List of Archived Posts

2008 Newsgroup Postings (01/01 - 01/15)

It keeps getting uglier
LINC-8 Front Panel Questions
folklore indeed
No Glory for the PDP-15
folklore indeed
folklore indeed
It keeps getting uglier
folklore indeed
folklore indeed
folklore indeed
For the History buff's an IBM 5150 pc
Information security breaches quadrupled in 2007
No Glory for the PDP-15
LINC-8 Front Panel Questions
hacked TOPS-10 monitors
hacked TOPS-10 monitors
No Glory for the PDP-15
Usefulness of bidirectional read/write?
Remembering the Cray-1
Tap and faucet and spellcheckers [was: Re: What do YOU call
Tap and faucet and spellcheckers [was: Re: What do YOU call
No Glory for the PDP-15
Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
z/OS and VM Control Blocks
Need Help filtering out sporge in comp.arch
Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Need Help filtering out sporge in comp.arch
hacked TOPS-10 monitors
1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
JCL parms
1970s credit cards, was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
U.S. Identity Theft at Record Level in 2007
1970s credit cards, was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
JCL parms
competitiveness
No Gory for the *NIX
IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization
Inaccurate CPU% reported by RMF and TMON
dig. TV
Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
No Glory for the PDP-15
Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
dig. TV
As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
IBM LCS
IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization
IBM LCS
Education ranking
Really stupid question about z/OS HTTP server
Really stupid question about z/OS HTTP server
Education ranking
Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
IBM LCS
old internal network references
Education ranking
1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
competitiveness
LINC-8 Front Panel Questions
Radix Partition Trees
As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
File Transfer conundrum
Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Rotary phones
As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Radix Partition Trees
Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Virtualization Wave
Rotary phones
Rotary phones
Radix Partition Trees
As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Rotary phones
Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
Education ranking
Rotary phones
Education ranking
Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
folklore indeed
folklore indeed
Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

It keeps getting uglier

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: It keeps getting uglier
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 08:07:42
Steve_Thompson@STERCOMM.COM (Thompson, Steve) writes:
WANG with their WANG/VS systems came up with an idea that would have met your problem. The workstations had a button that caused the CEC to download microcode for DP/WP (Data Processing / Word Processing). So your workstation could switch between types of work. [ASCII based S/360 type architecture on steroids.]

IBM attempted to make a product to market against WANG. They couldn't figure out how to do it economically. Problem was the distance from the tree to the eyeballs of the powers that were was about 2 inches. The problem was solved by having a PC that could do word processing while having an emulator (3270) for the 3270 type tasks, and then the PC would handle the word processing type tasks.


for some topic drift ... past posts about PC getting early market traction because it sold for about the same price as 3270 and in single desktop footprint could get 3270 terminal emulation and some local (personal) computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#emulation

OPD's displaywriter was in WANG wordprocessing market segment.

ROMP was early 801 risc chip originally designed to be used for displaywriter follow-on product. when that was killed, the group looked around for something else to use the machine for and settled on the unix workstation market. they got the company that had done the pc/ix port to do one for the displaywriter "follow-on" and renamed the product the PC/RT (and the software AIX).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

The PC/RT followon was the RS6000 with RIOS chipset. RS6000 was relogo'ed as hardware platfrom by some number of other companies ... including WANG as it got out of the hardware business. As part of that change-over, some number of the people from RS6000 group went to WANG.

old time article from nov80 mentioning wang, word-processing market
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,950498,00.html?iid=chix-sphere

page mentioning some of the old/70s wordprocessing market
http://www.computermuseum.li/Testpage/DedicatedWPMicros.htm

article on demise of dedicated wordprocessor boxes; having given away to multi-application PCs
http://www.cbronline.com/article_cg_print.asp?guid=265D4108-6F66-49EC-80B1-E51D2AA8876E

note that there was a project in the early 80s to replace the wide variety of internal microprocessors with 801/risc processors (including the ones used for displaywriters). this included all the processors in the low and mid-range 370s ... at the time, the 4341-followon (4381) was going to use a 801/risc processor; the s/38-followon (as/400) was going to use a 801/risc processor ... and lots of others were also. A special flavor of 801/risc, Iliad had additional features for supporting emulation of other architectures ... some old 801-related email, including mention of work on Iliad chips
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#801

for other topic drift, old email mentioning 43xx ... "e-architecture" machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

i.e. while the high-end 370 came up with 370-xa (code named "811"), the low/mid range came up with "e-architecture" (where dos/vs to vse came from).

for some archeological trivia, i contributed to the document killing 801/risc idea for the 4341-followon.

LINC-8 Front Panel Questions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LINC-8 Front Panel Questions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 11:58:07
jmfbahciv writes:
He was wrong. There are still thousands, millions? of tape that contains data. Weren't you the one who talked about data NASA can't retrieve because it's on tape? Until all data on tape is transferred off those tapes, tapes are not dead.

hot off the press ...

IBM: Tape Backup is Here to Stay
http://www.enterpriseitplanet.com/storage/features/article.php/3719041

from:
"In order to maintain continuous business operations, address regulatory requirements and archive business records, users need an infrastructure that allows them to manage their data from online application storage to offline, permanent archive media," says IBM's Bruce Master, senior program manager, Worldwide Tape Storage Systems Marketing. "Tape backup is a key part of this life cycle, allowing users to safely store long term archives for record keeping and disaster recovery while managing total costs of ownership (TCO)."

... snip ...

i mentioned before that when we were out marketing our ha/cmp product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

we coined the terms disaster survivability and geographic survivability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

we were also asked to write a section in the corporations continuous availability strategy document ... however both rochester and pok complained (as they couldn't meet at the time), and the section was pulled.

also from the above:
"IBM TS1120 tape drive and EKM technology is used in high-end enterprise accounts by Fortune 100 companies in a variety of industries including banking, finance and securities," says Master. "IBM's LTO tape offerings have achieved nearly 900,000 drive shipments and over 10 million cartridge shipments."

... snip ...

folklore indeed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: folklore indeed
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 12:33:26
Charlton Wilbur <cwilbur@chromatico.net> writes:
Exactly! The mompop can gross $15K, and then spend $5K-$15K on the auditing for their in-house credit card processing; or they can gross $15K, and then spend a couple hundred dollars for their share of the auditing on the service that processes credit cards for them and 100 other mompops.

but the analysis is that the attractiveness to the crooks can scale fairly linear with number of accounts ... and given security proportional to risk ... $15k-$30k annually (the necessary fraud countermeasures along with the audit of those countermeasures) is possibly proportional to the associated risk for the small mompops.

however, with the risk scaling linearly ... aggregation means that the countermeasures have to also increase enormously ... i.e. the refrain that the attackers can outspend the defenders by possibly 100:1.

a little military/boyd topic drift ... i think there is some guideline is that attackers need something like 3:1 for taking on a fixed defense ... being able to marshall 100:1, massively overwhelms fixed defense.

recent security thread mentioning boyd (& OODA-loop)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#3 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle

one could also claim that massive financial incentive also motivates them to more quickly cycle their OODA-loop. misc. past posts mentioning boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd

recent posts mentioning security proportional to risk and/or attackers can afford to enormously outspend the defenders.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#58 Our security sucks. Why can't we change? What's wrong with us?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#3 Solution to phishing -- an idea who's time has come?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#3 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#26 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#75 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#20 T.J. Maxx data theft worse than first reported
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#56 T.J. Maxx data theft worse than first reported
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#64 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#15 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#39 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#48 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#86 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#87 Data Breaches Soar In 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#90 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#91 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#93 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#94 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#97 folklore indeed

No Glory for the PDP-15

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: No Glory for the PDP-15
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers,alt.sys.pdp10
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 14:12:05
"Carl Appellof" <doctorcja@yahoo.com> writes:
I think it would have been tough, even in microcode, to emulate a 36-bit machine with a 32-bit architecture.

there were number of microengines used to emulate 360, 1401, 1410, 1610, 7090, etc

recent reference here to 360/30
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#99 It keeps getting uglier

and some numbere of 360 FE manuals
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/fe/

which makes some reference to the native hardware of the machines ... and at least for 360/30, talks about 1401 & 1610 emulation mode.

360/65 had front panel selector for 709x emulation

a misc references to (36-bit) 709x:

IBM 7090 CompWisdom
http://www.compwisdom.com/topics/IBM-7090
IBM Archives: 7090 Data Processing System
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP7090.html
IBM Archives: 7090 Data Processing System (continued)
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP7090B.html
IBM 7090/94 Architecture Home Page
http://dgatx.com/computing/people/Jack-Harper/pubs/2004/IBM-7090/archive.html

folklore indeed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: folklore indeed
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 14:42:36
Charlton Wilbur <cwilbur@chromatico.net> writes:
Leaping from "attractiveness scales linearly" to "risk scales linearly" is not warranted, I think. If I were a crook, and I had the choice between cracking difficult security at a TJX and cracking easy security at a mompop, I'd go for the mompop every time. Crooks aren't stupid; a 10% chance at $15K is as good as a 1% chance at $150K or a 0.01% chance at $1.5 million.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#2 folklore indeed

that is the outsider attack scenario ... the numbers indicate that as much as 70percent of such data breaches involve insiders. I've mentioned before that one of the results of focusing on the outsider issues will tend to obfuscate looking at major source, the insiders.

also, the large breaches are much more likely to make national press ... using news search engines ... there are quite a bit of purely "local" incidents hundreds.

there is also the scenario, that the financial institutions have fraud pattern analysis that are somewhat tuned to the "large" breaches ... looking at possibly hundred or thousands of account fraud reports and attempting to find some common transactions for the accounts (potentially indicating a common breach).

the "percentage chance" methodology tends to ignore sophistication level of crooks and/or amount of money that crooks might be willing to invest (i.e. crooks can afford to outspend defenders by as much as 100:1).

smaller operation will tend to have less sophisticated countermeasures and therefor more attactive to less sophisticated criminal activity. the sophistication of the countermeasures will tend to increase with the size of the operation ... which may mean some self-selection with regard to the sophistication of criminals doing the attacks.

the enormous multitude and variety of attacks is related to the posts in the naked transaction metaphor threads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#payments

which can be considered the root of the scenario where "crooks can afford to enormously outspend attackers" and the huge imbalance in the security proportional to risk ... (and possibly except for the x9.59 financial standard work) ... everything else is mostly patchwork and simple point solution security measures.

past references/posts mentioning insiders:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm12.htm#44 Identity Theft More Often an Inside Job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm12.htm#58 Time to ID Identity-Theft Solutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#1 Who's afraid of Mallory Wolf?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#12 Tackling security threats from within
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#28 Maybe It's Snake Oil All the Way Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm17.htm#38 Study: ID theft usually an inside job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm17.htm#39 The future of security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm17.htm#47 authentication and authorization ... addenda
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm17.htm#50 authentication and authorization (was: Question on the state of the security industry)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm17.htm#60 Using crypto against Phishing, Spoofing and Spamming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm18.htm#6 dual-use digital signature vulnerability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm18.htm#29 EMV cards as identity cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm18.htm#49 one more time now, Leading Cause of Data Security breaches Are Due to Insiders, Not Outsiders
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm19.htm#17 What happened with the session fixation bug?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm19.htm#19 "SSL stops credit card sniffing" is a correlation/causality myth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#2 GP4.3 - Growth and Fraud - Case #3 - Phishing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#3 GP4.3 - Growth and Fraud - Case #3 - Phishing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#27 Meccano Trojans coming to a desktop near you
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#33 Meccano Trojans coming to a desktop near you
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#36 Unforgeable Blinded Credentials
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#0 Separation of Roles - an example
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#9 PGP "master keys"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#10 PGP "master keys"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#44 ThreatWatch - markets in loss, Visa's take, 419 "chairmen"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm24.htm#5 New ISO standard aims to ensure the security of financial transactions on the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm24.htm#7 Naked Payments IV - let's all go naked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm24.htm#10 Naked Payments IV - let's all go naked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm24.htm#36 Interesting bit of a quote
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm24.htm#48 more on FBI plans new Net-tapping push
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#13 Sarbanes-Oxley is what you get when you don't do FC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#41 Why security training is really important (and it ain't anything to do with security!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#7 Citibank e-mail looks phishy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#31 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#52 more on firing your MBA-less CSO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#53 Doom and Gloom spreads, security revisionism suggests "H6.5: Be an adept!"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#60 Retailers try to push data responsibilities back to banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#45 PKI and Non-repudiation practicalities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#38 distributed authentication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#54 Does "Strong Security" Mean Anything?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#12 A terminology question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#14 Mainframers: Take back the light (spotlight, that is)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#35 Security and e-commerce
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#14 Symmetric-Key Credit Card Protocol on Web Site
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#5 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#16 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Ceritificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#15 US fiscal policy (Was: Bob Bemer, Computer Pioneer,Father of ASCII,Invento
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#37 Vintage computers are better than modern crap !
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#33 Good passwords and security priorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#37 MVS secure configuration standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#1 Brit banks introduce delays on interbank xfers due to phishing boom
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#11 Revoking the Root
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#52 Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#1 More on garbage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#55 Encryption Everywhere? (Was: Re: Ho boy! Another big one!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005l.html#29 Importing CA certificate to smartcard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005l.html#35 More Phishing scams, still no SSL being used
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#2 X509 digital certificate for offline solution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005v.html#2 ABN Tape - Found
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#35 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#26 Caller ID "spoofing"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#28 Caller ID "spoofing"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#26 Debit Cards HACKED now
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#44 Does the Data Protection Act of 2005 Make Sense
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#15 Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#26 Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#4 Passwords for bank sites - change or not?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#16 Value of an old IBM PS/2 CL57 SX Laptop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#23 Value of an old IBM PS/2 CL57 SX Laptop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#33 Password Complexity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#9 New airline security measures in Europe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#40 New attacks on the financial PIN processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#43 New attacks on the financial PIN processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#2 New attacks on the financial PIN processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#42 On sci.crypt: New attacks on the financial PIN processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#49 Patent buster for a method that increases password security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#14 IBM ATM machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#42 The logic of privacy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#13 special characters in passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#20 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#33 security engineering versus information security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#60 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#10 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#11 Decoding the encryption puzzle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#32 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#35 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#43 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#75 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#28 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#65 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#35 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#85 PCI Compliance - Encryption of all non-console administrative access
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#94 PCI Compliance - Encryption of all non-console administrative access
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#0 The Unexpected Fact about the First Computer Programmer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#11 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#72 Value of SSL client certificates?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#74 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#94 folklore indeed

folklore indeed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: folklore indeed
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 15:08:39
Charlton Wilbur <cwilbur@chromatico.net> writes:
And at the root of it all is, there's no need to store the credit card number, the valuable part, in the first place. You submit it to the credit card processor, and they reply with an authorization code and a reference number. That authorization code and reference number is sufficient to get the money from the credit card processor, and the credit card number is no longer needed.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#2 folklore indeed

as noted repeatedly before ... there are some number of business processes, like disputes & chargebacks ... that mandate the retention of the transaction account number & date/time (which survive long after the merchant having received their money).

also as referenced in previous posts ... the national retailers federation have raised the issue of changing the retention mandates.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#60 Retailers try to push data responsibilities back to banks

there is some conjecture that the financial institutions may resist becoming responsible for the transaction activity respository with lots of distributed access from their retailers and merchants ... since there would be a huge number of breach opportunities (represented by all those authorized accesses) and the financial institution then becomes liable (rather than the merchant for the breach).

also this reference to large national retailer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#95 folklore indeed

had calculated that the current transaction information retention mandates were costing more than automatically paying all existing disputes and chargebacks ... and was seriously considering dumping the data, ignoring the retention mandates and just automatically paying off dispuates and chargebacks. Or, at least until somebody raised the issue what might happened if that became public knowledge.

however, since with the underlying naked transaction metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#payment

there is still an enormous end-to-end vulnerability ... having aggregated repositories with a large number of "insiders" with access from widely distributed locations ... can create a new set of exploit avenues.

in the security proportional to risk scenario, the breach itself isn't the risk, the risk is that the crooks use the information for fraudulent transactions.

in the x9.59 financial standard scenario
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

the risk isn't reduced by securing all possible breaches and/or all possible other points where crooks might be able to obtain the information ... for complete end-to-end security ... as per the requirement placed on the x9a10 financial standard working group to preseve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments ... in x9.59 financial standard protocol, the risk is reduced by eliminating the crooks being able to use the information for fraudulent transactions.

misc. posts mentioning disputes, chargebacks, and/or references to NRF wanting the financial institutions to change the information retention mandates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm3.htm#cstech3 cardtech/securetech & CA PKI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#disputes Half of Visa's disputes, fraud result from I-commerce (more)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#nonreput Sender and receiver non-repudiation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#terror7 [FYI] Did Encryption Empower These Terrorists?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#terror12 [FYI] Did Encryption Empower These Terrorists?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#terror13 [FYI] Did Encryption Empower These Terrorists?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#terror14 [FYI] Did Encryption Empower These Terrorists? (addenda to chargebacks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay7.htm#nonrep0 non-repudiation, was Re: crypto flaw in secure mail standards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay7.htm#nonrep3 non-repudiation, was Re: crypto flaw in secure mail standards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay7.htm#nonrep5 non-repudiation, was Re: crypto flaw in secure mail standards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay7.htm#nonrep6 non-repudiation, was Re: crypto flaw in secure mail standards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm7.htm#rubberhose Rubber hose attack
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay10.htm#41 ATM Scams - Whose Liability Is It, Anyway?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm10.htm#tamper Limitations of limitations on RE/tampering (was: Re: biometrics)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm12.htm#63 Intertrust, Can Victor Shear Bring Down Microsoft?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm17.htm#59 dual-use digital signature vulnerability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm19.htm#44 massive data theft at MasterCard processor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm2.htm#useire U.S. & Ireland use digital signature
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm20.htm#22 ID "theft" -- so what?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm21.htm#36 browser vendors and CAs agreeing on high-assurance certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#14 Shifting the Burden - legal tactics from the contracts world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#33 Chip-and-Pin terminals were replaced by "repairworkers"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#10 Who has a Core Competency in Security?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#44 Governance of anonymous financial services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#48 Governance of anonymous financial services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#63 Public key encrypt-then-sign or sign-then-encrypt?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#57 RealNames hacked. Firewall issues.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#2 e-commerce security????
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#52 Security standards for banks and other institution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#41 Why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#10 Least folklorish period in computing (was Re: IBM Mainframe at home)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#36 (OT) acceptance of technology, was: Convenient and secure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#65 Strength of RSA with known plain-text
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#17 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#41 xml-security vs. native security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#28 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#23 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#64 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#67 open source voting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#32 Is the media letting banks off the hook on payment card security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#66 The new urgency to fix online privacy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#62 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#85 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#94 folklore indeed

It keeps getting uglier

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: It keeps getting uglier
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 15:14:17
edgould1948@COMCAST.NET (Ed Gould) writes:
Rick:

FYI according to lynn@GARLIC.COM the model 85 was the 1st 360 to have a HSB.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#98 It keeps getting uglier

not just me:
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/history/year_1968.html

from above:
Additions to System/360 family are announced, including the Model 85. The high-speed cache, or buffer memory, found in the System/360 Model 85, is the first in the industry. The cache memory makes highly prioritized information available at 12 times the speed of regular, main-core memory.

... snip ...

not only first 360 ... but "first in the industry".

folklore indeed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: folklore indeed
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 15:56:36
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
the risk isn't reduced by securing all possible breaches and/or all possible other points where crooks might be able to obtain the information ... for complete end-to-end security ... as per the requirement placed on the x9a10 financial standard working group to preseve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments ... in x9.59 financial standard protocol, the risk is reduced by eliminating the crooks being able to use the information for fraudulent transactions.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#2 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#4 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#5 folklore indeed

for other x9a10 financial standard working group and x9.59 financial standard folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959

x9.59 given the requirement to address *ALL* retail payments had to look seriously at all possible compromises in all possible environments ... not just simple point solution in single specific environments. as mentioned in some recent posts ... some of the other solutions from the period had enormous payload and processing bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#64 folklore indeed
and/or were so myopically focused on particular point solution actually managed to reduce the integrity of the overall, end-to-end infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#1

part of x9.59 standard was to require strong authentication for every transactions ... as means of eliminating the enormous number of vulnerabilities inherit in the existing paradigm associated with the naked transaction metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#payments

so one of the mechanism for strong authentication involved digital signatures ... but the genre from the period was to append a digital certificate to every digital signature. The associated digital certificate paradigm was one of the things that contributed to some of the enormous payload and processing bloats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#bloat

The x9a10 proposed a much simpler processing paradigm with digital signatures that didn't require the enormous additional processing and payload bloat represented by the digital certificate processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#certless

this created some amount of contention among standard body members who were strongly oriented towards digital certificate paradigm ... and there was strong on going effort to make x9.59 standard mandate digital certificates (which contributed to delays in getting the standard finally passed).

however the significant processing and payload bloat that resulted from digital certificates was a well known fact. as a result, there was a standardization effort started in x9 for financial transaction compressed digital certificates (addressing at least the enormous payload bloat problem, with objective of reducing the enormous payload bloat from a factor of one hundred times to possibly only five times)

after awhile, i proposed that it was possible to take their compression principles and compress a financial transaction digital certificate to zero bytes. then, instead stating that x9.59 transaction would not need an appended digital certificate (as a means of avoiding the enormous payload and processing bloat), the standard could state that x9.59 transaction standard mandated that every transaction have an appended zero-byte digital certificate.

past posts describing zero-byte digital certificates and/or how to create zero-byte digital certificates:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm3.htm#cstech3 cardtech/securetech & CA PKI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm3.htm#cstech6 cardtech/securetech & CA PKI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm3.htm#kiss1 KISS for PKIX. (Was: RE: ASN.1 vs XML (used to be RE: I-D ACTION :draft-ietf-pkix-scvp- 00.txt))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm3.htm#kiss6 KISS for PKIX. (Was: RE: ASN.1 vs XML (used to be RE: I-D ACTION :draft-ietf-pkix-scvp- 00.txt))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm4.htm#6 Public Key Infrastructure: An Artifact...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm4.htm#9 Thin PKI won - You lost
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm5.htm#x959 X9.59 Electronic Payment Standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm5.htm#shock revised Shocking Truth about Digital Signatures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm8.htm#softpki8 Software for PKI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm9.htm#softpki23 Software for PKI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm12.htm#28 Employee Certificates - Security Issues
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm12.htm#64 Invisible Ink, E-signatures slow to broadly catch on (addenda)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm13.htm#20 surrogate/agent addenda (long)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#30 Maybe It's Snake Oil All the Way Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#41 certificates & the alternative view
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm20.htm#11 the limits of crypto and authentication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#4 GP4.3 - Growth and Fraud - Case #3 - Phishing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#51 Status of opportunistic encryption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm24.htm#5 New ISO standard aims to ensure the security of financial transactions on the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#35 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#93 Question regarding authentication implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#41 Why trust root CAs ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#3 Why trust root CAs ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#15 Why trust root CAs ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#57 PKI and Non-repudiation practicalities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#58 PKI and Non-repudiation practicalities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#72 PKI and Non-repudiation practicalities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#35 Can I create my own SSL key?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#79 FREE X.509 Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#65 PKI/Digital signature doesn't work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#16 Net banking, is it safe???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#7 Digital Signature Standards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#6 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#7 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#8 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#9 Smart card Authentification
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#33 X509 digital certificate for offline solution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#31 Is symmetric key distribution equivalent to symmetric key generation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#6 phishing web sites using self-signed certs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#37 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#35 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#8 Beginner's Pubkey Crypto Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#29 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#31 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#28 confidence in CA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#13 Multi-layered PKI implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#31 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#16 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#72 Value of SSL client certificates?

folklore indeed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: folklore indeed
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 15:56:36
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
the risk isn't reduced by securing all possible breaches and/or all possible other points where crooks might be able to obtain the information ... for complete end-to-end security ... as per the requirement placed on the x9a10 financial standard working group to preseve the integrity for *ALL* retail payments ... in x9.59 financial standard protocol, the risk is reduced by eliminating the crooks being able to use the information for fraudulent transactions.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#2 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#4 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#5 folklore indeed

for other x9a10 financial standard working group and x9.59 financial standard folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959

x9.59 given the requirement to address *ALL* retail payments had to look seriously at all possible compromises in all possible environments ... not just simple point solution in single specific environments. as mentioned in some recent posts ... some of the other solutions from the period had enormous payload and processing bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#64 folklore indeed

and/or were so myopically focused on particular point solution actually managed to reduce the integrity of the overall, end-to-end infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#1

part of x9.59 standard was to require strong authentication for every transactions ... as means of eliminating the enormous number of vulnerabilities inherit in the existing paradigm associated with the naked transaction metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#payments

so one of the mechanism for strong authentication involved digital signatures ... but the genre from the period was to append a digital certificate to every digital signature. The associated digital certificate paradigm was one of the things that contributed to some of the enormous payload and processing bloats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#bloat

The x9a10 proposed a much simpler processing paradigm with digital signatures that didn't require the enormous additional processing and payload bloat represented by the digital certificate processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#certless

this created some amount of contention among standard body members who were strongly oriented towards digital certificate paradigm ... and there was strong on going effort to make x9.59 standard mandate digital certificates (which contributed to delays in getting the standard finally passed).

however the significant processing and payload bloat that resulted from digital certificates was a well known fact. as a result, there was a standardization effort started in x9 for "compressed" digital certificates (addressing at least the enormous payload bloat problem).

after awhile, i proposed that it was possible to take their compression principles and compress a financial transaction digital certificate to zero bytes. then, instead stating that x9.59 transaction would not need an appended digital certificate (as a means of avoiding the enormous payload and processing bloat), the standard could state that x9.59 transaction standard mandated that every transaction have an appended zero byte digital certificate.

past posts describing zero byte digital certificates and/or how to create zero byte digital certificates:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm3.htm#cstech3 cardtech/securetech & CA PKI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm3.htm#cstech6 cardtech/securetech & CA PKI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm3.htm#kiss1 KISS for PKIX. (Was: RE: ASN.1 vs XML (used to be RE: I-D ACTION :draft-ietf-pkix-scvp- 00.txt))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm3.htm#kiss6 KISS for PKIX. (Was: RE: ASN.1 vs XML (used to be RE: I-D ACTION :draft-ietf-pkix-scvp- 00.txt))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm4.htm#6 Public Key Infrastructure: An Artifact...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm4.htm#9 Thin PKI won - You lost
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm5.htm#x959 X9.59 Electronic Payment Standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm5.htm#shock revised Shocking Truth about Digital Signatures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm8.htm#softpki8 Software for PKI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm9.htm#softpki23 Software for PKI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm12.htm#28 Employee Certificates - Security Issues
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm12.htm#64 Invisible Ink, E-signatures slow to broadly catch on (addenda)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm13.htm#20 surrogate/agent addenda (long)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#30 Maybe It's Snake Oil All the Way Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#41 certificates & the alternative view
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm20.htm#11 the limits of crypto and authentication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#4 GP4.3 - Growth and Fraud - Case #3 - Phishing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#51 Status of opportunistic encryption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm24.htm#5 New ISO standard aims to ensure the security of financial transactions on the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#35 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#93 Question regarding authentication implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#41 Why trust root CAs ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#3 Why trust root CAs ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#15 Why trust root CAs ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#57 PKI and Non-repudiation practicalities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#58 PKI and Non-repudiation practicalities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#72 PKI and Non-repudiation practicalities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#35 Can I create my own SSL key?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#79 FREE X.509 Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#65 PKI/Digital signature doesn't work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#16 Net banking, is it safe???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#7 Digital Signature Standards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#6 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#7 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#8 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#9 Smart card Authentification
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#33 X509 digital certificate for offline solution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#31 Is symmetric key distribution equivalent to symmetric key generation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#6 phishing web sites using self-signed certs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#37 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#35 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#8 Beginner's Pubkey Crypto Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#29 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#31 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#28 confidence in CA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#13 Multi-layered PKI implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#31 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#16 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#72 Value of SSL client certificates?

folklore indeed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: folklore indeed
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2008 10:33:43
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
also as referenced in previous posts ... the national retailers federation have raised the issue of changing the retention mandates.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#60 Retailers try to push data responsibilities back to banks

there is some conjecture that the financial institutions may resist becoming responsible for the transaction activity respository with lots of distributed access from their retailers and merchants ... since there would be a huge number of breach opportunities (represented by all those authorized accesses) and the financial institution then becomes liable (rather than the merchant for the breach).


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#5 folklore indeed

a couple recent item:

Issuers Line Up for TJX Settlements
http://www.epaynews.com/index.cgi?survey=&ref=browse&f=view&id=11992194668314718872&block=
TJX To Pay Banks Up To $41 Million After Data-Theft Breach
http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/djf500/200712201826DOWJONESDJONLINE001104_FORTUNE5.htm

...

as stated before, the "risk" isn't the actual breach, the "risk" is that the crooks can use the harvested information (regardless of how they obtained it; skimming, breaches, evesdropping, etc) for fraudulent transactions.

the x9a10 financial standard working group, in the mid-90s, having been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for all retail payments, did detailed end-to-end vulnerabiilty and threat assessment. the resulting x9.59 financial standard:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

didn't do anything about reducing skimming, breaches, evesdropping, etc. what x9.59 standard did was eliminate the usefullness of that information to the crooks for executing fraudulent transactions.

this somewhat is discussed in various postings in the *naked transaction metaphor* threads ... instead of requiring that all access to the information is totally eliminated ... eliminating the ability to use the information for fraud.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#payments

this is also the periodic observation that even if the planet were buried under miles of (information hiding) encryption, it still wouldn't be able to prevent the information leakage. part of this is the dual-use characterization/requirements placed on the information. from one standpoint, the information has to be readily available for numerous business processes (and by a large number of different people). from the other standpoint (since in the current paradigm, the information can be used by crooks for fraudulent transactions), the information has to be kept confidential and never divulged (to anybody). recent post mentioning burying the planet under miles of encryption and still not being able to prevent information leakage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#70 folklore indeed

we had been called in to consult with small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their servers. they also had this technology they invented, called SSL they wanted to use for the transactions. the result is now frequently called electronic commerce.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

even before getting involved with x9a10 financial standard working group, we realized that the information was extremely vulnerability and we proposed that everybody with any kind of access to transaction information, be required to at least have an FBI background check ... in part because it had been known for a long time, that the highest percentage of related fraud has involved insiders. recent post mentioning insider issue
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#74 folklore indeed

since FBI background check pretty much met all merchant employees ... it didn't get very far.

a few old posts mentioning the FBI background check requirement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#terror3 [FYI] Did Encryption Empower These Terrorists?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm21.htm#20 Some thoughts on high-assurance certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm21.htm#34 X.509 / PKI, PGP, and IBE Secure Email Technologies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#18 "doing the CA statement shuffle" and other dances
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#5 e-commerce security????
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#54 Does "Strong Security" Mean Anything?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005v.html#4 ABN Tape - Found
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#33 The new High Assurance SSL Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#28 Caller ID "spoofing"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#30 Caller ID "spoofing"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#8 Special characters in passwords was Re: RACF - Password rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#6 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007

For the History buff's an IBM 5150 pc

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: For the History buff's an IBM 5150 pc
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2008 16:16:14
barry.a.schwarz@BOEING.COM (Schwarz, Barry A) writes:
The Apple I went on sale in l976 so the author seems to have limited view of what a PC is.

5100 pc was announced sep75.
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/pc/pc_2.html

predating the 5150 pc in 1981.
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/pc/pc_1.html

from above:
One of the earliest IBM attempts to move computing into the hands of single users was the "SCAMP" project in 1973. This six-month development effort by the company's General Systems Division (GSD) produced a prototype device dubbed "Special Computer, APL Machine Portable" (SCAMP) that PC Magazine in 1983 called a "revolutionary concept" and "the world's first personal computer." To build the prototype in the short half-year allowed, its creators acquired off-the-shelf materials for major components. SCAMP could be used as a desktop calculator, an interactive APL programming device and as a "dispenser" of canned applications. The successful demonstration of the prototype in 1973 led to the launch of the IBM 5100 Portable Computer two years later.

... snip ...

of course, one could claim that work by science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

creating cp67 virtual machines in the mid-60s, enabled the deployment of CMS personal computing.

Information security breaches quadrupled in 2007

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Information security breaches quadrupled in 2007
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2008 16:41:24
so much for "Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007".

Information security breaches quadrupled in 2007
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/01/02/data_breaches_skyrocket/

recent posts mentioning that change in paradigm may be necessary:


http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#6 Death of antivirus software imminent
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#7 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle

using the metaphor that the current situation doesn't provide a easily/readily defensable position ... applying a Boyd perspective ... what would be necessary to choose/create defensible position.

other
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#0 2007: year in review

and of course past posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd

No Glory for the PDP-15

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: No Glory for the PDP-15
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers,alt.sys.pdp10
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2008 19:25:47
glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu> writes:
Supposedly when asked what they would have done differently to unix many years later, the answer was to write "creat" with an "e". More commands and functions might have had longer names, but the basic idea of a simple OS might still have occurred.

similar but different thread from crypto mailing list, virtual machine operating system as a simple/micro kernel ... also mentioning vax/vms vmm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#4 Death of antivirus software iminent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#6 Death of antivirus software iminent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#8 Death of antivirus software iminent

LINC-8 Front Panel Questions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LINC-8 Front Panel Questions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2008 20:33:39
John Byrns <byrnsj@sbcglobal.net> writes:
How do you know what will be considered "outdated" by future users?

i had done the original cmsback implementation ... misc. old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#cmsback

which then went thru a number of iterations as workstation datasave, adsm, and currently tsm
http://www-306.ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/storage-mgr/

misc. backup/archive postings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#backup

on the other hand ... never anticipated the problem recently mentioned here involving loosing large amounts of archived data some dating back to my undergraduate days in the 60s:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#29 Folklore references to CP67 at Lincoln Labs

hacked TOPS-10 monitors

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: hacked TOPS-10 monitors
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers,alt.sys.pdp10
Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2008 10:45:31
cstacy@news.dtpq.com (Christopher C. Stacy) writes:
I had always heard that most sites ran a hacked version of TOPS-10 ("nobody runs a vanilla monitor"). How true was that?

I also believe it was not uncommon for IBM sites to fiddle with the provided software.

My experience with either of those systems was linited to a few sites, though, so I may have a distorted impression.


it was especially true of cp67 and vm370 ... both shipped not only with source, but the maintenance was also done in source. slightly related recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#29 Folklore references to CP67 at Lincoln Labs

it was less true of the other systems ... since they didn't ship as source distribution ... although source listings were available.

this changed in the early 80s with the transition to OCO (object code only); recent posts mentioning OCO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#8 Open z/Architecture or Not
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#9 Open z architecture and Linux questions

in the middle of the OCO wars there was some analysis of (waterloo) "SHARE" library for vm370 ... that there was a many lines of source in the "SHARE" library ... as there was in the base product. ... recent post mentioning share (source) library:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#3 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?

part of the corporate transition to OCO was to provide "user exits" ... places where users could add calleable routines associated with specific functions.

in recent thread in crypto mailing lists ... there were comments about early systems not being built specifically for "security". recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#12 No Glory for the PDP-15

and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#4 Death of antivirus software iminent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#6 Death of antivirus software iminent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#8 Death of antivirus software iminent

however, the idea that a system that didn't provide security was sort of a foreign concept ... and therefor having to build a separate system specifically for security (because normal systems didn't provide security) was also a foreign concept.

besides the gov. and commercial institutions with high integrity requirements there were also commercial timesharing (cp67 & vm370 based) service bureaus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

and one of the things that they would do, was make cms "padded cell" modifications to limit the harm that users might do themselves (as opposed to underlying security that limited harm that they could do the system or each other).

one example of the level of security ... is some of these commercial timesharing service bureaus were providing services to competitive wall street firms (all on the same machine).

hacked TOPS-10 monitors

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: hacked TOPS-10 monitors
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers,alt.sys.pdp10
Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2008 18:59:14
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I'd say *everyone* had mods to HASP/JES2, which is why so much of it is still shipped as source. I think most people modified VM, though Lynne could speak to this better. OS/360, MVS, etc. tried to provide standard exit points. Most people customized one or more exits, though I don't know if you'd classify these as a system mod.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#14 hacked TOPS-10 monitors

I had also done significant amount of HASP mods. as undergraduate. One was deleting the RJE support (to recover some space) and replacing it with 2741 & tty terminal support and a editor that implemented CMS edit syntax (total different code since cms editor wasn't re-entrant ... and HASP code had to be re-entrant) ... for an early CRJE

later in the transition from HASP to JES2 (and move to gburg, i've mentioned before my wife did a stint in the gburg JES group after working on future system project) ... JES2 had some integration and distribution problems. The JES2 was doing much of their source management with the cp67/vm370 processes on CMS ... but then to ship, they had to convert to "MVS" process.

misc. past posts mentioning hasp, jes, nje, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#hasp

No Glory for the PDP-15

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: No Glory for the PDP-15
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2008 10:15:04
jmfbahciv writes:
Consider a personality trait where the person has to control all aspects of a thing. When writing OS code this type of personality will be annoyed, irritated, and dismissive of an interruption. So the code won't reflect true timesharing which is event-based. You would tend to see an OS that is task-based instead. An interruption would be put on list to be dealt with after the current task is 100% finished.

we've had this discussion in past threads ... in other threads i've characterized it as not being able to change coding styles when dealing with different types of operations ... device drviers tend to be very event driven ... but I've critized before purely event driven (device driver) coding styles in schedulers ... which can work much better if it is dealing more with statistical activity.

this is also related to a joke that i buried in my resource manager.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock

the litigation from commerical and gov. resulted in the 23jun69 unbundling announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

which started to charge for application software and other services. however, the case was made that kernel software was still free. cp67 and vm370 continued full source-based distribution and maintenance.

however, the distraction of the future system effort
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

and a period where products in the 370 pipeline started to dry up ... allowed clone processors to gain a foothold. i claim that then contributed to the decision to start charging for kernel software ... and the release of my resource manager was selected to be the guinea pig. however, even with starting to charge for all software ... there was still a period before the decision to go OCO (object code only) ... recent reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#14 hacked TOPS-10 monitors

a lot of resource manager was low level event oriented coding ... that permeated all thru the kernel (pathlength optimizatins, fault handling, elimination of conditiions to leading to zombies, kernel strucutre reorg anticipating multiprocessor support) ... however, the stated purpose for the resource manager was advanced dynamic adaptive capability.

one of the corporate revues came up with the state-of-the-art for all "modern" schedulers was low-level "tuning" knobs. this totally ignored all the code that monitored all the low-level operational characteristics and dynamically adapted to configuration and workload. So i had to add low-level "tuning" knobs to be considered "state-of-the-art".

documentation was provided describing exactly what the tuning knobs did as well as the "algorithms" behind what went on ... as well as all the code was available.

the joke? (which went undetected for decades?) was what operations research call "degrees of freedom" ... i.e. the dynamic adaptive code had more "degrees of freedom" than the tuning knobs. one of my characterizations was that the typical people dealing with low-level kernel code (in 360 assembler) didn't recognize something that was effectively dealing in time dimension.

misc past posts mentioning tuning knobs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/97.html#12 OSes commerical, history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#13 OS Workloads : Interactive etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#16 OS Workloads : Interactive etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#28 OS Workloads : Interactive etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#10 Multi-processor timing issue
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#58 History of performance counters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#21 IBM 3090/VM Humor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#56 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?

Usefulness of bidirectional read/write?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Usefulness of bidirectional read/write?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2008 19:22:54
"Rostyslaw J. Lewyckyj" <urjlew@bellsouth.net> writes:
IBM or SYNCSORT? Also although it was no rewind required, it wasn't read backwards! It was backspace a block and then read it forward in the normal direction. Probably : (a)backspace, (b)wait, (c)read block, (d) backspace two blocks, GOTO (b). That way the tape motion back was overlapped with processing. I.e. I don't believe there was physical backward reading into a buffer or such like.

as before, quick & dirty conversion of gcard ios3270 to html
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/gcard.html

and magnetic tape i/o command codes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/gcard.html#25

from above (dates to 360 2400 tape drives)


I/O Command Codes Magnetic-Tape

+-----------------------------------+------------------------------------+
|  Write                      01    |    Sense                       04  |
|  Write Tape Mark            0F    |    Request Track-in-Error      1B  |
|                                   |    Erase Gap                   17  |
|  Read Forward               02    |                                    |
|  Read Backward              0C    |    Mode Set 2 (9-track)            |
|                                   |         800  BPI               CB  |
|  Backspace Block            27    |         1600 BPI               C3  |
|  Backspace File             2F    |         6250 BPI (3420)        D3  |
|  Forward Space Block        37    |                                    |
|  Forward Space File         3F    |    Sense Reserve (3420)        F4  |
|                                   |    Sense Release (3420)        D4  |
|  Rewind                     07    |                                    |
|  Rewind Unload              0F    |    Loop Write-to-Read (3420)   8B  |
|                                   |    Set Diagnose (3420)         4B  |
|  Data Secrity Erase (3420)  97    |    Diagnostic Mode Set (3420)  0B  |
+-----------------------------------+------------------------------------+

... snip ...

both read forward and read backward ... also mentioned here:
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_2401.html

for even older ... IBM 7340 hypertape drive (circa 1961)
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_7340.html

from above:
Among the 7340's features were:

* Character rate -- As many as 340,000 decimal digits per second; 170,000 alphanumeric characters per second.

* Checking -- Error detection and correction, dual odd-parity checking. A new, highly reliable method of recording called "IBM Phase Encoding" was used.

* Reel Capacity -- In many applications, more than twice that of the IBM 729-IV reels (recorded at high density).

* Cartridges for Tape Reels -- Supply and take-up reels in a sealed cartridge; faster loading and unloading (no manual threading of tape), tape protected from contamination and operator damage, unload reel without rewinding at any point in the file.

* Read Backward -- No rewinding necessary between passes in Phase II of tape sorting, faster tape searching.

* Faster Access Times -- 4.2 milliseconds (average).

* File Protection -- Cartridge file protect device was under program control.


... snip ...

predates syncsort.

following:
http://www.softwarehistory.org/history/important_people.html

mentions Aso Tavitian co-founded Syncsort in 1969.

for a little topic drift, above, also mentions that Bob Weissman was president of National CSS (cp67, virtual machine commercial timesharing service bureau) when it was acquired by D&B ... subsequently became president of D&B. some posts mentioning virtual machine timesharing service bureau
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

my first programming job as undergraduate was doing a port of 1401 MPIO program to 360/30. The univ. had 709 for running most of its workload ... but used a 1401 for driving unit record equipment and transfers to/from tape (with tapes manually carried between 1401 and 709).

the 360/30 was brought in to replace 1401 as part of transition to replacing the 709 ... and the 360/30 could perfectly well run the MPIO in 1401 hardware emulatiion mode ... but the port supposedly was part of gaining 360 experience.

as part of the port to 360/30, i implemented multiple buffering ... using all real storage that was available ... being able to overlap transfer to/from tape with unit record i/o.

Remembering the Cray-1

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Remembering the Cray-1
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2008 20:58:29
Remembering the Cray-1
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/01/05/tob_cray1/

the above webpage (for tomorrow, 5 Jan 2008) also mentions:

Related stories

• Remembering the CDC 6600 (3 December 2007)
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/12/03/tob_cdc_6600/
• Remembering the IBM PC (17 November 2007)
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/11/17/tob_ibm_personal_computer/
• Remembering the Commodore PET 2001 (10 November 2007)
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/11/10/tob_commodore_pet_2001/


... on the other hand, this particular news organization has been listing multiple virtualization (the "new", 40+ yr old) URLs on nearly all of their webpages for some time.

Tap and faucet and spellcheckers [was: Re: What do YOU call

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tap and faucet and spellcheckers [was: Re: What do YOU call
Newsgroups: alt.usage.english,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2008 22:14:10
Lon Stowell <lon.stowell@comcast.net> writes:
I can remember a rule a long time ago, that field engineers should not, by themselves, ever perform a field wiring change where more than 8 successive items had to be modified, because the odds after that were almost even that they would make a mistake. This was in RCA Computer System customer service, where this may just have been a corruption of Amdahl's Law [which I heard much more about while employed at Pyramid than at Amdahl]

even worse, one of the 370 clones makers had forgetten(?) to keep detailed manufacturing records ... then it sort of hit the fan when they had a couple hundred machines in the field ... at dozens of different engineering levels ... creating a real maintenance nightmare.

old email reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#email800310
in this post:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#39 another blast from the past

old email has a little topic drift x-over with this recent post:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#17 Usefulness of bidirectional read/write?

the old email also has mention of inquiry by tso product executive asking me if i would consider implementing my resource manager in mvs ... slight topic drift x-over with this recent post:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#16 No Glory for the PDP-15

of course other comments (in the old email) about cms (personal & interactive computer) and tso (interactive? computing) being in different divisions and each division needing their "own" offering is quite contrived ... since earlier the "TSO" division had done its best to totally kill off the whole vm370 product ... transferring all the people to POK to assist in helping get out mvs/xa on schedule ... recent post with reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#96 source for VAX programmers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#100 source for VAX programmers

Tap and faucet and spellcheckers [was: Re: What do YOU call

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tap and faucet and spellcheckers [was: Re: What do YOU call
Newsgroups: alt.usage.english,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Jan 2008 00:49:34
Lon Stowell <lon.stowell@comcast.net> writes:
I can remember a rule a long time ago, that field engineers should not, by themselves, ever perform a field wiring change where more than 8 successive items had to be modified, because the odds after that were almost even that they would make a mistake. This was in RCA Computer System customer service, where this may just have been a corruption of Amdahl's Law [which I heard much more about while employed at Pyramid than at Amdahl]

something jogged my mind about pyramid ... there was a company that had been running some sort of online service on pyramid computers and then made a move to get into e-commerce business ("oneserver") .. they were half a block or so down the road from netscape ... part way between them and 101 on ellis. My impression they had some number of pyramid and oracle folks.

not having much success trying find something on the web of their connection to pyramid and/or the pre e-commerce business. did find a reference that one of their directors had been chairman and ceo of pyramid from 86 until 95 when it was acquired by siemens.

after doing the thing with the "small" client/server startup ... up the street from them ... for what is frequently now called e-commerce
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

... we then were asked in to spend some time with some number of the other companies in the area.

this is later reference ...
http://www.internetnews.com/ec-news/article.php/242421

one earlier reference:
Founded: 1987

Business description: ConnectInc.com private computer networks called the CONNECT online information services delivery systems and electronic commerce applications.


...

one of the issues is that the coming of the internet made the (private) value added networks (VANs) that were springing up in the 80s (some earlier), obsolete.

No Glory for the PDP-15

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: No Glory for the PDP-15
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Jan 2008 12:38:28
jmfbahciv writes:
There seem to be a lot of people who cannot consider time as a dimension. I've never understood this one. When I talk about bit flows and work flows, I'm using time as a primary dimension. Note that I see Boyd's theory is based on flowing water models.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#16 No Glory for the PDP-15

recent thread in financial crypto blog mentioning Boyd and (boyd's) OODA-loops
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#3 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#5 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#7 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#10 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle

lots of past posts mentioning boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd
and various URLs from around the web mentioning boyd and/or OODA-loops
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd2

z/OS and VM Control Blocks

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: z/OS and VM Control Blocks
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Jan 2008 16:28:25
lindy.mayfield@SSF.SAS.COM (Lindy Mayfield) writes:
It was only a question! (-: I certainly didn't mean to upset the status quo. ((--::

recent post from how i tried to handle it long ago and far away ... before OCO in a ipcs alternative that i had implemented in rex(x).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#46 folklore indeed

it was eventually in use by all internal locations and PSRs ... even tho there was a decision not to release it to customers.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

it sort-of started out as a demonstration of the functionality of the "new" rex ... the stated objective was in half-time over period of 3months, i would re-implement ipcs in rex(x) with ten times the function and it would run ten times faster (little slight of hand since the base ipcs was all implemented in assembler).

i had access to softcopy of all the base source files (including control block definitions) and documentation. however, nearly all this stuff had been created for hardcopy/printed output. the particular issue was how to come up with online appropriate information display including being able to tailor to problem being dealt with (very crude online context sensitive orientation).

Need Help filtering out sporge in comp.arch

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Need Help filtering out sporge in comp.arch
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Jan 2008 19:44:50
ArarghMail801NOSPAM writes:
And here I thought it stood for "Program Temporary Fix". :-)

IBM Program temporary fix
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Program_temporary_fix

from above:
Program temporary fix is the standard IBM locution to designate single bugfix or group of bugfixes distributed in a form ready to install for customers. Often cited tongue-in-cheek as Permanent Temporary Fix.

... snip ...

also reference here ...

Using the program temporary fix (PTF) functions
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/iseries/v5r2/ic2924/books/c415321212.htm

for other topic drift, recent post mentioning vm370 source update/maintenance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#6 Open z/Architecture or Not
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#8 Open z/Architecture or Not
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#14 hacked TOPS-10 monitors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#16 No Glory for the PDP-15

in vm370, each PTF was a separate source file "update" (one per source module needing update).

once a month, all accumlated PTFs and some set of lesser enhancements would be packaged ... with some amount of regression testing into a PLC (program level change) tape ... and distributed to customers.

there might be a major release about once a year ... where all accumulated source updates and other functional enhancements would be integrated with the base source module and distributed (on tape).

a "kernel" map consisted of listing of location of each module in fixed kernel memory ... as well as the base (assembler) source file along with date/time ... as well as naming of all individual source update files (along with date/time) that went into creating the final source that went into generating the executable image for that routine.

in the mid-80s, i was on business trip visiting the madrid science center ... they had a project scanning and digitizing a lot of old documents ... in preparation for 500 yr anniv. "discovery" of america. while there, i visited local movie house ... which included short film produced at the univ. one scene played major role with wall covered with possible 20 or so televisions ... all scrolling identical text (approx. 1200 baud?). it took me a short while to realize that it was continuously looping display of a vm370 kernel "map". What was worse, i realized I recognized the PLC of the kernel ... by which PTFs were and were not included.

misc. past posts mentioning visiting madrid science center:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#9 IBM S/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#14 Computer of the century
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#36 stupid user stories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#66 line length (was Re: Babble from "JD" <dyson@jdyson.com>)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#16 Movies with source code (was Re: Movies with DEC minis)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#35 Computers in Science Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#39 CMS update
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#40 IBM 7094 Emulator - An historic moment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#17 Google loves "e"

Tap and faucet and spellcheckers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
Newsgroups: alt.usage.english,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Jan 2008 09:47:22
Peter Moylan <peter@DIESPAMMERSDIEpmoylan.org> writes:
One bit of (relatively) new computer jargon that still annoys me is "stable". We used to call software stable if it no longer needed to be modified. The new name for that is "abandonware". If I don't release a new version of my own software at least once every few months - even if that release is not an improvement - I get requests to release it into the public domain on the grounds that I'm no longer "supporting" (a euphemism for "changing") it.

When people call a version of a program stable now, it means that it doesn't fall over very often. The definition in everyone's mind is probably something like (MTBF > 1 week).


in the 80s and early 90s personal computer software was constantly going thru new versions ... with new features. in the mid-90s, there was some study that (traditional office oriented) personal computer software had more features than most people used (only 10 percent of the features being used by 90+ percent of the people most of the time).

the issue then was what was going to happen to the software houses that became use to revenue streams from people constantly buying the latest/new release (somewhat like the old paradigm of people buying disposable, new cars every year).

"internet" showed up as the new "buzzword" about that time and allowed new set of "internet" oriented features to continually be advertised ... extended the ongoing revenue stream paradigm related to constant introduction of new features.

for other topic drift ... i was allowed to play disk engineer in bldg. 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

one of the things that was going on was that they had several "testcells" of new equipment being developed ... which had to be scheduled for stand-along testing with large mainframe (running custom, stand-alone software monitor).

they had tried bringing up MVS for supporting concurrent testing of multiple testcells ... however discovered that with just a single testcell, MVS's MTBF on the order of 15 minutes. so for the fun of it, i undertook to redo the i/o supervisor ... so the mainframes could be operating in a operating system environment with concurrent testing of numerous testcells going on (bullet proof environment that would never fail). the result was significant improvement in disk engineering productivity with testing of any testcell could occur at any time (w/o waiting for the dedicated time allocation).

one (corporate internal only) report mentioning all the work that had to be done ... and also mentioning the MVS 15 min MTBF issue ... resulted in taking a huge number of barbs and arrows from the MVS RAS group (not particularly about it not being true ... but who was I to be allowed to even refer to such a thing). one folklore was that all of the ill-will from the MVS RAS group tanked a corporate award for the work.

for even more drift ... a testcell was a heavy steel wire mesh cage with special combination padlock on each door. this was located inside a security controlled machine room, inside a security controlled building, inside a security controlled plant site.

one of the issues was somewhat related to a court case over theft of condifidential hardware documents by and employee and provided to a disk clone manufacturer. there was a claim that it represented several billion dollars i.e. the revenue difference to the clone company to be able ship a new disk the same day it was announced ... versus at least six month delay to come up with compatible disk via reverse engineering after obtaining one via normal sales mechanism.

the court supposedly made some reference effectively that there had to be security procedures proportional to the claimed value ... otherwise it could be treated as an "attractive nuisance" ... aka the swimming pool scenario requiring fence ... otherwise the owner can be held liable.

Tap and faucet and spellcheckers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
Newsgroups: alt.usage.english,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Jan 2008 16:06:49
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
one of the issues was somewhat related to a court case over theft of condifidential hardware documents by and employee and provided to a disk clone manufacturer. there was a claim that it represented several billion dollars i.e. the revenue difference to the clone company to be able ship a new disk the same day it was announced ... versus at least six month delay to come up with compatible disk via reverse engineering after obtaining one via normal sales mechanism.

the court supposedly made some reference effectively that there had to be security procedures proportional to the claimed value ... otherwise it could be treated as an "attractive nuisance" ... aka the swimming pool scenario requiring fence ... otherwise the owner can be held liable.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#25 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers

one of the interesting aspects of this was that the courts seemed to view, that given a chance, human nature is criminal ... and it is necessary not to offer the chance; that human nature would be to steal something worth billions of dollars unless there were sufficient countermeasures in place (just like kids would jump in swimming pool unless there was fence around it).

Tap and faucet and spellcheckers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
Newsgroups: alt.usage.english,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 09:31:00
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
one (corporate internal only) report mentioning all the work that had to be done ... and also mentioning the MVS 15 min MTBF issue ... resulted in taking a huge number of barbs and arrows from the MVS RAS group (not particularly about it not being true ... but who was I to be allowed to even refer to such a thing). one folklore was that all of the ill-will from the MVS RAS group tanked a corporate award for the work.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#25 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers

and old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801015
in this post from 1jan2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#2 The Elements of Programming Style

mentioning MVS RAS issues with new disks.

somewhat related posts with regard to results of having offended some group or another:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#48 time spent/day on a computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#75 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#83 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#94 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#0 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#4 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#5 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#9 IBM Unionization

As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 10:29:32
As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/04/business/04auto.html?ref=automobiles

from above:
Toyota beat Ford in 2007 in United States auto sales, putting it behind General Motors, industry statistics showed Thursday. Ford had held the No. 2 spot since 1931, according to the company's historian.

... snip ...

i think the different between Toyota vis-a-vis GM and the recent overtaking Ford ... is whether or not it is world-wide figures or just US.

recent postings related to auto imports and competitiveness:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#32 Toyota set to lift crown from GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#34 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#52 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#13 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#4 Horrid thought about Politics, President Bush, and Democrats

still didn't find article that mentions calling for 100% unearned profit tax ... but some related articles from the period:


http://multinationalmonitor.org/hyper/issues/1984/08/reagan.html
In 1980 the outlook was bleak for U.S. automobile manufacturers. They had had recent huge profit losses. Employment had fallen by 20 percent. The Chrysler Corporation had just narrowly escaped bankruptcy by a federal bailout. It was all bad news, but rather than look for causes within (such as quality control problems and lagging productivity), the industry blamed Japanese imports. It turned to the President it had supported in the 1980 election-who had run on a platform of free market and free trade-and demanded some type of restraint on imported autos.

In response, Reagan announced in 1981 that the U.S. had reached an agreement with Japan on a voluntary export restraint limiting Japanese automobile exports to the U.S. to 1.68 million cars a year.

The result has been a bonanza of auto profits and auto executive bonuses. Creating an artificial scarcity of Japanese autos has caused prices of both Japanese imports and U.S. manufactured autos to jump. A 1983 Wharton Econometrics study estimated that in 1981 and 1982, the prices of Japanese imports increased an average of $920 to $960 per car. And since 1981, the average price of a U.S. manufactured car has increased by over 40 percent-twice the rate of increase in the Consumer Price Index during the same period.

Profits in the U.S. auto industry soared from a loss of $3.8 billion in 1980 to a gain of $7.7 billion in 1983. Brookings Institute economist Robert Crandall estimates that "a substantial share of the explanation must be the price effects of import restraints." And auto industry executives have cashed in, too: Roger B. Smith, General Motors chairman, granted himself $1.5 million in cash and stock bonuses in 1983; Ford's chairman Phillip Caldwell took home $1.4 million.


...


http://www.heritage.org/Research/NationalSecurity/FYI48.cfm
From 1981 through 1983 the Japanese were allowed to ship 1.68 million cars annually to the U.S.; last year the ceiling was 1.85 million. By restricting the number of imported cars, Washington made it possible for the auto companies to raise prices without fear of losing business to less expensive competitors. Wharton Econometrics calculates that the average price per new car has risen by $2,600 since the market restrictions were imposed. Brookings Institution economist Robert Crandall estimates that $400 of this price hike per U.S.-made car was possible only because quotas reduced competition. With 1984 sales of nearly 8 million U.S. cars, the quotas took $3.2 billion out of the pockets of consumers and gave it to the auto industry. Crandall further estimates that the low supply of imported cars mandated by the quotas added $1,000 to the pricetag of every Japanese car sold in the U.S., a total of $1.85 billion in extra consumer costs. The total 1984 bill for U.S. consumers due to auto trade restraints: $5 billion. Some argue that quotas should be extended because the U.S. auto industry is still not economically sound. This is a strange argument.

...

pasts posts mentioning there was article raising issue of 100% unearned profit tax:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#41 Reason Japanese cars are assembled in the US (was Re: American bigotry)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#43 Reason Japanese cars are assembled in the US (was Re: American bigotry)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#43 Economic Factors on Automation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#52 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#22 Vintage computers are better than modern crap !
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#2 Internet today -- what's left for hobbiests
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#23 auto industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#14 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#17 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#20 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#49 The Pankian Metaphor (redux)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#33 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#72 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#88 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#11 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#24 IBM Unionization

Need Help filtering out sporge in comp.arch

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Need Help filtering out sporge in comp.arch
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 10:51:24
Charles Richmond <frizzle@tx.rr.com> writes:
Just like "throw away" programs. If you write a quick-and-dirty program that exceeds 100 lines, be *sure* to throw it away. Otherwise, someone in the company will find it two years later and demand that you help them resurrect it. (Alternative, you can just purge your name and contact information, so whoever finds the source code is on their own.)

some old email regarding early "csc/vm" system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102

past references to internal, highly modified "csc/vm" that had somehow leaked out to at&t longlines ... which they propagated to some number of machines and continued to run it for nearly a decade ... then at&t national marketing manager tracking me down to see if I could help get them off that system and on to a current system:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#14 characters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#35 Mainframes & Unix (and TPF)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/97.html#15 OSes commerical, history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#5 IBM XT/370 and AT/370 (was Re: Computer of the century)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#60 360 Architecture, Multics, ... was (Re: X86 ultimate CISC? No.)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#3 Oldest program you've written, and still in use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#4 Buffer overflow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#11 The demise of compaq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#11 OS Workloads : Interactive etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#32 IBM was: CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#66 OT (sort-of) - Does it take math skills to do data processing ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#23 Cost of computing in 1958?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#17 vax6k.openecs.org rebirth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#46 unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#4 1950s AT&T/IBM lack of collaboration?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#32 The attack of the killer mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#58 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#31 z/VM performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#21 IBM 3090/VM Humor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#54 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#56 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#6 Open z/Architecture or Not
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#15 folklore indeed

hacked TOPS-10 monitors

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: hacked TOPS-10 monitors
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers,comp.sys.unisys
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 11:40:29
"Dave Wade" <g8mqw@yahoo.com> writes:
It depends on what you mean by "fiddle with" and "Monitor". Almost all IBM sites had some user mods. Many of these would be just extra commands, Others might be to add support for non-standard hardware, others to tune the system. VM/370 was largley shipped as source so was frequently modified...

previous post mentioning customers "mods" ... in aggregate ... eventually were larger than the base system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#14 hacked TOPS-10 monitors

for a little more drift ... only slightly related to this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#17 Usefulness of bidreictional read/write

in this post referencing getting call about helping get at&t longlines off a highly modified, ancient csc/vm system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#29 Need Help filtering out sporge in comp.arch

one of the "local" longlines (additional) modifications was support for "networked" tape drives. they had extended the device virtualization for tape drives to work over network (between vm370 machines) ... so applications running on remote vm370 could request tape mounts and read/write tapes on vm370 systems at other sites.

1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 14:16:03
hancock4 writes:
Someone made a credit card purchase in a store, the cashier phoned in the verification by voice, reading the credit card info and transaction over the phone. I forgot about those days. In so many stores today the credit card verification is integrated in the cash register itself, others have a separate keypad unit. I haven't seen an oral transaction in many years.

i had one 20 yrs ago at a dentist ... wasn't especially expensive ... but the excuse was that the "network" was down.

some large merchants would aggregate the electronic transactions and have one (or very few) interfaces into some acquiring network. most common seen in lots of stores are machines that do 1-800 calls in real time into modem bank ... which interfaces into acquiring network.

apparently in this case, the acquiring network had been down for an hr or so ... and the dentist was being forced into doing "voice" auths. some number of these are actually automated VRU ... with information entered via phone keypad.

more recently, i mentioned a situation where stores weren't taking cards unless they had the old fashion physical "swipe" machines ... because local (telco) central office had some problem (which lasted a couple days) we were in the process of moving and having to eat out a lot ... and also make a lot of new purchases ... so we ran into in numerous times during the period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#84 Poll: oldest computer thing you still use

more topic drift regarding older problem with 1-800 incoming auth calls
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#25 LAX IT failure: leaps of faith don't work

for other topic drift ... the long-time old small squat swipe machines with (numerical) keypad on top ... are perported to be "repackaged" pc/xt in different form factor ... with flash for harddisk ... running ms/dos with 1200 baud modem ... at least as far as programming is concerned. old post mentioning xt/msdos for point-of-sale terminals:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#21 A POX on you, Dennis Ritchie!!!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#13 What do ATMS and card readers use?

for other topic drift ... misc. posts mentioning compromises of point-of-sale terminals for skimming transaction information with the purpose of using the (skimmed transaction) information for fraudulent transactions:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#44 Creativity and security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#45 Court rules email addresses are not signatures, and signs death warrant for Digital Signatures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#46 Court rules email addresses are not signatures, and signs death warrant for Digital Signatures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#2 News and Views - Mozo, Elliptics, eBay + fraud, naive use of TLS and/or tokens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#30 Petrol firm suspends chip-and-pin
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#32 Chip-and-Pin terminals were replaced by "repairworkers"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#34 Chip-and-Pin terminals were replaced by "repairworkers"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#16 Fraudwatch - Chip&PIN one-sided story, banks and deception and liability shifts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#32 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#41 Maximum RAM and ROM for smartcards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#40 New attacks on the financial PIN processing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#14 IBM ATM machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#5 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#6 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#13 special characters in passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#72 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?

and even more drift ... a couple news articles from the past couple days:

Citibank limits ATM cash withdrawals in NYC (atm fraud)
http://www.atmmarketplace.com/article.php?id=9544&na=1
UK Bank Faces Chip-and-PIN Fraud Lawsuit
http://www.epaynews.com/index.cgi?survey=&ref=browse&f=view&id=1199470277837043222&block=

1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 14:21:54
"Charlie Gibbs" <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
In any event, the only difference between BCD and EBCDIC keypunches was the characters printed on the keytops and generated by the print unit. The combination of rows punched by a key in any given position on the keyboard remained the same regardless of model. I made good use of this knowledge in shops with a mix of BCD and EBCDIC punches; you can touch-type the same code on any punch, which allowed me to bypass many lineups.

in fact, it was possible to "multi-punch" on the machines ... even purely (ebcdic) "hex" codes w/o any corresponding character or key (on any machine, 026, 029, etc). misc. past posts mentioning "patching" executable 12-2-9/TXT decks by combination of card reproduction and multi-punching the patch into the new card:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#17 unit record & other controllers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#4 1401 overlap instructions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#44 20th March 2000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#75 Florida is in a 30 year flashback!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#8 finding object decks with multiple entry points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#14 IBM Model Numbers (was: First video terminal?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#60 Text (was: Review of Steve McConnell's AFTER THE GOLD RUSH)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#26 HELP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#27 HELP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#27 Is anybody out there still writting BAL 370.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#28 Is anybody out there still writting BAL 370.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#45 Commenting style (was: Call for folklore)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#1 DISK PL/I Program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#63 OT (sort-of) - Does it take math skills to do data processing ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#17 Google loves "e"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#24 Systems software versus applications software definitions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#54 12-2-9 REP & 47F0
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#47 What is written on the keys of an ICL Hand Card Punch?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#1 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#17 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#43 Binder REP Cards (Was: What's the linkage editor really wants?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#58 REP cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#64 Large Computer Rescue
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#1 The System/360 Model 20 Wasn't As Bad As All That
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#11 Not Your Dad's Mainframe: Little Iron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#30 Why these original FORTRAN quirks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#51 IBM S/360 series operating systems history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#78 What happened to the Teletype Corporation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#44 64 gig memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#69 IBM System/3 & 3277-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#70 IBM System/3 & 3277-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#8 Anybody remember Keypunch cards?

JCL parms

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: JCL parms
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 14:38:35
shmuel+ibm-main@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
No. The original design of OS/360 was that all programs were subroutines. A program written to be called as a jobstep task could also be called via LINK or ATTACH from another program. It was never designed for programs to assume that they were jobstep tasks, although IBM may have written code[1] that assumed that.

some number of univ. developed their own student job "monitors" (predating availability of watfor).

we had 709 running fortran monitor for student jobs ... running tape-to-tape ... tapes were physical moved back and forth between 709 and 1401 ... with the 1401 handling front-end unit record processing. student job elapsed time was on the order of a second.

moving to 360/65 with os360 and hasp ... minium elapsed time for 3step (student) fortran compile, link-edit and go ... was on the order of 30seconds ... effectively all of it (constantly re)executing job scheduler.

various univ one-step job monitors attempted to "attach" compile, link-edit, and go, for student jobs (eliminating job scheduler overhead).

i had done some custom optimization with very careful reorganization of stage-II sysgen cards (stage-I output) ... in order to very carefully physically place files and PDS members on disk ... for optimal arm seek operation. this had improved 3step (effecitvely job scheduler) from 30seconds to about 13seconds (for typical student fortran job).

part of old presentation at fall68 SHARE meeting in Atlantic City discussing very careful os360 stage-2 sysgen optimization ... in addition to separate activity rewriting large amounts of cp67 virtual machine kernel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18 CP/67 & OS MFT14

of course when watfor became available ... it eclipsed a lot of the work on one-step job monitors.

1970s credit cards, was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 1970s credit cards, was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 15:25:12
danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> writes:
If the card was listed, or if the sale was over the limit, we made a call to a credit card authorization center, gave our merhcant id, and then the card number (and the sales amount) and were usually given an approval code. (Sometimes we were told to grab the card...).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#31 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

at some point, the industry decided that point-of-sale clerks shouldn't be involved in grabbing cards from people that might be crooks (having stolen the card).

this was even pushed further with EU suggestion that such electronic transactions should be a lot more anonymous (in line with EU-DPD). this implied that names and other identifying characteristics should be removed from the cards (i.e. point-of-sale clerks also no longer x-checking name from card against name on some form of gov. issued card, preferrably something with photo ... as countermeasure to lost/stolen card) ... recent reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#1

U.S. Identity Theft at Record Level in 2007

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: U.S. Identity Theft at Record Level in 2007
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 16:01:09
U.S. Identity Theft at Record Level in 2007
http://www.epaynews.com/index.cgi?survey=&ref=browse&f=view&id=1199651793837043222&block=

various other URLs from above page:

Issuers Line Up for TJX Settlements
http://www.epaynews.com/index.cgi?survey=&keywords=brazil&optional=&subject=&location=&ref=keyword&f=view&id=11992194668314718872&block= Phishing Now a Multi-Billion Dollar Menace
http://www.epaynews.com/index.cgi?survey=&keywords=brazil&optional=&subject=&location=&ref=keyword&f=view&id=1198141697837043222&block= TJX settles with banks over credit card data breach
http://www.finextra.com/fullstory.asp?id=17877
International Card Fraudsters Scam English Village
http://www.epaynews.com/index.cgi?survey=&ref=browse&f=view&id=1198229769837043222&block= Brazilian Visa Acquirer Automates PCI Compliance
http://www.epaynews.com/index.cgi?survey=&keywords=tjx&optional=&subject=&location=&ref=keyword&f=view&id=1197582601837043222&block= Record Online Holiday Sales = Record Web Fraud
http://www.epaynews.com/index.cgi?survey=&keywords=tjx&optional=&subject=&location=&ref=keyword&f=view&id=1197582137837043222&block= TJX offers $40.9m in Visa Settlement
http://www.epaynews.com/index.cgi?survey=&keywords=tjx&optional=&subject=&location=&ref=keyword&f=view&id=1197028845837043222&block=

including:

The World of Identity Theft Continues to Evolve ITRC reports on the identity theft trends of 2007 with 2008 predictions
http://www.idtheftcenter.org/artman2/publish/m_press/2007_Trends_and_Predictions.shtml

... from above:
Last year, ITRC predicted the following trends for 2007:

• There will be an increase in check fraud, check synthesizing, and check counterfeiting.

• Phishing will continue to grow as a problem.

• Child, family, and domestic identity theft victims will be acknowledged by law enforcement and companies.

• There will still be a lack of sensitivity and responsiveness toward victims by some law enforcement agencies, companies, and government agencies.

• We will see more communication between various law enforcement entities in multi-jurisdictional cases including the creation of regional taskforces.


... snip ...

1970s credit cards, was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 1970s credit cards, was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2008 18:06:25
rpl <plinnane3@yahoo.com.invalid> writes:
well, apart from using abusing a gov. card like that, several companies require their clerks to jot down the ID serial (which, however innocent a purpose, is also ID-theft)

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#31 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#32 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#34 1970s credit cards, was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

one of the sources that upwards of 70percent of id-theft involve "insiders"

... misc. recent references:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#31 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#52 more on firing your MBA-less CSO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#53 Doom and Gloom spreads, security revisionism suggests "H6.5: Be an adept!"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#60 Retailers try to push data responsibilities back to banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#75 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#28 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#65 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#35 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#85 PCI Compliance - Encryption of all non-console administrative access
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#94 PCI Compliance - Encryption of all non-console administrative access
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#0 The Unexpected Fact about the First Computer Programmer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#11 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#72 Value of SSL client certificates?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#27 Default Search Engines are dangerous, Especially Google <- Domain Name Stealers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#20 UK Retail Giant Breached by Insider
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#74 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#94 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#4 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#5 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#9 folklore indeed

1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2008 05:26:22
Louis Krupp <lkrupp@pssw.nospam.com.invalid> writes:
I wrote a system for one of those about twelve years ago. It ran on a VMS system with a serial line and a modem. A server process accepted a credit card transaction from a program with a GUI, queued the transaction if there was an authorization in progress, or called the authorization number if there wasn't and then initiated the transaction. Results were routed back to the client COBOL program. I had a program that would show active transactions and maybe even display waiting times.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#31 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#32 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#34 1970s credit cards, was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#36 1970s credit cards, was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

we were called into consult with small client/server startup that wanted to do financial transactions on their server. they had this technology they had invented called SSL they wanted to use as part of this service ... which is now frequently referred to as electronic commerce ... some related posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

one of the acquiring networking protocols used extensively by T&E industry, hotels, casinos, etc ... for such aggregation, ran over x.25 ... was selected for the initial implementation. there were two varieties ... one was an internet "mall" operation ... where the paradigm was the physical mall with lots of different retail outlets sharing common services ... including the acquiring network interface. the other implementation was a payment gateway ... with authorized webservers interfacing over the internet via this new invention, ssl.

i've mentioned recently that for the internet gateway based operation, the diagnostic and service level operations (including active monitor) that had extended out from the acquiring network to the (assumed) x.25 endpoint ...now had to figure out how to propagated thru the internet. we had to develop and document some amount of compensating procedures that were implicit in circuit-based infrastructure for the wild anarchy of the internet.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#30 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#32 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#43 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#3 21st Century ISA goals?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#78 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#52 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#54 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#10 The top 10 dead (or dying) computer skills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#41 Windows: Monitor or CUSP?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#77 PSI MIPS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#85 PCI Compliance - Encryption of all non-console administrative access
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#94 PCI Compliance - Encryption of all non-console administrative access
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#23 Outsourcing loosing steam?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#25 LAX IT failure: leaps of faith don't work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#34 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#54 Industry Standard Time To Analyze A Line Of Code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#53 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#64 folklore indeed

JCL parms

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: JCL parms
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2008 05:48:56
hancock4 writes:
Also frustrating to us commuters was that the data center gave discounts for jobs run in evenings and weekends (just like long distance phone calls used to get). We commuters had no choice but to run on prime shift while resident students ran jobs during cheaper time and thus got more runs out of their budget.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#33 JCL parms

when i was undergraduate, they turned over responsibility for a lot of the stuff to me. they nominally would shutdown the computing center at 8am sat. morning and resume operations at 8am monday morning. i would be allowed to have the run of the place for 48hrs shift ... but then making it to monday classes (after having been awake for 48hrs) was a little trying.

competitiveness

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: competitiveness
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2008 13:03:08
there was tv factoid the past couple days claiming that for the first time in living history that the avg. standard of living in great britain is higher than the avg. standard of living in the states.

UK standard of living rises above that in America for the first time in a century
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=506442&in_page_id=1770

for other topic drift ... standard of living related posts starting with some posts referencing significant economic cost of illegal aliens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#18 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#70 illegal aliens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#79 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#81 illegal aliens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#22 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#61 Horrid thought about Politics, President Bush, and Democrats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#46 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers

above includes references to gao studies that illegal aliens typically provide economic value (only) a little over half their cost to society (i.e. society has to spend much more on illegal aliens than their direct economic contribution).

so another way of viewing this is with respect to studies of economic policies in Scandinavian countries after ww2 (this was from a series of articles from the boston globe in the early 70s with respect to declining shoe & clothing industry in new england). supposedly the countries set a standard of living target and looked at economic contribution of different kinds of work/jobs. industries where jobs provided economic value less than the target standard of living, were to be eliminated ... and those with jobs that provided economic value higher than standard were to be encouraged. the exception were industries that were deemed "strategic" ... and it may be necessary to subsidize those jobs (paying them more than what their work is worth).

so in the case of illegal aliens, the subsidy might be considered to be to the institutions that employ the illegal aliens. these industries may provide marginal salaries to the illegal aliens ... pocketing the difference between their salaries and the what the institutions receive for the work ... and general society is required to provide the additional benefits to the workers.

difference from the scandinavian scenario is that there has been no national policy decision regarding whether these particular industries are deserving the effective subsidy (i.e. general society underwriting the significant cost of benefits to their workers).

past posts referencing scandanavian economic policy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#28 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#52 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#4 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#8 The Pankian Metaphor

now from slightly different perspective ... there were a number of gov. reports in the 90s (based on 1990 census) ... half the workers in the manufacturing sector were "subsidized" ... aka they were receiving benefits (salary, medical, retirement, etc) that amounted to more than the economic contribution of their work. minor x-over topic drift in this recent post mentioning some suggestion about one hundred percent unearned profit tax:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#28 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

recent post mentioning inadequatly funded retirement benefits ... i.e. not fully funded retirement fund ... forcing the gov. to assume the responsibility
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#38 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#26 2007 Year in Review on Mainframes - Interesting

another report (based on 1990 census) was about half the 18yr olds were functionally illiterate, recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#7 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#24 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#79 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#31 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#51 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#80 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#85 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#10 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#30 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#34 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#42 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#68 Poll: oldest computer thing you still use
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#21 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#22 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#29 folklore indeed

other posts mentions competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#6 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#7 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#34 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#35 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#52 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#68 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#42 Experts: Education key to U.S. competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#13 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#10 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#22 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#20 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#15 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#18 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#22 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#23 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#32 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#2 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#15 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#18 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#17 T3 Sues IBM To Break its Mainframe Monopoly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#20 Education ranking

No Gory for the *NIX

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: No Gory for the *NIX
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers,alt.sys.pdp10
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2008 18:36:27
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
This was trivial with IBM 3330s also: 1) vary offline, 2) move pack, 3) change address plug, 4) vary online.

as well as 2314, there have been stories about operators using the process with a damaged pack and propagating (drive) head damage thru several drives.
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3330.html

multiple channel interfaces allowed for attaching disk controllers to multiple different channels/systems.

recent post mentioning one such problem in bldg. 28 between an mvs/168 system and vm/158 system.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#4 IBM mainframe history, was Floating-point myths

IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2008 22:59:09
how could i resist ... more 40+ yr old new technology

IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization; X86 virtualization lacks maturity of mainframe virtualization, analyst firm says.
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2008/011408-silentbanker-trojan.html

from above: IT managers well-versed in mainframe virtualization might expect smooth sailing when implementing virtualization tools for x86-based servers. But they're quickly finding unexpected challenges because x86 virtualization is nowhere near as mature as the mainframe virtualization tools that evolved over the past four decades, says a Saugatuck Technology analyst who is researching virtualization.

... snip ...

other refences in the above:

The Many Faces of Virtualization: Understanding a New IT Reality
http://www.saugatech.com/420order.htm

Virtual-machine evolution
http://www.networkworld.com/reviews/2007/091707-virtual-management-test-history.html

Server virtualization in two-thirds of enterprises by '09, Forrester predicts
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2007/120607-can-mid-market-merchants-comply-with.html

... and recent reference to long ago and far away, at&t longlines adding (networked) virtual tape drives to highly modified (vm370) csc/vm (that had leaked out)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#29 Need Help filtering out sporge in comp.arch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#30 hacked TOPS-10 monitors

Inaccurate CPU% reported by RMF and TMON

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Inaccurate CPU% reported by RMF and TMON
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 08:26:34
jasonto888@BORJAPHOTO.COM (Jason To) writes:
We have encountered some weird problem last week and discovered that the total MVS CPU busy percentage reported by both RMF and TMON were inaccurate. RMF and TMON reported MVS CPU percentage does not match with the total CPU% usage by the jobs running in the system at least in one LPAR, the other LPAR seems to be fine. For example the reported total CPU% was 72% at an interval period but only 40% when we add up all the CPU% of jobs, a disparity of 30%. From the WLM activity report, by comparing it with the total APPL% used divided by the total assigned CPs also produced result of 40+%. Hence, the MVS CPU percentage should have been 40+%. Anyone out there have encountered this problem before? Any reported fix to resolve this problem? Btw, we are still at z/OS v1.4, running in the sysplex.

can you say "capture" ratio?

some past posts mentioning effect:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#16 CPU time and system load
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#19 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#82 IBM to the PCM market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#23 SMF Under VM

really strange the first time you hear it ... aka the elapsed minus measured wait is much larger than the individually measured cpu useages (especially having vm background where it actually does capture nearly every cycle).

the referenced "SMF Under VM" post includes some number of corporate MVS URLs that go into much more detail.

old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email800717

discussing moving workload from 168 to 4341s w/o taking into account capture ratio.

dig. TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: dig. TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 08:45:17
jmfbahciv writes:
Do the HD TV signals get through storms like radio does? My physics is so rusty I think I've forgotten where to look.

HD is digital and has a lot of error correcting (FEC) ... similar to recent thread/post about cdrom (vis-a-vis analog records):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#82 folklore indeed

in the mid-80s, saw some side-by-side demos of analog tv vis-a-vis digital (w/fec) as the signal quality degraded ... which showed analog picture half snow before started seeing digital "drop-out" blips (somewhat similar to dvd that has been scratched ... again, FEC technology used in audio cdroms).

a couple old posts mentioning HDTV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#11 Is Al Gore The Father of the Internet?^
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#2 FCC rulemakings on HDTV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#23 OT - Internet Explorer V6.0

this post has long-winded sep90 discussion from one of the study groups:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#73 how old are you guys

the "joke" i heard about the current legislation was that as part of "balanced" budget activities in the 90s ... there was still a gap ... and to close it ... it was suggested that they could auction off frequencies that would come available with transition from analog to digital TV (of course the predictions back then about the bidding were astronomical).

Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 08:56:43
Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.stsc.hill.af.mil/CrossTalk/2008/01/0801DewarSchonberg.html

from above:
It is all about programming! Over the last few years we have noticed worrisome trends in CS education. The following represents a summary of those trends:

1. Mathematics requirements in CS programs are shrinking.

2. The development of programming skills in several languages is giving way to cookbook approaches using large libraries and special-purpose packages.

3. The resulting set of skills is insufficient for today's software industry (in particular for safety and security purposes) and, unfortunately, matches well what the outsourcing industry can offer. We are training easily replaceable professionals.


... snip ...

No Glory for the PDP-15

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: No Glory for the PDP-15
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 09:48:21
jmfbahciv writes:
The problem was the incoming IBM-trained people who did not think nor work without permission from the higher up. They had no concept of listening to equals nor lower-downs. The information flows (coffee maker talk) never travelled outside the group; to allow knowledge flow out was to lose power. This was all a result of removing the flat reporting mechanims of projects. If I needed to ask KO a question, I would go ask him. If I needed to know something that the forklift operator knew, I would ask him. I didn't need all the managers' signatures up my personnel line of reporting down to the forklift operator's line of reporting to get a yes/no answer to my question.

they weren't the only ones ... slight Boyd topic drift in this recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#10 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle

as referenced in above ... the heritage of rigid command and control was behind his Organic Design For Command and Control briefing.

it also contributed to all the arrows and barbs i got if i happened to wander into somebody else's "turf"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#25 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#27 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers

Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 10:40:14
Roland Hutchinson <my.spamtrap@verizon.net> writes:
I'm really an outsider to the field, so undoubtedly my reactions should bear less weight than others around here, but I do have some observations:

1. The authors are spot on in their observations, except for three things:

- The swing towards Java as an introductory language started long before the dot-com bust. It therefore can't have been caused by it. (I'd buy the hypothesis that it was caused by the boom before the bust.)


part of java was being object oriented and portable ... predating the browser/internet requirement. other attributes could be considered eliminating a lot of the storage management (ala lisp and apl) ... especially the enormous problems inherit in C language environments ... misc. posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#overflow

both apple (pink) and sun (spring) had object-oriented operating systems efforts ... and both floundered.

pink sort of morphed into taligent as an application environment and we were brought in to look at it for various reasons.

about the same time, we were also asked if we would consider heading up an effort to turn spring out as a product. i have some of the spring hardcopy information ... but the online softcopy seemed to have gone 404 ... although some of the references may still be in the wayback machine.

spring had an implementation very much like java ... a small footprint environment that allowed efficient transfers of executable images. there have been some past threads about whether java actually grew out of the spring effort ... or was completely independent of the spring effort, aka in the following, see abstract from spring "client-side stub interpreter"):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#51 A Speculative question

completely other topic drift ... one of the two people at the los gatos VLSI lab responsible for the pascal language implemenation ... left and went on to become mips software development vp ... and after sgi acquired mips ... became general manager of the sun unit responsible for java.

misc. past posts mentioning pink, taligent, spring:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#10 Taligent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#46 Where are they now : Taligent and Pink
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#48 Where are they now : Taligent and Pink
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#6 Java as a first programming language for cs students
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#32 Whom Do Programmers Admire Now???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#36 Proper ISA lifespan?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#93 Buffer overflow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#24 Buffer overflow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#60 Unisys A11 worth keeping?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#76 Difference between Unix and Linux?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#60 The next big things that weren't
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#45 IBM says AMD dead in 5yrs ... -- Microsoft Monopoly vs. IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#28 A Speculative question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#62 IBM says AMD dead in 5yrs ... -- Microsoft Monopoly vs. IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#15 A Dark Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#53 defination of terms: "Application Server" vs. "Transaction Server"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#49 "Perfect" or "Provable" security both crypto and non-crypto?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#64 Systems software versus applications software definitions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#40 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#38 Where should the type information be: in tags and descriptors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#42 Development as Configuration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#37 Von Neumann machines. The key to space and much else
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#20 The System/360 Model 20 Wasn't As Bad As All That
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#51 The Fate of VM - was: Re: Baby MVS???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#69 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#1 The top 10 dead (or dying) computer skills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#36 Future of System/360 architecture?

dig. TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: dig. TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 10:53:44
Roland Hutchinson <my.spamtrap@verizon.net> writes:
Nitpick: the current implementations of HDTV are digital, but it started out with analog systems.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#43 dig. TV

the demo i saw in the mid-80s was digital with fec ... and highlighted both the picture quality as signal degraded and also much smaller frequency footprint. the demo was simulated standard tv broadcast that could control signal quality reception (and also was part of the smaller frequency footprint). however, the motivation seemed to be oriented towards cable and satellite TV systems with encoded signal needing settop box to decode and view particular channels/programs (supporting pay-for-view and monthly subscription fees).

the hdtv format "wars" that went on in commerce dept meetings in the early 90s ... were about which country would win ... since the hdtv manufacturing volumes for digital chips was going to be so large, it would easily swamp everything else (including personal computer volumes at the time) ... and the "winner" would easily take-over the (whole) electronics industry.

there was some discussion of analog/digital issues in the part of a study group report mentioned in the previous post ... reference here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#73 how old are you guys

As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 11:12:44
greymaus <greymausg@mail.com> writes:
How does the greater number of Japanese cars beeing built in the U.S. affect these figures?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#28 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

recently there has been several news stories about Toyota automobiles having quality control problems and falling from number one in some quality rankings.

IBM LCS

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM LCS
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 11:45:35
PA7280@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU (Ben Alford) writes:
I worked with an IBM 360/65 that had one MB of IBM LCS and later 2 MB of LCS from some other OEM when I was a student. This 360/65 had 3 frames of main storage, each with 256 KB of storage. The way I remember it, we could ask for more LCS than main, but it was much slower. You could specify that data in COMMON as well as data buffers reside in the LCS under OS MVT. The LCS slowdown was noticable because the CPU had to wait longer for all data coming in/out of LCS and, of course, the CPU time was still ticking. I don't know if it slowed down channel access much.

i believe had cornell had 360/75 with 8mbytes of ampex lcs.

standard 360/75 (and 360/65) storage was 750 nsec for 8byte interleaved access (some claim that 360/75 was a "hardwired" 360/65 to get extra thruput).

some installations setup LCS as extension of (executable) main memory ... that just ran slower. other installations used it for "emulated" electronic disks ... with emulated data transfers; this could be things like "hasp" buffer records and/or executable images.

i believe the ampex lcs had 8msec access (better than 10 times slower).

if you look in 360/65, 360/67, and 360/75 functional characteristic instruction timings ... one of the things will be a prorated part of 750 nsecs for (the 8byte) instruction fetch i.e. 2byte instructions will include 1/4th of 750nsecs for instruction fetch, 4byte instructions will include 1/2th of 750nsecs for instruction fetch, and 6byte instructions will include 3/4th of 750nsecs for instruction fetch.

this can be somewhat inaccurate for branch operations ... a double-word aligned (2byte) BR instruction ... will incur the full 750nsecs instruction fetch ... since the rest of the double word won't be used for any other instruction operations.

LCS was both an issue of slower electronic memory as well as longer physical signal latency.

by comparison 3090 expanded storage was the same electronic memory but physical packaging resulted in longer signal latency. as a result, it was purely packaged as sort of emulated i/o transfer ... but with a much wider bus (so the latency was amortized over much larger amount of data) and synchronized transfer instructions ... to eliminate the significant pathlength overhead in MVS for asynchronous i/o operations.

later physical packaging (and improved caching infrastructure) eliminated the need for expanded storage ... however, emulated expanded storage (as part of LPAR configuration) lingered on, compensating for other system issues.

IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 22:27:32
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Instead, though, I *would* see Intel intentionally limiting the hardware virtualization capabilities, so that virtual machines wouldn't be 100% indistinguishable, to prevent them used for various forms of hacking and software piracy. After all, it needs to protect its core business.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#41 IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization

one might wonder whether or not this has been affected by having alternative chips offering virtualization capabilities.

another recent item with respect to budgets:

Through to 2010, Server Virtualization Will Have the Single Largest Impact on Budgets
http://www.rti.org/page.cfm?nav=443

from above:
Attracted by dazzling promises of dramatic reductions in the complexity and costs of infrastructures, user IT executives have made virtualization the hottest topic in many years

... snip ...

and this post, somewhat along the same lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#0 Marines look for a few less servers, via virtualization

the following threads have strayed quite a bit more into pros & cons of being able to ... or not being able to ... recognize running in virtual environment (i.e. virtualization can be used as countermeasures to compromises ... as well as the crooks possibly using virtualization to disquise compromises):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#2 Death of antivirus software imminent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#3 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#4 Death of antivirus software imminent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#6 Death of antivirus software imminent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#7 Why Security Modelling doesn't work -- the OODA-loop of today's battle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#8 Death of antivirus software imminent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#9 Death of antivirus software imminent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#11 Death of antivirus software imminent

note that mainframe virtualization also evolved into LPARs ... basically a virtualization subset built into the hardware of the machine ... reference in recent threads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#0 IBM mainframe history, was Floating-point myths

IBM LCS

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM LCS
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2008 23:07:25
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
i believe had cornell had 360/75 with 8mbytes of ampex lcs.

standard 360/75 (and 360/65) storage was 750 nsec for 8byte interleaved access (some claim that 360/75 was a "hardwired" 360/65 to get extra thruput).


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#49 IBM LCS

this reference has cornell with 360/65 (not 360/75) with 1mbyte of IBM LCS and then got 2mbytes of Ampex ECM
http://www.cit.cornell.edu/computer/history/Newman.html

When i was undergraudate, I had made quick stop by cornell to talk to worley(?) about hasp (part of east coast trip to attend share) ... recent reference mentioning the trip
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#79 IBM 360 Model 20 Questions

this google book reference says ampex had read/write cycle under 3msecs:
http://books.google.com/books?id=MFGj_PT_clIC&pg=PA201&lpg=PA201&dq=ampex+lcs+ibm+memory&source=web&ots=ZEmo1aj1cO&sig=2ZC1KCUBgSm-Dnfx61fKOK-UaKk

and for x-over from this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#33 JCL parms

from the cornell computer history article:
One of the things we didn't have, never really had well in the CLASP system and didn't initially have at all well in the Cornell HASP system, was the fast batch turnaround for WATFOR jobs and by then PL/C jobs. One of the programmers there, Walt Haas, had a brainstorm and thought we could just modify reader service and essentially execute these jobs as a subtask of the card reader process. So we would never get in to heavy duty job scheduling for these jobs, they would be executed in the reader process and passed right to the printer queue. In a sense we re-invented the "on-the-fly design" except we had a more modern operating system, a multi-threaded operating system, that made that work out. We called it Instant Turnaround, IT, and it was a mainstay of student computing for quite a while after that. Those were the years when you could go down to the basement of Upson Hall in the middle of winter and put yourself into the middle of a couple of hundred students all with steaming wool overcoats. Computing was just a vile experience for students in those days I would have to say.

... snip ...

Education ranking

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Education ranking
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2008 08:27:51
jmfbahciv writes:
Huh? You don't send police armed with the Miranda to capture Al Queda. Sheesh! You have a serious cognitive dysfunction.

there was some article about criminal justice system wasn't designed to handle al queda type events ... at something like $5m/trial ... and even with only 3000-5000 individuals ... it would amount to $15b-$25b ... sort of full employment windfall for the legal profession.

Really stupid question about z/OS HTTP server

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Really stupid question about z/OS HTTP server
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2008 10:16:53
John.Mckown@HEALTHMARKETS.COM (McKown, John) writes:
But on the off chance that I'm wrong, I will ask anyway. We use Windows as our desktop OS <blech>. One "nice" thing about it is that when we go to a restricted internal IIS web site, we are automagically "logged on" to the web site via the Active Directory "trust" mechanism (as I vaguely understand it). Is there any way to extend this so that when a user goes to our z/OS HTTP web server, they can be automagically logged on to their corresponding z/OS RACF id? We do use RACF on z/OS. We don't have any money for this, so a product (unless it is 100% free-as-in-beer and 100% supported) is out of the question. Yes, this is really a whine from the Windows people again about how "unfriendly" z/OS is. I wonder if they whine about our Linux and Solaris servers as well?

can you say kerberos? ...

some windows references:
http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/library/b748fb3f-dbf0-4b01-9b22-be14a8b4ae101033.mspx
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/technologies/security/kerberos/default.mspx

some ibm references
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246540.html?Open
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/dzichelp/v2r2/topic/com.ibm.db29.doc.admin/db2z_establishkerberosthruracf.htm
http://www-03.ibm.com/servers/eserver/zseries/zos/racf/pdf/share_03_2001_racf_kerberos_windows.pdf
http://www-03.ibm.com/servers/eserver/zseries/zos/racf/kmigrate.html

and then there is stuff like:

IBM CICS RACF Security and Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Security
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb463146.aspx

kerberos was originally developed a MIT's Project Athena ...and then became internet standard (GSS) ... and has been adopted by quite a few infrastructures for authentication interoperability

... from my rfc index
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm

select Term (term->RFC#) in the RFCs listed by section, and then select "GSS" in "Acryonym fastpath" ... i.e.
generic security service (GSS)
see also network services , security
5021 4768 4757 4752 4559 4557 4556 4537 4462 4430 4402 4401 4178 4121 4120 3962 3961 3645 3244 3129 2942 2853 2744 2743 2712 2623 2479 2478 2203 2078 2025 1964 1961 1510 1509 1508 1411


...

selecting RFC number brings up the corresponding summary in the lower frame ... i.e.
5021 PS
Extended Kerberos Version 5 Key Distribution Center (KDC) Exchanges over TCP, Josefsson S., 2007/08/17 (7pp) (.txt=13431) (Updates 4120) (Refs 4120) (was draft-ietf-krb-wg-tcp-expansion-02.txt)


...

and selecting the ".txt=nnn" field (in rfc summary) retrieves the actual RFC.

misc. past posts mentioning kerberos and/or pk-init
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#kerberos

Really stupid question about z/OS HTTP server

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Really stupid question about z/OS HTTP server
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2008 10:41:05
jchase@USSCO.COM (Chase, John) writes:
I *think* you could do that using digital certificates, but I've only read that part of the RACF doc once and have not tried it (yet).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#53 Really stupid question about z/OS HTTP server

base infrastructure for all of this has been Kerberos. It was originally developed at MIT's project athena ... which as equally funded by DEC and IBM ... and so we got to go by project athena for periodic project revues.

originally kerberos was purely password (aka shared-secret) authentication. however, passwords can be evesdropped and reused ... being shared-secret, the same value is used for both originating authentication and validating authentication ... which leads to lots of vulnerabilities and operational problems (including what happens when humans have to deal with scores or hundreds of unique passwords)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#secrets

public keys and digital signatures were originally proposed as addressing some of the short-comings of shared-secret infrastructures. first, there is different value for generating authentication information and validating authentication. this can address enormously growing problems with having to manage large number of unique passwords (security 101 typically requires unique passwords for unique security domains as countermeasure to cross-domain attacks ... which is no longer necessary in public key environment).

the original draft of pk-init for kerberos ... simply used public keys and digital signatures ... in lieu of passwords for authentication.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#kerberos

in a purely certificate-less environment:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#certless

However, a variety of public key operation has evolved with include something called digital certificates ... and digital certificate mode of operation was eventually also added to the kerberos pk-init draft.

digital certificates were developed to address the scenario involving first time interaction between complete strangers (aka the letters of credit/introduction from the sailing ship days ... when the relying party had no other means of obtaining information in first time interaction with complete strangers). The purpose of the digital certificates is to carry "certified" information regarding total strangers that can't be obtained any other way.

the issue in all the major institutional authentication scenarios is that digital certificates are redundant and superfluous ... especially in employer/employee scenario ... since it is rarely the case that an employer is dealing with an employee as a total stranger. in a real digital certificate scenario use for (kerberos) authentication, a total stranger ... that is not otherwise known and/or for which there is absolutely no prior information ... is allowed authorized access to the system ... aka nominally the purpose of the digital certificate paradigm is to carry the information about what the person is allowed to do ... and there is no requirement to have any predefined (system) information regarding the individual (and/or what they are allowed or not allowed to do)

Education ranking

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Education ranking
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2008 12:20:19
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
We managed to put the NSDAP leadership on trial as the criminals they were. They would put Al Qaida to shame any day. 9/11 was equal to less than 2 hours in Auschwitz. The entire US loss in Afghanistan and Iraq is equal to 3 hours. Hey, even Vietnam was less than 3 days worth of Auschwitz killings.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#52 Education ranking

slightly related topic drift:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#90 IBM Unionization

and then there was events in china.

Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2008 17:54:49
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#44 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#46 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

some other comments ...

Professors Slam Java As "Damaging" To Students
http://developers.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/01/08/0348239
Java panned, defended
http://weblog.infoworld.com/techwatch/archives/015423.html

from above:
Two professors emeritus at New York University, who also happen to be executives at AdaCore, which specializes in the Ada programming language, criticize Java in an article entitled "Computer Science Education: Where Are The Software Engineers of Tomorrow?" in CrossTalk - The Journal of Defense Engineering, this month.

... snip ...

Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2008 18:45:51
hancock4 writes:
The information processing industry found itself with a surplus of talent in some specialties after the Y2k effort was completed. For the first time in 50 years, IS people had serious trouble finding a job, many left the industry for good. In addition, many companies no longer had their own people, but outsourced or subcontracted the work to roaming laborers who moved from town to town or even came from overseas. All this makes it difficult for a kid just starting out to figure what he wants and should do.

...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#44 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#46 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#56 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Offshore Considerations for Infrastructure Management
http://www.cioupdate.com/article.php/3720671

from above:
Gartner predicts that infrastructure management is the third wave of services to be offshored after IT services and business processes.
...
there are three major reasons for the increased trend of offshoring infrastructure management:

# Skilled workforce availability;
# Falling telecom costs enabling cheaper data and voice connectivity; and
# Web enabled monitoring and management tools helping remote management of applications and IT infrastructure.


... snip ...

aka ... various work becoming increasingly distance insensitive

some other recent posts with education theme

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#42 Experts: Education key to U.S. competitiveness

and

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#5 IBM Unionization

including (referenced in the above)

National Institute for Literacy
http://web.archive.org/web/20100413134230/http://www.nifl.gov/nifl/facts/facts_overview.html

and

NSF Science and Engineering Indicators 2006
http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/seind06/

which also has pointer to

America's Pressing Challenge -- Building a Stronger Foundation
http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/nsb0602/

above NSF page indicates that mathematics and science achievement is critical.

and this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#78 Education ranking

references US ranking at or near the bottom of industrial countries.

and for more drift, latest effort from the comptroller general

U.S. Financial Condition and Fiscal Future Briefing, 2008 Economic Forecast Forum
http://www.gao.gov/cghome/d08395cg.pdf

includes part of previous reference posts regarding composition of federal spending from 1966 to 2006
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#14 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#15 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#24 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#25 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#33 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers

along with excerpts from OECD Key National Indicators: Where the United States Ranks (16 out of 28)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#0 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers

IBM LCS

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM LCS
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2008 21:47:20
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
That's definitely not true, as it is documented that it was independently designed by a separate team within IBM, but it is true that the ALU capabilities of the 360/75 were only a little bit above those of the 360/65.

It was intended to microcode it just like the others, but IBM couldn't find a microcode store fast enough. (Which, of course, is why the 360/85 was microcoded. And that design got recycled - with some changes and improvements which shouldn't be belittled, though - into the 370/165 and even the 3033, so it was an outstandingly successful design despite the 360/85 itself having very poor sales, due to becoming available at a bad time for selling big computers.)


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#49 IBM LCS

i know ... that was why i phrased it like i did; it was the way some people would present what a 360/75 was.

old internal network references

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: old internal network references
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2008 22:08:03
old history note discussing early internal network support ... supposedly there was some early "competition" between Yorktown TSSNET (aka TSS/360) and Cambridge (CP67) vnet.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

from the Cambridge Science Center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

with regard to the following, I've mentioned before the use of the networking between Cambridge and Endicott for the development of the CP67 that provided 370 virtual machine support (rather than 360), including supporting 370 virtual memory architecture.

with regard to the following, there was at least three science centers: cambridge, phili, and palo alto; three HONE centers: white plains, chicago, and wilshire;

the following "OS" references are to os/360 ... eventually HASP networking which evolved into JES2/NJI.

Date: 10/18/78 13:39:39
To: wheeler

According to several papers published by Yorktown people, they had TSS running in June 1968, and had their TSS-only net running by mid-1969, and had their OS link running in late 1970.

We started on CLMON in summer 1968, about when they got TSS running. We were using CLMON among CP-67, OS, and an 1130 in early 1969. CPREMOTE was first used in September 1969, and by the time they got the TSS<->OS link running in late 1970, the Scientific Centers, Endicott, HONE, and maybe even Yorktown were using CPREMOTE. Probably others, too. This use included some OS links. As of the time Hobgood's paper was written (it was published in the Sys Jour 1Q72), they had not yet successfully made any TSSNET connection with CP-67.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

Brief Timeline of the Internet
http://www.webopedia.com/quick_ref/timeline.asp

from above:
Sept. 1, 1969 . First ARPANet node installed at UCLA Network Measurement Center. Kleinrock hooked up the Interface Message Processor to a Sigma 7 Computer.

Oct. 1, 1969 . Second node installed at Stanford Research Institute; connected to a SDS 940 computer. The first ARPANet message sent: "lo." Trying to spell log-in, but the system crashed!

Nov. 1, 1969 . Third node installed at University of California, Santa Barbara. Connected to an IBM 360/75.

Dec. 1, 1969 . Fourth node installed at University of Utah. Connected to a DEC PDP-10.

March 1970 . Fifth node installed at BBN, across the country in Cambridge, Mass.


... snip ...

for other vnet early history ...
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/25paper.pdf

from above:
CPREMOTE was one of the earliest examples of a service virtual machine and was motivated partly by the desire to prove the usefulness of that concept. CPREMOTE was experimental and had limited function, but it spread rapidly within IBM with the spread of CP-67. As it spread, its "operational shortcomings" were removed through independent development work by system programmers at the locations

.. snip ...

as periodically referenced, the internal network was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-85.

as i've mentioned before, HONE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

was initially created after 23jun69 unbundling announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

besides starting to charge for software, it also started to charge for "system engineer" services. this was an issue since junior SEs had been getting on-the-job experience as part of teams at customer accounts (sort of apprentice kind of program). switching to having to charge time for everybody at a customer account eliminated that option. HONE started out as HANDS ON NETWORK ENVIRONMENT, giving SEs "hands-on" experience with "operating systems" running in HONE virtual machines (from branch offices via terminals into remote HONE machines).

The internal network nodes exploded during the 70s. There were on the order of 256 ARPANET nodes at the time of the great switch-over to TCP/IP on 1/1/83 ... a point in time when the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes ... CPHVMCE in Copenhagen was the 1000th node:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#112 OS/360 names and error codes (was: Humorous and/or Interesting Opcodes)

separate from the internal network, much the same software was also used for (univ/educational) bitnet and earn (in europe)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

and as noted the current genre of virtualization and service virtual machines is being referred to as virtual appliances ... misc past posts mentioning virtual appliances.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#46 To RISC or not to RISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#25 To RISC or not to RISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#6 Multics on Vmware ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#8 vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#36 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#26 user level TCP implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#48 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#67 Operating systems are old and busted
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#70 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#3 Hypervisors May Replace Operating Systems As King Of The Data Center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#25 VMware: New King Of The Data Center?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#4 Why do we think virtualization is new?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#26 Oracle Introduces Oracle VM As It Leaps Into Virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#35 Oracle Introduces Oracle VM As It Leaps Into Virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#39 New, 40+ yr old, direction in operating systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#41 New, 40+ yr old, direction in operating systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#81 IBM mainframe history, was Floating-point myths
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#75 virtual appliance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#80 software preservation volunteers ( was Re: LINC-8 Front Panel Questions)

Education ranking

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Education ranking
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2008 04:05:10
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#52 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#55 Education ranking

by comparison to domestic criminal justice system possibly being ill prepared to handle 3000-5000 illegal combatants & terrorists

this references
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuremberg_Trials

there were

24 tried 20nov45 thru 1oct46, 200 total tried 1945 to 1949 and additional 1600 tried in other parts of military justice. there was also reference to stalin requesting that 50,000 just be executed.

related article
http://arstechnica.com/articles/culture/civil-liberties.ars

from above:
McCarthy's talk was well-organized, and he drew heavily on his experiences as a federal prosecutor. McCarthy took as his starting point a simple question: is the criminal justice system an effective means of fighting terrorism? He then suggested that the answer depends on the context in which you ask the question.

... snip ...

1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2008 04:41:28
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
one of the acquiring networking protocols used extensively by T&E industry, hotels, casinos, etc ... for such aggregation, ran over x.25 ... was selected for the initial implementation. there were two varieties ... one was an internet "mall" operation ... where the paradigm was the physical mall with lots of different retail outlets sharing common services ... including the acquiring network interface. the other implementation was a payment gateway ... with authorized webservers interfacing over the internet, via this new invention, ssl.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#37 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff

and stuff for electronic commerce
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

for some additional topic drift ... at that time, there was only an implementation of client-side authentication of the server ... and we required/mandated mutual authentication of both the web merchant (by the payment gateway) and the payment gateway (by the web merchant) to be implemented.

by the time we were done, we pretty much realized while public key authentication provided a lot of advantages, the related use of digital certificates were redundant and superfluous ... somewhat related recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#53 Really stupid question about z/OS HTTP server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#54 Really stupid question about z/OS HTTP server

i.e. basically digital certificates are the electronic analog of the letters of credit/introduction from the sailing ship days ... aid in establishing first time communication between total strangers. the issue in the electronic commerce scenario and the payment gateway required that both the payment gateway be preregistered with the web merchant and the web merchants be preregistered with the payment gateway ... invalidating the underlying justification for having digital certificates and PKI.

competitiveness

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: competitiveness
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2008 10:26:25
greymaus <greymausg@mail.com> writes:
the whole thing is a farce, rather like the 'Rich Lists' which count people with most assets, and ignore liabilities. The property bubbles in US, UK, and .ie distort everything. One list has the republic Of ireland as the second richest (per capita) in the world..

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#39 competitiveness

however, maybe the question is not why it is dropping from first place ... but why it is so high at all?

in a technology age, with rankings so low in education and skills ... i.e. recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#44 Computer Science Education: Whare Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#46 Computer Science Education: Whare Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#56 Computer Science Education: Whare Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#57 Computer Science Education: Whare Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

including original post in this thread about science & math education
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#78 Education ranking

and reference to "Where the United States Ranks (16 out of 28)"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#0 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers

so with citizens apparently so mediocre, why is the avg. standard of living so high?

LINC-8 Front Panel Questions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LINC-8 Front Panel Questions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2008 11:48:04
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
hot off the press ...

IBM: Tape Backup is Here to Stay
http://www.enterpriseitplanet.com/storage/features/article.php/3719041

from:

"In order to maintain continuous business operations, address regulatory requirements and archive business records, users need an infrastructure that allows them to manage their data from online application storage to offline, permanent archive media," says IBM's Bruce Master, senior program manager, Worldwide Tape Storage Systems Marketing. "Tape backup is a key part of this life cycle, allowing users to safely store long term archives for record keeping and disaster recovery while managing total costs of ownership (TCO)."

... snip ...


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#1 LINC-8 Front Panel Questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#13 LINC-8 Front Panel Questions

Why Tape Libraries Still Matter
http://itmanagement.earthweb.com/article.php/3720726

the above states that revenue from tape libraries declined 15.6 percent in 2006 ... but
Despite those statistics, tape users purchased more than 50 percent more capacity as they migrated to higher-capacity and higher-performance tape drives and cartridges. Thus, what looks a fading industry on the surface is very much alive and kicking.

... snip ...

for other drift, old email about doing original cmsback
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#cmsback

that eventually morphed into the current TSM ... as well as collected posts mentioning (tape) backup/archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#backup

Radix Partition Trees

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Radix Partition Trees
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2008 22:19:25
rfochtman@YNC.NET (Rick Fochtman) writes:
Has anyone every seen any doc on using radix partition trees? I'm thinking it may have been one of the "rainbow" books.

I vaguely remember data tree structures and I've got a table search problem that might be the perfect application for a tree-structured data repository. The table might have up to 1,000,000 entries, all in storage, and a balanced n-ary tree has GOT to be faster than using a binary search. The nature of the data is such that a plain old-fashioned list, in sorted order, isn't real amenable to a binary search, either.


for the fun of it look at:
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/DZ9ZR003/A.7?SHELF=DZ9ZBK03&DT=20040504121320

As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2008 06:35:58
greymaus <greymausg@mail.com> writes:
As I wrote before, there are lots of Mitsubishi van/suv's in the Middle East (probably replacing the Peugeot's of Israeli nightmares) with 'made in USA' on them. Nissan has a vast car factory in Geordieland, England, and other countries, Toyota have built three world-scale factories in China. If the design is good enough.. and the management enforce quality control, can't see any problem. The Big U.S. firms have heavy welfare commitments and pensions to be paid out of their operations, which the newer entrants have not, which will will give the new entrants an advantage for, what?.. twenty years?.. (adding in the disappearence of 'blue-chip' investments for pension funds, looks like a cold christmas post 2012 (maybe the Mayans had some foreknowledge)).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#28 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#48 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

which is why some number of institutions have declared bankruptcy to get the retirement payments off their books ... and transferred to the gov.

... previous refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#93 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#38 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#26 2007 Year in Review on Mainframes - Interesting

quite a bit of discussion in this previously referenced wiki page
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pension_Benefit_Guaranty_Corporation

also here:
http://www.pbgc.gov/

from the wiki page:
Before ERISA, employers and willing unions could agree to increase benefits with little thought to how to pay for them. A classic case of the unfortunate consequences of an underfunded pension plan is the 1963 shutdown of Studebaker automobile operations in South Bend, Indiana, in which 4,500 workers lost 85% of their vested benefits.[10] One of ERISA's stated intentions was to minimize underfunding in defined benefit plans.

... snip ...

.... and other posts mentioning fully funded (or not) pension plans:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#9 A hundred subjects: 64-bit OS2/eCs, Innotek Products,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#42 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#14 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#37 I am an ageing techy, expert on everything. Let me explain
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#27 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#35 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#36 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#53 Mainframe Linux Mythbusting (Was: Using Java in batch on z/OS?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#20 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#91 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#39 competitiveness

As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2008 08:59:00
greymaus <greymausg@mail.com> writes:
The defined pension problem is a major problem here now, with companys trying to get out of the arrangements. Even the government, over a rport issued over the last few days, is revaluing upwards the value of its employees pension rights.

The ((credit crunch) || (mortgage problem)), over the near future term, will affect the whole area as well.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#65 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

besides the (long standing) issue of inadequately funded pension plans, there is current issue of some pension plans invested in toxic CDOs

there are issues with lending practices in the subprime mortgage market.

howver, possibly even more important is current enormous uncertainty in the valuation of the toxic CDOs (not so much that they may actually be worthless ... but nobody currently can tell the real value).

Some of this may be related to the "Consumer Reports" issue (i.e. rating institutions not accepting money from the corporations behind the products being rated).

Another part of the issue is the methodology in doing the ratings/valuation, recent post with several toxic CDO related references:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#25 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers

above includes reference:

How Conventional CDO Analytics Missed the Mark
http://www.bobsguide.com/guide/news/2007/Dec/20/Kamakura_Releases_Study:_How_Conventional_CDO_Analytics_Missed_the_Mark.html

again from above:
"Two years ago the Wall Street Journal in a page 1 story pointed out the dangers in relying on the copula approach for CDO valuation, but investors were slow to realize the magnitude of their model risk"

... snip ...

and old post with reference to problems in the 80s evaluating risk in variable rate mortgages
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm The Thread Between Risk Management and Information Security

there is possibly some connection/overlap between the 80s inspiration/insight regarding variable rate mortgages and the more recent reference (in wall street journal article) regarding CDOs.

File Transfer conundrum

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: File Transfer conundrum
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2008 09:45:10
Gary@EVERGREEN-SYSTEMS.COM (Gary Green) writes:
I lost track of who posted the original inquiry, so take this for what it's worth.

If the requirement is in the financial industry, could the communications between the two/various systems use S.W.I.F.T. (Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications)? It's been some time since I wrote anything for SWIFT, but it was extremely secure and most financial institutions should be linked in.

When I did some work, it was used in the securities market, primarily for payments, foreign exchange, securities, etc... However, there were rumblings that the SWIFT organization was thinking about opening up the network for other financial "transactions"; which I took to mean data exchange...


home page
http://www.swift.com/

"swift-2" providing internet capability and opening up for b-to-b;

we had been brought in to consult with small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server; they also had this technology they called SSL they wanted to use ... and result is sometimes now called e-commerce. part of the effort was something called payment gateway (transition between internet and acquiring networks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

we then were involved in x9a10 financial standard working group (in the mid-90s had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for all retail payments) that resulted in the x9.59 financial standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

some years ago we were also asked to provide some input to the swift-2 (what it was called at the time) specification.

Connecting to the secure IP network (SIPN)
http://www.swift.com/index.cfm?item_id=2304

from above:
SWIFTNet messaging services are provided via SWIFT's secure IP network (SIPN), a highly secure and reliable network. Full redundancy, advanced recovery mechanisms and first class operations and customer support services ensure continuous network availability for SWIFTNet services.

... snip ...

SWIFTNet Interfaces Qualification
http://www.swift.com/index.cfm?item_id=2451

other refs:

Securities Markets Infrastructures
http://www.swift.com/index.cfm?item_id=2437

Banking Markets infrastructures
http://www.swift.com/index.cfm?item_id=57981

from above:
Additionally, SWIFT is now complementing its position in the wholesale, high value clearing market by extending its portfolio of SWIFTNet messaging solutions to the low-value payments and ACH market.

... snip ...

Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main,alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2008 11:56:27
patrick.okeefe@WAMU.NET (Patrick O'Keefe) writes:
Since the other thread on this topic went off in a seriously OT direction I'll comment on this thread.

That original article seemed to imply that the problem was language- based. I've been out of touch with the educational system(s) far too long to have a really know what is currently taught and how it is taught. I have trouble believing that switching from Java to C, C++, LISP, and Ada is going to fix the problem. (Is Ada common in CS curriculum? I notice the authors work at an Ada development shop. They may be a bit biased.)

I think their comment that Java encourages a "pick a tool that works" mentality may be right on, though.

Rick Fochtman's question about Radix Partition Tress would make a good test for CS students. I picture a blank stare on the student's faces, but I would love to be shown wrong.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#64 Radix Partition Trees

there is independent thread in a.f.c regarding the same article, some of the posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#44 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#46 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#56 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#57 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#62 competitiveness

part of it related to reduced math requirements and part of it related to java (including some mention of java early days).

as noted in the radix partition trees thread ... some of luther's work showed up in mainframe instructions.

i had been involved in the original relational/sql implementation, system/r
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

and technology transfer to endicott for sql/ds. for other topic drift ... one of the people in the meeting referenced here ... had mentioned that they had done much of the work for the technology transfer back from endicott to stl for db2
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

about the same time as the original relational/sql work, I also was involved doing some stuff with a similar, but different kind of dbms implementation (joint project between some people in stl and the los gatos vlsi group). this had some of the similar objectives as the relational/sql activity ... but significantly relaxed the requirements for structured data definition ... and used radix partition trees for its indexing structure (and the person involved in the two mainframe instructions was brought in to consult on some of the work).

there was some differences between the old-style '60s DBMS contingent in STL and the relational/sql contingent ... with the '60 DBMS contingent pointing out that relational/sql typically doubled the physical disk requirements (for the table indexes) and also greatly increased the physical disk i/os (for processing the indexes). the relational/sql contingent countered that the use of indexes was part of eliminating the direct record pointer paradigm (that were characteristic of the '60 DBMS) as well as all the associated administrative overhead.

during the 80s, things started to tip towards relational/sql ... with disk cost/byte significantly reduced and significant increases in system real storages (allowing index caching, eliminating many of the additional index disk physical i/os) .... aka change in hardware cost tradeoff versis administrative/skill overhead.

for other drift, a totally independent implementation i use for maintaining the rfc index information
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm

as well as the merged glossary/taxonomy information
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/index.html

Rotary phones

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Rotary phones
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2008 12:32:20
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
The first one was Boris Jeltsin, the second one was Carl Bildt; who was elected PM of Sweden one week later. The Queen (of UKOGBANI) has a credible shot at the third place, having E-mail operational a week or so after that.

Clinton didn't get online until around half a year later.

There were some embarrasing moments for american hotshots explaining e-mail to russian couterparts who knew a lot more in that period.


slightly related post about old (profs) email (decade earlier) server in the basement of the white house ... and deleting email didn't necessarily remove it from backup tapes:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#42 vmshare

As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2008 14:52:07
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#66 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

as per most recent and various previous references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#50 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#25 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers

in the mid-80s there were number of large complex computer applications that were used in evaluated risks in various financial instruments. this long winded post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm Thread Between Risk Management and Information Security

includes mention that there was some deficiencies related to variable rate mortgages in the 80s risk management/evaluation computer software ... and, at least in one case a "fix/correction" led to citibank getting out of the mortgage business.

roll forward nearly 20 years ... and something similar has happened. also mentioned in recent posts about current large complex risk management/evaluation computer software:

How Conventional CDO Analytics Missed the Mark
http://www.bobsguide.com/guide/news/2007/Dec/20/Kamakura_Releases_Study:_How_Conventional_CDO_Analytics_Missed_the_Mark.html

also mentioned in previous posts:

U.S. Mortgage Crisis Rivals S&L Meltdown
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB119724657737318810.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

from above:
Indeed, coming up with a value for a CDO entails analyzing more than 100 separate securities, each of which contains several thousand individual loans -- a feat that, if done on any scale, can require millions of dollars in computing power alone.

... snip ...

not only is there some issues whether it is currently being calculated correctly ... but that it is a mammoth amount of calculation.

As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2008 20:17:35

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#66 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#70 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

a few other (computerized) risk modeling
Credit risk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Credit_risk
Modeling the Reality of Risk: The Cornerstone of Enterprise Risk Management
http://www.irmi.com/Expert/Articles/2001/Shah07.aspx
The largest collections of credit risk modeling resource
http://www.defaultrisk.com/
Stress Tests: Useful Complements to Financial Risk Models
http://www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/letter/2005/el2005-14.html
Financial Risk Modeling : DecisionCraft Analytics
http://www.decisioncraft.com/dmdirect/financial.htm
Statistical Methods for Dynamical Stochastic Models.
http://www.math.ku.dk/~mikosch/maphysto_alex/alex.html
The Big Picture | Risk Model
http://bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/2008/01/risk-model.html
FDIC: Strengthening Financial Risk Management at the FDIC
http://www.fdic.gov/deposit/insurance/strengthening/pgs34-39.html
Credit Risk Modelling: Current Practices and Applications
http://www.bis.org/publ/bcbs49.htm
Capital Based Risk Modeling
http://www.aon.com/as/en/risk/captive/based_risk.jsp
Risk Management and Risk Modeling Software Tools
http://www.roselladb.com/risk-modeling.htm


and wiki page:

Risk modeling
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Risk_modeling

from above:
Formal risk modeling is required under the Basel II proposal for all the major international banking institutions by the various national depository institution regulators.

Quantitative risk analysis and modeling have become important in the light of corporate scandals in the past few years (most notably, Enron), Basel II, the revised FAS 123R and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. In the past, risk analysis was done qualitatively but now with the advent of powerful computing software, quantitative risk analysis can be done quickly and effortlessly.


... snip ...

misc past posts mentioning basel and/or sarbanes-oxley:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm The Thread Between Risk Management and Information Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm5.htm#xmlvch implementations of "XML Voucher: Generic Voucher Language" ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm5.htm#epaym "e-payments" email discussion list is now "Internet-payments"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay8.htm#bis7 BIS Papers No. 7 - Electronic finance: a new perspective and challenges
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm10.htm#smallpay3 Small/Secure Payment Business Models
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm10.htm#cfppki19 CFP: PKI research workshop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay10.htm#50 glossary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay11.htm#29 CIOs Must Be Involved In Controlling Risk In Financial Services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#50 E-banking is board-level Issue, Says Basel Committee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#52 Committee calls for better e-banking security management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm16.htm#7 The Digital Insider: Backdoor Trojans ... fyi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm19.htm#10 Security as a "Consumer Choice" model or as a sales (SANS) model?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm21.htm#3 Is there any future for smartcards?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#26 FraudWatch - Chip&Pin, a new tenner (USD10)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#10 PGP "master keys"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#12 Sarbanes-Oxley is what you get when you don't do FC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#13 Sarbanes-Oxley is what you get when you don't do FC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#14 Sarbanes-Oxley is what you get when you don't do FC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#15 Sarbanes-Oxley is what you get when you don't do FC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#26 Fraudwatch - how much a Brit costs, how to be a 419-er, Sarbanes-Oxley rises as fraud rises, the real Piracy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#43 Audit Follies - Atlantic differences, branding UnTrust, thunbs on Sarbanes-Oxley, alternates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#2 Audit Follies - Atlantic differences, branding UnTrust, thunbs on Sarbanes-Oxley, alternates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#11 Is this Risk Management's Waterloo?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#41 An Understanding Database Theory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#23 More on garbage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#26 Dangerous Hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#33 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#58 Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#1 Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#28 Password Complexity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#35 the personal data theft pandemic continues
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#22 AOS: The next big thing in data storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#63 Is Silicon Valley strangeled by SOX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#0 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#74 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#75 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#0 The Unexpected Fact about the First Computer Programmer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#61 The new urgency to fix online privacy

Radix Partition Trees

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Radix Partition Trees
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2008 21:18:38
wkkelley@OPTONLINE.NET (W. Kevin Kelley) writes:
I see that I screwed up and I owe Luther an apology. It should read "...tightest assembly language programs.." There were few problems with Luther's program (other than figuring out how they worked!).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#65 Radix Partition Trees

a few old posts mentioning luther:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#19 S/360 operating systems geneaology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#20 Reviving the OS/360 thread (Questions about OS/360)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#2 A new "Remember when?" period happening right now
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#28 Very CISC Instuctions (Was: why the machine word size ...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#73 Most complex instructions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#14 index searching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#18 Mainframers: Take back the light (spotlight, that is)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#10 radix sort
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#80 "Super-Cheap" Supercomputing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#58 assembler performance superiority: a given
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#83 A Dark Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#10 Complex Instructions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#35 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#38 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#37 Where should the type information be?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#57 How would a relational operating system look like?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#55 mainframe performance, was Is a RISC chip more expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#18 Folklore references to CP67 at Lincoln Labs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#68 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2008 09:17:27
hancock4 writes:
The information processing industry found itself with a surplus of talent in some specialties after the Y2k effort was completed. For the first time in 50 years, IS people had serious trouble finding a job, many left the industry for good. In addition, many companies no longer had their own people, but outsourced or subcontracted the work to roaming laborers who moved from town to town or even came from overseas. All this makes it difficult for a kid just starting out to figure what he wants and should do.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#44 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#46 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#56 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#57 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#68 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

for some other topic drift:

Yes, The Tech Skills Shortage Is Real; The IT skills famine plaguing the United States is only going to get worse.
http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=205900413

from above:
The growth in IT-related positions is driven by new opportunities to leverage technology in the organization, and by businesses recognizing the impact that IT can have on revenue. Another important factor contributing to the growth in demand for IT talent is beginning to appear in news headlines: "By 2010, 40% of the U.S. workforce is set to retire." The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that in 2010, there will be 52% more people in the 55-to-64 age bracket than there were in that age group in 2000. Organizations will face significant knowledge loss because of retirements over the coming decade.

... snip ...

and somewhat related to the above mention of "impact that IT can have on revenue"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#70 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#71 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

also from the "tech skills shortage"
Nearly 70% of middle school teachers lack education and certification in mathematics, let alone computer and business skills, the National Center for Education finds.

... snip ...

and:
In a significant move, the European Union is pushing to provide "blue cards" aimed at attracting foreign-born IT pros to combat the shortage of tech talent in that region. If successfully implemented, the blue cards would apply in all 27 EU member states, increasing their economic competitiveness.

... snip ...

and other related recent threads mentioning IT and competitiveness.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#57 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#61 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#6 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#7 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#42 Experts: Education key to U.S. competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#10 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#22 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#15 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#23 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#32 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#70 Latest OECD broadband data puts US in middle of the pack on speed, price
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#15 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#18 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#31 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#43 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#78 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#20 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#28 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#39 competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#57 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#62 competitiveness

Virtualization Wave

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Virtualization Wave
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2008 10:36:25
more in the new, 40+ yr old technology.

Acquisition Creates Virtualization Powerhouse
http://www.crn.com/it-channel/205603045

Channel At The Center Of Virtualization Wave
http://www.crn.com/it-channel/205602022

from above:
According to two recent exclusive CMP Channel surveys, solution providers said server virtualization is becoming a larger part of their business and it's also quickly becoming the catalyst for a wide range of other service offerings, including disaster recovery and data center consolidation.

... snip ...

last week in jan68, three people came out to the univ from the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

to install cp67.

page 2 (of the above), The Intangible Factor
http://www.crn.com/it-channel/205602022?pgno=2

from above:
While some of the benefits of the technology—such as reduced power, cooling, floor space, maintenance requirements and better control of data backups—are tangible to customers, there is so much more that can be done. "If customers are not exposed to server virtualization, it's up to the VAR to bring it to their attention," he added.

... snip ...

recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#10 For the History buff's an IBM 5150 pc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#17 Usefulness of bidirectional read/write?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#30 hacked TOPS-10 monitors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#33 JCL parms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#41 IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#50 IT managers stymied by limits of x86 virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#59 old internal network references

Rotary phones

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Rotary phones
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2008 11:42:18
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
slightly related post about old (profs) email (decade earlier) server in the basement of the white house ... and deleting email didn't necessarily remove it from backup tapes:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#42 vmshare


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#69 Rotary phones

and for even more vmshare topic drift ...

on the internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

there was an application that supported both a usenet type of operation and an email distribution list type of operation. it was possible to "subscribe" to a discussion group (as in email mailing list) and/or participate in discussion group in more usenet like mode.

some of this possibly prompted the evolution of the later "listserv"
http://www.lsoft.com/corporate/ericthomas.asp
http://www.lsoft.com/corporate/history_listserv.asp

(email distribution list) application that appeared on bitnet and earn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

old earn/networking email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#email840320
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#65 UUCP email

however, predating both, was tymshare corporation offered vmshare online discussion groups (hosted on their commercial service bureau vm370-based online timesharing)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

in mid-70s (Aug76) ... vmshare archive
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

old email mentioning vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare

Rotary phones

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Rotary phones
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2008 12:04:24
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

http://www.lsoft.com/corporate/history_listserv.asp


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#69 Rotary phones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#75 Rotary phones

and even more drift extract from the listserv reference:
1990

Eric Thomas was hired by SUNET (the Swedish University Network) to help build a computer network with the ambition of making Sweden the leading IT nation in Europe. Because of this, LISTSERV development continued in Stockholm, Sweden.

Passive probes were added to LISTSERV.

1991

The international BITNET network reached its peak, connecting some 1,400 organizations in 49 countries for the electronic, non-commercial exchange of information in support of research and education. Thanks largely to the volunteer efforts of Eric Thomas, BITNET provided thousands of electronic mailing lists based on LISTSERV.

Eric Thomas did not want his software to disappear with the mainframes. Therefore, he started looking for ways to port LISTSERV to other environments, such as VMS and Unix.


... snip ...

Radix Partition Trees

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Radix Partition Trees
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Jan 2008 11:32:41 -0800
lists@KCATS.ORG (Michael Stack) writes:
Unfortunately, this seems to have little to do with sorts performed using CFC and UPT. In Knuth's terms, these instructions implement a loser tournament sort using a complete binary tree. The codeword created by CFC is a representation of the offset at which the comparison of two keys fails. The radix (2) of the keys has nothing to do with the result. The UPT instruction "percolates" an appropriate key upward - by comparing codewords - to the root of the tree where it becomes the "winner" of that round. The advantage is that costly key comparisons are reduced.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#64 Radix Partition Trees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#72 Radix Partition Trees

my original comment was "for the fun of it" ... look at the mainframe instructions ... on par with other comments about considering red-black trees, etc.

the other comment was with respect to Luther ... who I believe has been involved in both.

note a radix partition tree implementation can use bit strings and involve the bit displacement/place that the strings differ ... in such a situation ... rather than doing something like calculating a key for the entry ... take the bit string value itself and create a tree with forks at where there are bit differences.

radix as in numerical encoding system:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radix

from above:
The highest symbol of a positional numeral system usually has the value one less than the value of the radix of that numeral system.

... snip ...

radix as in radix tree:

Radix tree:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radix_tree

from above:
Unlike balanced trees, radix trees permit lookup, insertion, and deletion in O(k) time rather than O(log n). This doesn't seem like an advantage, since normally k ≥ log n, but in a balanced tree every comparison is a string comparison requiring O(k) worst-case time, many of which are slow in practice due to long common prefixes. In a trie, all comparisons require constant time, but it takes m comparisons to look up a string of length m. Radix trees can perform these operations with fewer comparisons and require many fewer nodes.

Hash tables are commonly said to have expected O(1) insertion and deletion times, but this is only true when considering computation of the hash of the key to be a constant time operation. When hashing the key is taken into account, hash tables have expected O(k) insertion and deletion times, but will take longer in the worst-case depending on how collisions are handled. Radix trees have worst-case O(k) insertion and deletion. The successor/predecessor operations of radix trees are also not implemented by hash tables.


... snip ...

i.e. rather than treating each bit in a value for tree position ... deal only with the location where there are bit differences ... difference displacements that are shorter (nearer the front of the string) will appear higher in the tree.

As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2008 13:09:00
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Risk modeling
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Risk_modeling

from above:

Formal risk modeling is required under the Basel II proposal for all the major international banking institutions by the various national depository institution regulators.

Quantitative risk analysis and modeling have become important in the light of corporate scandals in the past few years (most notably, Enron), Basel II, the revised FAS 123R and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. In the past, risk analysis was done qualitatively but now with the advent of powerful computing software, quantitative risk analysis can be done quickly and effortlessly.

... snip ...


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#66 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#70 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#71 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

the original Basel II draft included a new "qualitative" section (in addition to all the traditional risk quantitative requirements). we were interest in developing applications for the new specification ... for other topic drift ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm The Thread Between Risk Management and Information Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#41 An Understanding Database Theory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#47 'Innovation' and other crimes

however, during the Basel II review cycles much of the new section was removed. however, a few similar requirements did show up in sarbanes-oxley.

Rotary phones

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Rotary phones
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2008 13:40:29
floyd@apaflo.com (Floyd L. Davidson) writes:
It just isn't funny when somebody thinks they can directly connect the speaker of a radio to the telephone line, and as a result hundreds of other subscribers suffer degraded service.

my wife took at flyer at SBS (formed by ibm, aetna and comsat), thinking that they would do computer/digital satellite communication. however, the organization was heavily influenced by the communication division ... whose "SNA" products were exceptionally ill-suited for handling satellite propagation delays. as a result, the company looked around for other applications and for a period were in the 3rd party telephone service business. she has story when they first tried to switch their westchester county switching office into the network ... and briefly took down all telephone service in the area.

independent of that, we did do some completely different stuff in high-speed data transport project
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

working on getting, nearly full media thruput over T1 (and higher-speed) full-duplex links. besides the traditional speeds&feeds stuff ... there was also a lot of work on forward-error-correcting and encryption.

recent FEC related post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#43 dig. TV

some old email mentioning encryption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#crypto

part of the issue was satellite transmissions are felt to be especially easy to intercept ... however corporate standards was that all transmission (terrestrial or satellite) leaving corporate facilities had to be encrypted. at one point in the mid-80s, there was a comment that the internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

had more than half of all link encryptors in the world. In that period, link encryptors for 56kbit transmission weren't too bad, but I really didn't like the price I had to pay for T1 link encryptors .. and higher-speed were pretty much custom implementations. a couple old posts mentioning the T3 "data aggravator" encryption unit (as well as a few other HSDT issues)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#16 Why I use a Mac, anno 2006
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#36 The very first text editor

i was involved in project for packet-level encryption board that could change key on every packet and could substain better than T2 full-duplex ... and was targeted for $100 (all of which involved numerous complications).

Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2008 14:55:45
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/04/business/04auto.html?ref=automobiles

from above:

Toyota beat Ford in 2007 in United States auto sales, putting it behind General Motors, industry statistics showed Thursday. Ford had held the No. 2 spot since 1931, according to the company's historian.

... snip ...

i think the difference between Toyota vis-a-vis GM and the recent overtaking Ford ... is whether or not it is world-wide figures or just US.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#28 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2008/01/toyota_gm.html

from above:
Toyota reported 2007 worldwide sales of 9.37 million cars and trucks and that could be enough to propel the Japanese corporation ahead of General Motors to become the world's largest automaker.

GM, which is held the title for 76 years, will report company sales figures January 23. Analysts, however, estimate GM sales for 2007 at approximately 9.3 million cars and trucks.


... snip ...

Education ranking

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Education ranking
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2008 15:14:14
krw <krw@att.bizzzzz> writes:
In high school I had friend who's middle name was "Sonly". His father wrote "S only" on the birth certificate.

then there is standard oil (SO) ... with its branded local stations ESSO (rebranded EXXON).

refs:
http://www.us-highways.com/soworld.htm
http://www.us-highways.com/sohist1999.htm
http://www.us-highways.com/sohist.htm

and


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esso

from above:
In those states, it marketed its products under the brand "Esso", the phonetic pronunciation of the letters "S" and "O". It also used the Esso brand in New York and the six New England states, where the Standard Oil Company of New York (Mobil) had the rights, but did not object to the New Jersey company's use of the trademark (the two companies did not merge until 1998). However, in the other states, the other Standard Oil companies objected and forced Jersey Standard to use other brand names

... snip ...

Rotary phones

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Rotary phones
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2008 08:48:42
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
This is dangerous electricity. Many linemen have been killed by telco voltage, especially ringing shocks. They try to limit ring current to 30mA to avoid hazards, but it is nothing I would trust. Similarly, line current is normally limited to 300 mA while off-hook, 5mA on-hook. That is still 2VA, 15VA and 1/4 VA respectively.

old posts mentioning handling telco wires with bare hands as kid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#25 Security Proportional to Risk (was: IBM Mainframe at home)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#65 Xah Lee's Unixism

Education ranking

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Education ranking
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2008 22:27:19
Who Cares <lon.stowell@comcast.net> writes:
Marshall Plan?

... which eventually gets back to what started this thread ...

a current version is called ebrd ... a couple past posts mentioning Marshall Plan and EBRD:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm22.htm#43 Votes are coins stamped with the Red Queen's head
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#9 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#10 The Pankian Metaphor

EBRD:
http://www.ebrd.com/

although

History of the OECD
http://www.people.ku.edu/~nkinners/LangList/Langs/M/Mesa.htm

from above:
The forerunner of the OECD was the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation (OEEC), which was formed to administer American and Canadian aid under the Marshall Plan for reconstruction of Europe after World War II. Since it took over from the OEEC in 1961, the OECD vocation has been to build strong economies in its member countries, improve efficiency, hone market systems, expand free trade and contribute to development in industrialised as well as developing countries.

... snip ...

earlier post with OECD reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#70 Latest OECD broadband data puts US in middle of the pack on speed, price

and there have been recent references to this OECD study
http://www.oecd.org/document/40/0,3343,en_32252351_32235731_39701864_1_1_1_1,00.html

which was what started this thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#78 Education ranking

and other posts in the thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#80 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#82 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#16 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#19 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#20 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#38 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#39 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#44 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#45 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#51 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#71 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#52 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#55 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#60 Education ranking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#81 Education ranking

Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2008 08:36:15
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
No, and they will make the necessary adaptions to be able to _continue_ to sell trucks, pickups and small buses and lorries.

They no have tested hybrid cars, batteries, electric drive trains, and all the other stuff extensively in a production setting for close to a decade. They also have a lot of experience to aggressively push down fuel consumption. I would guess 20-25% of the turnover in Honda & Toyota is directly related to the "alternative" sector.


not quite a decade after the suggestion that there be 100 percent unearned profit tax ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#28 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#39 competitiveness

one of the us manufacturer formed C4 effort ... mostly leveraging information technology to cut the 7-8yr elapsed time new product effort in half (3-4yrs elapsed time for new product from start to finish). toyota had done that already ... and was on its way to cutting it in half again ... i.e. possibly less than 1-2yrs elapsed time for new product from start to finish ... much more agile adapting to changing conditions and/or consumer preferences, aka significantly more competitive in a changing environment.

misc. past posts mentioning participating in some of the C4 activities.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#43 Reason Japanese cars are assembled in the US (was Re: American bigotry)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#61 TGV in the USA?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#51 [OT] Lockheed puts F-16 manuals online
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#22 Vintage computers are better than modern crap !
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#44 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#14 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#20 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#49 The Pankian Metaphor (redux)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#14 In Search of Stupidity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#50 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#29 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#34 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#52 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#13 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#33 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#31 IBM obsoleting mainframe hardware

Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2008 08:44:13
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
one of the us manufacturer formed C4 effort ... mostly leveraging information technology to cut the 7-8yr elapsed time new product effort in half (3-4yrs elapsed time for new product from start to finish). toyota had done that already ... and was on its way to cutting it in half again ... i.e. possibly less than 1-2yrs elapsed time for new product from start to finish ... much more agile adapting to changing conditions and/or changing consumer preferences, aka significantly more competitive in a changing environment.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#80 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#84 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM

dare i mention OODA-loops (and john boyd)? ... being much more agile at rapidly adapting to changing/evolving conditions.

recent posts mentioning boyd &/or OODA-loops
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#2 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#11 Information security breaches quadrupled in 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#21 No Glory for the PDP-15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#45 No Glory for the PDP-15

misc. past posts mentioning john boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd
misc. URLs from around the web mentioning john boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd2

Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2008 09:06:41
greymaus <greymausg@mail.com> writes:
The early japanese cars (1970-90)s had great fuel efficency, adding features (Hey, back on Topic, Vista!) added weight, and added fuel use.

Adding gadgets, features, adds profit above the basic unit.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#28 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#48 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#65 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#80 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#84 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#85 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM

it isn't just about producing a better product ... it is having agility to rapidly create/adapt new products to changing consumer preferences (aka another form of just-in-time).

one of the "points" from the c4 time-frame was not only were far east automobile builders moving to possibly less than 12month new product cycle ... really mess-up the US tradition of annual purchase of yearly new (disposible?) car models ... there was some observation that far east consumer electronic manufacturers were on 90day new product cycle .... supply chain from origin to retail store shelves could be greater than new product cycle (aka new products were being created ... before the previous models had cleared the shelves at retail stores).

Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2008 09:33:32
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
for some other topic drift

Yes, The Tech Skills Shortage Is Real; The IT skills famine plaguing the United States is only going to get worse.
http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=205900413

from above:

The growth in IT-related positions is driven by new opportunities to leverage technology in the organization, and by businesses recognizing the impact that IT can have on revenue. Another important factor contributing to the growth in demand for IT talent is beginning to appear in news headlines: "By 2010, 40% of the U.S. workforce is set to retire." The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that in 2010, there will be 52% more people in the 55-to-64 age bracket than there were in that age group in 2000. Organizations will face significant knowledge loss because of retirements over the coming decade.

... snip ...


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#44 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#46 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#56 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#57 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#68 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#73 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

a little OODA-loop and john boyd topic drift:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd

leveraging "IT technology" competitive agility, adapting automobile products to changing conditions and changing consumer preferences:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#28 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#48 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#65 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#80 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#84 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#85 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#86 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM

folklore indeed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: folklore indeed
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2008 10:30:42
jmfbahciv writes:
Which implies that there are more than one processes occurring independent of each other. There are two general ways to implement the indedpendence: task-based and timesharing. In one all resources needed by the task has to be available before the task is started (that the general premise which gets modified when physical reality hits the fan) and the other assumes that the resource will be made available at the time the resource is needed. The latter is very scary to some programmers because they can't write based on reaction to the event of the moment; this takes a unique thinking style.

there tends to be lots of single event/variable optimization ... not being able to simultaneously/concurrently optimize multiple variables

if you go to time-sequence operation ... it is possible to treat both task-based and timesharing as subsets of common infrastructure ... just dealing with the amounts and types of resources dealt with, over some time-period. somewhat related recent post about a joke and dynamic adaptive resource management:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#16 No Glory for the PDP-15

on the timesharing side ... there were numerous implementations that made implicit assumptions that any single resource request would be significantly less than the available resources ... so a lot of the more complex resource allocation issues could be ignored. some amount of past posts related to timesharing and especially virtual machine based commercial timesharing service bureaus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

on the timesharing side ... the frequently trivial operations ... any pre-allocation could be significantly more expensive than the (tivial) operation itself ... so on-the-fly, dynamic could be much more efficient. on the task-based side ... some of the operations are so massive ... that the efficiency trade-offs between pre-allocation and on-the-fly allocation completely reverses (pre-allocation for massive tasks saves enormous amounts of infrastructure overhead ... vis-a-vis on-the-fly). some recent post mentioning the "pre-allocation" overhead for trivial, student fortran exercises (was significantly larger than the fortran programs themselves):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#33 JCL parms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#51 IBM LCS

people w/o any significant direct exposure to massive amounts of normal, business-critical dataprocessing that goes on the world today (keeping lots of the infrastructure operating) ... and have possibly mostly only dealt with univ. and/or desktop programming ... will have a totally different perspective with regard to lots of the issues ... aka some of the thinking styles/viewpoints may be heavily influenced by experience.

and now for something completely different:

Culture Influences Brain Function, Study Shows
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080111102934.htm

folklore indeed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: folklore indeed
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2008 11:23:48
jmfbahciv writes:
Let's try this one. IBM's batch is close to being a task-based system; before it begins a task, it ensures that all resources are available for the run. A timesharing system doesn't do this. It begins something with the assumption that resources will be made available when they are needed. There is a huge diffenence in how the monitor schedules "jobs" and I/O requests and memory needs between the two approaches.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#88 folklore indeed

os/360 (and descendents) batch did this ... recent posts mentioning some issues for (trivial) micro-resource operations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#33 JCL parms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#51 IBM LCS

note however, cp67 (and vm370 descendents) virtual machine operation had to simultaneously support both trivial interactive operations and timesharing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

as well as large (os/360) batch operations.

heavy duty allocation ... can consume more resources than the actual operation ... for the trivial, timesharing operations. however, for the large, industrial strength dataprocessing tasks; doing trivial, timesharing allocation can consume more resources than the actual industrial strength, dataprocessing task. timesharing will typically perform some sort of pre-allocation ... but it will be in much smaller granularities ... a sequence of micro-allocations (somewhat "on-demand")

an issue is to be able to dynamically adapt the quantity of resources being allocated (per event) to the type of work being performed. misc. past posts mentioning dynamic adaptive resource management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

one of the other approaches in the large os/360 batch operation genre were the transaction monitors ... like cics ... misc. past posts mentioning cics (and/or bdam)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#bdam

and/or DBMS operations ... like DB2, IMS, etc. These were long running "batch" operations with large amounts of pre-allocated resources ... and then these subsystems would "sub-allocate" resources (in much smaller granularities) to various online transactions (like settop box pay-for-view ... or ATM machine cash operations).

Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2008 11:40:39
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
for some other topic drift

Yes, The Tech Skills Shortage Is Real; The IT skills famine plaguing the United States is only going to get worse.
http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=205900413

from above:

The growth in IT-related positions is driven by new opportunities to leverage technology in the organization, and by businesses recognizing the impact that IT can have on revenue. Another important factor contributing to the growth in demand for IT talent is beginning to appear in news headlines: "By 2010, 40% of the U.S. workforce is set to retire." The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that in 2010, there will be 52% more people in the 55-to-64 age bracket than there were in that age group in 2000. Organizations will face significant knowledge loss because of retirements over the coming decade.

... snip ...


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#87 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?

and for a somewhat different perspective is the current subprime situation. some amount of it is some consumers not being able to anticipate/understand that variable rate mortgages might mean that their mortgage payments would go up.

however, a significant amount of the news is really about investors buying up toxic CDO with inaccurate risk ratings ... in effect, paying more for a lower risk rating ... however, it is now turning out that nobody really knows what a lot of the risk ratings actually are. In the current situation, w/o this risk rating knowledge ... there is now a tendency to assume the worst possible risk with implication of extremely low value (huge amount of current news about institutions doing "write-downs").

on one of the tv business news shows, they just asked why hasn't there been better "risk management 101" (and is the current problem, leadership, technology, and/or understanding).

recent posts with references to risk management technology:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#66 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#70 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#71 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#78 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales

older posts on the topic from last year:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#81 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#82 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#10 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#12 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#0 The Unexpected Fact about the First Computer Programmer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#50 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#28 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#41 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#58 Fixing our fraying Internet infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#60 Fixing our fraying Internet infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#25 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#28 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#4 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#12 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#50 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#25 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers




previous, next, index - home