm/xa) and in 1983 there were joint reviews with the JUPITER group (at the time in STL).

in the late 70s, I had been con'ed into playing disk engineer part time over in bldg. 14&15 (disk engineering lab and disk product test lab)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

... and the disk division was the ones that wanted more competitive 3350 (it was POK group that felt it would be in competition with the solid-state disk that they were hoping to do).

when I first transferred to san jose research ... they let me wander around various places ... recent mention about STL IMS group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

but they also let me wander around bldg 14&15. At the time they were running disk development regression tests with stand-alone mainframes (they had variety of different mainframes, frequently getting early engineering processors to validate new channels as well as using to validate engineering development dasd) ... scheduled 7x24 around the clock dedicated (stand-alone) mainframe time. They had recently attempted to use MVS in the environment, enabling concurrent testing ... but found MVS had 15min MTBF (hang/died, requiring re-ipl) in that environment.

I offerred to rewrite I/O supervisor making it bullet proof and never failed ... which greatly increased their productivity having ondemand, anytime, concurrent testing available. this got me sucked into diagnosing hardware problems because frequently initial fingerpointing was at my software.

later I wrote an internal-only document describing the effort and happen to mention the MVS 15min MTBF ... which brought down the wrath of the MVS group on my head (I think they would have gotten me fired if they could have figured out how).

note however, it was the san jose disk software group that quoted me the $26M business case requirement for MVS FBA ... even if I gave them fully integrated and tested code ... to cover pubs, education, training etc (and I could only use incremental new disk sales ... required possibly $200m-$300m ... and claim was they were selling disks as fast as they could make them ... and any FBA support would just change from CKD to same amount of FBA; was precluded from using life-cycle savings and/or other business justifications). misc. past posts mentioning CKD/FBA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

also unrelated to networking and crypto & the Los Gatos lab ... recent reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#1 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2013 22:16:09 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Are you talking about the 3880-11 and -13, or does that apply to the -23 as well?

3880-11 was 4k record cache & 3880-13 was full track cache, both 8mbyte

3880-2x increased cache size from 8mbyte to 32mbyte.

3880-11 code name was ironwood and before it was released i showed that typical configuration of virtual memory (using 3880-11 as 4k record paging cache) with 32mbyte 3081 ... typically provided little benefit.

default configuration was more real processor storage than cache storage ... so any record in the cache was also in processor storage. a miss on page in processor stroage ... would also result in it also not being in 3880 cache ... requiring it to be read from 3380 into cache and then into real memory ... rarely was there a miss in processor storage that was in the cache. I called this "dup" (or "duplicate") strategy.

I had run into it when i was managing page migration with 2305 fix-head disks several years earlier ... when processor real storage was becoming significantly larger than the backing fast secondary storage (aka 2301 or 2305; page migration would move low used pages off fixed-head area to . It was possible to do something similar with 3880-11 with a special "non-cached" read operation ... if the page wasn't in the cache ... it would do a direct disk cache-bypass read, it the page was in the cache, it would read it from the cache (and remove its slot in the cache). Writes went into cache (when page was replaced in real storage). That way there was no page in the cache that was also in processor storage (as opposed to every page in the cache also being in processor storage).

ibm justification for the 3880-13 full track cache was it had 90% cache hit ratio. The scenario was sequential read with 10 4k records per 3380 track. The first read for record on a track, would result in a miss bringing in the whole track. The next nine reads would be for the other nine records on the track (resulting in the 90% cache hit rate). if the access method interface was changed to do full-track buffered reads .... every track read would be a miss resulting in a zero percent cache "hit" rate ... which would be little different performance than full-track buffering w/o a cache.

misc. old email about migrating bunch of software from cp67 base to vm370 ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

including support for page migration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#8 Why these original FORTRAN quirks?

misc. past posts discussing "dup"/"no-dup" strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#12 managing large amounts of vm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#13 managing large amounts of vm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#9 talk to your I/O cache
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#13 4341 was "Is a VAX a mainframe?"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#42 Question re: Size of Swap File
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#55 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#78 Swap partition no bigger than 128MB?????
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#10 hollow files in unix filesystems?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#16 hollow files in unix filesystems?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#19 hollow files in unix filesystems?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#20 index searching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#11 What are some impressive page rates?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#20 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#26 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#5 Alpha performance, why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#62 1teraflops cell processor possible?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#17 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#18 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#20 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#19 fast check for binary zeroes in memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#1 Hard disk architecture: are outer cylinders still faster than inner cylinders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#27 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#28 IBM's mini computers--lack thereof
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#8 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#45 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#18 how much swap size did you take?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#41 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#11 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#0 old discussion of disk controller chache
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#60 FBA rant
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#61 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#19 Fantasy-Land_Hierarchal_NUMA_Memory-Model_on_Vertical
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#84 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#80 How to calculate effective page fault service time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#47 locate mode, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#73 Interesting presentation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#20 How to analyze a volume's access by dataset
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#67 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#68 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#70 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#47 nested LRU schemes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#75 megabytes per second

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
Date: 14 Mar 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/1ZWcmvD6pXG

Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/live-blogging-senate-hearing-tomorrow-when-j-p-morgan-chase-will-be-torn-a-new-one-20130314

from above:
If the information in the report is correct, Chase followed the behavioral model of every corrupt/failing hedge fund this side of Bernie Madoff and Sam Israel, only it did it on a much more enormous scale and did it with federally-insured deposits.

... snip ...

appears to be quite different tone from the hearings that were held last summer on the matter:

Jamie Dimon Avoids Hard Questions At Senate Hearing
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/13/jamie-dimon-senate-hearing_n_1594130.html

...

Out of Control -- New Report Exposes JPMorgan Chase as Mostly a Criminal Enterprise
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/david-dayen-out-of-control-new-report-exposes-jpmorgan-chase-as-mostly-a-criminal-enterprise.html
When A JPM "Hedge" Is Anything But A Hedge - In JPM's Own Words
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-14/when-jpm-hedge-anything-hedge-jpms-own-words
Senate on London Whale: Worse than we thought
http://money.cnn.com/2013/03/14/investing/jpmorgan-senate/index.html
Too Big To Regulate JP Morgan "Lied" And "Deceived" Regulators, Investors And Public, Senate Finds
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-14/too-big-regulate-jp-morgan-lied-and-deceived-regulators-investors-and-public-senate-
JPMorgan Chase: Too big to regulate?
http://blogs.blouinnews.com/blouinbeatbusiness/2013/03/14/jpmorgan-chase-too-big-to-regulate/

long-winded post from last year with some tie-in to ibm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#82

Gerstner "wins" in power play to be next CEO of AMEX, looser leaves with his protege to take over storefront money lending firm in Baltimore. After several acquisitions ... eventually acquires Citibank in violation of Glass-Steagall, Greenspan grants exemption while Congress is lobbied to repeal Glass-Steagall ... opening door for too-big-to-fail. Dimon leaves and becomes CEO of Chase.

past posts mentioning Morgan-Chase/Dimon:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#23 Should FDIC or the Federal Reserve Bank have the authority to shut down and take over non-bank financial institutions like AIG?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#36 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#53 Are the "brightest minds in finance" finally onto something?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#70 When did "client server" become part of the language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#79 Are the "brightest minds in finance" finally onto something?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#31 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#38 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#47 TARP Disbursements Through April 10th
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#49 Is the current downturn cyclic or systemic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#3 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#8 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#79 The $4 trillion housing headache
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#77 Financial Regulatory Reform - elimination of loophole allowing special purpose institutions outside Bank Holding Company (BHC) oversigh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#35 what is mortgage-backed securities?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#69 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#21 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#24 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#23 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#68 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#61 Oracle database design slowed Chase online banking fix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#67 Outgunned: How Security Tech Is Failing Us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#21 zLinux OR Linux on zEnterprise Blade Extension???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#76 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#43 Sabre; The First Online Reservation System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#47 junking CKD; was "Social Security Confronts IT Obsolescence"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#30 Bank email archives thrown open in financial crash report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#35 Chase, Bank of America credit cards too hacker-friendly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#56 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#41 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#77 How Pursuit of Profits Kills Innovation and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#28 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#6 Adult Supervision
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#9 JPM LOSES $2 BILLION USD!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#12 JPM LOSES $2 BILLION USD!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#16 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#61 Why Hasn't The Government Prosecuted Anyone For The 2008 Financial recession?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#82 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#87 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#5 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#45 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#58 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#64 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#79 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#17 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#25 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#29 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#50 The Games Played By JP Morgan Chase
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#31 History--punched card transmission over telegraph lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#75 What's the bigger risk, retiring too soon, or too late?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#63 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#19 Why Auditors Fail To Detect Frauds?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#45 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#46 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#53 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#59 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#1 STOP PRESS! An Auditor has been brought to task for a failed bank!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#12 Why Auditors Fail To Detect Frauds?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#20 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#14 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#32 Does the IBM System z Mainframe rely on Obscurity or is it Security by Design?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#49 Regulator Tells Banks to Share Cyber Attack Information
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#60 Today in TIME Tech History: Piston-less Power (1959), IBM's Decline (1992), TiVo (1998) and More
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#36 JPMorgan Chase slammed by regulators for control failings after botched derivatives bet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#65 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2013 00:28:52 -0400
Robert Wessel <robertwessel2@yahoo.com> writes:
The problem remains that Dhrystone is a horribly broken benchmark, and the returned numbers basically bear no relationship to reality as the benchmarks are badly broken by modern compilers.

Frankly, if all we have are Dhrystone MIPS to compare two systems, then we don't actually have anything at all. It's that bad.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

e5-2600 rating of 20gflops/processor then would appear to be broken also ... since a 33bips/processor doesn't seem to be horribly out of line given 20gflops rating ... i.e. non-flop ratings frequently tend to be greater than flop ratings.

it would be interesting to see what (broken) bips & gflops benchmarks are for z196 and ec12 ... as well as specint2006 and specfp2006 ... even if they are unofficial numbers.

all spec cint2006 results
http://www.spec.org/cpu2006/results/cint2006.html
all spec cfp2006 results
http://www.spec.org/cpu2006/results/cfp2006.html

ibm has quite a large number of non-mainframe numbers in the above (although mostly intel & amd) ... the few power aren't very current.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
Date: 15 Mar 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/1ZWcmvD6pXG
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#4 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One

hearings going on real time, current long description of violations going on over extended period of time with knowledge of the highest executives in the institutions and the regulators looking the other way.

JPMorgan ignored risks, fought regulators: Senate
http://www.newsdaily.com/stories/bre92d195-us-jpmorgan-whale/

Levin's long winded descriptions has Chase fabricating risk information, not just "ignored"

There is long-running discussion in (linkedin closed) Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security about the too-big-to-fail apparently believing that the can do what ever they want with impunity ... lots of instances where too-big-to-fail are actively engaged in illegal activity including money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists ... activity that would normally have people doing jail time and shutting down the institutions. It has given rise to too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-jail labels (in addition to too-big-to-fail and too-big-to-regulate)

Live-Blogging the Senate Hearing on J.P. Morgan Chase and the Infamous "London Whale" Episode
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/live-blogging-the-senate-hearing-on-j-p-morgan-chase-and-the-infamous-london-whale-episode-20130315
Live Blogging JP Morgan Senate Hearing -- a Rogue Institution on the Hot Seat
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/live-blogging-jp-morgan-senate-hearing-a-rogue-institution-on-the-hot-seat.html
JPMorgan... Or Long-Term Capital Management?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-15/jpmorgan-or-long-term-capital-management

Senate "Whale" Report Reveals JP Morgan as a Lying, Scheming Rogue Trader (Quelle Surprise!)
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/senate-whale-report-reveals-jp-morgan-as-a-lying-scheming-rogue-trader-quelle-surprise.html

from above:
But some critical findings emerge, quickly. We here at NC were particularly harsh critics of JP Morgan's conduct, and disappointed in the media's failure to understand that the information JP Morgan presented as it bobbed and weaved showed glaring deficiencies in risk controls. Yet the failings described in the report are even worse than we imagined.

... snip ...

some archived posts from Linkedin
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#65 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#74 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#3 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#5 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#42 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#55 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2013 11:16:57 -0400
Robert Wessel <robertwessel2@yahoo.com> writes:
Managed to mangle a negative there. I was saying caching at the host has always happened, and for database loads a big host cache is almost always a better investment than a big storage controller cache.

turns out there is different (supporting) scenario. late 70s, we did hack that recorded every record no./id for every read/write ... with some reduction in real time. this was installed on variety of production systems to get real world data. data was used for number of purposes ... including input for a cache effectiveness simulator. One of the simulator scenarios was to fix the total amount of electronic cache storage and compare effectiveness of using the storage distributed evenly for device caches, or for controller caches, or for channel cache ... or for system cache.

the simulation always had global cache more effective than any kind of cache partitioning (except of pathelogical case of large sequential reads that would wipe cache ... which cache had no effective strategy for handling scenario).

since there was efficient real-time reduction/analysis as part of the implementation ... there was some investigation into possibly incorporating implementation as part of standard system disk dynamic allocation as part of load-balancing.

this turns out to provide supporting information in the "Local LRU" versis Global LRU (where "Local LRU" is effectively a partitioning strategy).

I've mentioned before this came up at Dec81 ACM SIGOPS where Jim Gray asks me to wade in on battle a co-worker was having getting his Stanford PHD ... which involved various aspects of Global LRU ... and was under strong attack by "Local LRU" forces trying to prevent the PHD from being awarded. Jim knew I had done a lot of work on Global LRU in the 60s (about the time the "Local LRU" ACM paper appeared) ... and had direct "Local" versus "Global" comparisons for CP67. Unfortunately, research management managed to prevent me from sending a response for nearly a year (hopefully it wasn't because they were taking sides in the academic dispute ... but because they believe they were punishing me for some infrasction or other). Part of the response (nearly year later):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email821019

recent posts mentioning the incident
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#11 what makes a computer architect great?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#17 I do not understand S0C6 on CDSG
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#49 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

past posts discussing the disk activity trace/collection
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#35 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#3 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#18 How to analyze a volume's access by dataset
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#70 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#71 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#47 nested LRU schemes

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2013 11:34:49 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Our OS kept track of those counts, including kilo-core-seconds for each job. Anything which could not be "charged" to a user job was added to the system's data which was labelled as overhead.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#91 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

CP67 & VM370 would always have a timer running that accounted for how much time was being used for what purpose (application time, kernel time on behalf of specific application, "overhead" time not attritable to specific application). Original CP67 delivered had lots of bloat ... I rewrote lots of code that enormously reduced various CP67 kernel pathlength ... but I also restructured the whole "overhead" design. Overhead was growing non-linear with number users ... at 10% (of elapsed) at 35 users (and increasing). The restructure also created a "psuedo" user that all "overhead" functions was attributed to. This overhead dropped well under 1% and would increase much slower (as concurrent users & workload increase). Later in the 80s with significantly larger systems and workload ... this was still around 1%.

This is compared to MVS that had huge portions of kernel time not accounted for at all (this is total separate issue from the timer-driven interrupt that would wake up every 400milliseconds, primarily for the purpose of keeping the "cpu meter" from stopping). Time spent in wait state (no activity) was accounted for ... so total CPU use could be calculated (non-wait state) ... the total accounted for CPU use divided by the total CPU use (in MVS) is referred to as the "capture ratio".

Unaccounted MVS (kernel) cpu use could range from 20% to 80% (i.e. captured cpu use could be as low as 20% ... even on systems running 100% cpu use; aka no wait state). misc. past posts mentioning MVS "capture ratio"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#16 CPU time and system load
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#19 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#82 IBM to the PCM market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#23 SMF Under VM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#42 Inaccurate CPU% reported by RMF and TMON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#72 Price of CPU seconds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#66 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#33 SHAREWARE at Its Finest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#76 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#39 CPU time variance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#70 How many cost a cpu second?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#71 Help with elementary CPU speed question

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2013 11:51:00 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
I believe that you are referring to the System Resource Manager (SRM), and some customers complained that the interval was too long. I've seen no evidence that IBM did it to drive up the CPU meter, and considering the potential legal exposure I'm somewhat sceptical.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#91 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

the issue wasn't about interval under heavy load with no idle time, the issue was 1) the interval was the same when system was totally idle and 2) happened to be the same as the cpu meter limit on stopping. it could be chosen with no fingerprints as to why the interval was chosen.

also implied here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#8 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

as undergraduate in the 60s ... I did dynamic adaptive so things would be proportional to activity ... including extending the interval when the system was idle ... which would allow the cpu meter to come to a stop. misc. past posts mentioning dynamic adaptive resource management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2013 12:02:09 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
as undergraduate in the 60s ... I did dynamic adaptive so things would be proportional to activity ... including extending the interval when the system was idle ... which would allow the cpu meter to come to a stop. misc. past posts mentioning dynamic adaptive resource management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#91 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#8 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#9 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

for the fun of it ... this is old email mentioning the TSO product administer asking if I would implement my dynamic adaptive resource manager in MVS (this was after corporate had decreed that vm370/cms was the corporate strategic interactive product ... effort was also started to port CMS to MVS).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#email800310

I ran an internal advanced technology workshop/conference in spring of 1982 ... one of the presentations was on the progress of the CMS port to MVS.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#4a

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:34:32 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
What you want to do is spread your most heavily accessed files across all your drives, and fill the rest of each drive with "stuff." Unfortunately SMS, with its concept of storage pools, encourages exactly the opposite. SMS wants to keep files with like characteristics (defined by the installation) together.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#89 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

for some other topic drift ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#7 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre

besides the local/glocal (partitioned/single-large) cache issues, the detailed log of all record access of production systems showed that traditional commercial/business dataprocessing was quite bursty ... with collections of data having high periodic burst use on periodic basis ... daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, etc. The collection of data didn't need to be online between the bursty activity ... but it should be grouped with regard to migration between online & offline.

that analysis may have later contributed to some of the SMS implementation characteristics.

We actually made use of various collection and analsys techniques ... another was called MDREORG (the detail trace was DMKCOL after the module in which a lot of the collection was originally implemented). It was used in attempt to load-balance CMS use across all available drives. It was also used in wholesale datacenter vm370/cms migration from 3350s to 3380s. Highest use were spread across available 3380 in the center of packs with decreasing use radiating out from the center. There was an algorithmic objective to only fill 3380s 80% full with 3350 CMS migration ... the remaining was reserved for empty or trivially/rarely used data (say offshift, administrative data that would have little impact during prime shift useage). past posts mentioning mdreorg
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#65 Crippleware: hardware examples

for other topic drift ... recent thread over in ibm-main mailing list mentioning DFSMS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#2 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

the other place bursty use sensitive implementation shows up was TSM (tivoli storage management). This started out as CMSBACK that I originally implemented that was used a numerous internal datacenters starting in the late 70s. some old cmsback related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#cmsback

it went through a number of (internal) version/releases ... and then was finally packaged as customer product as Workstation Datasave Facility (wdsf) ... that included distributed computing backup. This was picked up by the disk product division and renamed ADSM (for Adstar Storage Manager ... this was after the disk division had been renamed Adstar as part of the re-org of IBM into the "baby blues" in preperation for breakup; Gerstner was then brought in and reversed the breakup process). later (2nd round) when the disk division was in the process of being sold off ... ADSM moved to Tivoli and renamed TSM. misc. past posts mentioning backup/archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#backup

recent posts mentioning baby blue restructuring (in preperation for IBM breackup):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#61 What is holding back cloud adoption?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#63 Today in TIME Tech History: Piston-less Power (1959), IBM's Decline (1992), TiVo (1998) and More
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#76 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#3 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#34 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2013 10:45:23 -0400
Robert Wessel <robertwessel2@yahoo.com> writes:
While it's rather a hack, PAV (and the subsequent improvement HyperPAV), have been around for some time now. PAV allows you to define multiple address aliases for a given device, and the OS can start an I/O to any non-busy address. HyperPAV improves that by allowing a pool of alternate device addresses, which can be dynamically assigned to alias the "real" volume.

aka predated by "multiple exposures" on 2305 ... which had 8 device addresses ... able to start an I/O on any non-busy address, recent posts mentioning 2305
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#70 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#74 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

and POK blocking me when I tried to extend "multiple exposures" for 3350s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#0 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

as i've periodically commented, mainframe FICON is a heavy duty layer that significantly regresses the throughput of the underlying fibre channel standard. fibre channel is dual-simplex asynchronous interface ... able to pump as much stuff down the outgoing interface concurrently with stuff coming in the incoming interface (aka in 1988, I had been asked to help LLNL standardize some serial technology they had ... which eventually morphs into fibre channel standard, I also got sucked in early with SLAC's serial technology standardization that morphs into SCI ... used for NUMA memory but also lots of work for use with I/O).

FCS doesn't have the serialization latency that still lingers on from the half-duplex mainframe channel paradigm. recent posts mentioning FICON:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#10 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#40 Searching for storage (DASD) alternatives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#77 OT: but hopefully interesting - Million core supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#6 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#7 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#8 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#63 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#67 relative speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#68 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#77 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 16 Mar 2013 08:15:03 -0700
clementclarke@OZEMAIL.COM.AU (Clem Clarke) writes:
When the first IBM 65 was wheeled into Shell Oil Melbourne, I think it had 256K of memory. And I believe it did cost a million or so. Of course, it was made from core memory with real wires. Very expensive to thread those wires, I suspect!!!

When I was still undergraduate in the 60s ... I got dragged into Boeing for the summer to work on what would become Boeing Computer Services (moving all dataprocessing into separate business unit ... improving ability to monetize computer operations ... including offering computer services to non-Boeing entities). At the time, I thought Renton datacenter was largest in the world ... supposedly having something like $300M in 360 equipment ... that summer there were constantly bits and pieces of several 360/65s in the hallways queued up for installation in the datacenter.

Later I would sponsor Boyd's briefings at IBM. Various of his biographies mention him doing stint in charge of spook base (about the same time I was at Boeing) ... claiming it to be a $2.5B windfall for IBM (nearly ten times renton). Boyd would comment that the datacenter was the largest air-conditioned bldg in that part of the world. This account of spook base only goes into a little bit of the datacenter operation.
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2013 11:06:37 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Was the uncounted cycles a hardware thing or just software?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#91 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#8 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

unaccounted cycles in MVS was software thing not keeping track of time spent in various parts of the MVS kernel. they accounted for time in wait/idle state ... and they could deduce unaccounted for time by calculating time non-idle time (elapsed minus idle time) and then subtracting all accounted for time (aka "captured" time). The difference was the non-captured/unaccounted time (spent in the MVS kernel)

all the accounted for time ("captured", divided by the non-idle time (elapsed minus idle) was the "capture ration".

by comparison, the dummy system user had all the kernel time ... that was accounted & associated with some specific user. this was considered "overhead" ... in the original cp67 it wasn't actually accounted for against a dummy user ... but simply a field called "overhead" (aka there was *NO* non-captured processor time). I drastically reduced this time as part of general pathlength as well as resource management work (aka a lot of "overhead" had been associated with general system resource management/administration). I then originally created the dummy system user as part of implementing support for paging portions of CP67 kernel. I needed a virtual address space for mapping the CP67 kernel ... and necessary control blocks required by the standard paging mechanism (including dummy user control blocks associated with the dummy virtual address space). Although lots of the stuff I did as undergraduate was picked up and shipped in standard CP67, my pageable kernel (along with dummy system user) wasn't.

Charlie (inventor of compare&swap) ... then did modification to the CP67 serialization function ... standard serialization would sometimes result in hung/zombie users ... or system failures with dangling operations where user was gone. First elimianted the ("dangling" operation) system failures by not allowing user to go away when there was some operation still in progress for them. Then if operation was taking too long to complete ... would swizzle the pointers so they now were associated with my dummy system user. This become part of the standard internal CP67 system at science center and I would distribute to other internal datacenters. It was also part of the changes that I migrated from CP67 to VM370 for CSC/VM ... and a piece of it was picked up and shipped in VM370 Release 3 (along with other bits&pieces of CSC/VM):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

misc. past posts mentioning eliminating *ALL* zombie/hung users and/or my dumprx failure analysis application:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 16 Mar 2013 08:39:15 -0700
lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler) writes:
Later I would sponsor Boyd's briefings at IBM. Various of his biographies mention him doing stint in charge of spook base (about the same time I was at Boeing) ... claiming it to be a $2.5B windfall for IBM (nearly ten times renton). Boyd would comment that the datacenter was the largest air-conditioned bldg in that part of the world. This account of spook base only goes into a little bit of the datacenter operation.
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#90 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#0 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#2 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

in 1969 dollars ... about 7 times that for 2012 dollars ... $2.1B for renton data center and about $17B for spook base.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2013 14:44:54 -0400
Robert Wessel <robertwessel2@yahoo.com> writes:
While it's rather a hack, PAV (and the subsequent improvement HyperPAV), have been around for some time now. PAV allows you to define multiple address aliases for a given device, and the OS can start an I/O to any non-busy address. HyperPAV improves that by allowing a pool of alternate device addresses, which can be dynamically assigned to alias the "real" volume.

re:
http:www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#12 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

in the period between 2305 "multiple exposures" and PAV, there was start subchannel and dynamic pathing. dynamic pathing had an architecture with a really heavy weight implementation ... also requiring enormous virtualization burden. After I first saw the internal implementation document, I did an alternate that was a trivial hit to the interface that significantly reduced the implementation burden and enormously reduced the virtualization effort. I got back an answer that it was too late to change the specification. past posts mentioning dynamic pathing:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#18 Disk caching and file systems. Disk history...people forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#3 Hercules 3.04 announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#15 Hercules 3.04 announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#9 21st Century ISA goals?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#33 Internal DASD Pathing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#52 Throwaway cores
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#79 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#86 'smttter IBMdroids
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#5 What is a Mainframe?

this was also in the time-frame that the 3090 was (being forced to) doubling its channels. originally they had sized the number of 3090 channels based on assumption that disk controllers were going to be similar to 3330/3830 characteristics.

However, the disk engineers complained that they got an accountant for new head of the division and for the 3880 a really slow processor was selected because it saved a few pennies. The 3880 had special hardware path for data transfer ... but control processor was slow JIB-prime ... as a result for all control operations, start/end each channel command word, start/end operations ... it took longer elapsed time. Since the whole I/O resource (channel, controller, device) were busy for such operations (because of the end-to-end requirement of the half-duplex paradigm) ... channel busy was significantly higher than 3090 anticipated. Because of the significantly higher channel busy for every disk operation ... they figured they would need to double the number of channels ... in order to meet the target number of disk I/O ops/sec. Doubling the number of channels, required adding another (expensive) TCM to 3090 manufacturing (increasing 3090 manufacturing costs). There were jokes that 3090 was going to bill the 3880 controller group for the cost of each additional 3090 TCM.

Somewhat because of the required doubling of the number of 3090 channels (to offset the overhead latency associated with the half-duplex channel paradigm and the 3880 busy), marketing tried to spin the increase in 3090 channels as a mainframe advantage (to obfuscate it was really required to compensate for mainframe channel I/O paradigm deficiency).

In the base FCS case, FCS channel is only tied up for the actual transfer time in the specific direction ... transfer in the opposite direction goes on asynchronously as well as various control operations ... it doesn't block either direction while a remote end controller (or device) is tied up in deciding what to do. This in large part accounts for the peak z196 I/O benchmark is done with 104 FICON channels getting 2M IOPS ... even when there is recent (single) FCS announced for e5-2600 claiming over 1M IOPS (theoritically two native FCS can have higher throughput than 104 FCS when FICON is layered on top).

past posts mentioning the 3090 channel doubling requiring extra TCM ... because of heavy channel busy time resulting from combination of the slow 3880 controller and the half-duplex channel busy paradigm:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#25 ESCON Data Transfer Rate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#3 Microcode? (& index searching)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#11 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#33 The attack of the killer mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#45 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#13 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#45 winscape?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#22 Channel Distances
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#21 IBM 3090/VM Humor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#34 TOD clock discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#35 The very first text editor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#36 REAL memory column in SDSF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#43 Remote Tape drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#53 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#7 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#77 T3 Sues IBM To Break its Mainframe Monopoly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#52 Throwaway cores
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#6 Fantasy-Land_Hierarchal_NUMA_Memory-Model_on_Vertical
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#10 Hannaford case exposes holes in law, some say
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#10 Different Implementations of VLIW
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#29 Thanks for the SEL32 Reminder, Al!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#45 Mainframe Hall of Fame: 17 New Members Added
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#49 Mainframe Hall of Fame: 17 New Members Added
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#50 Mainframe Hall of Fame: 17 New Members Added
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#54 Mainframe Hall of Fame: 17 New Members Added
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#57 Mainframe Hall of Fame: 17 New Members Added
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#60 Mainframe Hall of Fame: 17 New Members Added
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#60 ISPF Counter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#79 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#86 locate mode, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#69 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#13 What was the historical price of a P/390?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#16 What was the historical price of a P/390?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#62 25 reasons why hardware is still hot at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#2 Processors stall on OLTP workloads about half the time--almost no matter what you do
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#83 3270 Emulator Software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#39 Central vs. expanded storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#15 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#0 coax (3174) throughput
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#32 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#69 how to get a command result without writing it to a file
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#74 Vector processors on the 3090
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#22 3270 archaeology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#36 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#128 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#23 M68k add to memory is not a mistake any more
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#27 NASA unplugs their last mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#54 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#94 Can Mainframes Be Part Of Cloud Computing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#95 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#80 360/20, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#93 S/360 I/O activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#25 X86 server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#30 X86 server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#2 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#3 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#6 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#28 390 vector instruction set reuse, was 8-bit bytes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#27 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#5 What is a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#17 What is a Mainframe?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
Date: 16 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
JPMorgan Faulted on Controls and Disclosure in Trading Loss
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/03/14/jpmorgan-faulted-on-controls-and-disclosure-in-trading-loss/

Levin read an account where Dimon directs the regulatory compliance department to stop providing federally mandated reports ... and then Levin asks the witnesses present was that part of standard Chase business practices.

Long ago and far away, I was at IBM San Jose Research and BofA was buying and deploying a large number of 4300 machines (compact IBM mainframes, numerous large corporations were buying and deploying in branch & departmental locations, sort of the leading edge of the coming distributed computing tsunami) ... and Jim Gray was bugging me why I wasn't inventing new technologies for making distributed computing easier. BofA were also one of the early adopters of RDBMS technology ... installing the original relational/sql implementation done at IBM San Jose Research. When Jim was leaving Research for Tandem, he was palming a bunch of stuff on me ... including working with BofA on their System/R operation. misc. past posts mentioning System/R
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#system

At the time, I also had offices and labs in the IBM Los Gatos Lab ... where a lot of early ATM work was done:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_3624

Years later, I was back in the bay area and stopped by grocery store. At the front of the store was somebody working on large stand-alone BofA ATM machine ... completely open and pieces here and there. I went up and talk to him. He said that he was replacing BofA's state of the art ATM intrusion and security infrastructure with a hacked together operation from Nations, when he was finished with downgrading some number of ATM machines, his job was no more; BofA no longer existed.

There were recent article that the assets of the largest national banks were 16% of GDP in the 90s ... now the assets of the few too-big-to-fail are 69% of GDP.

more cross-over with this Google+ discussion (also similar in this linkedin group):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#4 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#6 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Grid Computing (from 1May2002)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Grid Computing (from 1May2002)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2013 15:14:31 -0400
also google+
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/Xs8HWQHprdx

from 1May2002

Grid Computing; Hook enough computers together and what do you get? A new kind of utility that offers supercomputer processing on tap.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

from above:
Back in the 1980s, the National Science Foundation created the NSFnet: a communications network intended to give scientific researchers easy access to its new supercomputer centers. Very quickly, one smaller network after another linked in-and the result was the Internet as we now know it. The scientists whose needs the NSFnet originally served are barely remembered by the online masses.

... snip ...

since also morphed into cloud computing

as I've periodically mentioned, tcp/ip is the technology basis for the modern internet, nsfnet backbone was the operational basis for the modern internet and cix was the business basis for the modern internet.

originally we were to get $20M to tie together the NSF supercomputer centers, then congress cuts the budget and a few other things happened, finally NSF released an RFP. Internal politics prevents us from bidding on the RFP. The director of NSF tries to help by writing the company a letter (copying the CEO) ... but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does references like what we already have running is at least five years ahead of all RFP responses).

misc. past NSFNET related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 16 Mar 2013 14:08:39 -0700
gabe@GABEGOLD.COM (gabe@gabegold.com) writes:
My first year-end retirement account statement -- for 1971! -- listed my projected retirement date as the incredibly distant, unimaginable, science-fiction-like date of February 1, 2012. So back then at least TIAA-CREF understood time windows spanning entire careers and beyond.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#90 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#0 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#2 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#13 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#15 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

I think 71 (72?) was when Amdahl gave talk in large (full) auditorium at MIT. A student in the audience asked him how did he convince the VC people to invest in his 360 clone company. His reply was that IBM customers had already spent enormous amount on 360 applications ... and even if IBM were to completely walk away from 360, that software base would be enough to keep him in business through the end of the century.

Of course Future System was starting up ... which was planned to completely replace 360 (and be radically different from 360). I've since been told that he wasn't aware of FS (even though his reference "walking away from 360" might be considered veiled reference to FS). However, the scarcity of 360/370 products during the period is credited with giving the clone processors a market foothold (FS internal politics were shutting down &/or suspending 370 efforts).

misc. past posts mentioning FS (along with some URLs to other online FS sources):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

as i've mentioned in the past, during that period I continued to work on 360/370 stuff and periodically ridicule the FS activity.

then with the failure of FS, there was mad rush to get products back into the 370 hardware&software pipeline.

for other drift, recent posts about Amdahl and IBM ACS-360 effort
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#46 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#47 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

more detail here:
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Y2K hacks

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Y2K hacks
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 16 Mar 2013 15:22:05 -0700
edgould1948@COMCAST.NET (Ed Gould) writes:
Just wondered if anyone had heard of any other Y2K hacks?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#90 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

for other trivia ... somewhat tenuous long-winded relationship between IBM and too-big-to-fail ... this post ... mostly about recent congressional hearings into too-big-to-fail and shortcomings of their regulatory organizations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#4

gives brief quicky overview ... referencing this post from last year that goes into much more detail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#82

IBM being restructured ("baby blues") in preparation to being broken up as it was going into the red in the early 90s ... then new executive brought in to resurrect the company ... also mentioned in this recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#11

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2013 22:26:22 -0400
Stephen Sprunk <stephen@sprunk.org> writes:
For instance, it's better to calculate someone's age when needed from birth date and current date (and keep both alive in the cache) than store their age separately (and probably miss in cache). Of course, that assumes you store dates in a calculation-friendly form, eg. UNIX timestamp, rather than strings. Better is to skip calculating age entirely by rewriting your query, eg. "born before/after X date".

related to privacy and identity theft ... not exposing "birth date" ... even internally, is countermeasure ... "birth date" is kept confidential and attempt for responses tbat are provided for generic questions over/under 21, over/under 65, etc. (allowing too specific questions could expose "birth date" ... similar to guessing pin-numbers)

"birth date" has frequently been used as a something you know authentication .... from 3-factor authentication paradigm
something you have
something you know
something you are


past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#3factor

recent post mentioning ATM machines, pin-number compromise
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#1 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 17 Mar 2013 08:48:58 -0700
lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler) writes:

http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#19 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

end of above article has two "sidebars" ... one on multithreading and the other that some of the features from acs-360 (from the late 60s) show up for the es/9000 in the early 90s.

i've pontificated before about getting sucked into participating some in the mid-70s on multithreaded design for the 370/195 (that never got announced). the 370/195 case was that conditional branches drained the pipeline ... and most codes would only achieve about half 370/195 throughput (because of the pipeline drain, conditional branches also discussed in the acs-360 article) ... having two independent instruction streams (each running at half 370/195 thruoughput) had chance of keeping execution units operating at full capacity.

other from acs-360 article:
over a three-month period, Amdahl convinces Earle that a S/360 version of ACS will be faster than the ACS-1; Amdahl and Earle sketch out a design that has 2/3 the cycle time of ACS-1 (8 nsec vs. 12.5 nsec) and that is overall 15% faster and requires 15% less hardware; their design is designated AEC/360 (or AEC-360) for Amdahl-Earle Computer

... snip ...

from this (mostly discussion of failed future system):
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
The 370 emulator minus the FS microcode was eventually sold in 1980 as the IBM 3081. The ratio of the amount of circuitry in the 3081 to its performance was significantly worse than other IBM systems of the time; its price/performance ratio wasn't quite so bad because IBM had to cut the price to be competitive. The major competition at the time was from Amdahl Systems -- a company founded by Gene Amdahl, who left IBM shortly before the FS project began, when his plans for the Advanced Computer System (ACS) were killed. The Amdahl machine was indeed superior to the 3081 in price/performance and spectaculary superior in terms of performance compared to the amount of circuitry.]

... snip ...

above references general ACS with overview:
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs.html

also in acs-end article (from Amdahl interview):
The single highest speed computer was a loss leader. The second smaller computer added made a break-even program. Adding the third even smaller computer came out with normal profit! IBM management decided not to do it, for it would advance the computing capability too fast for the company to control the growth of the computer marketplace, thus reducing their profit potential. I then recommended that the ACS lab be closed, and it was.

... snip ...

past FS posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 17 Mar 2013 11:59:46 -0700
shmuel+gen@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
When did LCS come out?

I do google and many of the references are various of my old posts (either in this mailing list and/or in a.f.c. usenet group) mentioning ampex lcs box

old ibm-main lcs disucssion (from 2008) archived at google groups:
https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/bit.listserv.ibm-main/0ff2kH5_pcs

Cornell LCS reference (from above)
http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/display.article?id=9828

and from same thread ... google book reference
http://books.google.com/books?id=MFGj_PT_clIC&pg=PA201&lpg=PA201&dq=ampex+lcs+ibm+memory&source=web&ots=ZEmo1aj1cO&sig=2ZC1KCUBgSm-Dnfx61fKOK-UaKk#v=onepage&q=ampex%20lcs%20ibm%20memory&f=false

section 4.2 "Main Memory Solutions" ... table 4.1, pg. 195, followed by LCS discussion on pg. 198

pg. 201:
Under Pressure from Dick Watson to obtain vendor technologies, John Gibson negotiated a contract in February 1965 in which Ampex was to supply fifty 2-megabyte LCS units by the end of 1966 for one and half cents per bit -- half the price of their original offer

... snip ...

my posts in the 2008 ibm-main thread (referenced above)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#49 IBM LCS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#51 IBM LCS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#58 IBM LCS

other recent posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#90 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#0 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#2 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#13 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#15 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#19 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#20 Y2K hacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#22 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
Date: 17 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#17 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?

and x-over from the live-blogging discussion

Live Blogging JP Morgan Senate Hearing -- a Rogue Institution on the Hot Seat
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/live-blogging-jp-morgan-senate-hearing-a-rogue-institution-on-the-hot-seat.html

from above:
"McCain stressed how JPM completely disregarded risk limits, deceived federal regulators, and developed business model that depended assumption that the bank was too big to fail. Both McCain and Levin hammered on how the JPM illustrated much bigger problems about how JPM and other banks routinely gamed risk limits and used guaranteed deposits to gamble rather than support the real economy."

... snip ...

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#4 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#6 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One

At celebration for Jim Gray at Berkeley (after his disappearance) ... part of the testimonial was his formalization of transactions is fundamental to financial dataprocessing, cash machines and electronic commerce.
http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/05/31/a-tribute-to-jim-gray-sometimes-nice-guys-do-finish-first/
Jim was also fundamental in creation of TPC
http://www.tpc.org/information/who/gray.asp

As electronic transactions were emerging in the 60s&70s, there wasn't a network infrastructure to carry the operations ... as a result, a large number of VANS (value added networks) sprung up, including some number of payment transaction VANS. However, with the rise of the internet in the 90s ... the VANS were obsoleted and have been disappearing.

In the mid-90s, the payment industry was extremely worried that the telcos would take over the payment industry. The issue at the time was that predicted micro-payment volumes were so large that they could only be handled by the telco cellphone transaction infrastructures (standard financial industry operations weren't capable of handling the projected volumes). As it turned out, the expected micro-payment volumes didn't happen ... and the telco forays into payment industry ran into problems because they hadn't sufficiently prepared for the handling of fraud and disputes. As a result, by the start of the century, most of the telco/cellphone movement into payments had significantly pulled back (to wait for another day).

Part of this was that the telco/cellphone industry had strongly supported the invention and development of "in-stoage" transaction DBMS ... for cellphone call/billings ... that dramatically increased the volumes that they could handle. In the past decade, some of the financial payment infrastructures have deployed such technology to better position for any dramatic increase in volumes that might happen as result of mobile transactions

oh ... and the rise of the internet:

Grid Computing; Hook enough computers together and what do you get? A new kind of utility that offers supercomputer processing on tap.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

from above:
Back in the 1980s, the National Science Foundation created the NSFnet: a communications network intended to give scientific researchers easy access to its new supercomputer centers. Very quickly, one smaller network after another linked in-and the result was the Internet as we now know it. The scientists whose needs the NSFnet originally served are barely remembered by the online masses.

... snip ...

since also morphed into cloud computing

as I've periodically mentioned, tcp/ip is the technology basis for the modern internet, nsfnet backbone was the operational basis for the modern internet and cix was the business basis for the modern internet.

originally we were to get $20M to tie together the NSF supercomputer centers, then congress cuts the budget and a few other things happened, finally NSF released an RFP. Internal politics prevents us from bidding on the RFP. The director of NSF tries to help by writing the company a letter (copying the CEO) ... but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does references like what we already have running is at least five years ahead of all RFP responses).

misc. past NSFNET related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

... and in the early 90s, we were brought in as consultants to a small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server; the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use; the result is now frequently called e-commerce. As part of doing this stuff called e-commerce ... we had to map the "SSL" technology to the payment business processes. We also had do audit and walk-thru of "SSL" technology as well as these new businesses selling "SSL" digital certificates. As part of that we generated several recommendations/policies about the deployment and use of "SSL" ... some number almost immediately violated ... which account for some number of exploits that continue to this day.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
Date: 18 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://wallstreetonparade.com/2013/03/senator-sherrod-brown-drops-a-bombshell-in-mary-jo-whites-hearing/

from above:
The spectacle of warped law enforcement grew worse today during the Senate Banking confirmation hearing of Mary Jo White to head the Securities and Exchange Commission. Under questioning by Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), White admitted that even the economy of a foreign country -- like Japan -- is taken into consideration before bringing a criminal indictment in the U.S. Even worse, White was forced to admit that while working for the U.S. Department of Justice as the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York (from 1993 to 2002), she considered it appropriate to speak with Larry Summers (a Treasury Secretary in the Clinton administration) to weigh the economic impact of bringing an indictment.

... snip ...

In the wake of ENRON and WORLDCOM, Sarbanes-Oxley required that SEC look into the rating agencies and also gave SEC additional powers supposedly to prevent any future ENRON/WORLDCOM (although supposedly they already had the power to prevent such events). Possibly because even GAO didn't think SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of public company fraudulent financial filings ... showing an increase in fraudulent filings even after Sarbanes-Oxley.

Rating agencies played a pivotal role in the financial mess of the last decade ... and SEC appears to have done little or nothing there also. Mortgages and loans previously had mostly been done by regulated depository institutions using deposit and the business model was profit off the monthly payments. During the S&L crisis, there had been some use of securitized mortigages to obfuscate fraudulent transactions ... but there was little market for the instruments.

The start of this century, mostly unregulated loan orginators found that they could pay rating agencies for triple-A ratings (even when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from the Oct2008 congressional hearings) ... giving them access to those institutions restricted to dealing in safe instruments (like large institutional retirement funds).

This also changed the mortgage business model from focus on monthly payments to enormous wallstreet commissions and fees on the triple-A rated toxic CDOs ... which exploded to over $27T done during the bubble (with wallstreet possibly skimming $4T-$5T). Both the FED and the SEC appear to have looked the other way as the mortgage market morphed into an enormous walltreet transaction bonanza. There are claims that wallstreet tripled in size (as percent of GDP) during the bubble. The assets of the large financial institutions increased in value from equivalent to 19% of GDP (in the 90s) to currently the few too-big-to-fail assets equivalent to 69% of GDP.

reference to gao reports of public company financial filings showing increase in fraudulent filings ... even after Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-03-395R
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-06-678
http://www.gao.gov/special.pubs/gao-06-1079sp/

reference to over $27T done during the bubble
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

any reference to all americans owning dream home has been obfuscation and misdirection ... the objective was to generate large securitized mortgage transaction business for the associated fees and commissions ... some properties possibly flipping several times during the bubble. The extreme focus on maximizing the number & size of transactions (for the associated fees & commissions) would result in liar loans, no-documentation loans, no-down loans ... w/o regard to the borrowers qualifications and/or loan quality (in large part because everything was guaranteed a triple-A rating). Documentation and income verification just slowed down the speed that the transactions could be generated.

Preserving and enhancing wallstreet also shows up in all the recent too-big-to-fail and mortgage whistleblower discussions/threads ... interests of individual home owners constantly being sacrificed for the benefit of the too-big-to-fail ... this wasn't a recent regulatory culture change ... but has been a long-term problem. The issue of regulatory agency capture by wallstreet ... and as a result little or no regard for the rest of the country, predates the current financial mess.

The over $27T done during the bubble was twice GDP and the wallstreet skim was major factor in the claim that wallstreet tripled in size (as percent of GDP) during the bubble.

Major contributor in rise of too-big-to-fail ... was repeal of Glass-Steagall ... which had kept the safety&soundness of regulated depsoitory institutions separate from risky investment banking. Some of the recent JPMorgan articles reference it using insured deposits in risky CDS gambling bets.

Current, real-time tv business news saying street is commenting about claims about JPMorgan getting into trouble was because it had the wrong risk limits .... is now known to be obfuscation and misdirection ... that they had the correct risk limits in place ... but were being directed by top executives to ignore them ... several comments about can anything from JPMorgan being able to be taken at face value.

Somewhere along the line, the federal reserve claimed that it had been printing money and providing it free to the too-big-to-fail in anticipation that the too-big-to-fail would lend it to mainstreet ... spurring an economic recovery. However, they found that too-big-to-fail weren't lending it to mainstreet, but buying treasuries (and the federal reserve had no way of forcing too-big-to-fail to lend the money to mainstreet), and using the profits on the spread to pay enormous bonuses. Possible questions are 1) did the federal reserve ever actually believe that too-big-to-fail would use the free money to revitalize mainstreet and 2) when they found out that too-big-to-fail weren't doing what they claimed was expected, why are they continuing to provide the free money.

recent posts mentioning over $27T in transactions during bubble:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#0 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#62 Taleb On "Skin In The Game" And His Disdain For Public Intellectuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#44 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

recent posts mentioning Sarbanes-Oxley and/or GAO reports on fraudulent public company financial filings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#0 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#60 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#62 Taleb On "Skin In The Game" And His Disdain For Public Intellectuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#4 Libor Lies Revealed in Rigging of $300 Trillion Benchmark
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#39 The Alchemy of Securitization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#70 Implementing a Whistle-Blower Program - Detecting and Preventing Fraud at Workplace

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 18 Mar 2013 09:44:58 -0400
nmm1 writes:
TAI, per-leese! UTC is bad news for any of those that may run over a leap second glitch.

shortly after i graduated and joined the science center ... the science center got charged with helping with policies for the 370 clock. it went on for 3months ... two biggest issues were 1) 370 clock was defined as number of seconds since the start of the century ... so what was the start of the century (midnight of 1jan1900 or 1jan1901, some software started out just being since 1jan1970) and 2) how to handle the recently announced leap seconds.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

a long time ago, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: a long time ago, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 09:09:02 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
The 360/91 at Princeton (the one that I wouldn't know anything about crashing with a two-line Fortran program) had a locally built device called a TOAD, Time Of Any Day. I believe it emulated a 1050 terminal to send an operator command to set the clock. Its eyes were two LEDs that lit up on its maker's birthday.

Science center had external clock box on 360/67 ... possibly replica of box for ctss/7094
http://www.multicians.org/thvv/7094.html

from above:
There was one kind of funny problem with this long decline of CTSS: every year, there was a fire drill as we tried to remember what you had to do to create a system for the next year. The Chronolog clock attached to tape channel E of the machine provided a date and time in BCD, but without the year; that came from a constant in the supervisor, and each year we had to recompile one small module, and relink the supervisor, the salvager, and a few other standalone utilities. As the original CTSS crew gradually moved on to other jobs, fewer and fewer people knew how to carry out this task, but we always managed to figure out how. And each year, we considered making the constant a configuration item somehow, and decided not to bother, because the system wouldn't last another year.

... snip ...

it was even provided as simulated psuedo "TIMR" device in virtual machine implementation. old a.f.c. discussion of this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#47

... and on pg. 52


Figure 4. Example of a Virtual CP-67 Directory

...

OPERATOR USER   CSC     ,A6230    ,A,5
         CORE   256K
UNIT   009,1052
         UNIT   00C,2540R
UNIT   00D,2540P
UNIT   00E,1403
UNIT   0FF,TIMR                < ---------
         UNIT   190,2314,CMS190,000,053,RDONLY
UNIT   191,2314,SRG001,020,022
         UNIT   19A,2314,19ASYS,000,053,RDONLY
*EOU*

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
Date: 19 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing

When You Weren't Looking, Democrat Bank Stooges Launch Bills to Permit Bailouts, Deregulate Derivatives
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/when-you-werent-looking-democrat-bank-stooges-launch-bills-to-permit-bailouts-deregulate-derivatives.html

from above:
In the US, depositors have actually been put in a worse position than Cyprus deposit-holders, at least if they are at the big banks that play in the derivatives casino. The regulators have turned a blind eye as banks use their depositaries to fund derivatives exposures. And as bad as that is, the depositors, unlike their Cypriot confreres, aren't even senior creditors. Remember Lehman? When the investment bank failed, unsecured creditors (and remember, depositors are unsecured creditors) got eight cents on the dollar. One big reason was that derivatives counterparties require collateral for any exposures, meaning they are secured creditors. The 2005 bankruptcy reforms made derivatives counterparties senior to unsecured lenders. Lehman had only two itty bitty banking subsidiaries, and to my knowledge, was not gathering retail deposits. But as readers may recall, Bank of America moved most of its derivatives from its Merrill Lynch operation its depositary in late 2011.

... snip ...

and move of derivatives to FDIC insurance

US Deposits In Perspective: $25 Billion In Insurance, $9,283 Billion In Deposits; $297,514 Billion In Derivatives
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-19/us-deposits-perspective-25-billion-insurance-9283-billion-deposits-297514-billion-de

... but also the best congress that money can buy ... with sufficient money ... just pay the lawmakers to change the laws & regulations to what you want to do.

Eisenhower wrote his goodby speech to warn about the military-industrial-congressional complex ... but dropped "congressional" in the actual speech. Now we also have the financial-regulatory-congressional complex (and the pharmaceutical-regulatory-congressional complex, MICC, FRCC, PRCC).

I periodically mentioned that Jan2009 I was asked to HTML'ize the Pecora Hearings (30s hearings into the '29 crash, had been scanned the fall before at Boston Public Library), with lots of internal x-links and URLs corresponding to what happened this time and what happened then (some assumption that the new congress would have some appetite to do something). After working on it for awhile, I got a call that it wouldn't be needed (reference to enormous piles of wallstreet money blanketing capital hill)

misc. recent posts mentioning Pecora Hearings:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Bank Holiday In Cyprus

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Bank Holiday In Cyprus
Date: 19 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Cryptography
Bank Holiday In Cyprus
https://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001418.html

...

When You Weren't Looking, Democrat Bank Stooges Launch Bills to Permit Bailouts, Deregulate Derivatives
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/when-you-werent-looking-democrat-bank-stooges-launch-bills-to-permit-bailouts-deregulate-derivatives.html

from above:
In the US, depositors have actually been put in a worse position than Cyprus deposit-holders, at least if they are at the big banks that play in the derivatives casino. The regulators have turned a blind eye as banks use their depositaries to fund derivatives exposures. And as bad as that is, the depositors, unlike their Cypriot confreres, aren't even senior creditors. Remember Lehman? When the investment bank failed, unsecured creditors (and remember, depositors are unsecured creditors) got eight cents on the dollar. One big reason was that derivatives counterparties require collateral for any exposures, meaning they are secured creditors. The 2005 bankruptcy reforms made derivatives counterparties senior to unsecured lenders. Lehman had only two itty bitty banking subsidiaries, and to my knowledge, was not gathering retail deposits. But as readers may recall, Bank of America moved most of its derivatives from its Merrill Lynch operation its depositary in late 2011.

... snip ...

and move of derivatives to FDIC insurance

US Deposits In Perspective: $25 Billion In Insurance, $9,283 Billion In Deposits; $297,514 Billion In Derivatives
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-19/us-deposits-perspective-25-billion-insurance-9283-billion-deposits-297514-billion-de

other recent

Gaming the Cyprus Negotiations (Updated)
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/gaming-the-cyprus-negotiations.html
Will Cyprus Become Creditanstalt 2.0?
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/will-cyprus-become-creditanstalt-2-0.html
Cyprus: The Next Blunder
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/cyprus-the-next-blunder.html

recent (closed, linkedin) "Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#35 Does the UK Government Really Want us to Report Fraud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#36 JPMorgan Chase slammed by regulators for control failings after botched derivatives bet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#41 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#16 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#27 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#36 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#47 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#53 Should Bethany McLean Be Bothered by the Government Lawsuit Against S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#64 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#65 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#70 Implementing a Whistle-Blower Program - Detecting and Preventing Fraud at Workplace
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#74 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#2 Legal Lessons from PATCO Fraud Case
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#3 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#5 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#6 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#7 LIBOR: Viewing the Biggest Financial Crime in History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#18 WhistleWatch -- Blog Archive -- Former Top Federal Whistleblower Protector Scott Bloch, Esq. Pleads Guilty to Destruction of Government Property
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#42 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#55 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#58 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#82 Retailer Sues Visa Over $13 Million "Fine" for Being Hacked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#17 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#24 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#28 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A Matter of Mindset: Iraq

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
Date: 20 Mar 2013
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army

this mentions Baqubah (upthread "Killing Our Way Out"), "Invisible Armies"
http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Armies-History-Guerrilla-ebook/dp/B007P9M034/

pg532/loc9023-25:
The organization that Zarqawi built was strong enough to survive his own death; he was killed by a pair of bombs dropped by an F-16 on June 7, 2006, after having been tracked down to a safe house outside Baqubah by the U.S. Joint Special Operations Command.

... snip ...

several articles recently about members of the former administration finger pointing at each other. this is a little more charitable to former president, pg533/loc9044-48:
But at the end of 2006, after more than three years of drift, President Bush made an unpopular decision to turn around a failing war effort. Over the opposition of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and most lawmakers, he decided to send 20,000 more troops to Iraq-- a figure that would eventually grow to 30,000. At the same time he made a clean sweep of his Iraq team. Out went Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, General John Abizaid, the head of Central Command, and General George Casey, the senior officer in Iraq: all of the architects of the worst disaster in American military history since Vietnam. In an echo of Westmoreland's fate, Casey was elevated to become army chief of staff.

... snip ...

recent posts referencing Westmoreland:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#25 You may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#64 Early use of the word "computer"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#44 Preparing for War with China

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
Date: 20 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://lineschfirm.com/wp/bank-whistleblower-claims-retaliation-and-wrongful-termination/

...

I always wonder how many of those organizations are decoys ... setup to sidetrack &/or diffuse whistleblowers.

POGO now has winslow wheeler (no relationship) ... has been considered part of the reform movement ... along with other Boyd acolytes ... disclaimer I used to sponsor Boyd's briefings at IBM (started 30yrs ago after the front-page spinney article in time)
http://nation.time.com/2013/02/28/it-was-30-years-ago-today/

related to housing: Housing Bubble II -- But This Time It's Different
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/wolf-richter-housing-bubble-ii-but-this-time-its-different.html

aka ... in the congressional Madoff hearings, they had the person that tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff. He testified that tips turn up 13 times more fraud than audits ... and that SEC didn't have a TIP line.

He also wouldn't appear for interviews; finally a legal representative showed up and said the person was concerned that he might be in physical danger; that plausible justification that SEC wouldn't do anything about Madoff (until they were forced to when Madoff turned himself) was that both Madoff and the SEC were under the influence of criminal elements. A year later on a book tour, he said he had changed his mind, that Madoff turned himself in looking for gov. protection (having defrauded some criminal elements) ... but no explanation still why SEC didn't do anything.

During the period when Sarbanes-Oxley bill was being debated ... there were snide comments that all the onerous audits were really a gift to the audit industry (after their bad reputation from the ENRON/WORLDCOM incidents) ... and all the claims about auditors and top executives doing jail time was just smoke, obfuscation, and misdirection. There was some opinion expressed that the SOX whistleblower provisions might contribute something .... but that would also have required SEC to do something.

recent posts mentioning whistleblowers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#41 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#16 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#27 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#36 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#47 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#64 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#70 Implementing a Whistle-Blower Program - Detecting and Preventing Fraud at Workplace
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#6 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#18 WhistleWatch -- Blog Archive -- Former Top Federal Whistleblower Protector Scott Bloch, Esq. Pleads Guilty to Destruction of Government Property
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#58 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 20 Mar 2013 07:42:57 -0700
jayarelim@HOTMAIL.COM (J R) writes:
Correct. Hardware Security Module is the more generic term.

Host Security Module is the Racal/Thales offering. Many still use the term generically.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#1 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube

Last decade, I had done design for new security chip and was looking at having it fab'ed at a new secure facility in Dresden.

In the 90s, I had semi-facetiously commented that I would take a $500 mil-spec chip, aggresively cost-reduce it by 2-3 orders of magnitude while improving the integrity.

In walk-through/audit of the facility, they wanted to charge me several cents to have HSM generate public-key pair and inject it into the chip (also added a couple minutes to processing for each chip)

Since I wanted the chip well under a dollar, that several cents were significant. I pointed out that the chip had a secure key generation incorporated into the power-on/test cycle ... and wouldn't need HSM processing (or the elapsed time). The secure key generation during power-on/test cycle actually speeded up the power-on/test sequence and the generated public key was exported as part of the power-on/test sequence validation data (the private key would never be exported). Not only wouldn't I need the HSM, extra time & cost ... but shouldn't I get a credit for speeding up the power-on/test sequence (as an aside, after power-on/test sequence ... those circuits get destroyed).

reference to bunch of patents on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

old email discussing pgp-like public key email on the internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email810506
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email810515

other old email about public key ... mentioning
The current MVS Cryptographic Subsystem key management scheme is a perfect example of the morass that faces us in 'automatically' managing keys

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email841218

and another quote
which, to SNA product developers always seem to be either inept, uninformed, or irrelevant

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#email841226

mentions cost of racal box ... would contribute to getting me involved as mentioned in post upthread, I wanted under $100, and capable of 3mbyte/sec ... this mentions $3,200/box running 128kbit/sec
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#email850701

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
Date: 20 Mar 2013
Blog: IBMers
also discussion in Google+
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/AW5hv4662md

IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.businessinsider.com/sam-palmisano-ibm-office-2013-3

recent tomes on previous executives ... starting with IBM's downward slide after Future System fiasco ... until going into the red when corporation was being restructured into "baby blues" as part of being slit up

"Ethernet at 40" contributing to the company sliding into the red ... on linkedin
http://lnkd.in/xJrYGh .
http://lnkd.in/SMzJrv .
and google+
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/YSSBbAaC5Ec .

IBM "baby blues" ... restructuring in preperation for splitup
http://lnkd.in/64w-BG .

above also references quotes about major change in corporate culture after failure of Future System

then new executive brought in to resurrect the company (instead of split up) ... some earlier history
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/bjQgvXFwEGZ

reports during the bubble that the ratio of top executive to avg worker compensation (in US corporations) exploded to avg 400:1 (after having been 20:1 for a long time and 10:1 in most of the rest of the world), in some places, even spiking over 1000:1. claims that it started in the 90s with executives offshoring and raiding employee retirement plans so they could pocket the proceeds.

recent d posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#9 Sandy Weill's About-Face on Big Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#61 What is holding back cloud adoption?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#63 Today in TIME Tech History: Piston-less Power (1959), IBM's Decline (1992), TiVo (1998) and More
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#76 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#3 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#31 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#32 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#33 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#34 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#40 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#56 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#59 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#63 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#27 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#11 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#20 Y2K hacks

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2013 17:48:45 -0400
elardus.engelbrecht@SITA.CO.ZA (Elardus Engelbrecht) writes:
Destroyed after such sequence? I'm having trouble swallowing your statement. ;-D

If you, for example, do that in the factory just to test it out before shipping to the customer, it is destroyed?

Are you not meaning 'those key get destroyed'? Or do I misunderstand you?

Thanks for your post anyway.

And thanks to J R and zMan for your reply too about that acronym!


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#68 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#69 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#70 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#1 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#32 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube

in the fab ... while still wafer ... a couple thousand chips ... connections are lowered to chip test contact points for initial power-on/test ... after test ... this area gets destroyed so can no longer be used. chips that fail the test are marked for dustbin. standard procedure for security chips.

wafer then is sliced and diced into individual chips ... failed chips are disposed of. chip wafer reference:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wafer_%28electronics%29

Added public/private keygen to power-on/test sequence ... saved the key-pair on chip and exported public key as part of power-on/test data. that area of the chip was then crippled.

Part of going to under a dollar was minimizing number of circuits needed for security functions. The problem was wafer slice&dice was done by sawing ... and as size of circuits shrank ... but number of circuits per chip didn't increase ... then limiting factor on increasing number of chips/wafer was the size of the cut made by sawing (i.e. wafer saw cut was becoming larger wafer area than total chip area). This was also problem for new generations of RFID chips (EPC ... to replace scanned barcodes) ... effectively number of circuits/chip was compareable to RFID chips. RFID industry did innovate and come up with significant reduction in the wafer cut area ... allowing chips per wafer to see large increase.

epc reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Product_Code
rfid chip reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio-frequency_identification

with wafer production costs effectively fixed, per chip becomes wafer-cost/(number of chips/wafer) ... especially if you can eliminate post fab, per chip process steps. size of circuits decrease by factor of four, number of chips/wafer go up nearly factor 16 (and therefor cost/chip declines by factor of 16 ... modulo post-fab per-chip process steps)

it has also been part of the justification for going from 6in to 12in wafers ... wafer area (and therefor chips/wafer) is pi*r**2 ... doubling the diameter(radius), guadruples the area (and increase nearly four times the number of chips).

Both were happening while I was working on the security chip ... seeing possibility of 64 times increase in the number of chips/wafer (while cost per wafer stayed about the same). I previously had eliminated all the circuits that weren't related to security functions getting nearly factor of 20 times reduction in number of necessary circuits for security functions (i.e. vendors were creating extremely bloated chip designs as part of trying to justify enormous markups). Initially actually seeing better than 1000 times increase in chips/wafer was limited by wafer slice&dicing technology.

with dramatic increase in chips/wafer (along with dramatic reduction in that component of cost/chip), then post fab "per-security-chip" processing started to dominate ... which was the next area that had to be addressed (part of which was doing keygen during power-on/test).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
Date: 20 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
http://compliancex.com/ex-bailout-watchdog-jpmorgans-actions-entirely-consistent-with-fraud/

Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions 'Entirely Consistent With Fraud'
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/15/neil-barofsky-jpmorgan_n_2884506.html
Neil Barofsky: $JPM's Accounting Process Appears Entirely Consistent With Fraud
http://ibankcoin.com/news/2013/03/16/neil-barofsky-jpms-accounting-process-appears-entirely-consistent-with-fraud/

The Spectacular Rise and Fall of Jamie Dimon, Wall Street's Golden Boy; More than just a tawdry tale, Dimon's demise is a critique of the American Dream.
http://www.alternet.org/economy/spectacular-rise-and-fall-jamie-dimon-wall-streets-golden-boy

has a little of IBM flavor to it.

Relax! They've Got It Covered; Why Jamie Dimon's $2 Billion Gambling Loss Will NOT Speed Financial Reform
http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/05/15/why-jamie-dimons-2-billion-gambling-loss-will-not-speed-financial-reform/

the above includes this reference:
Back in 1986, Dimon was the bright young protege of "Sandy" Weill, when he was forced out of American Express in a coup de requin. Master and servant made their way to Baltimore, Maryland, where Weill acquired a storefront moneylending firm called Commercial Credit.

... snip ...

above also refers to Commercial Credit as loan sharking operation. Sandy was in competition with Gerstner to be next CEO of AMEX, Sandy looses and leaves.

KKR and AMEX later are in competition for RJR, KKR wins. KKR has trouble and hires Gerstner away for the turn around. IBM is going into the red and being restructured into the "baby blues" for the splitting up of the company. The board then hires Gerstner away to resurrect IBM.

Sandy (& Dimon) are making acquisitions, eventually taking over Citi in violation of Glass-Steagall, Greenspan gives him an exemption while he lobbies congress for the repeal of Glass-Steagall. Dimon leaves and eventually becomes CEO of JPMorgan.

Sandy Weill on the Times list of those responsible for the economic mess:
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877329,00.html
partial account of Glass-Steagall repeal
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/wallstreet/weill/

which enables too-big-to-fail, too-big-to-jail, too-big-to-prosecute

past posts mentioning Weill&Dimon
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#9 JPM LOSES $2 BILLION USD!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#16 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#82 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#87 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#45 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#79 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#31 History--punched card transmission over telegraph lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#32 Does the IBM System z Mainframe rely on Obscurity or is it Security by Design?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#60 Today in TIME Tech History: Piston-less Power (1959), IBM's Decline (1992), TiVo (1998) and More

past posts mentioning too-big-to-jail/TBTJ
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#16 Wonder if they know how Boydian they are?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#35 The Dallas Fed Is Calling For The Immediate Breakup Of Large Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#37 The $30 billion Social Security hack
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#88 Defense acquisitions are broken and no one cares
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#9 JPM LOSES $2 BILLION USD!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#20 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#14 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#25 This Is The Wall Street Scandal Of All Scandals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#37 If all of the American earned dollars hidden in off shore accounts were uncovered and taxed do you think we would be able to close the deficit gap?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#30 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#0 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#55 U.S. Sues Wells Fargo, Accusing It of Lying About Mortgages
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#10 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#73 These Two Charts Show How The Priorities Of US Companies Have Gotten Screwed Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#20 HSBC, SCB Agree to AML Penalties
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#24 OCC Confirms that Big Banks are Badly Managed, Lack Adequate Risk Management Controls
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#30 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#39 UBS Faces Potential LIBOR Fine Of $1 Billion -- Twice What Barclays Paid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#48 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#62 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#64 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#1 Libor Lies Revealed in Rigging of $300 Trillion Benchmark
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#28 Neil Barofsky: Geithner Doctrine Lives on in Libor Scandal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#49 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
Date: 20 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#31

IRS Threatens to Weaken Whistleblower Program
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/03/20130320-irs-threatens-to-weaken-whistleblower-protections.html

from 4yrs ago

Obama vows to close loopholes after public anger
http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2009/mar/14/tax-avoidance-us-obama

the following month, April 2009, there were news that IRS was looking for 52,000 some super-wealthy americans ("tax-cheats") that were dodging taxes illegally with off-shore accounts.

past posts mentioning tax-cheats, dodging taxes, off-shore tax havens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#12 Amid Economic Turbulence, Mainframes Counter IT Cost-Cutting Trend
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#22 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#37 No Jail In UBS Tax Evasion Case
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#29 Mitt Romney avoids U.S tax by using Offshore bank accounts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#34 Mitt Romney avoids U.S tax by using Offshore bank accounts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#37 Romney's Opponents Intensify Attacks as Voting Nears
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#40 Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#27 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#30 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#39 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#64 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#37 If all of the American earned dollars hidden in off shore accounts were uncovered and taxed do you think we would be able to close the deficit gap?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#81 GBP13tn: hoard hidden from taxman by global elite

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 10:06:05 -0400
Robert Wessel <robertwessel2@yahoo.com> writes:
Those are large newsworthy mainly because they're rare. Some 13.6 million people were arrested in 2009 in the United States, and while only a fraction of those resulted in a criminal conviction, the number of cases you actually hear about on the news is *tiny* relative to the total number of cases.

US incarceration rate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_incarceration_rate

The incarceration rate in the United States of America is the highest in the world
While Americans represent about 5 percent of the world's population, nearly one-quarter of the entire world's inmates have been incarcerated in the United States in recent year

... snip ...

By the Numbers: The U.S.'s Growing For-Profit Detention Industry
http://www.propublica.org/article/by-the-numbers-the-u.s.s-growing-for-profit-detention-industry

Prison-industrial complex
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prison%E2%80%93industrial_complex
The term prison-industrial complex (PIC) is used to attribute the rapid expansion of the US inmate population to the political influence of private prison companies and businesses that supply goods and services to government prison agencies. The term is borrowed from the military-industrial complex President Dwight D. Eisenhower warned of in his famous 1961 farewell address

... snip ...

there was some article recently comparing the amount spent on prisons versus public education ... partially explaining why US education system ranks near the bottom of industrial countries.

currently reading
http://www.amazon.com/Ikes-Bluff-President-Eisenhowers-ebook/dp/B0076DCPI4/

Eisenhower's original draft had military-industrial-congressional complex (MICC) but he shortened it in the actual speech.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 11:42:19 -0400
hancock4 writes:
As an aside, a book just came out analyzing the relationship between Eisenhower and Nixon. I haven't seen the new book, but according to Ambrose Eisenhower treated Nixon like crap from day one. He used Nixon to do the dirty political work so Eisenhower could remain dignified and above the fray, while Nixon's reputation remained tarnished. Eisenhower failed to support Nixon at critical points. It seems this lousy treatment contributed to Nixon's dark side (Nixon was not paranoid, people really disliked him.)

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37

"Ike's Bluff" goes into some; pg25/loc278-82
Nixon's insecurities had turned to anger when Ike kept his distance from Nixon during a campaign-fund flap just six weeks before election day. The California senator had been able to save his place on the GOP ticket only by appealing to the public with his maudlin but effective "Checkers speech."

... snip ...

However, Ike didn't like McCarthy and what he was doing, but was able to use Nixon with McCarthy pg56/loc701-5
The vice president, Richard Nixon, who had his own history as a Red baiter and could talk to McCarthy, was dispatched to the Senate. McCarthy told Nixon he had two speeches prepared about Bohlen, and had not used "the real dirty one."

... snip ...

then there is latest news at 11

Declassified LBJ Tapes Accuse Richard Nixon of Treason
http://news.slashdot.org/story/13/03/21/0331256/declassified-lbj-tapes-accuse-richard-nixon-of-treason
The Lyndon Johnson tapes: Richard Nixon's 'treason'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21768668
It begins in the summer of 1968. Nixon feared a breakthrough at the Paris Peace talks designed to find a negotiated settlement to the Vietnam war that he knew would derail his campaign.

Nixon therefore set up a clandestine back-channel to the South Vietnamese involving Anna Chennault, a senior campaign adviser. In late October 1968 there were major concessions from Hanoi which promised to allow meaningful talks to get underway in Paris. This was exactly what Nixon feared. Chennault was dispatched to the South Vietnamese embassy with a clear message: the South Vietnamese government should withdraw from the talks, refuse to deal with Johnson, and if Nixon was elected, they would get a much better deal. Meanwhile the FBI had bugged the ambassador's phone and transcripts of Chennault's calls were sent to the White House

In the end Nixon won by less than 1% of the popular vote, escalated the war into Laos and Cambodia with the loss of an additional 22,000 American lives, and finally settled for a peace agreement in 1973 that was within grasp in 1968.


... snip ...

On this 10th anniversery of invasion of Iraq there are numerous recent parallels being drawn between Vietnam and Iraq, as well as senior members of the last administration recently doing lots of finger-pointing blame at each other. I recently finished "Invisible Armies" ... which is somewhat kinder to the past president on the invasion of Iraq (although other accounts has the president starting justification for Iraq invasion as soon as he took office, long before 9/11)
http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Armies-History-Guerrilla-ebook/dp/B007P9M034/

this account of the behind the scenes for the iraq invasion makes it sound more like the vietnam scenario (the author was even relative of the white house chief of staff)
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

my son-in-law 1st tour in Iraq was Fallujah during some of the worst fighting there in 2004-2005; 2nd tour was Baqubah in 2007-2008. this account "killing our way out" says Baqubah was much worse than Fallujah
http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-Killing-Our-ebook/dp/B007VBBS9I/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 13:21:48 -0400
hancock4 writes:
While I believe the old Friden machines had lower case in the 1960s, I'm not sure it was available on Teletype systems. At that time, in the US Western Union mostly used 5-bit Baudot. Most computer terminals were Teletype models 33 or 35 or their equivalent, and were upper case only. IIRC, it wasn't until the mid 1970s that lower case capability was widespread.

selectric-based terminals had selectric typeballs and use tilt-rotate code ... aka physical position typeball for the specific caracter ... host required "translate tables" that converted mainframe representation to code that positioned the typeball for that character. most typeballs from selectric typewriters had lower-case standard
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Selectric_typewriter

selectric-base terminals on ctss & mtss
http://www.multicians.org/terminals.html
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_2741

all the science center desks had 2741 next to it. i got "portable" 2741 at home march 1970 ... which was replaced with standard 2741 the next month ... which i had until the summer of 1977.

mainframe had two translate tables for the two kinds of 2741 (it would send tilt/rotate codes to print "CP-67 Online" twice on the same line ... once using one set of tilt-rotate codes and the 2nd using the other ... recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#30 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
to
http://archive.org/details/bitsavers_ibm360cp67n3UsersGuideOct70_24706079

I still have 2741 APL typeball ... there were then two 2741 APL translate tables to setup tilt-rotate for the APL characters position ... switching between APL & non-APL translate tables was done by "SET APL ON|OFF" (and corresponding swap of the typeballs).

pictures of my apl typeball
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#36 IBM THINK original equipment sign

CMS "BLIP" function used feature that would periodically "wiggle" the ball (tilt/rotate) w/o actually striking the paper.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#33 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
Date: 21 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
recent posts in the thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#3 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#5 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#42 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#55 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

Meet David S. Cohen of Treasury and Stuart Levey of HSBC -- Or Is It the Other Way Around?
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/meet-david-s-cohen-of-treasury-and-stuart-levey-of-hsbc-or-is-it-the-other-way-around.html

to bad you can't charge them as criminal conspiracy under RICO ... there have been some cases that show implicit conspiracy w/o having to prove that they met and agreed to explicit conspiracy. too big to prosecute would appear to be an implicit criminal conspiracy.

Morning Links: Too Big to Fail, Too Big to Jail?
http://blogs.wsj.com/marketbeat/2013/03/12/morning-links-too-big-to-fail-too-big-to-jail/

After Watering Down Financial Reform, Ex-Senator Scott Brown Joins Goldman Sachs' Lobbying Firm
http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2013/03/11/1700341/after-watering-down-financial-reform-ex-senator-scott-brown-joins-goldman-sachs-lobbying-firm/

About That $83 Billion Bank Subsidy. We Still Mean It.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-27/about-that-83-billion-bank-subsidy-we-still-mean-it-.html

Why Has the US Government given trillions of dollars to Wall Street welfare queens like JP Morgan's Jamie Dimond? Shouldn't the market decide winners and losers rather than corrupt
http://johnhively.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/why-has-the-us-government-given-trillions-of-dollars-to-wall-street-welfare-queens-like-jp-morgans-jamie-dimond-shouldnt-the-market-decide-winners-and-losers-rather-than-corrupt/

the graph in the above ("Wall Street Bailout So Far Exceeds the Total Cost of All US Wars") is somewhat skewed ... it shows wallstreet bailout so far totaling $8.5T ... and total of all the wars involving US (going back to american revolution) at around $6T. Note however, recent articles about enormous fabrication justifying the case for invading Iraq, claim that the total for Iraq will be $5T-$6T when all is settled and done (including all future veteran medical and disability payments).

JPMorgan's Follies, for All to See
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/business/jpmorgans-follies-for-all-to-see-in-a-senate-report.html

from above:
That's the takeaway for both investors and taxpayers in the 307-page Senate report detailing last year's $6.2 billion trading fiasco at JPMorgan Chase. The financial system, thanks to dissembling traders and bumbling regulators, is at greater risk than you know.

... snip ...

When You Weren't Looking, Democrat Bank Stooges Launch Bills to Permit Bailouts, Deregulate Derivatives
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/when-you-werent-looking-democrat-bank-stooges-launch-bills-to-permit-bailouts-deregulate-derivatives.html

from above:
In the US, depositors have actually been put in a worse position than Cyprus deposit-holders, at least if they are at the big banks that play in the derivatives casino. The regulators have turned a blind eye as banks use their depositaries to fund derivatives exposures. And as bad as that is, the depositors, unlike their Cypriot confreres, aren't even senior creditors. Remember Lehman? When the investment bank failed, unsecured creditors (and remember, depositors are unsecured creditors) got eight cents on the dollar. One big reason was that derivatives counterparties require collateral for any exposures, meaning they are secured creditors. The 2005 bankruptcy reforms made derivatives counterparties senior to unsecured lenders. Lehman had only two itty bitty banking subsidiaries, and to my knowledge, was not gathering retail deposits. But as readers may recall, Bank of America moved most of its derivatives from its Merrill Lynch operation its depositary in late 2011.

... snip ...

and move of derivatives to FDIC insurance

US Deposits In Perspective: $25 Billion In Insurance, $9,283 Billion In Deposits; $297,514 Billion In Derivatives
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-19/us-deposits-perspective-25-billion-insurance-9283-billion-deposits-297514-billion-de

Is Cyprus in Our Future?; The Plague of Wall Street Banking
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/20/the-plague-of-wall-street-banking/

from above:
financial fraud investigator Bill Black points out that the SEC cannot institute fines that are too big for the same reason. "The art is to make the number sound large to fool the rubes, but to insure that the fine poses only a modest inconvenience to our 'most reputable' fraudulent banks." So, the SEC trumpets "more than 150 firms and individuals, with sanctions totaling $2.7 billion." Black points out that this number sounds big, but it isn't compared to the losses caused by the fraud epidemic in the US which are well in excess of $15 trillion.

... snip ...

1% of $15T would be $150B ... $2.7B is 1.8percent of $150B which is 1percent of $15T ... i.e. $2.7B is .018% of $15T There was over $27T in transactions done during the bubble with wallstreet possibly skimming $4T-$5T. $2.7B is .0676% of $4T. Some of the too-big-to-fail had repeated fines/sanctions/injunctions for the same violations during the last decade i.e. too-big-to-fail fraudulent activity, found guilty, fined & singed injunction to never repeat again ... and then repeated same fraudulent activity ... same sequence for the same fraudulent activity repeated several times ... showing that the fines & legal injunctions had little effect on behavior.

more on enormous amount of wallstreet money blanketing capital hill

Wall Street Deregulation Advances As Top Democrat Warns That Vote Could 'Haunt' Congress
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/20/wall-street-deregulation-_n_2916795.html?1363804456

from above:
The most controversial bill to advance Wednesday is explicitly designed to expand taxpayer backing for derivatives. It was the only legislation that lawmakers were required to cast individual votes for or against

... snip ...

Whose Insured Deposits Will Be Plundered Next?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-21/guest-post-whose-insured-deposits-will-be-plundered-next

from above:
Far more worrying for American and British depositors though is this paragraph Golem XIV brings up from a joint Bank of England and FDIC paper from 2012 which points to the possibility of using deposit insurance funds to bail out illiquid banks:

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computer Simulations Reveal Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Computer Simulations Reveal Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones
Date: 21 Mar 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/KByyvEShnDE

Computer Simulations Reveal Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones
http://www.technologyreview.com/view/512696/computer-simulations-reveal-benefits-of-random-investment-strategies-over-traditional/

Somewhat similar to economics nobel prize winner in "Thinking, Fast & Slow":
Since then, my questions about the stock market have hardened into a larger puzzle: a major industry appears to be built largely on an illusion of skill. Billions of shares are traded every day, with many people buying each stock and others selling it to them

News accounts for just 1/3 of commodity price moves-study; Up to 70 percent of price moves are "self-generated"
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/21/imf-commodities-study-idUSL6N0CDBH22013032

from above:
Only about a third of commodity price moves are caused by news, reflecting the growing role of high-frequency trading in steering prices, according to a study selected by the International Monetary Fund.

... snip ...

HFT Reality: 70% Of Price Moves Are Disconnected From Fundamental Reality
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-21/hft-reality-70-price-moves-are-disconnected-fundamental-reality

past references to HFT providing little or no benefit ... except to those manipulating the market
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/MLcraAQg72T

archive of above:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#29 Destructive Destruction? An Ecological Study of High Frequency Trading

past posts mentioning "Thinking Fast & Slow" reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#138 Thinking, Fast & Slow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#1 The war on terabytes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#3 We are on the brink of a historic decision [referring to defence cuts]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#29 The speeds of thought, complexities of problems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#35 Entropy and #SocialMedia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#44 What's the most interesting thing you do in your non-work life?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#57 speculation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#16 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#67 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#65 Thousands Of IBM Employees Got A Nasty Surprise Yesterday: Here's The Email They Saw
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#87 Naked emperors, holy cows and Libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#4 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#74 What voters are really choosing in November

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 21:52:09 -0400
Robert Wessel <robertwessel2@yahoo.com> writes:
Simply not supported by the statistics. While the U.S. leads a few categories (murders, in particular), over most of the spectrum over numbers are not terribly different than other developed countries.

http://www.civitas.org.uk/crime/crime_stats_oecdjan2012.pdf


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

there have been articles that a lot of the violence in mexico is because of the drug cartels ... significantly aided by enormous amounts of money that has been laundered by the too-big-to-fail.

the refusal to presecute and jail too-big-to-fail for lots of criminal activity ... has given rise to number of observations 1) too-big-to-jail and too-big-to-presecute 2) too-big-to-fail are involved in lots of criminal activity, not just money laundering for drug cartels and terriorists, 3) too-big-to-fail money laundering plays a major factor in the ability of the drug cartels to operate (and the corresponding level of violence), 4) the heavy use of jail time for the predominantly poor is contrasted by the lack of any jail time for super-wealthy and too-big-to-fail.

recent

HSBC, too big to jail, is the new poster child for US two-tiered justice system
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2012/dec/12/hsbc-prosecution-fine-money-laundering
Outrageous HSBC Settlement Proves the Drug War is a Joke
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/outrageous-hsbc-settlement-proves-the-drug-war-is-a-joke-20121213
Outrage: Some Banks Are Too Big to Prosecute; Attorney General Eric Holder admits that the biggest banks are not just too big too fail, but above the law.
http://www.alternet.org/outrage-some-banks-are-too-big-prosecute
Elizabeth Warren Wants HSBC Bankers Jailed for Money Laundering
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2013/03/elizabeth-warren-wants-hsbc-bankers-jailed-for-money-laundering/
The Corrupt US Government: Why US Treasury Officials Refused to Consider Recommending Criminal Charges Against Drug Money Laundering Bankers
http://johnhively.wordpress.com/2013/03/08/the-corrupt-us-government-why-us-treasury-officials-refused-to-consider-recommending-criminal-charges-against-drug-money-laundering-bankers/

Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://wallstreetonparade.com/2013/03/senator-sherrod-brown-drops-a-bombshell-in-mary-jo-whites-hearing/

from above:
The spectacle of warped law enforcement grew worse today during the Senate Banking confirmation hearing of Mary Jo White to head the Securities and Exchange Commission. Under questioning by Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), White admitted that even the economy of a foreign country -- like Japan -- is taken into consideration before bringing a criminal indictment in the U.S. Even worse, White was forced to admit that while working for the U.S. Department of Justice as the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York (from 1993 to 2002), she considered it appropriate to speak with Larry Summers (a Treasury Secretary in the Clinton administration) to weigh the economic impact of bringing an indictment.

... snip ...

articles from 2-3 yrs ago started the reference of the too-big-to-fail are also too-big-to-jail ... and too-big-to-fail money laundering for the drug cartels was turning Mexico into Columbia (and major enabler in the upswing in violence).

recent posts mentioning too-big-to-jail:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#1 Libor Lies Revealed in Rigging of $300 Trillion Benchmark
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#28 Neil Barofsky: Geithner Doctrine Lives on in Libor Scandal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#49 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#53 Should Bethany McLean Be Bothered by the Government Lawsuit Against S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#55 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#35 Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 11:00:12 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
It seems like criminals fall into two groups. I continually hear good things about prison work programs. Locally we have a minimum security prison where the inmates get out and do work for local governments or non-profits: painting, raking leaves, rehabbing old buildings etc. They apparently like the chance to get out and do something useful and maybe learn a skill. Than you have the "recidivists" who only learn how to be better criminals.

It's too bad we don't do a better job distinguisihing them.

I have some doubts about "prison industries." The SS ran quite an efficient system of work camps. When people didn't perform they didn't bother to fire them.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

some amount of the press is the PIC lobbying legislatures ... and the two-tiered justice system ... from this reference:
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2012/dec/12/hsbc-prosecution-fine-money-laundering

The Caging of America; Why do we lock up so many people
http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2012/01/30/120130crat_atlarge_gopnik

from above:
Over all, there are now more people under "correctional supervision" in America -- more than six million -- than were in the Gulag Archipelago under Stalin at its height. That city of the confined and the controlled, Lockuptown, is now the second largest in the United States.

The accelerating rate of incarceration over the past few decades is just as startling as the number of people jailed: in 1980, there were about two hundred and twenty people incarcerated for every hundred thousand Americans; by 2010, the number had more than tripled, to seven hundred and thirty-one. No other country even approaches that. In the past two decades, the money that states spend on prisons has risen at six times the rate of spending on higher education.


... snip ...

Runaway Prison Costs Trash State Budgets
http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2011/02/09/Runaway-Prison-Costs-Thrash-State-Budgets.aspx

from above:
The prison system in the U.S. is in crisis mode. States across the country are grappling with massive budget shortfalls, much of which can be credited to the runaway growth of prison budgets over the past 25 years

... snip ...

some web searches on the subject, this is somebody's blog that looks at the lobbying and legislation over the past couple decades
http://rortybomb.wordpress.com/2011/08/03/elk-sloan-on-alec-and-prison-sentencing-and-labor/

referencing series of articles that also looks at the lobbying and legislation that has gone on over the past couple decades

The Hidden History of ALEC and Prison Labor
http://www.thenation.com/article/162478/hidden-history-alec-and-prison-labor

references

Corporate Con Game; How the private prison industry helped shape Arizona's anti-immigrant law.
http://inthesetimes.com/article/6084/corporate_con_game/

another blog that quotes the "ALEC and Prison Labor" article

How ALEC Changed Policies To Allow Corporations To Use Prisoners As Coerced Slave Labor
http://crooksandliars.com/susie-madrak/how-alec-changed-policies-allow-corpo

another article

Lobbyists, Guns and Money
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/26/opinion/krugman-lobbyists-guns-and-money.html

from above:
Many ALEC-drafted bills pursue standard conservative goals: union-busting, undermining environmental protection, tax breaks for corporations and the wealthy. ALEC seems, however, to have a special interest in privatization -- that is, on turning the provision of public services, from schools to prisons, over to for-profit corporations

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 11:30:08 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
I just read a book _Three Circles of War_ which is a collection of analysis papers, most coming out of the Naval [something or other college?]. they broke up the 10 years in Iraq into 3 kinds of war. you might be interested in it. The similarity to Viet Nam had to do with data gathering. Since people didn't go outside of the cities in Viet Nam, the conclusiong w.r.t. the sentiment of the population was skewed. A similar thing happened with Iraq.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#30 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

there has been lots of discussion in the Boyd groups on the subject. At last fall's Boyd conference at Marine Corps univ. there was (marine) regional commander talking about what he did that was starting to show some benefit (but also had an army officer or two talk about it).

however, much of it has been dwarfed by all the stuff that was handed out to private contractors ... including private military companies
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_military_company

the issue in vietnam and iraq wasn't that the sentiment was skewed ... that the repeated lessons about success and failure with insurgencies and gorilla warfare is that it has to be population centric (winning hearts and minds; coined in england during revolutionary war; can win every set-piece army battle and still loose the war, especially when you loose the support of the citizens back home).

"Invisible Armies" looks at succesful instances where the occupying country ignored "hearts and minds" of the occupied country was that they could be totally ruthless ... but they also ruthlessly tightly controlled their own citizens.

both vietnam and iraq had large parts of the military that their life-long training was large military battles with the soviet union on the fields of europe; problems were solved with lots of artillery and tank shells along with massive aerial bombing. massive shelling&bombing tends to be counter-productive since it tends to turn the population against the occupying force and strengthen the insurgency.

Afghanistan has much longer history of failures by occupying forces. There is research activity looking at all the soviet union military, intelligence and political archives related to their Afghan war ... and there have presentations of the research at the last couple Boyd conferences.

misc. boyd posts and references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 17:02:13 -0400
hancock4 writes:
There was a big cost saving between an IBM 3270 and a clone of it. I don't remember the exact amount, but it was enough so that there was no way one could justify getting IBM despite their better quality.

Around 1980 everyone wanted their own terminal on their desk. But not only was each terminal expensive, one had to get multiplexors (not cheap) and insure adequate capacity on the mainframe's network controller (3705?) as well as the mainframe itself. It took a long time until hardware costs of all the above went down enough so that terminals could be provided to everyone.

In the 1980s, some folks got a PC with a 3270 emulation card ("Irma"). But a PC's CGA monitor was kind of crappy compared to a normal terminal's monochrome monitor.


3705 was an extremely slow device ... handling lots of lines ... but fastest was 56kbit ... more typically, 9.6 & 19.2.

1980 ... STL (now called silicon valley lab, SVL) was bursting at the seams and they were moving 300 people from the IMS dbms group to off-site bldg with "remote" 3270 (at 19.2) back into the STL datacenter. The group tested out the "remote" 3270 and found it intolerable (being used to direct channel connect 3270 vm370/cms service inside the bldg).

I got sucked into doing HYPERChannel channel-extension support for the group where there were "channel-attached" local 3270s placed at the remote site. The group tested it out and could see no difference (to what they were used to) ... even though part of the path was full-duplex T1 (1.5mbit/sec) link over campus collins digital radio microwave link (that the company had put in the area; when I85 first went in, people with radar detectors would notice that they went off as they were passing the line-of-sight between the antenna on the hill overlooking STL and the main plant site).

I've recently pontificated on the subject with regard to the companies FICON. As part of the channel-extender support, the channel programs were "downloaded" to the remote end ... so they ran "remotely" ... rather than having latency back&forth for all the CCW half-duplex channel gorp. FICON has been an extremely heavy-weight layer that drastically cuts the throughput of the underlying FCS throughput ... and 30yrs later they have implemented a similar CCW download strategy for FICON ... that only partially mitigates the heavy FICON throughput penalty.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#63 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#68 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

in the mid-80s, as part of my HSDT project,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

there was some hardware being built on the other side of the pacific. On the friday before a visit, the communication group sent out an announcement for a new high-speed communication online discussion ... with the following definitions:


low-speed:       <9.6kbits
medium-speed:    19.2kbits
high-speed :     56kbits
very high-speed: 1.5mbits

the following monday morning in a conference room on the other side of the pacific ... the following definitions were on the wall:

low-speed:       <20mbits
medium-speed:    100mbits
high-speed:      200-300mbits
very high-speed: >600mbits


while I was doing T1 & higher-speed ... the communication group was trying to justify why their 32x5 products didn't support anything faster than 56kbit/sec. One of their published studies looked at customers using 32x5 "fat pipes" would logical treat multiple parallel 56kbit links as a single logical link. They had study that showed the number of customers with 2, 3, 4, etc parallel links in fat pipe which dropped to zero by six. They used that to claim that customers wouldn't want actual T1 before the early to mid 90s. What they failed to mention (or were even aware of) was that the telco tariff for five 56kbit links (280kbit) was about the same as single T1 (1.5mbit/sec) ... and so customers were moving off 32x5 gear to other vendors for support of T1 and faster links.

as I've periodically mentioned, then the communication group was resorting to all sorts of other misinformation to obfuscate their lack of competitive products (and preserve their terminal emulation install base) ... part was in justification of converting the internal network to SNA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#email870302
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#email870306

as well as claiming that the NSFNET backbone would be done with VTAM/SNA, old email, somebody had collected a bunch of their mis-information email and forwarded it (sort of a early mini wikileaks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109

past posts mentioning NSFNET bakcbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

lots of past posts mentioning terminal emulation install base (including lots of past posts mentioning senior disk engineer claiming that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division ... because of the stranglehold that the communication group had on datacenters)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#emulation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 17:11:41 -0400
Stephen Sprunk <stephen@sprunk.org> writes:
... or it could be that US law designates as "crimes" things that are not "crimes" in many other countries. So, even if human behavior is held constant, the US "crime" rate will always be higher.

For instance, roughly 70% of US inmates were convicted of non-violent, drug-related offenses. European countries generally consider drug abuse to be a medical problem, not a criminal one. (And they don't care at all about recreational use that doesn't rise to the level of abuse.)


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#43 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

changes in various laws partially accounts for why the incarceration rate per hundred thousand has more than tripled ... while in the same period typical crime has held steady or declined

one of the chapters in freakonomics was about the expected big upswing in crime rate ... which didn't happen. past posts mentioning freakonomics:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#17 The Worth of Verisign's Brand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#55 ANN: Microsoft goes Open Source
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#53 What do you think about fraud prevention in the governments?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#88 NASA proves once again that, for it, the impossible is not even difficult
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#30 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#57 speculation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#57 a clock in it, was Re: Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#12 The Secret Consensus Among Economists

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 17:35:07 -0400
Tech Time Warp of the Week: Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/03/tech-time-warp-arthur-c-clarke/

bank of 2314s in the background
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_2314.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 18:43:17 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
I just read a book _Three Circles of War_ which is a collection of analysis papers, most coming out of the Naval [something or other college?]. they broke up the 10 years in Iraq into 3 kinds of war. you might be interested in it. The similarity to Viet Nam had to do with data gathering. Since people didn't go outside of the cities in Viet Nam, the conclusiong w.r.t. the sentiment of the population was skewed. A similar thing happened with Iraq.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#44 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

The US Embassy In Baghdad Cost A Staggering $750 Million
http://www.businessinsider.com/750-million-united-states-embassy-iraq-baghdad-2013-3

from above:
They had been told it would cost $50 billion and that it would end soon.

... snip ...

other reports that the justification for the invasion began early in the administration, well before 9-11, and the public sell was that it would only cost $50B-$60B. Recent GAO report has $60B in Iraq disappearing into (us) corporate pockets with little or nothing to show for it. The current bill for Iraq is listed at $1.6T and projections it will eventually reach $5T-$6T (including long-term veteran benefits and medical bills) ... a 100 times greater than the original claims.

some of my recent archived posts in Boyd discussion group (some amount of the fabrication, obfuscation, & misdirection associated with both Iraq-I and Iraq-II) ... lots of MICC is not to win wars ... but to have constant conflicts to keep the funds flowing:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#30 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq

"invisible armies" starts vietnam with french return after ww2 ... and follows it up through at the various ups and downs ... including Eisenhower constantly not wanting to get involved ... and lots of experienced americans working with the french also recommending not to get involved. After the dividing vietnam into north & south ... there was american advisor (supposedly some of the "quiet american" is based on him ... although it points out things that Greene got wrong, that constantly advised against USA military involvement)

pg411/loc7024-31
Now, when he heard that Lightning Joe was trying to strike down Diem, whom he considered "a great patriot" and "probably the best of all the nationalists," Lansdale furiously typed a lengthy cable to Allen Dulles warning that "any successor government to Diem's acceptable to the French would be unable to carry out the reforms essential to deny Vietnam to the Communists." A few years later he predicted that Diem's successors would be "highly selfish and mediocre people [who] would be squabbling for power among themselves as the Communists took over." It was a prescient prediction in light of the "political and security vacuum" that was to envelop South Vietnam after Diem was overthrown and killed in 1963 with American connivance. Diem's overthrow was later to be seen by CIA Director William Colby, among others, as "America's primary (and perhaps worst) error in Vietnam."

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 20:28:22 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#44 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#30 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq

written by Chuck Spinney, one of Boyd's acolytes

Iraq Invasion Anniversary: Inside The Decider's Head
http://nation.time.com/2013/03/22/iraq-invasion-anniversary-inside-the-deciders-head/

from above:
Faced with this reality in the 1980s, the military reformers in the Pentagon led by Col John R. Boyd found it necessary to develop a more precise working definition of madness: We concluded that madness occurs when the decision maker's Observation -- Orientation -- Decision -- Action (OODA) loop becomes increasingly distorted and disconnected from its environment by the existence of Incestuous Amplification.

... snip ...

with references to this article in 2004:
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/17/magazine/17BUSH.html

misc. other posts &/or references to Boyd, OODA-loop, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 08:45:07 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
Interesting. From my recollection it took a lot longer for the 2314 to penetrate the market. Of course IBM says *announced* "April 22, 1965," but I don't recall seeing any in use until the mid 70's. Nearly everyone had 2311s.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#47 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

more 2314 history
http://www.computerhistory.org/groups/storagesig/media/docs/IBM-2314.pdf

at the univ. there were 2311s with the 360/30. the univ had a 709/1401 combo ... and were going to upgrade to 360/67. the 360/30 came in replacing the 1401 (had 1401 hardware emulation) as part of the transition to 360/67.

plausably higher work throughput of the larger 360s justified the higher capacity 2314s.

in the 70s with introduction of 3330s ... i would have expected prices of 2314s (with 29mbyte capacity) to come down ... but would still be hard to beat the price/bit of the 3330s (with 200mbyte capacity).
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3330.html

from above:
Development of the 3330 -- known as 23XX, then 2314B and later Merlin during its pre-announcement life -- began in March 1965. Model 1 was rolled out in 1970 and first shipped the following year. The second model was introduced in 1972 and first delivered in 1974. A Model 11 was announced in 1973, with first customer shipments scheduled for March 1974.

... snip ...

science center in the early 70s had 45 2314 drives (five 8+1 banks plus one five drive bank) for its cp67 360/67 system. misc. past posts mentioning cp67
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

it was replaced with 370/155-II with 3330s ... old email about migrating bunch of cp67 enhancements to vm370 (the original morph by the development group of cp67 to vm370 did a lot of simplification and dropped lots of features)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

summer of 1969, I was con'ed into going to Boeing Seattle as part of an effort setting up Boeing Computer Systems (I was one of the first dozen BCS employees) which was going to bring all of dataprocessing under independent business unit ... as part of being able to better monetize the dataprocessing investment (including offerring dataprocessing services to non-Boeing entities).

at the time, I thought Renton datacenter was possibly largest in the world ... claims were it had couple hundred million in IBM 360s ... and that summer there were pieces of 2-3 360/65s constantly being staged for installation (in the hallways around the datacenter room) ... as I remember these were all 2314 systems. Some amount of Renton datacenter was also being replicated at the new 747 plant up in Everett (serial #3 was seen flying the skys of Seattle summer of 1969 as part of FAA flight certification) ... disaster scenario was that Mt. Rainer heats up and results in mudslide that takes out the Renton datacenter ... the cost to the company of not having the Renton datacenter for a week was more than the cost of the Renton datacenter.

much later I would sponsor Boyd's briefings at IBM. In some of his biographies mention that he was in command of spook base (about the same time I was at Boeing) and lists it as a $2.5B "windfall" for IBM (aka ten times the value claimed for 360s at the Renton datacenter). misc posts and other references to Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

old reference to spook base, gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine (Boyd would make some comment about the datacenter being the largest air conditioned bldg in that part of the world):
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 09:40:00 -0400
Stephen Sprunk <stephen@sprunk.org> writes:
... or it could be that US law designates as "crimes" things that are not "crimes" in many other countries. So, even if human behavior is held constant, the US "crime" rate will always be higher.

local radio station had interview with CNN's medical sanjay gupta about states moving to de-criminalize marijuana
http://www.cnn.com/CNN/anchors_reporters/gupta.sanjay.html

Decriminalization of non-medical cannabis in the United States
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decriminalization_of_non-medical_cannabis_in_the_United_States
Legal history of cannabis in the United States
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_history_of_cannabis_in_the_United_States

one of the questions was about current laws against marijuana justified because it was a "gateway drug" ... aka leading to use of much more dangerous drugs. Gupta said that studies show that alcohol is by far the largest "gateway drug".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gateway_drug_theory

past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#43 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#46 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 11:09:40 -0400
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
It wasn't the development of the Internet that took the most time, it was the deployment.

The base protocols of the Internet were developed ca 1974 - 1983. They went into production on january 1st 1983, and have been operational since. However, that network was a relatively tiny, academic network, with AUPs (acceptable use policies) and limited connectivity.

This met with fierce resistance from all incumbent telcos and network owners that defended their proprietary islands of networks where content and delivery were one and the same. It took until ca 1996 before that battle was won, and until ca 2002 before the Internet had taken over the deliveries pipielines too. (DSL, FTTH/FTTC etc).


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#47 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#50 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

similar but slightly different perspective ... recent post in Financial Crime Risk, Fruad and Security group ... and the rise of the internet (from nsfnet backbone)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#24 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?

referencing

Grid Computing; Hook enough computers together and what do you get? A new kind of utility that offers supercomputer processing on tap.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

also in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#18 Grid Computing (from May2002)

as mentioned, we were prevented from bidding on the NSFNET backbone RFP (earlier we were to have gotten $20M to tie together all the NSF supercomputers, but then congress cut the budget and several other things happened). old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

the winning bid was $11.2M ... but guestimates are that something like $40M to $50M was actually put into the backbone ... in large part by various telcos.

major telcos had huge infrastructures and large fixed monthly costs & run rate ... which were recovered, in large part, by bit-rate use charges. There was huge amount of dark fiber going unused ... and they were in chicken&egg situation ... to motivate any significant use of all the additional capacity they would have to significantly drop the bit-rate use charges. However, if they significantly dropped the bit-rate use charges ... it would likely be a decade before the use levels got up to the point where their large monthly run-rate was covered.

Significantly over provisioning the NSFNET backbone with lots of extra resources ... along with strict AUP restrictions for commercial use, created a technology incubator for high-bandwidth applications ... while not impacting their bottom line.

other trivia from my HSDT effort
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

recent post referencing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#45 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

we were already running lots of T1 connections ... which I believe helped motivate NSF to specify T1 in the NSFNET backbone RFP. When we weren't allowed to bid, the director of NSF tried to help, writing the company a letter (copying the CEO), but that just made the internal politics worse (as did references to what we already had running was at least five years ahead of all bid responses).

The actual winning RFP response didn't install T1 ... but put in 440kbit/sec links ... and then possibly to obfuscate not meeting the letter of the RFP, put in T1 trunks with telco multiplexors running multiple 440kbit links per trunk.

We would sarcastically comment that they could possibly call it a T5 network ... since some of the links were possibly multiplexed over some telco T5 trunk at some point.

Later when the T3 upgrade RFP was released, possibly trying to shutup my sniping, I was asked to be the red team. The blue team was a couple dozen researchers from half dozen labs around the world. At the final executive review, I presented first ... and then the blue team. Five minutes into the blue team presentation, the executive in charge pounded on the table and said he would lay down in front of a garbage truck before he allowed any put the blue team response to go forward (I, and a couple others, got up and walked out).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 11:18:00 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
He doesn't do it to provide any information. If you follow the links, most of them are irrelevant to the subject at hand.

I think he does it to drive up Google rankings for his pages.


totally orthogonal ... for a long time all the major search engine crawlers would hit all of my web pages a minimum of once/day ... especially the merged taxonomy & glossaries and the rfc index ... possibly because they had the highest percent of hrefs to size of file ... and it looked like they were using them as daily regression tests.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 14:29:04 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
There were a few papers talking about economics and things I don't understand. I wondered if Boyd's approach would work with economics, too. I tried to look for his thinking style in some of the papers but couldn't read it between the lines. That doesn't mean it's not there; my brain wasn't working well when I read the book.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#44 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

part of is OODA-loop being agile & adaptable ... another part is cutting through the "fog of war" (or purposeful obfuscation and misdirection) to figure out what is really going on ... lots of current "economics" is "gaming" the system; reference to the situation has gotten so bad among the economists profession that there has been call for "code of ethics" in the professional society (something that is common in nearly every other professional society)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#20 The Big Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

winslow wheeler (no relationship) moved here:
http://www.pogo.org/about/cdi-joins-pogo.html

and here
http://www.pogo.org/our-work/straus-military-reform-project/

has lots of articles by Winslow, Chuck and others

several of boyd's acolytes and reform movement contributed to this ... how pentagon & MICC keeps the funds flowing
http://dnipogo.org/labyrinth/

including one titled The Domestic Roots of Perpetual War by chuck
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html

also reproduction of the recently referenced time article
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-madness-of-king-george-revisited.html

claim that it is only going to cost $50B when corporations are going to skim much more than that ... and bill is now $1.6T heading to 100 times the original claim
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

a lot of it could be considered continuation of Eisenhower's warning about the MICC ... it is all about money, once the money is flowing they never want it to stop ... and in fact, always want it to increase; as a result there is no real objective to win wars because the objective is to have continuous conflicts as part of maintaining the flow of money

this is older post about warning about perpetual war coming in the wake of how WW1 ended (a member of congress from 100yrs ago, the paradigm isn't new with chuck)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#15 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#26 Cultural attitudes towards failure

from "Triumphant plutocracy" loc6265-74:

XXX. THE LEAGUE TO PERPETUATE WAR The war has just begun. I said that when the Armistice terms were published and when I read the Treaty and the League Covenant I felt more than ever convinced of the justice of my conclusion. The Treaty of Versailles is merely an armistice -- a suspension of hostilities, while the combatants get their wind. There is a war in every chapter of the Treaty and in every section of the League Covenant; war all over the world; war without end so long as the conditions endure which produce these documents.

... snip ...

previous referenced up-thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#49 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

another Boyd acolyte teaches courses in an MBA program ... using OODA-loop.

there are some number of boyd afficionados in the financial relm ... some have their own blogs and some also post in the (closed linkedin) Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security discussions There are long lengthy discussions about how the too-big-to-fail have also turned into too-big-to-jail.

The Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security discussions, also has some detailed discussions about what happens to whistleblowers; a senior examiner for large institutions at FDIC turned up a bunch of stuff about WAMU, CITI and others in 2006 time-frame ... and basically was eventually forced out. He has written a detailed account with copies of lots of the records and how the federal whistleblower protections actually assisted in shutting him out:
http://www.amazon.com/American-Betrayal-ebook/dp/B00BKZ02UM/

for a little drift back to computer related ... I referenced the Scientific American article in this Boyd facebook discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army

Why It's Smart to Be Reckless on Wall Street
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2013/02/27/why-its-smart-to-be-reckless-on-wall-street/

"Game Theory" morphs into "gaming the system" at MICC and part of the results is growing Success of Failure culture (more money in a series of failures ... analogous to objective of continuous conflict)
http://www.govexec.com/management/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

one of the other whistleblowers mentioned was the one that blew the whistle in the above article ... mentioned in this FCRFS post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower

There is other computer related in "high frequency trading" ... where apparently the primary purpose is to "steer" (aka manipulate) the market.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#29 Destructive Destruction? An Ecological Study of High Frequency Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#41 Computer Simulations Reveal Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones

includes this reference (as well as numerous others):

Dear SEC, This Is HFT "Cheating" At Its Most Obvious. Regards, Everyone Else
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-01-04/dear-sec-hft-cheating-its-most-obvious-regards-everyone-else

here is older reference to (illegally) steering/manipulating the market (but everybody does it and nothing to worry about from SEC):
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

boyd related posts & references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 18:58:16 -0400
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
But by the time it arrived, there were already terminal emulators for a number or quiet a few of the existing "small computers". Buying a computer for use as a terminal wasn't seen as the way to go, but once you had the computer, a terminal emulator added function. You could connect to a mainframe, or do things locally.

It was a weird situation. SOme of what drove the early interest in "home computers" was to give power to the people, no need for mainframes, you'd have your own computer. But it just took a few years before Compuserve and the like started up, giving power back to the mainframes and the small computers bieng nothing more than somewhat smart terminals.

Now the dependency is almost total, at the very least needing the infrastructure of the internet, and often "the cloud".


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#47 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#50 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#52 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

lots of past posts about cp67 spin-offs to online commerical computer service bureaus in the 60s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

compuserve founded in same timeframe, 1969
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CompuServe

above describes something similar to what Boeing was doing summer of 1969 with BCS ... described in earlier post in this thread.

one was tymshare out on the west coast ... in aug1976 they provided their vm370/cms based online computer conferencing system "free" to the SHARE user group community ... archives online here:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

Tymshare
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymshare

trivia ... above mentions Tymshare acquiring Augment from SRI, with Augment they also got the inventor of the mouse:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Engelbart

when M/D was purchasing Tymshare, I managed to set up interviews for him at IBM ... but couldn't convince anybody to make an offer.

more trivia ... GNOSIS (mentioned above) was 370 operating system developed by Tymshare, as part of the sale to M/D, GNOSIS was spun-off ... I was brought in to evaluate/audit GNOSIS as part of its spin off
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOSIS

while I was trying to get process setup to get periodic tape dump of all the vmshare files from tymshare ... so i could make them available inside the corporation on the internal network ... i tried to get my brother (regional marketing rep for apple) to setup an apple-ii to act as terminal emulator for vmshare (tymshare's vm370/cms service) ... create copies of new conference entries ... and then run terminal emulator in reverse "uploading" into corporate vm370/cms system. misc. old email mentioning vmshare (tymshare's online computer conferencing for SHARE user group)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare

my brother would periodically come into town for business at corporate hdqtrs, & I got to tag alone to business dinners. Later I got to argue with some of the mac developers about need for terminal emulator (this was before mac was announced) and other things at these dinners.

trivia ... at the time, apple co. business ran on s/38 ... and my brother had worked out process to remotely connect and watch manufacturing and delivery schedules.

terminal emulators and spreadsheet were two of the early killer aps that drove the big volume sales. ibm/pc was about the same price as 3270 and in single desktop footprint could provide 3270 terminal emulation as well as some local computing (large corporations had justifications for hundreds of thousands of 3270 orders ... converting those to ibm/pc at roughly the same price was no-brainer).

while 3270 terminal emulation provided big boost to early ibm/pc uptake, it later came to be an enormous albatross for the company since the communication group would attempt to preserve its terminal emulation install base, fighting off distributed computing, client/server, etc ... nearly taking down the company ... lots of past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#emulation

i've frequently mentioned that the internal network was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late 85 or early 86. Part of that was that the internal network effectively had somewhat of a gateway in every node from just about the start ... making adding new nodes and different kinds of nodes much easier ... something that the arpanet/internet didn't get until great cut-over on 1jan1983. lots of past internal network posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

at the time of the great cut-over, the arpanet/internet had approx 100 (IMP) nodes and around 255 connected hosts ... at the same time, the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes which it passed later in the year. old post with some internal network from 1983 (including list of all world-wide corporate locations that had new nodes added during the year)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8 Arpa address

one of the contributing factors for the internet passing internal network (in number of nodes) was that workstations and PCs were starting to appear as internet nodes ... while the internal network was restricted to mainframe hosts (as part of the communication group war to preserve their terminal emulation install base).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 21:41:19 -0400
Steele comments GAO ... mentioned in this reference to article by Winslow (at the bottom there are lots of URLs to other articles by both Chuck Spinney and Winslow Wheeler)

Winslow Wheeler: GAO (A Legislative Entity) Plays Courtesan to Lockheed, DoD, and the Congressional Recipients of Lockheed Largesse + F-35 RECAP
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2013/03/winslow-wheeler-gao-a-legislative-entity-plays-courtesan-to-lockheed-dod-and-the-congressional-recipients-of-lockheed-largesse/

from above (towards the bottom after copy of the original article):
GAO is required to do its analysis on the basis of prescribed assumptions from its Congressional masters that are inevitably corrupt -- designed to suck the integrity out of any analytic endeavor. Despite this, GAO in the past has been relatively reliable as a source to mix with others. With the departure of the former director of GAO to front for Peter Peterson and Wall Street on a campaign to assure government payment of fraudulently contrived debt, GAO appears to have lost even more of its integrity under his succesor

... snip ...

Over the past decade or so, I have periodically quoted the former head of GAO (comptroller general) ... especially in posts here in a.f.c.

original Winslow article appears here:

Error Report; Is there a government conspiracy to save the F-35?
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/03/22/error_report

from above:
Every GAO report should be, and is widely assumed to be, completely independent of any influence from outsiders, especially those who are the subject of investigation. The way I saw GAO operate during my tenure there as an assistant director and as former colleagues and other GAO contacts continue to tell me, that essential independence is sometimes compromised.

... snip ...

the former comptroller general would periodically say in speeches, that nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmetic (based on the terrible things they were doing to the budget ... which started after congress let the fiscal responsibility act expire in 2002; required spending match tax revenues). One of the first major acts after allowing fiscal responsibility act to expire was medicare part-d ... which he said was a long-term $40T unfunded mandate that would come to swamp all other budget items. cbs 60mins had an expose on how the bill was passed and the 18 responsible (of the majority party at the time) ... who had all resigned and were on drug industry payrolls not long afterwards. misc. past posts mentioning the fiscal responsibiilty act expiring in 2002 and the (former) comptroller general
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#75 origin of 'fields'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#72 77,000 federal workers paid more than governors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#15 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#22 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#29 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#33 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#18 Congressional Bickering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#59 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#68 Bernanke Hearings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#57 The Mortgage Crisis---Some Inside Views
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#67 The debt fallout: How Social Security went "cash negative" earlier than expected
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#42 Speed: Re: Soups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#136 Gingrich urged yes vote on controversial Medicare bill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#50 They're Trying to Block Military Cuts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#53 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#58 Word Length
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#81 The Pentagon's New Defense Clandestine Service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#6 Adult Supervision
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#45 Fareed Zakaria
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#25 US economic update. Everything that follows is a result of what you see here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#27 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#33 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#61 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#68 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#0 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#41 Lawmakers reworked financial portfolios after talks with Fed, Treasury officials
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#63 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#81 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#37 If all of the American earned dollars hidden in off shore accounts were uncovered and taxed do you think we would be able to close the deficit gap?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#45 If all of the American earned dollars hidden in off shore accounts were uncovered and taxed do you think we would be able to close the deficit gap?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#74 Unthinkable, Predictable Disasters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#79 Romney and Ryan's Phony Deficit-Reduction Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#33 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#0 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#30 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#36 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#40 Stealth Target of Defense Spending Cuts: America's Highly Effective Socialized Medicine Provider, the VA System, and Military Benefits Generally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#41 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#43 Search Google, 1960:s-style

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 10:06:19 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
3705?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#45 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

oops, finger-check; 3705 ... and then 3725

at science center in the first half of the 70s, there was an effort to try and convince the communication group to use "peachtree" (processor used in series/1) as the processor for the 3705 communication controller ... but instead they used an extremely slow UC processor.

one of the baby bells in the 80s, did do a 37x5/NCP/PU4 emulator with channel interface board on series/1 ... but then carried SNA RUs in real network. they emulated VTAM/PU5 cross-domain support outboard in the distributed series/1s ... for no-single point of failure (no more if the "owning" 370 VTAM/PU5 was down, couldn't do anything even if the rest of the system was up).

I was sucked into turning it into an official IBM product and upgrading the Series/1 to RIOS (rs/6000) risc/801 processor. old post with part of pitch I presented at fall 1986 SNA architecture review board meeting in Raleigh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#67 System/1 ?

followup post with part of presentation by one of the original baby bell authors at spring 1986 "COMMON" user group meeting (series/1)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#70

then from what only be described as truth is stranger than fiction ... is what the communication group did to block my effort to turn it out as IBM product (I already had all the funding in place and lined up customer pre-orders to completely recover costs & overhead in less than year; one of the largest 37x5/VTAM customer installations in the world claimed that they could buy all the new equipment, write-off the old, and come out ahead in less than a year).

topic drift ... as undergraduate in the 60s ... when cp67 was delivered it had 2741 & 1052 terminal support, but the univ. had some number of TTY33s ... so I did the tty/ascii terminal support for cp67. as part of this, I tried to get the 2702 terminal controller to do something it couldn't quite do. Somewhat as result, the univ launched a terminal controller clone effort that started with Interdata/3 ... reverse engineering the 360 channel interface, building clone controller channel interface board, programming the Interdata/3 to emulate 2702 (with support for all the features I wanted to do). Later it morphs into an Interdata/4 (for the mainframe interface) and multiple Interdata/3s as line-scanners (all in single box). Later, four of us were written up for being responsible for (some part of) the clone controller business. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

interdata is then selling it as product; Perkin-Elmer then buys Interdata and selling it under the Perkin-Elmer logo. In the early 90s, I ran into somebody that had formally been Perkin-Elmer salesman that says he did quite well selling the boxes to the federal government (he said that the channel interface board looked as if it hadn't been changed since our original design/implementation). In the late 90s, in walk through of major credit card processing datacenter ... I find one of the later Perkin-Elmer boxes handling a majority of the dialup point-of-sale terminal traffic on the east coast.

this reference to the future system effort started in the early 70s says major motivation was to be countermeasures to clone controllers
http://www.ecole.org/en/seances/CM07

from above:
IBM tried to react by launching a major project called the 'Future System' (FS) in the early 1970's. The idea was to get so far ahead that the competition would never be able to keep up, and to have such a high level of integration that it would be impossible for competitors to follow a compatible niche strategy. However, the project failed because the objectives were too ambitious for the available technology. Many of the ideas that were developed were nevertheless adapted for later generations. Once IBM had acknowledged this failure, it launched its 'box strategy', which called for competitiveness with all the different types of compatible sub-systems.

... snip ...

there have been some references to the extrodinary baroque and obtuse PU4/PU5 interface as attempt to meet the original future system objectives

past posts mentioning future system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 10:31:17 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
I was sucked into turning it into an official IBM product and upgrading the Series/1 to RIOS (rs/6000) risc/801 processor. old post with part of pitch I presented at fall 1986 SNA architecture review board meeting in Raleigh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#67 System/1 ?

followup post with part of presentation by one of the original baby bell authors at spring 1986 "COMMON" user group meeting (series/1)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#70

then from what only be described as truth is stranger than fiction ... is what the communication group did to block my effort to turn it out as IBM product (I already had all the funding in place and lined up customer pre-orders to completely recover costs & overhead in less than year; one of the largest 37x5/VTAM customer installations in the world claimed that they could buy all the new equipment, write-off the old, and come out ahead in less than a year).


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#57 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

before the really bizarre corporate dirty tricks by the communication group kicked in ... they tried a bunch of obfuscation and misdirection trying to cast doubt (aka FUD) on the comparisons to 3725/ncp operation ... this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#32 SNA/VTAM Misinformation
with this old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#email870218
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#email870219

for the 3725/NCP analysis I used a standard HONE "configurator" (supplied and sanctioned by communication group for use by sales & marketing people for sizing and configuring their products).

HONE was the online (virtual machine) based world-wide sales & marketing support system. Lots of the applications were implemented in cms apl. Most products were so complex ... that sales person was required to generate most product orders using a HONE configurator (in part keeping the multitude of features, options, prerequisites, etc straight).

it was unusual for internal people to have HONE access ... but since I provided custom operating system for HONE operation (from just about the beginning of HONE for well over a decade) ... I had special access. misc. past posts mentioning HONE (&/or APL)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Madness of King George Revisited

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Madness of King George Revisited
Date: 24 Mar 2013
Blog: Facebook
The Madness of King George Revisited
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-madness-of-king-george-revisited.html

from above:
Faced with this reality in the 1980s, the military reformers in the Pentagon led by Col John R. Boyd found it necessary to develop a more precise working definition of madness: We concluded that madness occurs when the decision maker's Observation -- Orientation -- Decision -- Action (OODA) loop becomes increasingly distorted and disconnected from its environment by the existence of Incestuous Amplification.

... snip ...

steele references with additional:

Roasting Dick Cheney, the Neo-Cons, and Blatant (Treasonous) Lies ... Ends with a Call for a Truth & Reconciliation Commission
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2013/03/chris-matthews-roasting-dick-cheney-the-neo-cons-and-blatant-treasonous-lies-ends-with-a-call-for-a-truth-reconciliation-commission/

his blog on Spinney's article
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2013/03/chuck-spinney-the-mind-of-the-decider-ignorance-plus-arrogance-disconnected-from-reality-while-all-others-buried-their-integrity/

(same) spinney's article at time:

Iraq Invasion Anniversary: Inside The Decider's Head
http://nation.time.com/2013/03/22/iraq-invasion-anniversary-inside-the-deciders-head/

The US Embassy In Baghdad Cost A Staggering $750 Million
http://www.businessinsider.com/750-million-united-states-embassy-iraq-baghdad-2013-3

from above:
They had been told it would cost $50 billion and that it would end soon.

... snip ...

other reports that the justification for the invasion began early in the administration, well before 9-11, and the public sell was that it would only cost $50B-$60B. Recent GAO report has $60B in Iraq disappearing into (us) corporate pockets with little or nothing to show for it. The current bill for Iraq is listed at $1.6T and projections it will eventually reach $5T-$6T (including long-term veteran benefits and medical bills) ... a 100 times greater than the original claims.

recent iraq facebook B&B discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#30 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq

Boyd relates posts &/or references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 11:19:48 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
trivia ... above mentions Tymshare acquiring Augment from SRI, with Augment they also got the inventor of the mouse:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Engelbart

when M/D was purchasing Tymshare, I managed to set up interviews for him at IBM ... but couldn't convince anybody to make an offer.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#55 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

some recent cross-over from another blog:

The Mother of All Demos, presented by Douglas Engelbart (1968)
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/the-mother-of-all-demos-presented-by-douglas-engelbart-1968.html

from above:
Finally, and however, this. (Amazingly, a transcript for MoAD was put up on Github just this month). Toward the end, Engelbart says:

[ENGELBART: Anyway, one of the interesting things that NLS does, just an advantage of being online is that it keeps track of who you are and what you're doing all the time. So on these statements, uh ... on everything, every statement that you write it keeps track of who you are and when you did it.


... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 15:42:27 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
I was in a communications group at Bell Labs back then. We had a Series 1 in our lab but I don't remember the story about what it was being used for.

Was the work done at a Baby Bell or at the labs?

I never cared for mainframe communications gear. You never could tell what was going on, like no detecting dial tone, or busy signal and half duplex seemed to be the only thing the gear could do.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#45 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#57 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#58 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

it had been a baby bell (not labs) ... they had technology group with about 120 people working on it and various other things. at the time, they were part of regional bell. a lot of the effort was directed at spoofing ibm mainframe sna/vtam ... but had support for interfacing to other kinds of mainframe also.

part of the work was also very sophisticated network graphical management application.

the truth is stranger than fiction way that the communication group shut me down (on the effort) ... was that they cut a deal with regional bell hdqtrs operation (located at a different baby bell, so there was some internal competition since they had been different baby bells) for the communication group to 1) "buy" the graphical network monitoring application to be used for graphical NETVIEW and 2) part of the deal with that regional bell hdqtrs was it would shutdown the technology group in the other baby bell (and put all the people on the street). First I heard of it was when the IBM consulting marketing rep (for the account) called me ... explained all the gory details ... and asked me if I could hire several people from the baby bell technology group.

about the time, new series/1 machines were getting a little hard to come by ... and I think boca s/1 was hoping to ramp up manufacturing

ROLM had been bought ... and as part of moving from data general, ROLM had placed an order for several hundred series/1. would periodically go buy the rolm campus for some horse trading on machines.

one of their issues was that they had a development effort which then used a slow-speed link to transfer from the development machine to a test machine that could take 24hrs elapsed time. I was asked to look at putting together a T1 operation that would significantly speed up the transfer to the test machines (and in return horse trade on some of their series/1 allocation).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 17:41:12 -0400
"Charlie Gibbs" <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
Yes, but the government makes money off alcohol so it's all right. Good for the The Economy, y'know.

Studies have shown that milk is an even larger gateway drug; nearly 100% of alcoholics got their start on milk. Oxygen is even worse; as little as one breath of oxygen can create a lifelong addiction which invariably ends in death.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#61

i remember business trips to stockholm, being told about the significant swedish alchoholism problem and the government had very strict laws and enormous taxes ... then watching tv with gov. liqueur stores adverstising sales (which seemed to be counter-productive to their primary goal).

things wavered back&forth between income tax and alcohol/tabacco tax "The Benefit and The Burden"
http://www.amazon.com/The-Benefit-Burden-ebook/dp/B005LJEVDM
loc282-84:
The unpopularity of the income tax led to its expiration in 1872. To replace the lost revenue, the federal government expanded the taxation of alcohol and tobacco. By 1900 these taxes constituted 43 percent of federal revenue. Customs duties raised 41 percent.

... snip ...

I recently finished book on sector of the lobbying industry that was fostered by the tobacco industry ... releasing all sorts of obfuscation and misdirection PR as well as funding research that showed lack of link between smoking and cancer, as well as scientists that would distort statistics regarding smoking. When that business fell off, that part of the lobbying industry looking for other causes that needed fabrication; "Merchants of Doubt"
http://www.amazon.com/Merchants-of-Doubt-ebook/dp/B003RRXXO8/

There is some overlap with the "Merchants of Doubt" and current book I'm finishing "Ike's Bluff"
http://www.amazon.com/Ikes-Bluff-President-Eisenhowers-ebook/dp/B0076DCPI4/

where Eisenhower warns about the Military-Industrial(-Congressional) complex (MICC) ... with several examples that they try and fabricate justification for some program or another ... where some of the same "Merchants of Doubt" then get involved in fabrication related to military programs.

appear to now be active with f-35
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

some other posts on the subject:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#87 The Benefit and The Burden
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#13 Study links ultrafast machine trading with risk of crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#19 Occupy the SEC Pitches An Extreme Makeover of Wall Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#46 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 19:48:18 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I think there were a few people at the top who knew what they were doing, and a large number who just assumed that because the boss said to do it it must be legal. Sure I'd like to see some of the big boys put in jail.

there has been a whole series of posts in linkedin financial fraud on whistleblowers

more recent archived here (and with dozen or earlier refs)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#58 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence

with this reference ... not just robo-signing but also fabrication alteration ... most of the people knew what they were doing ... but they were being payed to do it ... if they complained, they were replaced ... only very few were whistle blowers

Whistleblower: Wells Fargo Fabricated and Altered Mortgage Documents on a Mass Basis
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/whistleblower-wells-fargo-fabricated-mortgage-documents-on-a-mass-basis.html

from above:
A contractor who worked at a Wells Fargo facility in Minnesota reports that the bank engaged in systematic, large scale alteration of mortgage notes and fabrication of related documents in preparation for foreclosure. The procedures the bank used are questionable for a large portion of the mortgages.

A team of roughly 100 temps divided across two shifts would review borrower notes (the IOU) to see whether they met a set of requirements the bank set up. Any that did not pass (and notes in securitized trusts were almost always failed) went to another unit in the same facility. They would later come back to the review team to check if the fixes and fabrications had been done correctly.


... snip ...

earlier archived reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#41

More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/01/more-whistleblower-leaks-on-foreclosure-settlement-show-both-suppression-of-evidence-and-gross-incompetence.html

from above:
No wonder the Fed and the OCC snubbed a request by Darryl Issa and Elijah Cummings to review the foreclosure fraud settlement before it was finalized early last week. What had leaked out while the Potemkin borrower reviews were underway showed them to be a sham, as we detailed at length in an earlier post. But even so, what actually took place was even worse than hardened cynics had imagined.

... snip ...

other refs:

Cummings criticizes mortgage servicer settlement
http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/real-estate/wonk/bs-re-cummings-criticizes-mortgage-servicer-settlement-20130109,0,7969992.story
Pending Foreclosure Fraud Settlement Achieves New Level of Abject Regulatory Failure
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/01/pending-foreclosure-fraud-settlement-achieves-new-level-of-abject-regulatory-failure.html
Foreclosure Review Insiders Portray Massive Failure, Doomed From The Start
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/14/foreclosure-review-failure-start_n_2468988.html

more recent:

New Ruling on Mortgage Putbacks a Potential Huge Win for Banks
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/01/new-ruling-on-mortgage-putbacks-a-potential-huge-win-for-banks.html

from above:
Investors in mortgage-backed securities were not quite as dumb as the crisis aftermath had made them look. The sponsors of the securitizations made promises in the offering documents (called representations and warranties) about the quality of the loans. It turns out they lied.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 21:56:22 -0400
in the congressional madoff hearings they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get the SEC to do something about Madoff. News organizations tried repeatedly to get the person for interviews ... finally he sent a legal representative. The legal representative explained that the person was concerned for his physical safety ... conjecture was that both Madoff and the SEC were under the influence of some very bad people ... and that was why the SEC spent and a decade ignoring him.

He had testified that whistleblowers/tips turn up 13 times more fraud than audits ... that SEC didn't have a tip-line (aka whistle-blowers) ... but did have a 1-800 number for corporations to complain about audits. He was also asked if new regulations were needed; he replied that while new regulations might be needed was much more important for transparency and visibility (regulations would only mean something if regulatory agencies were to actually do something .... but if agencies like SEC weren't doing anything ... it hardly matter what the regulations were).

A year later, he was on book tour and said he had changed his mind ... that Madoff had turned himself in (effectively forcing SEC to take some action) ... looking for gov. protection ... because Madoff had defrauded some very bad people. However, that still didn't explain why SEC didn't do anything.

Note that decade ago, congress passed Sarbanes-Oxley ... claiming it would prevent any future Enron/Worldcoms (even tho there were claims that at the time, SEC had sufficient authority already to have prevented Enron & Worldcom situations) ... further more any auditors and top executives that signed public company financial reports that had incorrect numbers, they would do jail time. Jokes at the time, SOX actually was just a present to the audit industry ... requiring significantly more stringent audits (and more business for audit agencies).

Possibly because even GAO (last decade) thought that SEC wasn't doing anything, it started doing reports of fraudulent public company financial filings ... even showing uptic/increase after Sarbanes-Oxley .. in theory under SOX all the auditors and executives would be doing jail time.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-03-395R
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-06-678
http://www.gao.gov/special.pubs/gao-06-1079sp/

As an aside, Sarbanes-Oxley also had provision for SEC to do something about rating agencies. The rating agencies played pivotal role in the recent financial mess. Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages ... but there was little market. More recently (mostly unregulated) loan originators found that they could pay the rating agencies for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from oct2008 congressional hearings into the rating agenices), giving them access to the huge market of institutional investors that are restricted to only dealing in "safe" investments (like large institutional retirement funds). Part of the rating agency congressional hearings was that the business model had become "mis-aligned" in the early 70s when they changed to the sellers paying for the ratings (nominally the ratings are for the benefit of the buyers, but having the sellers pay for the ratings, aligns the rating agencies with the sellers). Note that during the financial bubble/mess last decade, there was $27T in these transactions performed.

In hearings, there was observation that regulation is extremely more difficult when entities are incented to do the wrong thing (business process mis-aligned). Before I graduated, I was solicited by one of the online virtual machine-based service bureaus that was rapidly moving upstream into financial information. Early jan2009, when there was still some facade that the appropriated TARP funds ($700B) would be used to buy toxic assets, there was brief mention of this company participating in valuation (end of 2008, valued at face-value, just the four largest too-big-to-fail were carrying $5.2T of toxic assets "off-book" ... at the time, the market value was 22cents on the dollar, if they had been forced to bring them back on the books at market value, the four largest too-big-to-fail would have been declared insolvent and forced to be liquidated). It turns out that this company had bought the pricing services division from one of the rating agencies in the early 70s (about the same time the rating agency business model became mis-aligned, might be interpreted as no longer needed accurate assessement of financial instruments being rated).

recent posts discussing/mentioning whistleblowers (and some amount about the various protections supposedly in place to protect whistleblowers doesn't seem to be working)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#41 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.htme#16 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#27 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#36 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#47 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#64 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#70 Implementing a Whistle-Blower Program - Detecting and Preventing Fraud at Workplace
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#6 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#18 WhistleWatch -- Blog Archive -- Former Top Federal Whistleblower Protector Scott Bloch, Esq. Pleads Guilty to Destruction of Government Property
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#58 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#31 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#36 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#63 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 22:57:34 -0400
hancock4 writes:
In some histories of the 1950s, they make it sound like women were miserable and kept prisoner in their homes and rigid cultural demand. However, women I've talked to who lived through that era said they were very content being housewives and mothers and happy that they didn't have to go to work.

this
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html
and this
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

compensation rising with productivity from end of ww2 until late 70s ... when it went flat. after compensation went flat started seeing increasing two-income families attempting to stay even.

shows 1975 with 47% of women with children under 18 working and 2008 it had risen to 71% ... and household debt exploding.

recent posts referencing the article:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#39 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#65 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#73 These Two Charts Show How The Priorities Of US Companies Have Gotten Screwed Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#44 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#64 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#1 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#15 Search Google, 1960:s-style

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 07:43:37 -0400
"Stanley Daniel de Liver" <admin@127.0.0.1> writes:
At a PPOE, most of the programmers had one. The vision for the future (as sold by IBM) was of PC front-end to (initally) screenscraped IMS transactions. There was an API (EHLLAPI?).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#47 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#50 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#52 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#55 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#60 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

there was psuedo device 3270 simulation for vm370/cms (predating PCs). person responsible for internal VMSG email client (used by the released PROFS product, when he offered them an updated version, they tried to get him fired, since they had already claimed credit for doing it; it all died done when he pointed out that every PROFS msg in the world had his initials in non-displayed field) ... also did parasite/story ... which provided for programmed terminal scripting (HLLAPI-like) language for simulated 3270 (predating HLLAPI)

past post with more description and examples
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#35 Newbie TOPS-10 7.03 question
and another example ... log into the field engineering fix/change database and display (aka download) latest information
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#36 Newbie TOPS-10 7.03 question

my periodic rant was at least by 2nd half of the '80s, PCs were moving beyond simple terminal emulation to full distributed network nodes ... the communication group trying to fight it off and preserve its terminal emulation paradigm contributed significantly to nearly taking down the company ... various past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#emulation

other past posts mentioning parasite/story
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#73 Computer resources, past, present, and future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#24 Red Phosphor Terminal?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#14 were dumb terminals actually so dumb???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#12 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#14 Program execution speed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#37 Over my head in a JES exit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#35 Draft Command Script Processing Manual
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#23 sorting was: The System/360 Model 20 Wasn't As Bad As All That
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#31 "25th Anniversary of the Personal Computer"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#16 intersection between autolog command and cmsback (more history)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#23 How to write a full-screen Rexx debugger?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#65 The use of "script" for program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#22 Was CMS multi-tasking?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#0 Timeline: The evolution of online communities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#43 SNA: conflicting opinions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#4 Arpanet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#66 spool file data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#73 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#80 3270 Emulator Software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#67 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#73 Custom programmability for 3270 emulators
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#83 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#10 History of APL -- Software Preservation Group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#11 History of APL -- Software Preservation Group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#44 CMS load module format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#30 Any candidates for best acronyms?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#64 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#17 Inventor of e-mail honored by Smithsonian

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 08:02:48 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
In hearings, there was observation that regulation is extremely more difficult when entities are incented to do the wrong thing (business process mis-aligned). Before I graduated, I was solicited by one of the online virtual machine-based service bureaus that was rapidly moving upstream into financial information. Early jan2009, when there was still some facade that the appropriated TARP funds ($700B) would be used to buy toxic assets, there was brief mention of this company participating in valuation (end of 2008, valued at face-value, just the four largest too-big-to-fail were carrying $5.2T of toxic assets "off-book" ... at the time, the market value was 22cents on the dollar, if they had been forced to bring them back on the books at market value, the four largest too-big-to-fail would have been declared insolvent and forced to be liquidated). It turns out that this company had bought the pricing services division from one of the rating agencies in the early 70s (about the same time the rating agency business model became mis-aligned, might be interpreted as no longer needed accurate assessement of financial instruments being rated).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

for more computer related ... one of the two people that was responsible for visicalc, worked at this company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VisiCalc

from above:
The development of Visicalc took two months of work by Frankston and Bricklin during the winter of 1978-79. Their original intention was for it to fit in 16k, but this proved impossible and 32k became necessary (some additional features they wanted like a split text/graphics screen still had to be omitted for space reasons). However, Apple eventually began shipping all Apple IIs with 48k following a drop in RAM prices and this was no longer an issue.

... snip ...

reference to over $27T in securitized loans doine during the financial bubble/mess (significantly enabled by being able to pay the rating agencies for triple-A ratings)
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

this moved the mortgage industry from regulated depository financial instituations based on profit off the monthly payments to new revenue stream for wallstreet, based on transaction fees&commissions on the triple-A rated toxic CDOs ... wallstreet possibly skimming $4T-$5T (off the over $27T in transactions) ... would explain claims that wallstreet tripled in size (as percent of GDP) during the financial bubble/crisis (and wallstreet bonuses went up over 400%).

reference that just four largest too-big-to-fail carrying $5.2T in toxic assets "off-book" at the end of 2008.
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home

TARP originally appropriate $700B to purchase the (off-book) toxic assets
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troubled_Asset_Relief_Program

which wouldn't been enough to buy the $5.2T (from just the four largest too-big-to-fail) ... even at 22cents on the dollar.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 08:54:51 -0400
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
But do you think that someone who signs a statement that says "I swear under penalty of perjury that I have done X" when they haven't done X, really doesn't have a clue that it's illegal? If so, aren't those people too stupid to be operating on their own? I agree that those people weren't the root of the problem, their boss told them to do it, so their boss is far more guilty (and likely his boss, etc. etc.). But should "my boss told me to do it" be a valid criminal defense?

because of guaranteed triple-A rating on toxic CDOs, loan originators no longer had to care about borrower's qualifications and/or loan quality ... since they could immediately sell-off every loan at top-dollar ... regardless of its actual characteristics. This led to "liar loans", no-documentation loans; etc. things like documentation and income verification just slowed down the speed that they could turn-over the transactions (and collect their fees&commissions).

some recent posts mentioning being able to pay for triple-A rating (regardless of actual quality) enabled enormous amount of fraud in the loan industry ... and the over $27T in transactions done during the financial bubble/mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

later when things like foreclosures came up ... the current mortgage/instrument owners found that it was "where's the beef" time ... and the institutions administering the loans started fraudulently generating the enormous amounts of missing stuff.

we were brought in on the peripheral of this in the late 90s. we had been brought in to help word-smith the cal. electronic signature legislation. the mortgage industry was then looking at moving to electronic documents with electronic signatures as means of making the mortgage process significantly more efficient ... and supposedly MERS was going to be the institution for all of this.
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/mortgage_electronic_registration_systems_inc/index.html

also, securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages. we were also asked to look at improving the integrity of supporting documents in securitized mortgages. However, we the advent of being able to pay for triple-A rating on everything and the move to "liar loans" & no-documentation loans ... that mostly evaporated ... with no documentation ... there was no longer an issue of supporting document integrity and/or electronic signatures on electronic documents

other past posts mentioning MERS:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#24 What Is MERS and What Role Does It Have in the Foreclosure Mess?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#38 The Death of MERS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#46 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#49 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#8 Adult Supervision
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#55 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#12 Why Auditors Fail To Detect Frauds?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#39 The Alchemy of Securitization

other recent posts about whistleblowers involved in fabricating & forging documents ... with little regard for the validating of the information
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#41 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#16 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#27 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#36 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#47 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#64 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#6 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#18 WhistleWatch -- Blog Archive -- Former Top Federal Whistleblower Protector Scott Bloch, Esq. Pleads Guilty to Destruction of Government Property
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#58 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#31 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#36 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#63 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 10:03:49 -0400
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
Essentially nobody thinks they're going to get caught. Either because they don't think about it at all, or because they think they're too clever, or it's not important enough for anyone to do anything. And we say "what the heck were they thinking?", but only about the ones that do get caught. Before Bernie Madoff got caught, he was a pillar of the community.

Madoff turned himself in ... speculation was that he had defrauded some bad people and was looking for gov. protection.

recent discussions of the madoff congressional hearings and person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade trying to get SEC to do something about Madoff (SEC was finally forced to do something when he turned himself in)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#4 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing
Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#31 Bank Whistleblower Claims
Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 10:25:07 -0400
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
Huh. So those people who forged ("robosigned") mortgage papers and signed false affidavits, those who sold financial instruments without honestly appraising the buyers of their risk, people who drive home after having a few drinks, who call to sell you something even though you're on the "do not call" list, they're all just naturally criminals?

recent discussion of MERS (computer/electronic mortgage documents) ... supposedly mortgage industry was going to be dragged into the 21st century with electronic documents, however along the way ... the ability to pay for triple-A ratings on securitized mortgages regardless of quality (congressional hearings that the role that the rating agencies played was that both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#68

the guaranteed triple-A rating allowed the loan originators to unload every loan they wrote at face value w/o regard to borrower qualifications and/or loan quality. this morphs into liar loans and no-documentation loans ... triple-A rating enabled mortgage business to move to wallstreet transactions ... more than $27T done during the financial mess/bubble ... with wallstreet skimming possibly $4T-$5T in new revenue stream ... major part of claim that wallstreet tripled in size (as percent of GDP) during the bubble (as well as wallstreet bonuses increased by over 400%). things like documentation and doing income verification just slowed down the rate that they could turn over the transactions.

later, when there was requirement for valid documentation for things like foreclosures, fraudulent documents were fabricated with little regard for accuracy of the information (robosigned).

no. 1 on list of those responsible for the financial mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877339,00.html

later in congressional hearing, he denies knowing what income verificiation means ... even though he had been in the industry for decades.

Angelo Mozilo, Former Countrywide CEO, Claims He Doesn't Know What 'Verified Income' Is
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/angelo-mozilo-former-countrywide-ceo-claims-he-doesnt-know-what-verified-income-is-20121228

securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages ... but they had little market. With triple-A ratings the market significantly increased .... including the large institutional investors that only dealt in "safe" investments (like large institutional retirement funds).

wallstreet had several objectives in this ... turning mortgage business into enormous new money stream for the industry (enormous fees&commissions on the over $27T in triple-A rated toxic CDOs) ... but also looting the funds of the large institutional retirement funds. wallstreet had been behind major lobbying for 401k retirement plans ... because the fees from individual 401k plans was significantly higher than they could get from the institutional retirement funds. the triple-A ratings on toxic CDOs then allowed wallstreet to also significantly loot those funds. This is also why they've been behind some of the major lobbying efforts to "privatize" social security ... so they can get their hands on the enormous amount of money squirreled away there.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 15:23:20 -0400
hancock4 writes:
Were any of the raters who gave triple-A to crappy loans called to answer for their actions? Seems to me that'd be a violation of their fiduciary responsibility.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

not that I know of ... lots of press about regulatory agencies maybe holding rating agencies accountable seems to be obfuscation and misdirection

quicky web search engine turns up

A Pattern of Unaccountability: Rating Agency Liability, The Dodd-Frank Act, and a Financial Crisis That Could Have Been Prevented
http://works.bepress.com/stephen_alicanti/4/

Rating Agencies Dodge Accountability Again
http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2010/09/rating-agencies-dodge-accountability-again/62392/

Wall Street and the Financial Crisis: Anatomy of a Financial Collapse
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wall_Street_and_the_Financial_Crisis:_Anatomy_of_a_Financial_Collapse

the above uses the excuse of lack of regulation ... but Sarbanes-Oxley had asked SEC to do something about the rating agencies ... and it didn't.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarbanes%E2%80%93Oxley_Act

rhetoric leading up to passage of SOX was that SEC would put auditors and executives in jail that signed public company financial filings that had incorrect information. possibly because GAO didn't think SEC was doing anything, it started doing reports of fradulent public company financial filings ... even showing uptic after SOX. All of the auditors and executives should be doing jail time, but I don't know of any that are ... so I wouldn't expect a lot on the rating agencies.

New rules on credit rating agencies (europe)
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_MEMO-13-13_en.htm

other recent posts mentioning rating agencies:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#0 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#62 Taleb On "Skin In The Game" And His Disdain For Public Intellectuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#38 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#39 The Alchemy of Securitization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#53 Should Bethany McLean Be Bothered by the Government Lawsuit Against S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#70 Implementing a Whistle-Blower Program - Detecting and Preventing Fraud at Workplace
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 20:41:34 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#71 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

another way that wallstreet was gaming the system was composing toxic CDOs that they were sure would fail, pay for the triple-A rating, sell them to their customers and then make CDS gambling bets that they would fail.

and old standby ... illegal manipulation but nothing to worry about from the SEC
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

and then comment by nobel economic winner
http://www.amazon.com/Thinking-Fast-and-Slow-ebook/dp/B00555X8OA

pg. 212:
Since then, my questions about the stock market have hardened into a larger puzzle: a major industry appears to be built largely on an illusion of skill. Billions of shares are traded every day, with many people buying each stock and others selling it to them

... snip ...

more gaming the system providing an edge

Why It's Smart to Be Reckless on Wall Street
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2013/02/27/why-its-smart-to-be-reckless-on-wall-street/

from upthread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 10:47:08 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#71 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

little recent cross-over from Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security discussion: "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" and "JPMorgan Faulted on Controls and Disclosure in Trading Loss"

lots of obfuscation regarding what is going on in the derivative market (free hand to make derivative gambling bets and even have then insured/backed-up by the government)

World Derivatives Market Estimated As Big As $1.2 Quadrillion Notional, as Banks Fight Efforts to Rein It In
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/worldwide-derivatives-market-estimated-as-big-as-1-2-quadrillion-as-banks-fight-efforts-to-rein-it-in.html

from above:
We wrote earlier about the recent move by bankers -- and the politicians who serve them -- to unreform the derivatives market, to return it to its pre-Dodd-Frank, pre-Crash-of-2007 state. This is a serious move by banks and bank lobbyists, and it could well happen soon. The seven bills in the House package of "tweaks" -- as the House Agriculture website dishonestly puts it -- have cleared the committee with Democratic support and are headed to the House floor. In the meantime, there are companion bills in the Senate.

... snip ...

When You Weren't Looking, Democrat Bank Stooges Launch Bills to Permit Bailouts, Deregulate Derivatives
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/when-you-werent-looking-democrat-bank-stooges-launch-bills-to-permit-bailouts-deregulate-derivatives.html

from above:
In the US, depositors have actually been put in a worse position than Cyprus deposit-holders, at least if they are at the big banks that play in the derivatives casino. The regulators have turned a blind eye as banks use their depositaries to fund derivatives exposures. And as bad as that is, the depositors, unlike their Cypriot confreres, aren't even senior creditors. Remember Lehman? When the investment bank failed, unsecured creditors (and remember, depositors are unsecured creditors) got eight cents on the dollar. One big reason was that derivatives counterparties require collateral for any exposures, meaning they are secured creditors. The 2005 bankruptcy reforms made derivatives counterparties senior to unsecured lenders. Lehman had only two itty bitty banking subsidiaries, and to my knowledge, was not gathering retail deposits. But as readers may recall, Bank of America moved most of its derivatives from its Merrill Lynch operation its depositary in late 2011.

... snip ...

and move of derivatives to FDIC insurance

US Deposits In Perspective: $25 Billion In Insurance, $9,283 Billion In Deposits; $297,514 Billion In Derivatives
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-19/us-deposits-perspective-25-billion-insurance-9283-billion-deposits-297514-billion-de

Wall Street Deregulation Advances As Top Democrat Warns That Vote Could 'Haunt' Congress
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/20/wall-street-deregulation-_n_2916795.html?1363804456

....

older history, no. 2 on list of those responsible for the financial mess last decade (repeal of Glass-Steagall and blocking derivatives from being regulated)
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

Gramm and the 'Enron Loophole'
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/17/business/17grammside.html

from above:
Enron was a major contributor to Mr. Gramm's political campaigns, and Mr. Gramm's wife, Wendy, served on the Enron board, which she joined after stepping down as chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

... snip ...

and an older article: Phil Gramm's Enron Favor
http://www.villagevoice.com/2002-01-15/news/phil-gramm-s-enron-favor/

from above:
A few days after she got the ball rolling on the exemption, Wendy Gramm resigned from the commission. Enron soon appointed her to its board of directors, where she served on the audit committee, which oversees the inner financial workings of the corporation. For this, the company paid her between $915,000 and $1.85 million in stocks and dividends, as much as $50,000 in annual salary, and $176,000 in attendance fees,

... snip ...

and #3 responsible,
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877331,00.html

then

Greenspan Slept as Off-Books Debt Escaped Scrutiny
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&refer=home&sid=aYJZOB_gZi0I

from above:
That same year Greenspan, Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin and SEC Chairman Arthur Levitt opposed an attempt by Brooksley Born, head of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, to study regulating over-the-counter derivatives. In 2000, Congress passed a law keeping them unregulated.

... snip ...

Brooksley was fairly quickly replaced by Wendy Gramm as head of Commodity Futures Trading Commission, before Wendy then resigned to join Enron's board.

and #4 responsible, head of SEC:
http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877323,00.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 13:37:11 -0400
Stephen Sprunk <stephen@sprunk.org> writes:
Secret Service (and CIA, etc.) can only hire candidates that can get one. From within that pool, they select those who have the talents and skills needed for the job.

the end of last century there was observation that the backgroup check for security clearance in the executive branch had been cut in half from 14yrs to 7yrs ... supposedly because there were quite a few (desired) candidates that wouldn't pass if went back more than 7yrs.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 14:35:57 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
more gaming the system providing an edge

Why It's Smart to Be Reckless on Wall Street
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2013/02/27/why-its-smart-to-be-reckless-on-wall-street/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#29 Bank Holiday In Cyprus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

and even more gaming the system ... frequently with the use of high-powered computer systems

Not a decent banker around
http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Global_Economy/GECON-01-260313.html

from above
First, credit default swaps are not solidly based, because their settlement procedure can very easily be "gamed" - rather than the current procedure it would make more sense to select a random number between 1 and 100 as the percentage of the contract that was paid out on default.

... snip, also
Truly almost 20 years of funny money and 30-40 years of misguided deregulation have drained the financial sector of the quiet competence it used to exhibit.

... snip ...

comments going back to end of last century
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

HFT having no useful purpose other than gaming the system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#29 Destructive Destruction? An Ecological Study of High Frequency Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#41 Computer Simulations Reveal
Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
Date: 26 Mar 2013
Blog: IBMers
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#33 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office

some slight x-over with IBM CEO and on-going financial mess (lots of recent press why feds aren't prosecuting too-big-to-fail financial institutions for blatant fraud like money laundering for the drug cartels and terrorists)

The Spectacular Rise and Fall of Jamie Dimon, Wall Street's Golden Boy; More than just a tawdry tale, Dimon's demise is a critique of the American Dream.
http://www.alternet.org/economy/spectacular-rise-and-fall-jamie-dimon-wall-streets-golden-boy

has a little of IBM flavor to it.

Relax! They've Got It Covered; Why Jamie Dimon's $2 Billion Gambling Loss Will NOT Speed Financial Reform
http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/05/15/why-jamie-dimons-2-billion-gambling-loss-will-not-speed-financial-reform/

the above includes this reference:
Back in 1986, Dimon was the bright young protege of "Sandy" Weill, when he was forced out of American Express in a coup de requin. Master and servant made their way to Baltimore, Maryland, where Weill acquired a storefront moneylending firm called Commercial Credit.

... snip ...

above also refers to Commercial Credit as loan sharking operation. Sandy was in competition with Gerstner to be next CEO of AMEX, Sandy looses and leaves.

KKR and AMEX later are in competition for RJR, KKR wins. KKR has trouble and hires Gerstner away for the turn around. IBM is going into the red and being restructured into the "baby blues" for the splitting up the company. The board then hires Gerstner away to resurrect IBM.

Sandy (& Dimon) are making acquisitions, eventually taking over Citi in violation of Glass-Steagall, Greenspan gives him an exemption while he lobbies congress for the repeal of Glass-Steagall. Dimon leaves and eventually becomes CEO of JPMorgan.

Sandy Weill on the Times list of those responsible for the economic mess:
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877329,00.html
partial account of Glass-Steagall repeal
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/wallstreet/weill/

which enables too-big-to-fail, too-big-to-jail, too-big-to-prosecute

All you have to do is check the referenced URL for authoritative source included in the article, IBM financial filings at the SEC
http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/51143/000110465913019165/a13-1547_1def14a.htm

from above:
(9) Amounts in this column also include the following perquisites for 2012: for Mrs. Rometty: personal financial planning, personal travel on Company aircraft of $304,376, personal use of Company autos, personal security, annual executive physical, family attendance at Company-related events, and other personal expenses; for Mr. Loughridge: personal financial planning, personal travel on Company aircraft of $45,102, personal use of Company autos, family attendance at Company-related events, and other personal expenses; for Mr. Palmisano: personal financial planning, personal travel on Company aircraft of $248,093, personal use of Company autos, retirement items, office payments and administrative support, including space renovation of $1,033,138, personal security, family attendance at Company-related events and other personal expenses; for Mr. Mills: personal financial planning, family attendance at Company-related events, and other personal expenses; for Mr. Daniels: personal financial planning; and for Mr. MacDonald: personal financial planning, personal travel on Company aircraft of $59,962, family attendance at Company-related events, and other personal expenses. See the 2012 Summary Compensation Table Narrative for a description and information about the aggregate incremental cost calculations for perquisites.

... snip ...

Is the issue with the accuracy of what IBM has filed in required official federal document ... or that somebody has quoted from it.

I do know that lots of companies have played fast&loose with the accuracy of financial filings with the SEC. In 2002, congress significantly increased the audit requirements and the penalties for false information with Sarbanes-Oxley (claiming that it was to prevent an Enron or Worldcom from occurring again ... although other claims were that SEC already had the authority to have prevented Enron and Worldcom). Possibly because the GAO didn't think that SEC was doing anything, it started do reports of public company fraudulent financial filings ... even showing increase after Sarbanes-Oxley (rhetoric for the passage of SOX was that all auditors and executives would do jail time for financial filings with incorrect information, even tho GAO turned up lots, I'm not aware of anybody that has yet to do jail time).

among the other sources/URLs cited in the short article (besides the SEC financial filings) are

IBM's Ex-CEO Is Well-decorated
http://www.footnoted.com/ibms-ex-ceo-is-well-decorated/
IBM Ex-CEO's Perks: $1 Million for Office, Cars
http://www.cnbc.com/id/100565278

it helps when articles have references that help substantiate the point of the article ... say as opposed to articles that might have no references that can be checked

Note in the upthread reference to Ethernet ... IBM had earned a reputation in the industry of FUD (obfuscation and misdirection) ... and the communication group was especially practiced at it ... even funding horribly skewed token-ring/ethernet comparisons that had a lot of pure fabrication and easily disproved. In the late 80s, especially the communication group was generating huge amounts of mis-information ... in part protecting its token-ring sales ... but much more important was its wars against distributed computing trying to protect its terminal emulation paradigm & install base.

In the late 80s, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at the world-wide, annual, internal communication group conference and opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had strategic responsibility (and stranglehold) for everyhthing that crossed the datacenter walls (and was fighting off distributed computing and attempting to protect its terminal emulation paradigm and install base). The disk division was seeing its sales erode with data fleeing the datacenters to more distributed computing friendly platforms. The disk division had come up with several solutions to address the opportunity ... but those were constantly being vetoed by the communication group (having strategic corporate responsibility for everything that crossed the datacenter walls). All of this significantly contributing to the company's slide into the red in the early 90s. misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
Date: 26 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Even American Banker is Savaging the OCC's Mortgage Settlement
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/even-american-banker-is-savaging-the-occs-mortgage-settlement.html

OCC, Fed Stonewalling Congressional Oversight of Independent Foreclosure Reviews
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/david-dayen-occ-fed-stonewalling-congressional-oversight-of-independent-foreclosure-reviews.html

other recent whistleblower threads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#18 WhistleWatch -- Blog Archive -- Former Top Federal Whistleblower Protector Scott Bloch, Esq. Pleads Guilty to Destruction of Government Property
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#31 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#36 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination

past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#41 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#16 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#27 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#36 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#47 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#64 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#6 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#58 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
Date: 26 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
The Fed Is Printing Money, But Where Is It Going? They Know But Will Not Say
http://jessescrossroadscafe.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-fed-is-printing-money-but-where-is.html

from above
And he knows that this is a form of 'trickle down' approach, and is not stimulating the commercial economy. But it is helping to prop up a banking sector that has never really taken its losses by writing down bad debts, cutting salaries and jobs, and downsizing to a more historical size relative to the real economy.

... snip ...

Sherrod Brown Goes After the Big Banks
http://www.thenation.com/article/173336/sherrod-brown-goes-after-big-banks

from above:
In olden days, it used to be that the bad guys robbed the banks. Now it seems the bad guys are running the banks, at least the big ones, and robbing the rest of us.

... snip ...

past posts in this discussion:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#65 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#74 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#3 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#5 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#42 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#55 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
Date: 26 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#17 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#24 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?

The London Whale and the real link between the US economy and Cyprus; Washington policy-makers say the deficit is the greatest threat to the US economy. In reality, it's the failure of banking reform
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/mar/25/london-whale-link-us-economy-cyprus

from above:
On its face, it seems that the Wall Street crew is invincible. But the London Whale episode and the silly efforts at cover-up should provide some grounds for confidence. These people can be pretty brazen in their contempt for the law and the general public. This arrogance on the part of the Wall Street gang is exactly what we need to give democracy a chance.

... snip ...

Not a decent banker around
http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Global_Economy/GECON-01-260313.html

from above:
In the past week, the detailed revelations from JP Morgan's grilling in the US Senate have combined with the Cyprus rescue blunder to generate one inescapable conclusion: public or private sector, European or American, there isn't a decent, competent banker among them. Truly almost 20 years of funny money and 30-40 years of misguided deregulation have drained the financial sector of the quiet competence it used to exhibit.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 27 Mar 2013 10:12:32 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
You, obviously, don't know what a Pentagon general is. It's a guy/gal who has been promoted to his Peter principle peak, has never done much real miliatry work (like killing, fighting and planning tactics and strategy). S/he puts in his years and gets a good pension. they're the middle managers who are ignored by the most productive in a factory.

there are claims to make full colonal ... you've already had to give up all your principles and become pure political animal.

Just finished reading "Ike's Bluff" which is about his years as president ... one of the points was he was more successful at battling MI(C)C than later presidents because of his experience as supreme commander and understood what they were doing. It covers him selecting the theme of his goodby speech, warning about MI(C)C (something about it went through 29drafts ... some with "congressional" in the MIC). DOD budget was $40B, air force wanted another $10B to close the (fabricated) bomber gap with Soviets (claiming they had thousands, Ike knew otherwise since the classified U2 flights only found six). After the Bay of Pigs disaster, Kennedy asks Ike for private meeting to discuss what went wrong. Ike asks him if he had detailed planning sessions where all the pros&cons could be aired; Kennedy said no.

Boyd would talk about doing audits of large scale war game exercises. He characterized that the generals&admirils spent all year playing golf ... while their subordinates practice in the war rooms. When it came time for the live exercises ... the generals&admirils had no "finger-feel" (fingerspitzengefuhl) for the pace of the battles.

More recently there have been presentations about regional (colonel) commanders in Iraq and Afghanistan ... to get promotion to general requires no blemish on their record ... as a result they are very careful 1) requiring all actions to come up the chain for them to authorize and 2) extra careful to not authorize anything that might not go perfectly.

One example was firefight with some hostiles in village sq, soldiers were heavily outnumbered and they call for supporting artillery barrage ... it takes 40mins to go up the chain of command to the regional commander. When the artillery does start arriving, the bad guys are gone and local villagers have started wandering into the sq.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 27 Mar 2013 10:46:45 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
That last line was the key one. I'd assumed that bankers didn't buy at par when making those kinds of deals. WEll, we don't have to worry about the people who thought they were too big to jail; the Russian mafia will take care of them since >100K is disappearing.

IT'S OFFICIAL: Banks In Europe May Now Seize Deposits To Cover Their Gambling Losses
http://www.businessinsider.com/implications-of-the-cyprus-bailout-2013-3

When You Weren't Looking, Democrat Bank Stooges Launch Bills to Permit Bailouts, Deregulate Derivatives
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/when-you-werent-looking-democrat-bank-stooges-launch-bills-to-permit-bailouts-deregulate-derivatives.html

from above:
In the US, depositors have actually been put in a worse position than Cyprus deposit-holders, at least if they are at the big banks that play in the derivatives casino. The regulators have turned a blind eye as banks use their depositaries to fund derivatives exposures. ... The 2005 bankruptcy reforms made derivatives counterparties senior to unsecured lenders. Lehman had only two itty bitty banking subsidiaries, and to my knowledge, was not gathering retail deposits. But as readers may recall, Bank of America moved most of its derivatives from its Merrill Lynch operation its depositary in late 2011.

... snip ...

Whose Insured Deposits Will Be Plundered Next?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-21/guest-post-whose-insured-deposits-will-be-plundered-next

from above:
Far more worrying for American and British depositors though is this paragraph Golem XIV brings up from a joint Bank of England and FDIC paper from 2012 which points to the possibility of using deposit insurance funds to bail out illiquid banks:

... snip ...

Wall Street Deregulation Advances As Top Democrat Warns That Vote Could 'Haunt' Congress
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/20/wall-street-deregulation-_n_2916795.html?1363804456

from above:
The most controversial bill to advance Wednesday is explicitly designed to expand taxpayer backing for derivatives. It was the only legislation that lawmakers were required to cast individual votes for or against

... snip ...

and from upthread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

US Deposits In Perspective: $25 Billion In Insurance, $9,283 Billion In Deposits; $297,514 Billion In Derivatives
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-19/us-deposits-perspective-25-billion-insurance-9283-billion-deposits-297514-billion-de

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes Economic History Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes Economic History Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 27 Mar 2013 21:59:53 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
History quiz: how long was it from the end of the German hyperinflation until the rise of you know who?

Bonus question: describe the economic policies of Heinrich Brüning


lot of what happened, described here is not all that different from lenders in the US during the last decade

Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World
http://www.amazon.com/Lords-Finance-Depression-Bankers-ebook/dp/B001QIGZEK/
pg283/4468-75:

The Dawes Plan had been an enormous success. In fact it had worked almost too well. American bankers, assured under the plan of being repaid first ahead of reparations owed to France and Britain, had fallen over one another in their enthusiasm to lend to Germany. In the two years since the plan, $1.5 billion flowed into the country, giving Germany the $500 million due for reparations and still leaving it an enormous surplus of foreign cash. Some of this money had gone to finance the reconstruction of industry; but a very large amount had been taken up by the newly empowered states, cities, and municipalities of the budding democracy to build swimming pools, theaters, sports stadiums, and even opera houses. The zeal with which foreign bankers promoted their wares led to a great many imprudent investments and a lot of waste—one small town in Bavaria, having decided to borrow $125,000, was persuaded by its investment banks to increase the amount to $3 million.

... snip ...

from "Triumphant plutocracy" loc6265-74:

XXX. THE LEAGUE TO PERPETUATE WAR The war has just begun. I said that when the Armistice terms were published and when I read the Treaty and the League Covenant I felt more than ever convinced of the justice of my conclusion. The Treaty of Versailles is merely an armistice -- a suspension of hostilities, while the combatants get their wind. There is a war in every chapter of the Treaty and in every section of the League Covenant; war all over the world; war without end so long as the conditions endure which produce these documents.

... snip ...

Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World from pg401/loc6362-65

Bruning, who was now being called the "Hunger Chancellor," would later claim that his austerity measures had been designed to prove to foreigners that Germany could no longer pay reparations, a reprise of the old perverse "hair-shirt" policy attempted in the early 1920s: to inflict so much damage on Germany's economy that her creditors would be forced to reduce their demands.

... snip ...

or the description how too-big-to-fail now have derivatives (CDS gambling bets) senior to deposits (american loans to germany senior to reparations) ... recent references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#81 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
Date: 27 Mar 2013
Blog: IBMers
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#33 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#76 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office

a little more internet history, old MIT tech review article

Grid Computing; Hook enough computers together and what do you get? A new kind of utility that offers supercomputer processing on tap.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

from above:
Back in the 1980s, the National Science Foundation created the NSFnet: a communications network intended to give scientific researchers easy access to its new supercomputer centers. Very quickly, one smaller network after another linked in-and the result was the Internet as we now know it. The scientists whose needs the NSFnet originally served are barely remembered by the online masses.

... snip ...

since also morphed into cloud computing

as I've periodically mentioned, tcp/ip is the technology basis for the modern internet, nsfnet backbone was the operational basis for the modern internet and cix was the business basis for the modern internet.

originally we were to get $20M to tie together the NSF supercomputer centers, then congress cuts the budget and a few other things happened, finally NSF released a RFP. Internal politics prevents us from bidding on the RFP. The director of NSF tries to help by writing the company a letter (copying the CEO) ... but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does references like what we already have running is at least five years ahead of all RFP responses). misc old NSFNET related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 27 Mar 2013 16:40:02 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
That last line was the key one. I'd assumed that bankers didn't buy at par when making those kinds of deals. WEll, we don't have to worry about the people who thought they were too big to jail; the Russian mafia will take care of them since >100K is disappearing.

... there are claims of very large wire transfers that have been going on during their bank holiday ... and some speculation how much of those large balances will still be in the banks when they open their doors

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 11:07:04 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
... there are claims of very large wire transfers that have been going on during their bank holiday ... and some speculation how much of those large balances will still be in the banks when they open their doors

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Have The Russians Already Quietly Withdrawn All Their Cash From Cyprus?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-25/have-russians-already-quietly-withdrawn-all-their-cash-cyprus

from abouve:
So while one could not withdraw from Bank of Cyprus or Laiki, one could withdraw without limitations from subsidiary and OpCo banks, and other affiliates?

....

If one thinks there is any material Russian cash therefore left in Cyprus with this epic loophole in place, we urge them to make a deposit in the insolvent nation. One person who certainly will not be allocating any of his money into Bank of Cyprus is German FinMin Schaeuble:


... snip ...

As Cyprus Delays Reopening Banks Again, Here Are The Longest Bank Closures Ever
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-25/cyprus-delays-reopening-banks-again-here-are-longest-bank-closures-ever

The Good, the Bad and the Extremely Ugly (Aspects of the Cyprus Deal)
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/yanis-varoufakis-the-good-the-bad-and-the-extremely-ugly-aspects-of-the-cyprus-deal.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 11:41:51 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
How long has that royalty been in power? By "middle-class mindset" I'm talking about families who have lots of wealth and power which disintegrates into self-servering by the third generation. The fourth generation is back to being poor with all the knowledge of how to create a lot of wealth gone. The third generation hears status symobol discussions at the dinner table instead of detailed inspections of business, government, politics and trade.

You talked about your father talking about banking when you were a child. That's how you learned. If all you heard was the latest fashions or who's-who in society, you would be in the spolit generation and never learn how to create a lot of wealth.


The 2013 Gelber Prize winner: Chrystia Freeland's 'Plutocrats'
http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2013/03/25/the_2013_gelber_prize_winner_chrystia_freelands_plutocrats

Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else (also Financial Times best book of 2012)
http://www.amazon.com/Plutocrats-Global-Super-Rich-Everyone-ebook/dp/B007V65OQG/

recent blog on the subject:

Oligarchy Exists Inside Our Democracy
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/oligarchy-exists-inside-our-democracy.html

from above:
It's only recently that the Oligarchy has lost interest in the bargain about following the rules. Entire industries are off limits for prosecution. Rules are randomly changed to favor the interests of the rich. And worst of all, democracy itself isn't working. We used to operate under some general form of majority rule.

... snip ...

this isn't strictly true, it was also seen in leading up to the crash of 29. However, there have been various recent congressional hearings where regulators & prosecutors have admitted to not prosecuting too-big-to-fail for criminal activity. This then generates fair amount of references to too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-to-jail

there are periodic news articles about what the ideal percentage of total wealth would be for the top 1%, what most of the citizens think the percentage of total wealth is held by the top 1% and the actual amount of total wealth held by the top 1% (actual tends to be much more skewed that what majority believe and/or ideal)

from 2011
http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/10/income-inequality-america
and
http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2011/02/income-inequality-in-america-chart-graph
article from a year ago:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/moneywisewomen/2012/03/21/average-america-vs-the-one-percent/
last fall
http://money.cnn.com/2012/09/11/news/economy/wealth-net-worth/index.html
a month ago
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/12/top-one-percent-income-gains_n_2670455.html
recent
http://billmoyers.com/2013/03/06/income-inequality-goes-viral/

recent posts on the topic (of too-big-to-jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#1 Libor Lies Revealed in Rigging of $300 Trillion Benchmark
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#28 Neil Barofsky: Geithner Doctrine Lives on in Libor Scandal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#49 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#6 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#35 Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 11:56:12 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Another example is in the State department when the ambassador got killed.

I've heard some stories about so-called rules of engagement. The military grunts ahve their hands and feets tied with duct tape and are expected to defend/fight without firing a shot or doing anything to avoid it.

Politically Correctness is helping to destory Western Civilization.


varous bloggers have claimed that it was CIA location that was trying to keep low-profile ... so didn't have a lot of guards at the location (which would raise attention) and question why the ambassador was visiting it; the hearings are why aren't there more guards at state dept. locations is somewhat obfuscation, misdirection, and political (Kabuki) theater

there also reports that CIA has acquired large mercenary army ... and straying into relatively large military operations (that should be the province of DOD) and less intelligence and covert operations.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2226821/CIA-admits-role-US-consulate-attack-Benghazi.html
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204712904578092853621061838.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2012_Benghazi_attack

then there is this
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2013/02/berto-jongman-brennan-screwed-petraeus-in-benghazi-cia-security-detail-revealed-the-affair-as-coup-from-within/

above says that satellite photo shows it to be laid out as cia base ... not a consulate.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 12:00:36 -0400
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
Whose insurance and where?

The current FDIC insurance limit is USD250,000, per owner, per account.

A joint account for a married couple is covered up to USD500,000.

http://www.fdic.gov/deposit/deposits/dis/


except this claim that deal made derivatives senior to deposits
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/when-you-werent-looking-democrat-bank-stooges-launch-bills-to-permit-bailouts-deregulate-derivatives.html

and amount in the insurace fund is less than .01% of derivatives

US Deposits In Perspective: $25 Billion In Insurance, $9,283 Billion In Deposits; $297,514 Billion In Derivatives
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-19/us-deposits-perspective-25-billion-insurance-9283-billion-deposits-297514-billion-de

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 12:26:32 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
written by Chuck Spinney, one of Boyd's acolytes

Iraq Invasion Anniversary: Inside The Decider's Head
http://nation.time.com/2013/03/22/iraq-invasion-anniversary-inside-the-deciders-head/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#49 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

original justification for Iraq invasion was that it would only cost $50B ... some estimates now have total long-term costs at $5T-$6T ... or 100 times more (just part of the huge fabrications in the runup to the invasion). It isn't clear if that also includes non-DOD reconstruction payments that leaked to US corporations in the tens of billions with little or nothing to show for it.

this recent item (no relationship, although I've met him)

Winslow Wheeler: AF-IQ -- $4 to $6 Trillion Cost -- All Predictable
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2013/03/winslow-wheeler-af-iq-4-to-6-trillion-cost-all-predictable/

has Iraq+Afghanistan (only) between $4T-$6T (maybe $7T)

Chuck's time article also here at his blog:

Iraq Invasion Anniversary: Inside The Decider's Head
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-madness-of-king-george-revisited.html
and earlier version here: The Madness of King George Revisited
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/21/the-madness-of-king-george-revisited/

Chuck has followed up with Inside the Decider's Head II
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/2013/03/inside-deciders-head-ii.html

which is Bill Moyer segment from 2007 looking in detail at the fabrication leading up the invasion. One of the things implied in the segment (and gets periodically repeated) is that much of the media in the country has been "captured" (analogous to how wallstreet has captured the regulatory agencies and gets to operate with relative impunity).

some of Bob's reference on the Moyer segment
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2013/03/chuck-spinney-bill-moyer-on-incestuous-amplification/

for other drift, some past posts referencing the "capture" theme
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#70 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#71 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#25 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM! http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#7 FDR explains one dimension of our problem: bankers own the government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#39 Greek knife to Wall Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#54 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#64 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#20 The Big Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#44 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 12:49:27 -0400
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
Whose insurance and where?

The current FDIC insurance limit is USD250,000, per owner, per account.

A joint account for a married couple is covered up to USD500,000.

http://www.fdic.gov/deposit/deposits/dis/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

a little x-over from upthread (individual also active in the linkedin financial crime risk, fraud, and security group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

the author of "American Betrayal"
http://www.amazon.com/American-Betrayal-ebook/dp/B00BKZ02UM/

somewhat characterizes the FDIC as the least captured of the regulatory agencies ... but still failed to take effective action in large number of cases. he has characterized "some of the books written since the mess claiming the agency wasn't totally asleep at the wheel ... citing examples were it became aware of the enormous wrong doing" ... as analysis he performed, reported and requested action be taken; when he was ignored, he took the information up the chain of command ... but that just got him labeled as a whistleblower and target for bureaucratic retribution.

American Betrayal; loc1613-16
The title chosen by Chairman Bair for her book, perhaps, would have been more appropriately titled, "Bull by the tail and not the horns" instead of "Grabbed the Bull by Horns." The "bull" can be seen to mean something entirely different, especially when one reads some of her comments and compares it with my emails I provided her throughout her tenure as chairman of the Financial Regulatory Agency.

... snip ...

Bull By The Horns
http://www.amazon.com/Bull-Horns-Fighting-Street-ebook/dp/B0061Q688A/

recent post referencing agencies being "captured"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet >>>and more

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet >>>and more
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 15:25:14 -0400
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
I'm imagining micro-sats, mass produced and thus throwaway. Not that different from a smart cruise missile, costing quite a bit but cheap compared to something fancier, and a cheap way to get the function. The cost of recover would be seen as too costly, unless they actually had full rockets onboard and would then return themselves to the Enterprise.

Once you start sending something as massive as the Enterprise out to the planets, the cost dwarfs a lot of smaller things.


they are talking about 3D printers in space, moons, other planets ... using local raw materials

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Inside IBM's $67 billion SAGE, the largest computer ever built

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Inside IBM's $67 billion SAGE, the largest computer ever built
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 19:12:46 -0400
Inside IBM's $67 billion SAGE, the largest computer ever built
http://www.extremetech.com/computing/151980-inside-ibms-67-billion-sage-the-largest-computer-ever-built

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 09:09:14 -0400
Casper H.S. Dik <Casper.Dik@OrSPaMcle.COM> writes:
Did Nixon play a role? I've heard the same about Kissinger; and he was there.

Kissinger was also the architect of the Shah's regime and directly resposible for the current regime in Iran.


up thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Declassified LBJ Tapes Accuse Richard Nixon of Treason
http://news.slashdot.org/story/13/03/21/0331256/declassified-lbj-tapes-accuse-richard-nixon-of-treason
The Lyndon Johnson tapes: Richard Nixon's 'treason'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21768668

from above:
It begins in the summer of 1968. Nixon feared a breakthrough at the Paris Peace talks designed to find a negotiated settlement to the Vietnam war that he knew would derail his campaign.

Nixon therefore set up a clandestine back-channel to the South Vietnamese involving Anna Chennault, a senior campaign adviser. In late October 1968 there were major concessions from Hanoi which promised to allow meaningful talks to get underway in Paris. This was exactly what Nixon feared. Chennault was dispatched to the South Vietnamese embassy with a clear message: the South Vietnamese government should withdraw from the talks, refuse to deal with Johnson, and if Nixon was elected, they would get a much better deal. Meanwhile the FBI had bugged the ambassador's phone and transcripts of Chennault's calls were sent to the White House

In the end Nixon won by less than 1% of the popular vote, escalated the war into Laos and Cambodia with the loss of an additional 22,000 American lives, and finally settled for a peace agreement in 1973 that was within grasp in 1968.


... snip ...

With all the discussion on the 10th anniversary of the invasion of Iraq there is some question that the enormous fabrication to justify the invasion was also politically motivated. Part of the case was that it would only be $50B ... long term it sizing up to be possibly 100 times that (and recent GAO report that something like $60B gone to US companies for various reconstruction has little or nothing to show).

Regime change in Iran dates back to early 50s, by the CIA and a descendent of Theodore Roosevelt (documented several places).

Confessions of an Economic Hit Man; pg21/loc613-17:
In response, the highly popular, democratically elected Iranian prime minister (and TIME magazine's Man of the Year in 1951), Mohammad Mossadegh, nationalized all Iranian petroleum assets. An outraged England sought the help of her World War II ally, the United States. However, both countries feared that military retaliation would provoke the Soviet Union into taking action on behalf of Iran. Instead of sending in the Marines, therefore, Washington dispatched CIA agent Kermit Roosevelt (Theodore's grandson). He performed brilliantly, winning people over through payoffs and threats.

... snip ...

National Insecurity: The Cost of American Militarism pg39/loc482-88:
The CIA has destroyed numerous files that would have provided information on many clandestine operations, thus depriving us of an authoritative record of U.S. activities abroad. Some proclaimed successes often have turned out to be disasters in the long run. These include the overthrow of Mohammed Mossadegh in Iran in 1953 and Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán in Guatemala in 1954. These so-called successes led to the decision to overthrow Fidel Castro in 1961, the so-called "perfect failure" at the Bay of Pigs. 10 Sympathetic accounts of CIA covert action describe the Iran and Guatemala operations as "unblemished triumphs," although the conventional wisdom in the wake of the corrupt reign of the Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi in Iran and the horror of the reign of terror against the indigenous population for decades in Guatemala teaches much different lessons.

... snip ...

"Ike's Bluff: President Eisenhower's Secret Battle to Save the World" has account that after the "Bay of Pigs" disaster, Kennedy asked for meeting with Ike to discuss what went wrong. Ike asked him if there were detailed planning meetings to discuss the pros & cons, Kennedy said no.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 11:22:53 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Now you are off in La-La land again. Pay attention. It was GWB and Greenie that crashed the economy. It was Obama that got us out of that crash.

the problem is that the basic financial structural problems haven't been corrected ... the too-big-to-fail ... enabled by repeal of glass-steagall, are still at it. the TARP "bail-out" finds in the last days of the previous administration, were to buy the off-book toxic assets ... however at $700B it couldn't cover the $5.2T in off-book held by just the four largest too-big-to-fail ... so TARP was redirected for other uses and FED Reserve began printing trillions for the behind the scenes assistance & subsidy.

The Confiscation Scheme Planned for US and UK Depositors
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/28/the-confiscation-scheme-planned-for-us-and-uk-depositors/
The 15-page FDIC-BOE document is called "Resolving Globally Active, Systemically Important, Financial Institutions." It begins by explaining that the 2008 banking crisis has made it clear that some other way besides taxpayer bailouts is needed to maintain "financial stability." Evidently anticipating that the next financial collapse will be on a grander scale than either the taxpayers or Congress is willing to underwrite

... snip ...

and that too-big-to-fail are considered too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-to-jail ... contributing to "moral hazard" ... believing that they can get away with nearly any kind of financial manipulation, fraud and criminal activity.

Lanny Breuer Cashes in After Not Prosecuting Wall Street Execs, Will Receive Approximate Salary of 4 Million Dollars
http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/item/17885-lanny-breuer-cashes-in-after-not-prosecuting-wall-street-execs-will-receive-approximate-salary-of-4-million-dollars

references:

Holder Admits That Department of Justice Believes Big Bankers Are Above the Law
http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/item/17846-holder-admits-that-department-of-justice-believes-big-bankers-are-above-the-law
Eric Holder Enables Dishonesty, Fraud and Likely Criminal Activity on Wall Street
http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/item/17863-eric-holder-enables-dishonesty-fraud-and-likely-criminal-activity-on-wall-street
In Bank Tax Cut for Job Scheme, Another Bank Gets Immunity by DOJ
http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/item/17866-in-bank-tax-cut-for-job-scheme-another-bank-gets-immunity-by-doj

which references lots of recent mainstream news articles about failure to prosecute too-big-to-fail for various kinds of fraud, criminal activity, money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists, etc

Jan2009, I was asked to HTML'ize the Pecora Hearings (1930s congressional hearings into the '29 crash, had been scanned the fall2008 at Boston Public Library), with lots of x-indexing and URLs between what happened then and what happened this time (references to belief that the new congress would have appetite to do something). After working on it for some time, got a call saying it wouldn't be needed after all (references to enormous piles of wallstreet money blanketing capital hill). from Pecora Hearings:

BROKERS' LOANS AND INDUSTRIAL DEPRESSION

For the purpose of making it perfectly clear that the present industrial depression was due to the inflation of credit on brokers' loans, as obtained from the Bureau of Research of the Federal Reserve Board, the figures show that the inflation of credit for speculative purposes on stock exchanges were responsible directly for a rise in the average of quotations of the stocks from sixty in 1922 to 225 in 1929 to 35 in 1932 and that the change in the value of such Stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange went through the same identical changes in almost identical percentages.


... snip ...

the equivalent fueling the financial mess last decade (except it was the housing market bubble instead of a stock market bubble) was over $27T in securitized loans sold through wallstreet enabled by being able to pay for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A). Motivation for wallstreet was new revenue of possibly $4T-$5T skimmed off the $27+T in triple-A rated toxic CDOs ... which accounts for claims that wallstreet tripled in size during the bubble (as percent of GDP) and wallstreet bonuses went up over 400%.

'29 crash, people went to jail and there were fundamental changes to the root problems that enabled the '29 crash. This time, nobody has gone to jail and the fundamental structural problems are allowed to continue (claims that it isn't question of whether it happens again, but when).

the theme of "regulatory capture" (responsible institutions failing to perform their duty) that was hallmark of the bubble&crash has not changed.

along with the lack of adult supervision for the financial industry, last decade, congress cut tax revenues by $6T (compared to baseline which had all federal debt retired by 2010) and increased spending by $6T (compared to baseline) for a $12T budget gap. Much of this happening after congress allowed the fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002 (required spending match collected taxes). In speeches middle of last decade, fed comptroller general (and head of GAO) would periodically include references to nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmetic (for how they were savaging the budget). The first major legislation after allowing fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002 was Medicare part-d ... which the comptroller general characterized as a long-term $40T unfunded mandate that comes to swamp all other budget items.

misc. past posts referencing Brokers' loans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#28 I need insight on the Stock Market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#77 Who first mentioned Credit Crunch?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#8 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#23 Should FDIC or the Federal Reserve Bank have the authority to shut down and take over non-bank financial institutions like AIG?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#40 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#27 US banking Changes- TARP Proposl
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#38 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#49 Is the current downturn cyclic or systemic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#53 What every taxpayer should know about what caused the current Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#56 What's your personal confidence level concerning financial market recovery?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#65 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#5 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#22 China's yuan 'set to usurp US dollar' as world's reserve currency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#25 The Paradox of Economic Recovery
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#29 Analysing risk, especially credit risk in Banks, which was a major reason for the current crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#40 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#57 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#35 what is mortgage-backed securities?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#38 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#53 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#69 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#52 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#36 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#88 Fed Report Finds Speculators Played Big Role in Housing Collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#52 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#32 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#28 REPEAL OF GLASS-STEAGALL DID NOT CAUSE THE FINANCIAL CRISIS - WHAT DO YOU THINK?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#67 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#75 Interesting News Article

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 12:19:08 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
Wouldn't that have been illegal conmfiscation? Sounds like the late and unlamented jefe of Venezuala

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

not illegal under their gov. and possibly only minor compared to the british actions in the region over the previous 100yrs. "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man" is all about various kinds of activities and manipulation around the world (repeated theme where they install their own puppet gov. through bribary and violance, which allows US interests to plunder the country); "Lawrence of Arabia" also gets into some of the double dealing by the British and French in the region. Then there is the interval between the wars, through ww2 and the aftermath.

some here and the "Great Game"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran

also from above:
In 1953 US President Dwight D. Eisenhower authorized Operation Ajax. The operation, supported by the Shah, was successful, and Mosaddegh was arrested on 19 August 1953. The coup was the first time the US had openly overthrown an elected, civilian government of another sovereign state.[85]

After Operation Ajax, Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi favoured American and British oil interests and his rule became increasingly autocratic. With American support, the Shah was able to rapidly modernize the Iranian infrastructure and military. However, his rule was also corrupt and repressive. Arbitrary arrests and torture by his secret police, SAVAK, were used to crush all forms of political opposition


... snip ...

past references to "Economic Hit Man"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#63 21st Century Management approach?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#80 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#111 Matt Taibbi with Xmas Message from the Rich
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#25 You may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#57 Study Confirms The Government Produces The Buggiest Software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#70 The Army and Special Forces: The Fantasy Continues
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#83 Protected: R.I.P. Containment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#2 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 15:25:32 -0400
"James O. Brown" <job654@ax.com> writes:
Bullshit it doesn't.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#95 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

the constitution may apply to US entities outside the country (like cases where US companies are bribing foreign officials) ... but it doesn't govern non-US entities. That has been the explanation for the terrorist rendition program ... attempting to avoid circumstances where the constitution would apply.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 15:43:41 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Yes, I remember the legislative attempts to pass some legislation. The Republicans fought like their life depended on it. Of course their self declared goal was to make Obama a one term president.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

the "speaker of the house" gave early press conference where he said his primary objective was to do whatever necessary to make Obama a one term president. he also had press conference where he was bragging about placing the up&coming bright new stars of the party on the financial committee ... because those members receive the largest amount of money from lobbiests (when there are enormous piles of money blanketing capital hill, it is those members that receive the largest share).

wallstreet hit the economy potentially to the tune of the $27+T in securitized loans (not just the amount they skimmed off for themselves):
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

some amount continuing since nobody has been sent to jail and no major restructuring to prevent it from happening again.

CBO has congress with a $12T hit to the budget in the same period (after the fiscal responsibility act expires in 2002). That is potential total of $39T hit to the country from combination of wallstreet and congress.

that budget hits works out to avg. of about $1.5T/year ... continuing into this decade since there was little redo of the budget to return to fiscal responsibility era. Congress needs to increase revenue about $750B/yr and decrease spending by corresponding amount to get back to the baseline budget. However with the budget hit continuing into this decade plus other spending & revenue issues related to the financial mess ... there is significant debt+interest that needs to be cleared ... say another $1T/year to try and fix what happened after the fiscal responsibility act was allowed to expire in 2002 ... aka $2.5T/yr fix to the budget, $1.25T/yr increase in taxes and $1.25T/yr cut in spending.

That is in addition to sending a large number on wallstreet to jail and restructuring the too-big-to-fail.

from large bank senior examinar that turned into whistleblower after regulatory executives wouldn't act on his findings the middle of last decade ... "American Betrayal" loc3684-90:
One reason the Department of Justice has not charged any top officers at Countrywide or other large banks with fraud may be that a decree was ordered by the Obama administration to have the Department of Justice tread lightly against the banking industry. Most likely, the Obama administration did not desire to embarrass former Senator James Dodd, an influential Democrat, and other Democratic members of Congress who personally benefited by receiving sweet-heart loans from Countrywide. It was widely known that Countrywide was providing favorable terms to members of Congress not available to the public. One ought to know that Chairman Bair also reportedly got a sweet-heart loan, not by Countrywide, but from Bank of America. No doubt, President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder decided it unwise to go after the banks too hard. There was no telling how many skeletons might fall from the closet.

... snip ...

i.e. both parties were involved in not only the savaging of the federal budget but also pressuring regulatory agencies to not take action against too-big-to-fail and wallstreet

That still leaves Medicare Part-d, which the former comptroller general claims becomes a $40T unfunded mandate and swamps all other budget items. CBS 60mins had done an expose on 18people from the party in power in 2003, who managed to snake the bill through passing ... and afterwards, resign and were all on drug industry payroll (it hasn't just been military-industrial-complex, wallstreet, and congress that have been plundering the country). Part of favor to the drug industry was slipping a one line sentence into the legislation just before final vote that precludes competitive bidding (and maneuvers that prevented any review of the change before the vote). CBS 60mins then showed drugs from the VA that permits competitive bidding that are 1/3rd the price of the same identical drugs under part-d.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 16:11:08 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

previous reference to Nixon's Treason has reference to Invisible Armies which talks about success and failures of invading armies dealing with native population that is not cooperating (going back to Greek & Roman times, but coming forward to the most recent two wars by the US).

Economic Hit Man is autobiography by somebody involved in plundering other countries in the 60s-80s on behalf of US interests, sometimes with the aid of US gov. agencies.

National Insecurity talks about some of the specific success and failures of when US gov. agencies were involved.

Note that the Marine's Small Wars Manual written in the 30s, is based on their experience in dealing with native population in countries where they've invaded.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Wars_Manual

however, also written about the same time by a decorated Marine general about the same events being in support of wallstreet plundering the countries War Is a Racket
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

earlier work is Triumphant plutocracy; the story of American public life from 1870 to 1920 was written by former US congressman that includes some amount of references to his experience with wallstreet both blundering the US as well as getting aid from the gov in plundering other countries.
http://archive.org/details/triumphantpluto00pettrich

past posts mentioning War Is a Racket &/or Trumphant plutocracy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#58 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#62 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#97 What a Caveman Can Teach You About Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#49 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#29 Jedi Knights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#60 The IBM mainframe has been the backbone of most of the world's largest IT organizations for more than 48 years
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#83 Protected: R.I.P. Containment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#2 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#15 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#26 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#46 The China Threat: The MICC Pivots Obama Back to the Future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#82 What Makes Economic History Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970



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