List of Archived Posts

2014 Newsgroup Postings (10/10 - 11/09)

HP splits, again
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
360/85
HP splits, again
Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
HP splits, again
Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
HP splits, again
Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Unisys CEO ousted, shares slip
HP splits, again
LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
Early Digital Research CP/M Source Code
HP splits, again
IBM 1401 emulation on 360 processors
HP splits, again
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Surveillance Reform Theater
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Surveillance Reform Theater
LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
A View From Beneath the Dancing Elephant
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
This Chart From IBM Explains Why Cloud Computing Is Such A Game-Changer
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
IBM 1401 upgrade--differences between 1460, 1410, and 7010?
IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
This Was the Very First Website In the US
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
SEC probing private equity performance figures
How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?
Uncovering insider trading with big data
How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?
Brand-name companies' secret Luxembourg tax deals revealed
IBM sees boosting profit margins as more important than sales growth
IBM sees boosting profit margins as more important than sales growth
Forbes perspective on IBM's troubles
What's the difference between doing performance in a mainframe environment versus doing in others
IBM 1401 and Zeus Z1 projects share the leading computer conservation award
How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?
Brand-name companies' secret Luxembourg tax deals revealed
weird apple trivia
weird apple trivia

HP splits, again

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 11:57:45 -0700
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
I don't remember what he said. I do remember marveling at how simple the wing looked and began to imagine what must be underneath the skins to take 9 months of work.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#76 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#80 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#83 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#84 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#85 HP splits, again

special modified 747 for flying in large 787 subassemblies for final assembly
http://www.boeing.com/boeing/commercial/787family/dreamlifter_fact.page
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_Dreamlifter

from above:
Delivery times for the 787's wings, built in Japan, will be reduced from around 30 days to just over eight hours with the 747 LCF.[17]

... snip ...

Boeing 787: A Complete Timeline Of The Dreamliner's Legacy Of Failure, After Cracks Discovered In Wings
http://www.ibtimes.com/boeing-787-complete-timeline-dreamliners-legacy-failure-after-cracks-discovered-wings-1560491
What Went Wrong At Boeing?
http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2013/01/21/what-went-wrong-at-boeing/

above mentions "coordination risk" (with suppliers/outsourcing), "innovation risk" (further aggrevated by outsourcing innovation), outsourcing risk, tiered outsourcing, offshoring risk, etc.

as aside ... earlier this year when IBM said it was selling off its server business to China (at least in part motivated by the enormous price pressure placed on servers by the large cloud megadatacenters), HP said it was taking a different tact and signing manufacturing agreements with Chinese manufacturers (but would stay in the server business).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#86 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#88 HP splits, again

the "26" from (i'm sure there are going to be others ... recent article about china becoming the largest wine consumer)
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-10-09/not-just-largest-economy-%E2%80%93-here-are-26-other-ways-china-has-surpassed-america

from above:

1 When you add up all imports and exports, China now accounts for more total global trade than the United States does.
2 There is now more total corporate debt in China than there is in the United States.
3 During 2013, we sold about 121 billion dollars worth of stuff to the Chinese, but they sold about 440 billion dollars worth of stuff to us. That was the largest trade deficit that one nation has had with another nation in the history of the world.
4 China is now the leading manufacturer of goods in the entire world.
5 Back in 1998, the United States had 25 percent of the world's high-tech export market and China had just 10 percent. Today, China's high-tech exports are more than twice the size of U.S. high-tech exports.
6 The United States had been the leading consumer of energy in the world for about 100 years, but during the summer of 2010 China took over the number one spot.
7 China now has the largest new car market in the entire world.
8 China has more foreign currency reserves than anyone else on the planet.
9 China is the number one gold producer in the world.
10 China is also the number one gold importer in the world.
11 15 years ago, China was 14th in the world in published scientific research articles. But now, China is expected to pass the United States and become number one very shortly.
12 China is also expected to soon become the global leader in patent filings.
13 China awards more doctoral degrees in engineering each year than the United States does.
14 China has the world's fastest train and the world's most extensive high-speed rail network.
15 China uses more cement than the rest of the world combined.
16 Today, China produces nearly twice as much beer as the United States does.
17 85 percent of all artificial Christmas trees are made in China.
18 There are more pigs in China than in the next 43 pork producing nations combined.
19 China is now the number one producer of wind and solar power on the entire globe.
20 China produces more than twice as much cotton as the United States does.
21 China produces more than three times as much coal as the United States does.
22 China now produces 11 times as much steel as the United States does.
23 China controls over 90 percent of the total global supply of rare earth elements.
24 An investigation by the U.S. Senate Committee on Armed Services found more than one million counterfeit Chinese parts in the Department of Defense supply chain.
25 According to author Clyde Prestowitz, China's number one export to the U.S. is computer equipment. According to an article in U.S. News & World Report, the number one U.S. export tqo China is "scrap and trash".
26 Nobel economist Robert W. Fogel of the University of Chicago is projecting that the Chinese economy will be three times larger than the U.S. economy by the year 2040 if current trends continue.


... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 13:16:43 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
A majority of voters now say that Romney would have been a better president than BHO. Too bad it too them so long to come to that conclusion.

bill black recently on bill moyers talks about how the president was bought by wallstreet ... getting the funds necessary to defeat his democratic opponent.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#67
and
http://billmoyers.com/episode/full-show-big-jail/

lots of the country have periodic tendency to want to vote out everybody ... also short memories, not only was the republican opponent bought and paid for by wallstreet ... was also a member of wallstreet.

however, i've periodically commented that washington media periodically refers to washington politics as Kabuki Theater ... what you see has little or nothing to do with whats really going on. past references to washington political Kabuki theater.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

... lots of political conflict between the parties fabricated show to distract the populace from what is really happening (obfuscation and misdirection).

it was pretty well understood that the federal gov. last decade was the best that wallstreet money could buy. however, I've mentioned that in jan2009 I was asked to html'ize the Percora hearings (30's senate hearings into crash of '29 that resulted in lots of jail sentences) with lots of internal xrefs and lots of URLs between what happened this time and what happened then ... comments that the new administration & congress would have an appitite to do something. I worked on it for awhile ... and then got a call saying it wouldn't be needed after all ... references to enormous piles of wallstreet money totally blanketing washington.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

some amount of upsurge in articles recently about no prosecution with the AG resigning

Eric Holder Resigns: Attorney General's Weak Record on Wall Street
http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119586/eric-holders-legacy-weak-record-prosecuting-wall-street
The Blotch on Eric Holder's Record: Wall Street Accountability
http://www.thenation.com/blog/181763/blotch-eric-holders-record-wall-street-accountability
After Eric Holder Resigns, A Look at His Record on Bank Prosecutions
http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=12433
333,000 signatures, 13 organizations, 8 cities, 1 demand: End Too Big to Jail.
http://www.homedefendersleague.org/end_too_big_to_jail
Eric Holder Is Resigning
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-09-25/eric-holder-resigning

too big to fail, too big to prosecute and too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
as well as money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering

recent references that S&L crisis had 30,000 criminal referrals and over 1000 criminal convictions, economic mess last decade was seventy times larger and has no criminal referrals (30k*70= 2.1M) or criminal prosecutions (at least 1k*70=70,000)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#66 GAO and Wall Street Journal Whitewash Huge Criminal Bank Frauds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#70 Obama Administration Launches Plan To Make An "Internet ID" A Reality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#10 Instead of focusing on big fines, law enforcement should seek long prison terms for the responsible executives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#27 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#45 Sale receipt--obligatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#77 Settlements and Fines from TBTF Institutions Since the Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#95 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#106 only sometimes From looms to computers to looms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#66 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 19:27:12 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#1 HP splits, again

Bill Moyer program just now highlighted that in the middle of the two wars in Iraq and Afghanistan last decade that the administration made drastic cuts in tax revenue at the same time it was greatly increasing spending.
http://billmoyers.com/

recent posts mentioning 2010 CBO report that baseline budget had all federal debt retired by 2010 ... but after the fiscal responsibility act (spending not exceed tax revenue) was allowed to expire in 2002
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

taxes revenue was cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap (much of which continues to this day).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#45 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#57 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#38 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#104 A lifetime ban on lobbying for lawmakers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#66 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2014 14:20:21 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
recent posts mentioning 2010 CBO report that baseline budget had all federal debt retired by 2010 ... but after the fiscal responsibility act (spending not exceed tax revenue) was allowed to expire in 2002
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act


one of the gimicks was that congress would sell tax loopholes rather than changing the tax regulation ... that has been going on for some time ... and is significant contributor to congress being considered the most corrupt institution on earth. misc. past posts, tax avoidance, tag evasion, etc.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

i've periodicall referred 2008 economists conference where they talk about major benefit of flat tax was eliminating tax loopholes which accounts for major amount of the enormous congressional corruption (other benefit is that tax loopholes enormously complicates tax code and costs the economy 3-6% of GDP to deal with) ... recent references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#33 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#57 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#14 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services

recent reference to corporate tax rate is 35% ... but the effective tax rate (based on taxes collected, large part because of the enormous tax loopholes sold by congress) is 12.6% ... lowest in 40yrs

How High Are US Corporate Taxes?
http://johnhively.wordpress.com/2014/10/10/how-high-are-us-corporate-taxes/

other recent posts mentioning corporate tax rate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#16 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#21 Quixotically on-topic post, still on topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#25 IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#30 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#32 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#34 IBM sells x86 server business to Lenovo (was Levono)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#40 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#48 IBM Dumps Its Server Business On Lenovo For $2.3B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#53 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#79 Shocking news: Execs do what they're paid to do
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#94 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#100 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#101 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#54 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#31 Apple's long IRS-Irish history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#75 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#77 Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#48 IBM hopes new chip can turn the tables on Intel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#54 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#80 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#111 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#95 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 10:45:12 -0700
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Interesting how "earmarks" are gone now, but then congress is unable to pass any bill, let alone a bill with earmarks.

equal opportunity ... last week it was current administration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#1 HP splits, again
this week it was the former administration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#2 HP splits, again

... the facade of political conflict and a congress that appears paralized (past six years, there has been analysis that each subsequent congress has been the least productive in the history of the institution, continued downhill record)... the tax loopholes & spending bills were passed last decade pretty much continue unchanged ... although claims that tax code has increased by about 20% and they have pretty much held off the mandated sequestration cuts ... any cuts have pretty much managed to avoid appropriations going to "for-profit" MICC companies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

even talk that the extensive use of private armies (mercenaries) by the US last decade, will even be increasing (cutting size of the military is obfuscation and misdirection while increasing amounts of money shifted to private armies and for-profit military programs)

behind the scenes there is little difference between the parties but sometimes they let it slip ... part of reason DC news make the Kabuki refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

start of 2011/2012 congress, the new majority leader in the house gave local DC news orgs interview where he said that several newly elected darlings of the party were being given positions on the finanance/tax committee because it was members of that committee which get the largest amounts from wallstreet and corporations.

the requlatory agencies continue to be captured and little has changed for the too big to fail (prosecute/jail)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

recent posts with refs to wallstreet has "captured" their regulatory agencies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#3 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#50 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#68 Economists and our responsibilities to society
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#47 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

a few items the past couple days:

Regulatory Capture 101
http://online.wsj.com/articles/regulatory-capture-101-1412544509?mod=WSJ_hps_sections_opinion
If this is "Regulatory Capture" May the Lord Smite Us with It - And May We Never Recover!
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2014/10/regulatory-capture-may-lord-smite-us-may-never-recover.html
Preventing Regulatory Capture: Special Interest Influence and How to Limit It
http://tobinproject.org/books-papers/preventing-capture
Preventing Regulatory Capture: Special Interest Influence and How to Why regulatory capture is here to stay
https://medium.com/bull-market/why-regulatory-capture-is-here-to-stay-1c4d3f4ccc7b

even more drift ... from today

In the Shadow of Central Banking
http://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001521.html

there was huge shift in wallstreet last decade ... claims that major shift to securtization flowing thru wallstreet (instead of traditional banking) had increased wallstreet size by three times (as percent of GDP) ... over $27T done during the period
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c
of toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

major factor in the increase was sellers being able to buy triple-A ratings from the rating agences (when both sellers & rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A) ... which opened up the toxic CDO market to large institutional retirement & soveriegn funds that are retstricted to only dealing in "safe investments".

then the enormous amounts of free money provided by the federal reserve ... has pretty much eliminated too big to fail needing to concern themselves with traditional depositors and borrowers ... trillions in free money from federal reserve can be used to buy trillions in us treasuries (which would not exist if it wasn't for the enormous budget gap created last decade). Recent reference where Bernanke claims that he had expected too big to fail to use the free money to lend to mainstreet ... but when they didn't, he couldn't do anything about it (however something similar had happened after crash of '29, and supposedly part of reason that Bernanke got the job was because he was an expert on the '29 crash).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#66 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
other past Bernanke refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#bernanke
posts mentioning (30s senate) Pecora hearings into the '29 crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 11:39:04 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
Shades of the Roman Empire. I suppose we could always hire hordes of northern barbarians to fight, but I doubt enough Canadians would be willing to do the job.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#4 HP splits, again.

it was combination of hiring mercenaries as well as tributes/payoffs not to fight (sometimes you couldn't distinquish between the two) ... both used last decade.

recent book claims that northern africa was economic engine that provided the funds to hold off the northern aggressors (as well as eliminate most of the taxes on the wealthy) to fund most of the activity. further fund skimming cut the garrisons protecting the northern africa economic engine ... so they were sitting ducks when Gauls crossed into africa from spain and attacked from the west. the loss of the economic engine lost the money used for the tributes/payoffs ... as well as the wealthy started to be taxed again. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#22 Death From Above
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#23 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#31 Rome speaks to us. Their example can inspire us to avoid their fate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#66 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#75 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#81 Steve B sees what investors think

some amount of recent discussion that US star is on the decline ... with China's rising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#86 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#88 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#0 HP splits, again

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 12:24:58 -0700
"john james" <jj9801@nospam.com> writes:
Its MUCH more likely that they just believed the impossible to prove line that tax cuts would see the economy boom and that that would produce the same net revenue and that it didn't do any harm in their view that they benefitted from the tax cuts too.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#1 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#2 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#3 HP splits, again

there were articles that Greenspan and several of the other Ayn Rand afficionados felt uncomfortable with the idea that all federal debt being eliminated by 2010 ... there were large part of wallstreet that had become use to being able to make money off the federal debt .... much of the rest is obfuscations and misdirection, also numerous articles from the 90s debunking the myth that net tax collections increase after tax cuts ... if they actually believed that net tax collections would increase after tax cuts, they wouldn't have needed to let the fiscal responsibility act expire in 2002 (that required spending not exceed tax revenue)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

some were even still repeating that debunked mantra this decade ... even after having created a $12T budget gap (and growing) ... as if having cut tax revenue between 2002 & 2010 by $6T wasn't enough ... that if only it was cut by another couple hundred billion it would magically correct. as previous mentioned very little of what is seen publicly has very little with what really goes on
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

for other drift, this is from one of the original visicalc people redistributed on mailing list today
http://www.salon.com/2013/12/10/ayn_rand_loving_ceo_destroys_his_empire_partner/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 15:31:38 -0700
for other drift, somebody reposted this from Taleb's facebook (Information Theory)
https://www.facebook.com/13012333374/photos/a.10150109720973375.279515.13012333374/10152488919783375/

in different group. I then posted in that thread ....

I recently finished Creveld's Wargames ... i would have enjoyed it more if there had been more analysis. Boyd would talk about having audited/reviewed several large scale wargames ... he would characterize as the generals & admirals played golf all year while their staff practices ... and then when it came to the actual events ... the generals & admirals had no "finger feel" for the information flow in the warrooms ... complaints about being totally overwhelmed by information overload ... as opposed to not bothering to understand what was happening. This was about the time that PCs were becoming increasingly pervasive ... and we would make observations that while PCs were more complex than operating a car (and cost about the same) ... they were complaining about not being able to instantly use one.

doesn't preclude corporations from using gaming for profit strategies ... including probability & size of fines for illegal activities:

How countries use war games to prevent future catastrophes
http://qz.com/279955/how-countries-use-war-games-to-prevent-future-catastrophes/

and then somebody posts reference to

Living in the Futures
http://hbr.org/2013/05/living-in-the-futures/ar/1

and I respond with

old long-winded post from jan1999, decade earlier, citibank was the largest mortgage lender in the country ... somebody did rate scenarios showing that small changes in interest rate would take down the bank, prompting them to sell off their mortgage portfolio, get out of mortgages, and needed a bailout to stay in business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm

In the late 90s, we had been asked to improve the integrity of supporting documents in securitized mortgages (which had been used in the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages). however, shortly the industry figured out that they could pay rating agencies for triple-A ratings (even when the sellers and rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A). They could also now start doing no-documentation loans (triple-A rating trumps documentation). Under new management, citibank became one of the largest players (decade old institutional knowledge apparently having evaporated) ... and needed one of the largest bailouts when things crashed.

other trivia ... meeting in Ellison's conference room early Jan1992
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

Oracle had been in financial difficulty and agreed to be bought by Nippon Steel. They then got a 6000 seat corporate license from Shell allowing them to cancel the Nippon Steel buyout. Both Oracle and IBM setup whirlwind tour of Europe for us giving executive presentations ... including Shell hdqtrs in Netherlands and Shell offices in London. My wife and I are doing four parallel executive presentations a day ending with business dinner, typically different city every day ... finally culminating with big booth at Oracle World held in Cannes.

IBM (commercial) mainframe people are complaining that if we are allowed to continue, we will be at least five years ahead of them. The cluster scaleup is then transferred, announced as supercomputer for scientific and technical *ONLY* and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors (we then decide it is time to leave).

and of course ... i've pontificated that Success Of Failure is result of doing various profit scenarios
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

posts mentioning toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo
posts mentioning Success Of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
posts mentioning ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp
old email mentioning ha/cmp cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa
posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 18:54:07 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
I don't want to fire up another OT political argument, but aside from Obamacare I complained that his foreign policy seemed to be based on cut and run, and hoping someone else would volunteer to do the heavy lifting. I don 't believe he would have had problems with Republicans with a more robust foreign policy, in fact the Democrats seem to be doing all the pushback. We could have armed and trained the Kurds seven years ago and may well not have had the present troubles, without "bots on the ground", except maybe a few trainers and special forces. The Kurds are the best potential ally we have in the region, and Obama left them to swing in the wind.

except we have history trying to not side too strongly with the Kurds and offending turkey

Can Americans, Turks, and Kurds Get Along in Northern Iraq?
http://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/view/can-americans-turks-and-kurds-get-along-in-northern-iraq-a-vision
An Independent Kurdistan: World War I Continues
https://www.strategypage.com/on_point/2014071015852.aspx

2003 invasion of Iraq
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003_invasion_of_Iraq

from above:
While there had been some earlier talk of action against Iraq, the Bush administration waited until September 2002 to call for action, with White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card saying, "From a marketing point of view, you don't introduce new products in August."[49] Bush began formally making his case to the international community for an invasion of Iraq in his 12 September 2002 address to the UN Security Council.[50]

... snip ...

the WMDs were fabricated as justification for the Iraq invasion ... claims are that planning started as soon as the administration took office, well before 9/11. misc. past posts on mentioning fabricated WMDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#38 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#59 John Boyd's Art of War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#80 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#61 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#38 Can America Win Wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#54 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#106 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#99 Reducing Army Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#103 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#36 The Designer Of The F-15 Explains Just How Stupid The F-35 Is

which just happens to dovetail with Spinney's perpetual war (lots of special interests with complimentary agendas)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

book by 2nd cousin of Card about trying to present evidence of the fabrication ... and got treated very, very badly.
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/
another case
http://www.amazon.com/Classified-Woman-The-Sibel-Edmonds-Story-ebook/dp/B007XY8INW/

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#57 Study Confirms The Government Produces The Buggiest Software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#25 We are are on the brink of historic decision [referring to defence cuts]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#70 Disruptive Thinkers: Defining the Problem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#83 Protected: R.I.P. Containment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#21 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#51 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#70 NCIS Season Finale
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#78 Has the US Lost Its Grand Strategic Mind?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#59 John Boyd's Art of War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#32 U.S. Sidelined as Iraq Becomes Bloodier
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#37 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#77 Passage of Budget Bill Is NOT a Victory for the American People ... Only for the Military-Industrial Complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#83 NSA surveillance played little role in foiling terror plots, experts say

and MICC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 15:08:05 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
some amount of upsurge in articles recently about no prosecution with the AG resigning

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#1 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#2 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#4 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#8 HP splits, again

more on AG resigning and his Justice dept.

The American Government Tried to Kill James Risen's Last Book
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2014/10/13/american-government-tried-kill-james-risens-last-book/
The war on leaks (last night's CBS 60mins)
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/war-on-leaks-national-security-press-freedom/

from above:
Risen was subpoenaed in 2008 to divulge his sources on Merlin. But when President Obama was elected, he thought it would all be over.

James Risen: Now everything's going to be fine.

Lesley Stahl: He had talked about transparency and protecting whistleblowers in the campaign.

James Risen: Yes. And I was shocked. They said, "No, no, no. We want to keep this going." And they subpoenaed me again.

What shocks him even more is that the Obama administration has prosecuted more government leakers than all previous presidents combined and his Justice Department has seized the records of phone calls made by more than a hundred AP reporters and investigated a Fox News correspondent under the Espionage Act.


... snip ...

and wallstreet president (referenced on Moyer)

EXCLUSIVE: Elizabeth Warren on Barack Obama: "They protected Wall Street. Not families who were losing their homes. Not people who lost their jobs. And it happened over and over and over"
http://www.salon.com/2014/10/12/exclusive_elizabeth_warren_on_barack_obama_they_protected_wall_street_not_families_who_were_losing_their_homes_not_people_who_lost_their_jobs_and_it_happened_over_and_over_and_over/
US Senator Elizabeth Warren Bashes Wall Street President Barack Obama:
http://johnhively.wordpress.com/2014/10/13/us-senator-elizabeth-warren-bashes-wall-street-president-barack-obama/

posts mentioning too big to fail, too big to presecute, too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
posts mentioning whistleblowers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 20:53:20 -0700
nmm@needham.csi.cam.ac.uk (Nick Maclaren) writes:
That is a separate point. Plus you are seriously mistaken to think that multi-tasking and time-sharing were the same thing. Yes, both were established technologies by the mid-1960s, led by places like Cambridge and MIT (if I recall), but multi-tasking was FAR more widespread and was used mainly for batch work.

The main use of multi-tasking in the early mainframe days was to improve the efficiency of programs that had long tape (and sometimes disk) delays. Some programs could and did overlap computation and execution, but others hung while waiting.

IBM was the last of the big vendors to realise the importance of time-sharing. Its experimental projects (vide Wheeler messages) were about when most companies started, but it didn't get into IBM's mainstream until well after all of the others had done so.

It must be repeated that almost all of the early production time-sharing systems were developed and supported by academia. And they were of better quality than the commercial ones were at the time, most of them have been since, or are today :-(


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#78 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#79 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#82 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#87 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

some of the CTSS people
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System

went to the 5th flr and did multics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics

... others went to the IBM science center on the 4th flr and did virtual machines, internal network, various online apps, including inventing GML in 1969 (which morphs in SGML after a decade ... and HTML after another decade). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

one of the issues was that the batch market had such a huge customer base ... it seem to obscure any other activity going on ... even if the other online/timesharing activity at IBM was larger than many other vendors.

there was some rivalry between the 4th flr and 5th flr ... but because the virtual machine online, timesharing customer base was so large ... (even if it was small compared to the batch customer base) ... it wasn't fair to compare it with the total number of multics installations. even the total number of internal ibm online/timesharing installations was significantly larger than all multics installations that ever existed.

one of my hobbies was doing highly enhanced operating systems for internal installations ... so would compare just the number of internal installations that i supported (a fraction of the internal online/time-sharing installations, a small fraction of total online/time-sharing customer installations, but a relatively trivial fraction of total batch customer installations) ... which was still slightly larger than the total number of multics installations that ever existed.

the IBM batch platforms had enormously heavy weight supervisor (kernel) services ... as a result, batch platform online services tended to operate as subsystems, come up ... acquire large amount of resources than do their own (lightweight) multithreading (multitasking) ... systems like CICS ... later on, doing things like supporting tens of thousands of ATM (cash) machines.

The high-end flagship batch system was MVT with real storage paradigm however its storage management was horribly inefficient ... typically requiring contiguous real storage area four times that would actually be used (for each application/task)

the initial transition from 360 to 370 was still real storage ... this previously mentioned post discusses the motivation for early transition to having virtual memory available on all 370 machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

MVT running on a typical "high-end" processor 370/165 with 1mbyte of real storage ... typically would only support a multitasking level of four (because of the requirement for large contiguous real-storage for each application). work showed that adding virtual memory to MVT would allow increasing that to multiprogramming level to 16 with very little paging activity (four times increase able to use virtual memory to provide the appearance of contiguous storage for the MVT memory management for each application, and because the relative inefficiency of MVT memory management would only result in nominal paging activity).

for recent topic drift ... 360/85 is referenced here
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2014/10/02/the-nsa-and-me/

which then morphs into 370/165, the 370/168 and finally the 3033 (3033 starts out being 168 logic mapped to 20% faster chips)
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

one of the largest operations was the IBM internal world-wide (online/timesharing) sales&marketing support system that started out using cp67/cms (ran on only standard 360 model with virtual memory, 360/67) ... which later moves to vm370/cms.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

360/85

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014
Subject: 360/85
Blog: IBM Retirees
360/85 morphed into 370/165 before adding DAT. 370 virtual memory architecture had a lot of features ... but retrofitting virtual memory hardware to 370/165 (for 370/165-II) ran into schedule problems and it was going to slip virtual memory announce by six months. 370/165 said they could gain back six months if some number of features were dropped from 370 virtual memory ... the POK favorite son operating system people said that there was no problem and the features were dropped. As a result all the other 370s that had already added all the features had to eliminate the features dropped for 370/165 ... and any software written using the new features had to find some other way of doing it.

this is long winded old post discussing the original decision to support virtual memory for all 370s (rather than just special models like 360/67)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73

Systems were becoming increasingly I/O bound and increasing the multiprogramming level was necessary to keep processors busy. MVT storage management was horribly inefficient, typically requiring 4times the contiguous real storage that would be used at any time. Tests showed adding virtual memory to MVT would allow increasing concurrent tasks by a factor of four times (16 tasks instead of four on 1mbyte real storage 370/165) with little paging impact

this article has the same picture along with some other pictures
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2014/10/02/the-nsa-and-me/

there is also this (gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

I was undergraduate ... but doing a lot of work on IBM operating systems, which IBM would pickup and ship in product ... IBM would even periodically suggest things for me to do ... in retrospect some may have originated from that customer set ... which I didn't learn about until much later (even tho I didn't have a security clearance, they would kid me that they knew where I was everyday of my life back to birth).

Big change from 155/165 to 158/168 was much faster and larger memory. By the time of 3031/3032/3033, 4341 was faster than both 158&3031 and cluster of 4341s were much faster, much cheaper, and smaller physical & environmental footprint than 3033. At one point, head of POK got allocation of critical 4341 component cut (to reduce competition). The small physical & environmental footprint also had large corporations ordering hundreds at a time for placing in dept. areas (leading edge of distributed computing tsunami)

4361/4381 was expecting continued explosive sales growth of 4331/4341 ... but by that time midrange and distributed server market was beginning move to workstations and large pcs. Before 4341 had shipped I was roped into benchmarking 4341 for LLNL was looking at getting 70 for cluster compute farm ... sort of precursor to the ibm supercomputer more than decade later. some past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#medusa

Note not only was 4341-1 processor faster than 158&3031 ... but the six 4341 channels were much faster than the 6 158/3031 channels. Internally tweaking 4341 channels allowed testing 3880/3380 3mbyte/sec

old 4341 email ... a lot from 79 before ship, including benchmarks for LLNL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

during the "Future System" project first part of 70s, internal politics where killing/suspending 370 efforts; when FS failed, there was mad rush to get hardware&software products back into 370 pipeline. 303x&3081 were kicked off in parallel using warmed over FS technology
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

they took the integrated channel microcode from 158 for the 303x channel director. A 3031 was two 158 engines, one with just the 370 microcode and a 2nd with just the integrated channel microcode. A 3032 was 168 configured to use channel director as external channels. A 3033 started out being 168 logic mapped to 20% faster chips (from FS).

One of my hobbies was producing enhanced operating systems for internal datacenters, HONE was long time customer back to its cp67/cms days ... although DPD hdqtrs kept threatening HONE to stop using my systems (what would happen if I got hit by a bus)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#hone

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 10:22:15 -0700
greymausg <maus@mail.com> writes:
The Kurds were uninvolved in the Assad-AlQueda struggle, and were not unhappy with the Assad regime (Contrast to Turkey, where writing in Kurdish is an offence). Turkey probably is looking forward to a time when the US leaves the Middle East, and Turkey is the dominant force.

It is generally believed in the Arab world that IS* is backed bu Saudi Arabia, and Qatar (even Joe Biden realized That), with the US and Turkey as part-allies. (Saudi and Qatar are involved in both sides in the conflict, catch-22 returns) The whole thing is crazy, and getting crazier, notice Israel is making no comments?


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#8 HP splits, again

Turkish warplanes hit Kurdish rebels as tensions stoked by Islamic State fight
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/turkish-warplanes-hit-kurdish-rebels-as-tensions-stoked-by-islamic-state-fight/2014/10/14/cca48b44-538a-11e4-ba4b-f6333e2c0453_story.html?wprss=rss_world

from above:
Clashes last week between Turkish security forces and Kurdish demonstrators left more than 30 people dead. It also highlighted the internal pressures complicating Washington's efforts to persuade Turkey to expand its role within the international coalition confronting the Islamic State.

... snip ...

Turkey Bombs Anti-ISIS Kurds Inside Its Own Borders
http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2014/10/14/turkey_bombs_kurds_isis_fight_triggers_secondary_violence.html
Mideast crisis widens as Turkey bombs Kurdish militants
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/14/us-mideast-crisis-idUSKCN0I30ZI20141014
Turkey Launches Air Strikes Against Kurdish PKK Fighters
http://warnewsupdates.blogspot.com/2014/10/turkey-launches-air-strikes-against.html
Turkey Joins the War! Waitâ€Â¦Against Its Own People?
http://pjmedia.com/tatler/2014/10/14/turkey-joins-the-war-wait-against-its-own-people/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 11:03:24 -0700
nmm@needham.csi.cam.ac.uk (Nick Maclaren) writes:
Grrk. There was more to it than THAT! If you tried to get any of of the customer-facing parts of IBM to even admit that time-sharing was useful for 'ordinary' computing, you had an uphill struggle. After all, the communication between IBM research and IBM's commercial areas was extremely poor.

Dammit, as you know, customers and the VM/CMS people spent a lot of time in the early 1970s trying to beat that into the heads of senior management! And that was after time-sharing had been established for a decade.


first part of 70s, was the "Future System" effort, was completely different from 370 and was going to completely replace it, during the period internal politics was killing off 370 efforts (not just time-sharing). the lack of products during this period is credited with giving the clone 370 processors a market foothold. With the death of FS, there was mad rush to get hardware&software products back into the 370 pipeline ... which spawned 303x & 3081 in parallel using warmed-over FS technology
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
and past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

as part of this, the head of POK (high-end batch systems) was able to convince corporate to kill-off vm370/cms product and transfer all the development people to POK (or otherwise the enhanced MVS/XA wouldn't ship on schedule 6-8yrs later).

the endicott mid-range 370s (138/148, 4331/4341, etc) eventually managed to save the vm370/cms product mission but had to reconstitute a development group from scratch ... there are various customer comments about code quality during this period in the vmshare archives (online computer conferencing service provided free to SHARE by Tymshare starting Aug1976)
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

i continued to work on 360/370 during that period and would even periodically ridicule the FS efforts ... which wasn't exactly a career enhancing activity. Also during the period, the SHARE (IBM customer user group) would claim that more new vm370/cms came from other SHARE/vm370 customers than from IBM salesmen (i.e. vm370/cms customers increased in spite of IBM marketing).

circa 1974, CERN had produced a SHARE report comparing vm370/cms and "TSO" (MVS batch system online facility) ... and even tho it was a readily available customer report, copies internally inside IBM were labled "confidential - restricted" (available on "need to know" basis only, attempting to minimize the contamination of ibm employees).

70s&80s major portion of IBM internal development was done on vm370/cms (even for the "batch", non-timesharing systems) and the vm370/cms-based internal network was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late 85 or early 86. I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s ... and folklore is that when the executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. posts mentioning online computer conferencing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

one of the largest online, timesharing services was the internal world-wide sales&marketing support HONE system (although they did a facade that partially obfuscated it was cp67/cms and then later vm370/cms based). As previously mentioned, one of my hobbies was providing highly enhanced operating systems for internal datacenters ... and HONE was longtime customer back to early cp67/cms days. I worked out a deal with Tymshare to get regular copies of all VMSHARE files and provide them online internally ... including on HONE system. A major obstacle was IBM lawyers who were concerned that IBM employees would be contaminated by what customers might be saying on VMSHARE.

posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#78 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#79 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#82 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#87 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#10 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 11:06:45 -0700
nmm@needham.csi.cam.ac.uk (Nick Maclaren) writes:
Eh? GML was simply an abbreviation of the full name, Generalized Markup Language. What on earth do you say that it was chosen to correspond to?

G, M, & L are the first letters of the last names of the inventors ... generalized markup language was then conjured to match their initials. posts mentioning gml, sgml, html
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

i've mentioned science center did something similar for compare&swap which was invented by Charlie at science center when he was doing fine-grain cp67 multiprocessor locking ... CAS are charlie's initials and compare-and-swap was conjured to match his initials. posts mentioning smp &/or compare-and-swap
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 12:22:08 -0700
nmm@needham.csi.cam.ac.uk (Nick Maclaren) writes:
But 'time-sharing' dates from the early 1960s, there were dozens of systems in production use by the late 1960s, and was SOP in many places by the early 1970s. It was the period 1962-1972 that I was referring to.

posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#78 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#79 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#82 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#87 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#10 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#13 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#14 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

there were (at least) two commercial cp67/cms spin-offs in the 60s ... offering online, commercial cp67/cms-based timesharing services ... they fairly quickly moved up the value chain and started offerring financial information to the financial industry (later moving to vm370/cms). then tymshare starting at least by the early 70s with vm370/cms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

while still undergraduate, i was brought into Boeing summer of 1969 as one of the first boeing computer services employees ... Boeing was consolidating a lot of its dataprocessing into independent business unit to better monetize its investment (just the renton datacenter had upwards of $300m ... 60s dollars ... in ibm gear). One of my responsibilities was to deploy cp67/cms online timesharing services ... that could be offerred to both boeing internal operations as well as external entities.

there were a number of industry & gov. internal cp67/cms timesharing services in the 60s ... just for internal operations ... not offering commercial external services. old reference gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

as undergraduate, i did a lot of operating system enhancements that ibm picked up and shipped in products ... ibm even periodically suggests some enhancements i could do ... in retrospect some may have originated with this customer set ... i didn't learn about them until much, much later ... (and even tho I don't have security clearance) they would periodically kid me that they knew where i was every day of may life back to birth.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 16:47:16 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#8 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#12 HP splits, again

Bombing of Kurds Shows Everything That's Wrong with U.S. Foreign Policy
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2014/10/14/pkk-one-administrations-terrorist-anothers-freedom-fighter/

from above:
However, in yet another ironic twist to U.S. foreign policy in the region, this ostensible terrorist organization is now an important American partner in halting the expansion of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS. The PKK today in part represent the "boots on the ground" in Syria that many observers have said are necessary to any serious campaign to reverse the spread of this group. In other words, the Bush administration's terrorist group has become the Obama administration's freedom fighters.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 18:56:50 -0700
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Cool. One terrorist organization taken off the enemies list. Get one to fight the other, how is that a bad proposition?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#8 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#12 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#16 HP splits, again

we were suppose to be helping the Kurds fight ISIS but now the Turks are bombing the Kurds ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 20:57:45 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#8 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#12 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#16 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#17 HP splits, again

'The Freedom Fight Has Returned to Turkey' As Kurds head to the front lines to fight the Islamic State, they face a Turkish government attacking them from the rear.
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2014/10/14/pkk_isis_kurds_turkey_erdogan_ocalan_islamic_state_kobani
Turkey denies it agreed to let US use air bases for Islamic State fight
http://www.stripes.com/news/europe/turkey-denies-it-agreed-to-let-us-use-air-bases-for-islamic-state-fight-1.308156

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 23:41:08 -0700
Stephen Fuld <SFuld@alumni.cmu.edu.invalid> writes:
Yes, although there was another name. At the time, IBM supported two different, but somewhat similar programs. One was the aforementioned HASP, the was ASP, an acronym for Attached Support Processor. Asp had many more capabilities than HASP, but it took far more resources and was harder to use. There were people fervently advocating for their favorite and since ASP was the more capable system, it advocated took to calling HASP, and acronym for Half ASP. :-)

BTW, this was back in OS/360 days. by MVS time, Hasp evolved into JES2 and ASP into JES3.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#78 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#79 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#82 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#87 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#10 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#13 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#14 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#15 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

some history here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_Entry_Subsystem_2/3

above mention that ASP had evolved from the 7094/7044 direct coupled system

some of the HASP people went to gburg and were part of the organization turning it into JES2. My wife did a stint in the group ... and was part of the catchers for ASP turning into JES3 ... she was also co-author of JESUS (JES unified system) ... all the features of JES2 & JES3 that respective customers couldn't live w/o. For various internal politics, never was able to pull off JESUS.

HASP started out somewhat more lightweight and ran on the same processor with the system. As the name ASP implies, it ran with a 2nd "front-end" processor that handled actual unit record gear ... running in loosely-coupled configuration (mainframe for cluster) with shared connection to disks.

old history of hasp&jes2
http://web.archive.org/web/20120205210204/http://www.redbug.org/dba/sharerpt/share79/o441.html

mentions that SHARE HASP project first met in Houston in March 1968. I was still undergraduate but had done a lot of software work on MFT&HASP ... as well as started doing some work on CP67 (which had been installed at the univ. last week jan1968). I was sent to that SHARE meeting to attend HASP sessions as well as session announcing CP67.

past posts mentioning JESUS:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#61 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#3 JES2 vs. JES3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#42 Which non-IBM software products (from ISVs) have been most significant to the mainframe's success?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#21 zLinux OR Linux on zEnterprise Blade Extension???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#85 Two terrific writers .. are going to write a book
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#74 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#87 Scanning JES3 JCL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#83 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#27 A debate on JES2 versus JES3 and IBM's continued support for both products
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#22 Rejoice! z/OS 2.1 addresses some long term JCL complaints from here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#64 A Fascinating History of JES2
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#95 Access to IBM Z/OS z/VM Documentation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 11:43:51 -0700
jgk@panix.com (Joe keane) writes:
Like OMG, virtual memory (AKA address translation) is useful for something...

So the 'time-sharing' guys wanted to put it in 360 machines. That didn't happen (except for the /67, which i guess they got shamed into doing), and maybe that is fine.

They were the ones pushing for it first, and some people there got it stuck into their head that it is synonymous with 'time-sharing': if you are doing 'time-sharing' it is useful to have address translation (right); if you are not doing 'time-sharing' it is not useful to have address translation (wrong).

When i am sure that a lot of people there knew that that really didn't make sense.


IBM cambridge science center had expected to be the center for IBM time-sharing and virtual memory ... but that got assigned to another group. Lots of early CTSS, science center, virtual memory, etc history from Melinda's paper ... moved here (from princeton)
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/

lots of locations (especially educational institutions) had been sold 360/67 for the official tss/360 product ... which never quite matured. At one point tss/360 group peaked around 1200 people ... at a time when the science center had 12 people on cp67/cms (science center only occupied part of 4th flr 545 tech sq ... and typically had total of 30-40 people during the period).

Both Stanford (orvyl) and UnivMichigan (MTS) wrote their own virtual memory operating systems (for 360/67) when tss/360 never made it to production quality. Several locations just ran the 360/67 in real-mode (360/65) with os/360. Other locations switched to running (virutal machine) cp67 from the science center.

where i was undergraudate ... the univ. continued to mostly run the 360/67 in real-mode with os/360 ... and most of my work was primary system support for os/360 ... but I was allowed to play with cp67 on the weekend. Sometimes I had to share the machine with the IBM SE testing tss/360. At one point we did synthetic user benchmark doing Fortran program, edit, compile & execute (before I had done much optimization and performance work on cp67). The benchmark simulating 35 users on cp67/cms had better response and throughput than four simulated users on tss/360 (which was a real dog). One of the issues was that tss/360 had also done a (really poor) memory mapped, "one-level-store" filesystem (all filesystem operations were implemented as memory map operations.

when FS started ... nearly every blue-sky, poorly thought out feature was thrown into it. Part of it was really complex instruction operand accesses ... which could require five sequential, serialized memory accesses to retrieve an operand. One of the final nails in the FS was performance simulation that showed if a FS machine was made out of the fastest available hardware (370/195), a 370/195 application would have the throughput of 370/145 (10-30 times slowdown).

It also carried over much of the (poorly thought-out) "single-level-store" design from tss/360. One of the reasons that I would periodically ridicule the FS effort was I had done a paged-mapped filesystem for CMS that I thought was enormously superior (I could get 3times the throughput of moderately filesystem intensive applications over running on standard CMS filesystem).

With the failure of FS and the mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipelines ... a decision was made to release lots of the 360/370 stuff that I continued to do all during the FS period ... except for the paged-mapped stuff ... anything that smacked of "single-level-store" had gotten bad rep from the tss360 & FS experience.

Folklore is some number of the FS people retreated to Rochester and did the System/38 ... with many simplified FS features ... including single-level-store. S/38 had single 48bit virtual address space and every "file" had a unique address range within the 48bit virtual address space. Part of the issue was throughput performance wasn't really an issue in the low-end S/38 market place.

When virtual memory was justified for all 370s ... including the real-memory paradigm batch systems ... there was no effort to try and move to memory-mapped filesystem ... even though continuing to simulate the real-memory channel program I/O paradigm (in virtual memory environment) carried a very heavy overhead.

one of the issues facing (virtual machine) cp67/cms & vm370/cms was wide range of customer requirements ... some customers made heavy use of CMS for interactive, online time-sharing ... but other customers made little use of CMS ... using the virtual machines primarily for running multiple batch operating systems (in virtual machines) .... other customers were "mixed-mode" expecting to do both interactive time-sharing and batch on the same machine. trying to deal with this early on. In my undergraduate days, I developed dynamic adaptive resource manager (customers frequently referred to it as "fair-share scheduler" because default resource management policy was "fair-share")

past posts mentioning FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys
past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
past posts mentioning dynamic adaptive resource management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#78 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#79 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#82 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#87 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#10 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#13 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#14 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#15 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#19 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 12:05:18 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
the WMDs were fabricated as justification for the Iraq invasion ... claims are that planning started as soon as the administration took office, well before 9/11. misc. past posts on mentioning fabricated WMDs

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#8 HP splits, again.

(non-WMD) chemical weapons found from the 80s (had been provided by &/or facilitated by US)

US support for Iraq during the Iran-Iraq war
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war

... and some of the same people from 80s show up in high-level positions in the administration last decade ... misc. past posts mentioning above:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#78 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#62 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#74 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#92 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#23 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#30 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#57 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#59 John Boyd's Art of War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#84 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#87 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#85 U.S. Sidelined as Iraq Becomes Bloodier
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#42 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#106 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#38 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#80 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#68 Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#22 $40 billion missile defense system proves unreliable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#102 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Report: U.S. Kept Mum After Finding Old Chemical Weapons in Iraq
http://time.com/3508881/iraq-isis-chemical-weapons-report/
Pentagon withheld information about decades-old chemical weapons during Iraq War, report claims
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/10/15/us-troops-wounded-by-decades-old-chemical-weapons-during-iraq-war-report-claims/
American soldiers exposed to chemical weapons during Iraq War
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/american-soldiers-exposed-to-chemical-weapons-during-iraq-war/
Chemical weapons WERE found in Iraq but Pentagon kept it secret
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2793452/u-s-troops-did-chemical-weapons-iraq-pentagon-kept-secret-discovery-5-000-warheads-shells-saddam-hussein-s-abandoned-weapons-program-hushed-soldiers-injured.html
Report: Pentagon 'suppressed' finds of chemical weapons in Iraq and related U.S. casualties
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/10/15/report-pentagon-suppressed-finds-of-chemical-weapons-in-iraq-and-related-u-s-casualties/
Has ISIS looted chemical weapons from former nerve agent factory?
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2793731/will-rusting-chemical-weapons-cache-ignored-americans-fall-isis-hands-iraq-claims-2-500-rockets-containing-deadly-sarin-hands-terrorists.html
Is ISIS Using Chemical Weapons?
http://www.defenseone.com/ideas/2014/10/isis-using-chemical-weapons/96425/
Report: Pentagon 'suppressed' finds of chemical weapons in Iraq and related U.S. casualties
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/10/15/report-pentagon-suppressed-finds-of-chemical-weapons-in-iraq-and-related-u-s-casualties/
Has ISIS looted chemical weapons from former nerve agent factory?
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2793731/will-rusting-chemical-weapons-cache-ignored-americans-fall-isis-hands-iraq-claims-2-500-rockets-containing-deadly-sarin-hands-terrorists.html
Breaking News: Islamic State Militants Are Now Using Chemical Weapons
http://warnewsupdates.blogspot.ca/2014/09/breaking-news-islamic-state-militants.html
The Secret Casualties of Iraq's Abandoned Chemical Weapons
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html?_r=0
Washington concealed US troops exposure to chemical weapons in Iraq intel docs
http://rt.com/news/196152-us-iraq-chemical-weapons/
ISIS Likely Captured Iraqi Chemical Weapons, New York Times Confirms
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/14/isis-chemical-weapons-_n_5987106.html
Saddam-Era Chemical Weapons Now Under ISIS Control: Reports
http://www.ibtimes.com/saddam-era-chemical-weapons-now-under-isis-control-reports-1705144
Is ISIS Using Chemical Weapons?
http://www.defenseone.com/ideas/2014/10/isis-using-chemical-weapons/96425/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 15:43:13 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#20 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

other virtual memory trivia: as undergraduate in the 60s I also did a lot of work on cp67 for page thrasing controls and (global LRU) page replacement algorithms; this was about the time that there were papers in the academic literature on working set page thrashing controls and "local LRU" page replacement algorithms.

roll forward to the early 80s, I was at IBM san jose research and had worked with Jim Gray before he left for Tandem. At Dec81 ACM SIGOPS, Jim asked me if I could help a Tandem co-worker get his Stanford PHD (which included work on global LRU page replacement), the advisor was coming under intense pressure from the local LRU forces blocking awarding the PHD.

in the early 70s, I was at the IBM cambridge science center and running standard cp67 with my page thrashing and global LRU page replacement. The IBM Grenoble science center had gotten a 1mbyte 360/67 and modified cp67 to implement the academic working set page thrashing controls and local LRU page replacement; they sent me a lot of raw data and published a CACM paper. Cambridge had a 768kbyte 360/67 (104 pageable pages after fixed storage requirements) and were running 80-85 users with better response & throughput than the modified Grenoble system with 30-35 users (and 155 pageable pages after fixed storage requirements) ... user workload was essentially identical at the two locations (aside ... while science center only had 35-40 people at the time, the science center operated online timesharing cp67 used by IBMers at other locations as well students and staff from univs. in the cambridge/boston area).

Jim was aware of the comparison and wanted to make it available to help get his coworker's PHD approval. However, IBM executives blocked me from sending a response for nearly a year. I prefer to think that they thought they were punishing me (blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s) as opposed to taking sides in the academic dispute.

response reference in old post:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email821019
past posts on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock

other posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#78 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#79 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#82 Do we really need 64-bit DP or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#87 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#10 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#13 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#14 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#15 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#19 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 16:33:37 -0700
Larry Sheldon <lfsheldon@gmail.com> writes:
Somewhere along in there I was working in a UNIVAC 1100 shop that had to talk to two IBM shops and somebody had selected HASP as the protocol (I think we, arguably the biggest machine in the system, were the RJE) because neither they nor their machines and their OSes were smart enough to use anything else.

I forget most of the details but the links used "transparent" modems which, after the howdydos switch to a mode that will pass binary strings with embedded control codes without reacting to the codes.

UNIVAC at the time didn't support the "transparency" so we had to do it in Assembler code in user space.


co-worker
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks
at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
responsible for technology used for the internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#internalnet
also used for corporate sponsored univ bitnet (earn in europe)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET
some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

JES2 networking evolved from HASP RJE/networking. The original HASP networking intermixed networking control information and job control information in headers ... as a result ... minor header problems could crash the operating system. The original HASP/JES2 networking also used unused entries in the 255 psuedo device table (usually 140-180 entries might be available for defining network nodes) ... and original source carried the identifier "TUCC" in cols 68-71. The internal network had early/quickly exceeded 255 nodes and HASP/JES2 nodes had the unfortunate behavior of trashing traffic where the origin &/or destination nodes weren't in their local tables. As a result, most HASP/JES2 nodes had to be carefully kept to boundary/peripheral locations.

The internal network (& bitnet) technology had carefully separated the different layers ... but in order to support HASP/JES2 they did special drivers to allow some connectivity of HASP/JES2 to the internal network. Also because even traffic between HASP/JES2 systems at different release levels had tendency to crash the (MVT, OS/VS2, MVS, etc), there eventually grew up a large library of internal network HASP/JES2 drivers (HASP/JES2 header information would be converted to connonical format and then the specific driver that corresponded to the connected HASP/JES2 system would be responsible for making sure that the header information was in correct form for that specific system). I've mentioned before the infamous case of JES2/MVS systems in San Jose crashing JES2/MVS systems in Hursley ... because of the mismatch in header fields ... and it was blamed on the corresponding Hursley VM370/VNET for not having the driver with the necessary header rewrite rules.

In the early 80s, JES2 finally got around to releasing support for 999 nodes ... but unfortunately by that time the internal network had already exceeded 1000 nodes. By the mid-80s, politics had finally got around to no longer shipping native vm370/vnet drivers to customers and only shipping the JES2-compatible drivers (even though the native vm370/vnet drivers contrinued to be used on the internal network because they had significantly higher throughput).

About that time, the communication group was spreading information about the internal network had to be converted to VTAM/SNA ... or otherwise it would stop working (it had avoided being VTAM/SNA implementation). At the same time they were also spreading information internally that embryonic NSFNET backbone (precursor to the modern internet) could run over VTAM/SNA.

We had project I called HSDT with T1 (1.5mbit/sec) and faster links ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

and were also working with the director NSF and the NSF supercomputer centers on interconnecting them ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

we were suppose to get $20m for the project, but then congress cuts the budget ... and some other things happen, and then finally NSF releases an RFP. Internal politics prevent us from bidding, the director of NSF with backing from some other agencies writes a letter to the corpration trying to help ... but that just makes the internal politics worse (as did comments that what HSDT already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses).

The NSF supercomputer interconnect morphs into the NSFNET backbone ... the operational precursor to the modern internet ... another ref:
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

various HASP, JES2, and/or HASP/JES2 networking posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#hasp

The NSFNET RFP called for T1 links ... in part because HSDT was already running T1 & faster links. It turns out the winning RFP response installed 440kbit links ... and then sort of to make it look like they met the letter of the RFP ... they installed T1 trunks and telco multiplexor running multiple 440kbit links over T1 trunks.

At the same time that the communication group was internally spreading misinformation about running NSFNET backbone over VTAM/SNA ... they had just recently generated a report for the executive committee explaining how customers wouldn't need T1 support until sometime in the 90s (largely motivated because VTAM/SNA support was limited to 56kbit/sec links).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Unisys CEO ousted, shares slip

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Unisys CEO ousted, shares slip
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 10:27:19 -0700
hancock4 writes:
I wonder if any _new_ customers come along to IBM and order a Z series mainframe because their business has grown to the extent that they need such a machine or they've realized their existing setup is inadequate?

there have been periodic discussions about IBM not offering entry level mainframes ... especially after IBM shutdown most of the i86 emulators ... that had been filling that void. there has been some discussion of a few new customers that have done linux consolidation on z with mainframe linux under z/vm.

however, max. configured z196 with 80 processors was rated at 50BIPS and had a max/peak I/O benchmark of 2M IOPS using 104 FICONs (heavyweight channel emulation protocol layer that runs over industry standard fibre channel and drastically cuts the native i/o throughput). At about the time of the max/peak I/O benchmark there was native fibre channel announced for e5-2600(v1) claiming over 1M IOPS (two such fibre channel would have higher throughput than 104 FICONs). misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

e5-2600(v1) have had drystone benchmarks of 527BIPS (compared to 50BIPS for max configured z196) ... and IBM had base list price for e5-2600(v1) blade of $1815 ($3.44/BIPS compared to $28M for max configured z196 or $560,000/BIPS)

followon to z196 is ec12 with max configured 101 processors, 75BIPS and $33M ($440,000/BIPS) ... i haven't seen peak/max i/o benchmark for ec12 ... but announce says it would have 1.3times I/O of z196.

1qtr2014 ec12 financials was IBM had sold equivalent of 14 max configured ec12 or 56 on annualized basis ... still built on 32nm technology. news earlier in the year was ibm was trying to pay somebody $1B to take its chip business ... more recent rumours is that it has up'ed the offer to $2.5B. If ec12 processor chips were straight remap to latest 14nm tech & 450mm wafer ... the total annualized ec12 sales would be handled by one or two wafers (my past experience is minimum batch run is six wafers ... so such minimum chip production would be several years of ec12 sales).

by comparison intel now is at e5-2600v3 ... gone through two newer generations of chip technology.

some recent discussions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#8 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#9 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#10 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#11 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#20 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#57 [CM] Mainframe tech is here to stay: just add innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#61 Are you tired of the negative comments about IBM in this community?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#68 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#56 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#0 The SDS 92, its place in history?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#85 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#86 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#87 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#89 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#90 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#91 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#93 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#5 Demonstrating Moore's law

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 12:09:36 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
behind the scenes there is little difference between the parties but sometimes they let it slip ... part of reason DC news make the Kabuki refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#1 HP splits, again

all owned by MICC,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military-industrial-complex

wallstreet money and too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

as well as drug industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#medicare.part-d

and other special interests ... especially
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

recent

Waste: America's Secret Deterrence Strategy?
http://www.realcleardefense.com/articles/2014/10/12/waste_americas_secret_deterrence_strategy_107489.html

along the lines of Success Of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

along with continuous conflict and perpetual war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

and

Does CIA Covert Aid Ever Work?
http://warnewsupdates.blogspot.com/2014/10/does-cia-covert-aid-ever-work.html
C.I.A. Study of Covert Aid Fueled Skepticism About Helping Syrian Rebels
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/15/us/politics/cia-study-says-arming-rebels-seldom-works.html

past posts about Team B ... the head of CIA didn't believe their analysis ... so he would have to be replaced with somebody that would go along ... stories about replacement were 1) had to agree with the Team B analysis and 2) sideline a republican party rival
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#team.b

the replacement then goes on to be VP in the 80s.

there was claim that he had no idea about the iran/contra affair
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair

since he was fully occupied with deregulating the financial industry (the major factor behind S&L crisis) ... also other family members involved
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan

and then many of the same players
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war

show up last decade with the two wars ... others show up with new round of eliminating adult supervision of the financial industry and a new financial mess.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LA Times commentary:  roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 10:11:57 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
TARP
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troubled_Asset_Relief_Program

was supposedly to buy the toxic assets of the too big to fail,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

however only $700B was allocated which was barely drop in the bucket, end of 2008 just the four largest too big to fail were carrying $5.2T in toxic assets
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#66 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

AIG Bailout Trial Bombshell III: Paulson Lied to Congress About TARP
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/10/aig-bailout-trial-bombshell-iii-paulson-lied-to-congress-about-tarp.html

from above:
So you can see Alvarez stating, under oath, that TARP was designed from the very outset as a way to buy bank equity. Even the reference in testimony to buying debt, in context, clearly means buying debt issued by the bank, as in having Treasury lend money in some form, say by buying newly-issued bonds of the financial institution, as an alternative to an equity infusion.

... snip ...

it was up to the federal reserve that was handling the off-book toxic assets.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

note that the major beneficiary of TARP funds injected into AIG was company that Sec. Treasury Paulson had previously headed up. At the time, there were stories that AIG was negotiating to pay off CDS gambling bets at 50-60cents on the dollar (especially when there were lots of rigged CDS bets, CDOs designed to fail, sold to their customers and then take out CDS bets that the CDOs would fail), Paulson steps in and says it was illegal to pay off CDS bets at less than 100cents on the dollar, forces AIG to take gov. funds in order to pay off the CDS bets at face value and forces AIG to sign a legal agreement that it couldn't sue any of those making CDS bets (especially the rigged bets).

past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#5 AIG's Bank Of America Suit Puts Trashy Paper On Display
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#42 Who Increased the Debt?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#50 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#18 U.S. Treasury, AIG are poised to sever ties
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#51 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#6 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#7 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#8 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#15 Instead of focusing on big fines, law enforcement should seek long prison terms for the responsible executives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#106 only sometimes From looms to computers to looms

other past posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#42 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#43 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#44 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#45 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#46 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#47 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#49 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#50 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#51 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#52 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#53 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#54 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#55 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#56 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#57 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#58 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#59 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#60 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#62 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#63 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#65 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#67 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#68 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#69 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#70 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Early Digital Research CP/M Source Code

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Early Digital Research CP/M Source Code
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 21:25:23 -0700
recent item stumbled across: Software Gems: The Computer History Museum Historical Source Code Series

Early Digital Research CP/M Source Code
http://www.computerhistory.org/atchm/early-digital-research-cpm-source-code/

from a couple days ago

Flashback: CP/M and the beginning of the microcomputer era
http://ahmedelazab.com/nagg/?p=135541
Flashback: CP/M and the beginning of the microcomputer era
http://www.zdnet.com/flashback-cpm-and-the-beginning-of-the-microcomputer-era-7000034683/

recent posts mentioning cp/m:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#90 Enterprise Cobol 5.1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#103 Microsoft publishes MS-DOS, Word for Windows source code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#71 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 09:16:35 -0700
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
And W pushed that program after opposing Social Security. His goal must have been to bankrupt the country and thus end Social Security and no doubt the whole safety net.

the story is that big part of last decade was shift mortgage business from traditional banking into toxic CDOs so that wallstreet could loot mortgage business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

... over $27T done during the bubble and claims that it was major contributor to wallstreet increasing by factor of three times (as percent of GDP).
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

then coupled with being able to pay the rating agencies for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A) allowed wallstreet to loot the large institutional retirement funds (and other funds restricted to only dealing in "safe" investments).

similar stories are that wallstreet wants social security funds privatized so they could loot those funds (analogous to when crooks are asked why they rob banks, they say that is where the money is).

in parallel with that is the shift from traditional institutional retirement plans to 401k ... making it much easier for wallstreet to loot (and the margins they charge on 401k are higher than they can charge large institutional plans ... aka new 401k money becomes much easier to loot ... but they were able to use toxic CDOs to help clean out the existing pre-401k plans, but the significant social security fund is still waiting to be privatized and looted).

it wasn't solely wallstreet wanting to loot large institutional retirement plans ... there were other cooperating interests
http://www.amazon.com/Retirement-Heist-Companies-American-ebook/dp/B003QMLC6K
and
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

it wasn't just as simple as bankrupting the country ... there were trillions that wallstreet and corporate executives wanted ... tax elimination, tax avoidance, tax evasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

there is also large section of wallstreet that makes significant skim off of government dept ... and they didn't like the prospect that the baseline budget had all federal government dept gone by 2010.

even if wallstreet was making only 1% off gov. dept ... when tens of trillions are involved that is still significant amount of money (hundreds of billions) ... and they can afford to spend 1% of that buying congress (billions) ... and what do any of them care ... it isn't their money.

It was major republican interests in the 90s that were behind the fiscal responsibility act (and had all federal debt gone by 2010) ... however shift in politics, it was the same party that allowed fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002 ... and the enormous ballooning in gov. debt.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

and most of the stuff for public consumption is just obfuscation and misdirection from what is going on behind the scenes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

recent posts mentioning retirement heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#45 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#48 IBM Dumps Its Server Business On Lenovo For $2.3B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#79 Shocking news: Execs do what they're paid to do
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#101 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#54 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#75 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#32 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#47 Barbarians at the Gate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#48 IBM hopes new chip can turn the tables on Intel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#54 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#111 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#25 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#89 IBM, Lenovo server deal potentially scuppered over security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#69 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 1401 emulation on 360 processors

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 1401 emulation on 360 processors
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 11:31:31 -0700
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
I woulda thunk that the maintenance cost would preclude the DC-3 from service long before now.

this summer, visited historic flight (at paine field, opposite side of the runway from another flight museum)
http://historicflight.org/hf/collection/

had (still flying) former c47 (dc3) army cargo plane that flew in china in the 40s. it was eventually acquired by Johnson & Johnson and converted to VIP plane ... and operated by Pan American. recent reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#58 RR songs, was Re: e50th/60th anniversary of SABRE--real-time airline reservations computer system

more details:
http://www.airlinereporter.com/2013/07/an-inside-look-at-a-restored-panam-dc-3-at-historic-flight/

photo gallery
http://historicflight.org/hf/gallery2/

they said that you could tell it was originally cargo plane ... by the double wide window where the cargo door use to be
http://historicflight.org/hf/wp-content/gallery/hff-new-gallery-12-8-10/hff-dc-3-inaugural-flight-take-off-credit-to-liz-matzelle.jpg
inside
http://historicflight.org/hf/wp-content/gallery/hff-new-gallery-12-8-10/hff-dc-3-passengers-enjoying-the-flight-credit-to-jeremy-dwyer-lindgren.jpg

I've mentioned before my wife's dad was posted to china as advisor to generalissimo and took his family with him to Nanking ... they were evacuated in army cargo plane on 3hrs notice (to Tsingtao airfield) when the city was ringed. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#22 Pre-relational, post-relational, 1968 CODASYL "Survey of Data Base Systems"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#27 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#27 Mount DASD as read-only

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HP splits, again

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: HP splits, again.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 16:13:10 -0700
Walter Banks <walter@bytecraft.com> writes:
If nothing else the current Ebola fiasco in the US points out a need for a single payer system. There is a Dallas hospital that may go out of business because of the long term finger pointing on responsibility for the spread of Ebola and who is responsible. The bottom line is deal with the medical issues and stay focused on them. Totally innocent people have been affected both medically and financially.

A lot could be learned from the Ontario Canada SARs experience and how to deal with a a very contagious disease.

On all the Sunday morning talk shows they didn't mention the Canadian developed Ebola vaccine that starts human testing this week. There are solutions to these problems, under-funding the health systems isn't one of them.


there are the stories about enormous influence of medical/insurance lobby precluding single payer system ... but there also the stories of effect of MBAs & private equity industry has had on health care economics (attempt to squeeze every dime out of the operation).
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/10/will-ebola-vanquish-the-mbas-who-run-our-hospitals.html

from above:
On the other hand, based on what we have been posting on Health Care Renewal for nearly 10 years, the conduct of the Texas Health Resources leaders should have come as no surprise. On Health Care Renewal we have been connecting the dots among severe problems with cost, quality and access on one hand, and huge problems with concentration and abuse of power, enabled by leadership of health care organizations that is ill-informed, incompetent, unsympathetic or hostile to health care professionals' values, self-interested, conflicted, dishonest, or even corrupt and governance that fails to foster transparency, accountability, ethics and honesty.

... snip ...

also referencing
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-29638724
and
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/16/us/infamy-for-dallas-hospital-where-virus-spread.html?_r=3

posts mentioning private equity industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

HCA
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hospital_Corporation_of_America
A Giant Hospital Chain Is Blazing a Profit Trail
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/15/business/hca-giant-hospital-chain-creates-a-windfall-for-private-equity.html?pagewanted=all
Dental Abuse Seen Driven by Private Equity Investments
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-05-17/dental-abuse-seen-driven-by-private-equity-investments.html
For-Profit Nursing Homes Lead in Overcharging While Care Suffers
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-12-31/for-profit-nursing-homes-lead-in-overcharging-while-care-suffers.html
New York Reconsidering Private Equity Investment in Health Care Entities
http://www.healthcarelawtoday.com/2014/03/31/new-york-reconsidering-private-equity-investment-in-health-care-entities/
"Barbarians at the Gate" - Making Private Equity Less Private, and Understanding Its Effects on Health Care
http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2012/01/barbarians-at-gate-making-private.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 18:51:18 -0700
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2835872/ibm-major-announcement-points-to-deal-on-chip-manufacturing.html
IBM expected to unveil chip manufacturing deal Monday
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2835756/ibm-expected-to-unveil-chip-manufacturing-deal-monday.html
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2835873/ibm-major-announcement-points-to-deal-on-chip-manufacturing.html

from above:
Reports surfaced this summer that IBM was working on a deal to have GlobalFoundries take over the plant. The deal fell though at the time, however, over disagreement on the amount of money IBM would pay GlobalFoundries to take over the money-losing fab, reports said. IBM was offering $1 billion, but GlobalFoundries wanted $2 billion, according to a Bloomberg report.

IBM has been steadily shedding its hardware assets and is closer to taking on a chip licensing model approach much like ARM Holdings. IBM earlier this month closed a deal to sell its x86 server business to Lenovo for $2.1 billion.


... snip ...

recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#33 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#43 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#54 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#80 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#8 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#14 Check out IBM Said Near Deal With Globalfoundries for Chip-Making - Bloomberg
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#20 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#29 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#87 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#91 Demonstrating Moore's law

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Surveillance Reform Theater

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Surveillance Reform Theater
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:54:54 -0700
Surveillance Reform Theater
http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/10/20/73235/

from long ago and far away, i was required to attend key escrow meetings. they tried a theme that businesses needed key escrow to protect/preserve corporate assets (only copy of very valuable corporate assets is encrypted and keys are lost) as justification that all keys (private, public, secret, etc) needed to be escrowed.

we started looking at the business justification. first off, keys used for authentication had to be precluded from escrow because it would enable impersonation (violate authentication principle being able to determine specific person).

then keys used for temporary data in-transit (aka email, messages, etc) didn't need to be escrowed ... because the original copy still existed. that sort of finished it from business justification standpoint ... apparently they were really interested in evesdropping on transmission/messages ... and much less interest in long term archives (the business justification, backups/archives, etc).

there were some number of scenarios spun that corporations should be interested in evesdropping on everything that their employees were doing (possibly colluding to steal assets).

nearly 20yrs earlier, i was peripherally involved in trade secret court case. details of next generation disk drive had leaked to another company and there was a court case for couple billion in damages. I've mentioned before, that in order to prevail the judge said it was (at least) necessary to demonstrate anti-theft provisions proportional to the claimed value ... including significant amount of employee education (analogy to fences and swimming pools ... attractive nuisance) if there was something worth billion dollars just laying around ... of course ordinary people would be expected to walk away with it. however, there was never any reference that all employee activity had to be monitored.

posts mentioinng security proportional to risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proportional.to.risk

past references to trade secret theft case
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#60 Where should the type information be: in tags and descriptors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#7 DDJ Article on "Secure" Dongle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#36 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#29 Intel abandons USEnet news
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#26 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#5 Greed - If greed was the cause of the global meltdown then why does the biz community appoint those who so easily succumb to its temptations?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#24 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#4 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#82 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#71 Trade Secrets and Confidential Information
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#72 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#25 Economic espionage discussed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#58 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#10 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#45 U.S. agents 'got lucky' pursuing accused Russia master hackers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#46 Feds indict indentity theft ring

past prefs to key escrow (and/or clipper chip)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm9.htm#pkcs12 A PKI Question: PKCS11-> PKCS12
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm9.htm#pkcs12d A PKI Question: PKCS11-> PKCS12
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm13.htm#12 Antwort: Re: Real-time Certificate Status Facility for OCSP - (RTCS)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm15.htm#32 VS: On-line signature standards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm16.htm#11 Difference between TCPA-Hardware and a smart card (was: example: secure computing kernel needed)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm17.htm#3 Non-repudiation (was RE: The PAIN mnemonic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm18.htm#12 dual-use digital signature vulnerability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm18.htm#13 dual-use digital signature vulnerability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#6 PGP "master keys"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#7 PGP "master keys"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#39 PKI Implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#64 Storing digital IDs on token for use with Outlook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#53 public key confusion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#12 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#39 transputers again was Re: The demise of Commodore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#40 transputers again was Re: The demise of Commodore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#1 Decoding the encryption puzzle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#48 Data Center Theft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#62 Ransomware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#14 August 7, 1944: today is the 65th Anniversary of the Birth of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#56 About that "Mighty Fortress"... What's it look like?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#85 Key Escrow from a Safe Distance: Looking back at the Clipper Chip
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#65 Reject gmail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#40 The Vindication of Barb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#74 How the NSA Manipulates Language To Mislead The Public
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#90 copyright protection/Doug Englebart
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#10 "NSA foils much internet encryption"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:39:30 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#31 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

How Big Blue Blew It: Inside IBM's Catastrophic Earnings Miss
http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertcringely/2014/10/20/how-big-blue-blew-it-inside-ibms-catastrophic-earnings-miss/?partner=yahootix
IBM: Can it transform fast enough?
http://www.zdnet.com/ibm-can-it-transform-fast-enough-7000034862/
IBM: Can it Transform Fast Enough?
http://www.linux.com/news/enterprise/biz-enterprise/792359-ibm-can-it-transform-fast-enough

IBM's Rometty defends bumpy financial ride
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2836133/data-center/ibms-rometty-defends-bumpy-financial-ride-as-company-shifts-strategy.html
IBM's Rometty defends bumpy financial ride as company shifts strategy
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2836132/ibms-rometty-defends-bumpy-financial-ride-as-company-shifts-strategy.html
IBM Sells Chip Business, Losses Continue
http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/it-strategy/ibm-sells-chip-business-losses-continue/d/d-id/1316773
IBM recreates itself with focus on research, software, and advanced systems
http://www.infoworld.com/article/2836075/techology-business/ibm-recreates-itself-with-focus-on-research-software-and-advanced-systems.html
IBM earnings slump as company shifts to cloud, mobile and analytics
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2836092/ibm-earnings-slump-as-company-shifts-to-cloud-mobile-and-analytics.html
IBM earnings slump as company shifts to cloud, mobile and analytics
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2835719/ibm-earnings-slump-as-company-shifts-to-cloud-mobile-and-analytics.html
IBM to pay GlobalFoundries $1.5bn to take on loss-making microchip business
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/oct/20/ibm-pay-globalfoundries-microchip-microelectronics-business
Twist: IBM to pay GlobalFoundries $1.5B to offload its chip business
http://www.cnet.com/news/ibm-offloads-chip-business-to-globalfoundries-for-1-5b/
IBM Pays GlobalFoundries $1.5 Billion To Shed Its Chip Division
http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/14/10/20/1233235/ibm-pays-globalfoundries-15-billion-to-shed-its-chip-division
IBM Pays GlobalFoundries $1.5 Billion To Shed Its Chip Division
http://hardware-beta.slashdot.org/story/14/10/20/1233235/ibm-pays-globalfoundries-15-billion-to-shed-its-chip-division
IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2835873/ibm-major-announcement-points-to-deal-on-chip-manufacturing.html
IBM pays GlobalFoundries $1.5 billion to take over IBM's chip-making unit
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2836012/globalfoundries-to-take-over-ibms-semiconductor-unit-in-13-billion-deal.html
IBM to cast off its semiconductor unit in $1.3B deal
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2835479/components-processors/globalfoundries-to-take-over-ibms-semiconductor-unit-in-13b-deal.html
GlobalFoundries to take over IBM's semiconductor unit in $1.3 billion deal
http://www.infoworld.com/article/2835230/techology-business/globalfoundries-to-take-over-ibms-semiconductor-unit-in-13-billion-deal.html
IBM exits semiconductor business and re-creates itself
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2835940/ibm-exits-semiconductor-business-and-recreates-itself.html
IBM exits semiconductor business and re-creates itself
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2836039/data-center/ibm-exits-semiconductor-business-and-recreates-itself.html
IBM to PAY GlobalFoundries to take chip fab unit
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2835973/ibm-to-pay-globalfoundries-to-take-chip-fab-unit-itbwgk.html
Struggling IBM pays $1.5 billion to dump its chipmaking business
http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/10/struggling-ibm-pays-1-5-billion-to-dump-its-chipmaking-business/
Is IBM Worthy Of A Position In A Portfolio Right Now? - International Business Machines Corporation (NYSE:IBM)
http://seekingalpha.com/article/2573245-is-ibm-worthy-of-a-position-in-a-portfolio-right-now
IBM's stop-start chip deal with GlobalFoundries resumes: Reports
http://www.zdnet.com/ibms-stop-start-chip-deal-with-globalfoundries-resumes-reports-7000034831/
IBM's $1.5bn chip deal with GlobalFoundries is finally signed
http://www.zdnet.com/ibms-1-5bn-chip-deal-with-globalfoundries-is-finally-signed-7000034857/
IBM Paying Globalfoundries $1.5 Billion to Take Unit in Retreat From Chips
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-10-19/ibm-agrees-to-pay-globalfoundries-1-5-billion-to-take-chip-unit.html
IBM: 'Marked Slowdown In September'
http://www.businessinsider.com/ibm-marked-slowdown-in-september-2014-10
Stanley Druckenmiller On IBM
http://www.businessinsider.com/stanley-druckenmiller-on-ibm-2014-10
IBM, GF Strike Historic Fab Deal
http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1324321
IBM to pay $1.5B to shed its costly chip division
http://phys.org/news/2014-10-ibm-15b-chip-division.html
IBM Paying $1.5 Billion to Shed Its Chip Division
http://mashable.com/2014/10/20/ibm-chip-division/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 20:24:55 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Would anyone know what IBM still manufactures?

Do they still make military equipment?

Specialty super computers?

What happened to all the factory buildings in Endicott, Poughkeepsie, and Kingston? All shut down?


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#31 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#33 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

some endictto references
http://www.endicottalliance.org/jobcutsreports.php
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endicott,_New_York

from above:
After the Second World War, IBM corporate headquarters moved to Armonk, New York, and new research and manufacturing sites were established throughout the United States and overseas. In 2002, IBM sold the aging Endicott manufacturing site to local investors. IBM now leases several buildings in the complex, and employment is currently estimated at 600-800. These jobs are entirely in research and development, and there is no longer any manufacturing at IBM-Endicott.

... snip ...

The Town Ibm Left Behind
http://www.businessweek.com/stories/1995-09-10/the-town-ibm-left-behind
and
https://www.facebook.com/KingstonTheIBMYears?_fb_noscript=1
http://www.dailyfreeman.com/general-news/20130601/ibms-legacy-in-kingston-area-to-be-documented-in-exhibit
http://www.hvmag.com/Hudson-Valley-Magazine/June-2014/Kingston-The-IBM-Years-Gives-a-Peek-Into-Tech-Giants-History/

looks like some packaging, putting logos on things, etc. watson is power chips and mostly programming ... trying to get others to use power ... so it can have larger volumes still being done
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenPOWER_Foundation

AI ...
http://techcrunch.com/2014/10/18/the-future-of-ai-will-be-stacked/
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2835669/ask-watson-or-siri-artificial-intelligence-is-as-elusive-as-ever.html

other

With chip fabs gone, IBM's hardware future will be in high-end design
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2836172/with-chip-fabs-gone-ibms-hardware-future-will-be-in-highend-design.html
With chip fabs gone, IBM's hardware future will be in high-end design
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2835636/data-center/with-chip-fabs-gone-ibms-hardware-future-will-be-in-highend-design.html
IBM Stock Plummets as Company Abandons Chip Business
http://www.wired.com/2014/10/ibm-globalfoundries/
IBM preps for a post-silicon world
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2836233/ibm-preps-for-a-post-silicon-world.html
IBM's future: 6 things it needs to thrive
http://www.zdnet.com/ibms-future-6-things-it-needs-to-thrive-7000034870/
IBM operating income falls by 18% as it offloads semiconductor unit
http://www.computerweekly.com/news/2240233002/IBM-operating-income-falls-by-18-as-it-offloads-semiconductor-unit
Three ways IBM can shine after shedding its CPUs
http://www.infoworld.com/article/2835664/tech-industry/three-ways-ibm-can-shine-after-shedding-its-cpu-division.html
IBM Poised to Go Where It's Never Gone Before
http://blogs.wsj.com/moneybeat/2014/10/20/ibm-poised-to-go-where-its-never-gone-before/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:50:49 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#31 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#33 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#34 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

The Canary In Big Blue's Mainframe: Why IBM's Q3 Bust Marks A Turning Point
http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/the-canary-in-big-blues-mainframe-why-ibms-q3-bust-marks-a-turning-point/

from above:
IBM has long been a poster boy for the untoward effects of central bank financial repression. For most of this century the once and faded king of tech has been in a modality of slow liquidation, leveraging up its balance sheet with cheap debt to fund stock buybacks, dividends and accounting-driven two-bit M&A deals. This morning that destructive strategy---pursued by two incompetent CEOs in a row---came to a thundering crash. IBM is now down by 7% and deserves to go far lower.

... snip ..

recent posts mentioning stock buyback
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#14 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#16 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#25 IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#34 IBM sells x86 server business to Lenovo (was Levono)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#48 IBM Dumps Its Server Business On Lenovo For $2.3B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#79 Shocking news: Execs do what they're paid to do
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#101 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#104 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#54 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#31 Apple's long IRS-Irish history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#75 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#77 Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#1 Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#33 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#43 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#48 IBM hopes new chip can turn the tables on Intel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#54 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#57 Fed's stress tests were a confidence-rattling comedy of errors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#80 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#111 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#0 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#4 only sometimes From looms to computers to looms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#3 HP splits, again

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 11:54:22 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
The Canary In Big Blue's Mainframe: Why IBM's Q3 Bust Marks A Turning Point
http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/the-canary-in-big-blues-mainframe-why-ibms-q3-bust-marks-a-turning-point/

IBM has long been a poster boy for the untoward effects of central bank financial repression. For most of this century the once and faded king of tech has been in a modality of slow liquidation, leveraging up its balance sheet with cheap debt to fund stock buybacks, dividends and accounting-driven two-bit M&A deals. This morning that destructive strategy---pursued by two incompetent CEOs in a row---came to a thundering crash. IBM is now down by 7% and deserves to go far lower.

... snip ..


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#35 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- And It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
http://www.businessinsider.com/ibm-gives-up-on-its-2015-promise-2014-10
Goldman Makes It Official That the Stock Market is Manipulated, Buybacks Drive Valuations
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/10/goldman-makes-it-official-that-the-stock-market-is-manipulated-buybacks-drive-valuations.html
GOLDMAN: We're Blaming The Stock Market Sell-Off On A Pullback In Buybacks
http://www.businessinsider.com/goldman-on-buybacks-and-market-volatility-2014-10

Stockman in "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America" ... talks about stock buybacks as a mini-form of (private equity) LBO (leverage buyout), with the executives reaping huge rewards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

other past posts referencing Stockman's comments on stock buybacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#3 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#4 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#5 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#30 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#36 Fed proposes annual assessments for large financial companies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#49 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#5 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#69 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#2 IBM Relevancy in the IT World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#50 IBM Furloughs U.S. Hardware Employees to Reduce Costs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#51 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#57 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#49 The Original IBM Basic Beliefs for those that have never seen them
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#57 What the Orgy of "Lehman Five Years On" Stories Missed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#24 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#37 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#61 IBM now employs more workers in India than US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#84 3Q earnings are becoming the norm at IBM. What is IBM management overlooking?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#85 How do you feel about IBM passing off it's retirees to ObamaCare?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#1 IBM board OK repurchase of another $15B of stock
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#60 Bridgestone Sues IBM For $600 Million Over Allegedly 'Defective' System That Plunged The Company Into 'Chaos'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#14 Microsoft, IBM lobbying seen killing key anti-patent troll proposal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#15 IBM Shrinks - Analysts Hate It
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#16 IBM Shrinks - Analysts Hate It
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#64 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#14 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#25 IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#48 IBM Dumps Its Server Business On Lenovo For $2.3B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#79 Shocking news: Execs do what they're paid to do
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#101 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#54 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#75 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#1 Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#33 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#48 IBM hopes new chip can turn the tables on Intel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#54 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#0 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#3 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#95 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 12:23:46 -0700
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Indeed it was; and Adam Osborne got it right; the survivors in the clone market would think of themselves simply as manufacturers, not computer companies.

However, while lots of people put together their own PC from motherboards and RAM, that isn't universal. Note, too, that the PS/2, while it used peripheral boards that were not compatible with the ordinary IBM PC or the new standard, the PC AT, was still *software* compatible with the IBM PC. OS/2 was only an option.

So the industry wasn't pushed into switching in order to stay with IBM.

But if the PS/2 had used a PowerPC chip, running only OS/2, would it have been a bigger success... or a bigger flop? That's hard to say. It could have carved out a niche market in IBM mainframe shops that would be willing to pay a premium to get micros that IBM would support with connectivity software. (For that matter, that option is *still open* to IBM, even if AIX or Linux and not OS/2 would be the software base.)


I've mentioned before:

In late 80s, a senior disk enginneer got talk scheduled at the annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference ... supposedly on topic of 3174 performance, but open the talk with statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for demise. of the disk division. The communication group had stranglehold on the datacenter with corporate strategic responsibility for everything that cross the datacenter walls ... and were violently fighting off distributed computing and client/server trying to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm. The disk division was starting to see data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to correct the situation ... but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group. A few short years later the company goes into the red ... and the disk division is no more.

part of this is the cards for the PS/2 were designed for dumb terminal emulation paradigm including 300+ stations sharing same T/R bandwidth.

ROMP 801/risc chip was originally suppose to be followon for displaywriter, when that was canceled they looked around and decided to reposition for the unix workstation market and got the company that had done PC/IX to do port for what becomes PC/RT and AIX.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

the PC/RT did much of their own cards for PC/AT 16bit bus, SCSI, graphics, T/R, etc. with workstation high throughput design point.

Followon to ROMP was RIOS for RS/6000 (power) which happened to have 32bit microchannel bus in place of PC/AT 16bit bus ... but the RS/6000 group was forced to (help their brethern) and only use PS2 cards (weren't allowed to do their own). As a result there was joke that the RS/6000 wouldn't have greater throughput than PS2 (386/486) ... since it was running the same low-throughput (dumb terminal design point) PS2 graphics, scsi, lan, etc cards

I've periodically cited example of the PC/RT 4mbit (16bit bus) T/R card which had higher card throughput than the PS2 (RS/6000) 16mbit (32bit bus) T/R card ... i.e. a PC/RT server using its 4mbit T/R card had higher throughput than RS/6000 with PS2 microchannel 16mbit T/R card.

To get around the corporate restrictions they came out with the RS6000 model 730 ... which had a VMEbus (rather than microchannel) ... which allowed them to get vendor VMEbus cards (that had much higher throughput than the PS2 microchannel cards).

recent posts mentioning internal politics trying to preseve the communication group's dumb terminal paradigm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#97 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#15 Quixotically on-topic post, still on topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#8 Microsoft culture must change, chairman says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#41 World Wide Web turns 25 years old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#50 Can we logon to TSO witout having TN3270 up ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#70 Last Gasp For Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#22 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#41 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#50 Beyond the EC12
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#54 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#65 Are you tired of the negative comments about IBM in this community?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#68 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#38 Meet Cobol's hard core fans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#66 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#15 MVS

misc. past posts mentioning the PC/RT 4mbit T/R card having higher throughput than the PS2 16mbit T/R card
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#55 9-track tapes (by the armful)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#9 IBM MIcrochannel??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#40 ibm time machine in new york times?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#13 were dumb terminals actually so dumb???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#59 IBM 3614 and 3624 ATM's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#12 practical applications for synchronous and asynchronous communication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#20 Ethernet, Aloha and CSMA/CD -
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#21 Ethernet, Aloha and CSMA/CD -
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#38 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#50 Channel Distances
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#35 Token-ring vs Ethernet - 10 years later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#36 Token-ring vs Ethernet - 10 years later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#81 IBM to the PCM market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#21 MAINFRAME Training with IBM Certification and JOB GUARANTEE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#37 What if the computers went back to the '70s too?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#64 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#15 SNA: conflicting opinions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#16 WSJ.com - IBM Puts Executive on Leave
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#15 Small Server Mob Advantage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#66 How long before Microsoft goes the way of DEC (and in part, IBM)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#67 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#23 What is the protocal for GMT offset in SMTP (e-mail) header
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#34 (slightly OT - Linux) Did IBM bet on the wrong OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#63 25 reasons why hardware is still hot at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#4 When will MVS be able to use cheap dasd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#57 So why doesn't the mainstream IT press seem to get the IBM mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#34 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#0 I actually miss working at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#64 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#41 Is email dead? What do you think?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#43 My first mainframe experience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#60 Speed matters: how Ethernet went from 3Mbps to 100Gbps... and beyond
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#35 Soups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#90 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#50 Hello?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#92 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#61 "25 Years of IBM's OS/2"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#37 Hard drives: A bit of progress
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#70 Under what circumstances would it be a mistake to migrate applications/workload off the mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#40 PC/mainframe browser(s) was Re: 360/20, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#9 3270s & other stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#32 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#84 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#4 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#5 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#19 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#79 wtf ? - was Catalog system for Unix et al
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#88 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Surveillance Reform Theater

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Surveillance Reform Theater
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 12:34:51 -0700
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
This makes sense if the company was suing, for example, an employment agency that provided them with programmers, including the one who leaked the information, for failing to provide properly trustworthy staff.

But if one is suing the company that made use of the stolen information, or the actual thief, that should be completely irrelevant. It is not the fault of honest people that there are thieves, and so they are not responsible for spending money on dealing with the problem.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#32 Surveillance Reform Theater

they were suing the company that offered the money if somebody could get the plans and were then making use.

the judge appeared to be effectively ruling that everybody is potentially dishonest if the stakes are high enough ... as well as trade secrets require demonstration of effort to keep it secret
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trade_secret

from above:
Companies often try to discover one another's trade secrets through lawful methods of reverse engineering or employee poaching on one hand, and potentially unlawful methods including industrial espionage on the other. Acts of industrial espionage are generally illegal in their own right under the relevant governing laws. The importance of that illegality to trade secret law is as follows: If a trade secret is acquired by improper means (a somewhat wider concept than "illegal means" but inclusive of such means), the secret is generally deemed to have been misappropriated. Thus if a trade secret has been acquired via industrial espionage, its acquirer will probably be subject to legal liability for acquiring it improperly. (The holder of the trade secret is nevertheless obliged to protect against such espionage to some degree in order to safeguard the secret. As noted above, under most trade secret regimes, a trade secret is not deemed to exist unless its purported holder takes reasonable steps to maintain its secrecy.)

... snip ...

aka security proportional to risk/value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proportional.to.risk

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LA Times commentary:  roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:31:53 -0700
recent item in closed, linkedin Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security where there were comments about why hadn't US ever deployed chip&pin and that there has never, ever been any problems with chip&pin. i provided some counter examples (but there continued to be posts/refrains about there never, ever having been any problems)

Obama signs chip and PIN executive order
http://www.finextra.com/news/fullstory.aspx?newsitemid=26601

from above:
US president Barack Obama has signed an executive order mandating the use of chip and PIN technology at executive departments and agencies for card payments.

... snip ..

Remember there was large roll-out here early part of the century in the Yes Card period ... reference here in this cartes2002 trip report (last paragraph, gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine; trivial to create counterfeit cards using essentially same skimming used for counterfeit magstripe)
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

then some FED LEO gave presentation at 2003 ATM (cash machine) taskforce meeting ... prompting somebody to observe that they managed to spend billions of dollars to prove chips are less secure than magstripe.

In the wake of that, the US deployment seemed to evaporate w/o a trace ... and some conjecture that it would be quite awhile before it was tried in US again (let all the kinks be worked out in other parts of the world in smaller scale deployments)

The Yes Card scenario was that it with skimming it was as trivial to make a counterfeit chip as it was to make a counterfeit magstripe. The decrease in security was because the standard had business rules moved out into the chip. A countermeasure to a counterfeit magstripe is to deactivate the account number so that no more fraudulent transactions could be done.

The Yes Card label comes from the fact that the POS terminal would ask the chip three questions ... and a counterfeit chip would always answer "YES" to all three questions: 1) was the correct PIN entered (regardless of what was typed), 2) should the transaction be done offline and 3) is the transaction within the credit limit.

The chip answering "YES" to 1 (correct PIN) means that it isn't necessary to know the correct PIN .... the chip answering "YES" to 2&3 means that all transactions will be authorized even if long after the account has been deactivated. the cartes2002 trip report sort of alludes to the problem (weaker and stronger "clones") ... but it was explained in much more detail by the Federal guy at the 2003 ATM Integrity Taskforce meeting.

I've been contacted in the past ten years by legal representatives of individuals disputing fraudulent transactions in the UK done with chipcards ... so there must be at least some. Somebody sent me a softcopy of the Cartes2002 Yes Card presentation ... but it says "confidential" all over it so am unable to share. I had actually advised the people doing the US deployment about the problem (before they starting sending out the chipcards), but they went ahead anyway.

Note ... when I advised the people doing the (early part of the century, US) deployment of the nature of the problem ... their response was that it didn't affect them because none of their (valid) cards were configured to do offline transactions (valid cards would only do online transactions). The issue was they didn't change the POS terminal implementation ... so counterfeit YES CARDS could still do fraudulent offline transaction (configuration of valid cards had no effect what-so-ever on PS terminal configuration and the operation of counterfeit YES CARDS).

as mentioned in this trip report to cartes2002 by the UK smartcard group
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

the same POS terminal compromise that had been in use for at least a decade to harvest information for cloning magstripe cards, turned out to also harvest information for trivially cloning EMV cards. It was part of the original EMV specification. As previously mentioned, when I provided the information to the group doing the EMV deployment in the US (they had been assured by the card association there were no such security vulnerabilities) ... they effectively ignored it and mailed the EMV cards anyway. Afterwards all traces of the deployment appeared to evaporate and the US appeared to position itself for long wait while all such kinks got worked out with smaller deployments in other parts of the world.

HINT: EMV specification allowed for both SDA and DDA (the chips they used for SDA were significantly cheaper than chips for DDA). In the early part of the century the deployments were still SDA. The point wasn't that the kinks weren't going to be eventually worked out ... but after being assured that there were no such security vulnerabilities when they were doing a very large and very expensive deployment ... and then have to abort and reset the whole effort, they weren't likely to try it again soon (which goes a long way towards accounting for the decade plus delay, also the people involved lost some amount of credibility).

note: having been involved in both X9 accredited financial industry standards group http://x9.org/ and ISO/TC68 international financial services standards group
http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink/open/tc68

they tend to make the distinction that EMV is a specification. This has some explanation of difference between SDA and DDA. It also talks about some of the more recent attacks:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMV

In one UK case that I was contacted about, it was expected that the victim produce the ATM machine surveillance video to prove that they didn't perform the transaction ... the bank claiming that they didn't have such a video to produce. Given current reg-e in the US, they shouldn't be possible to change the burden of proof ... as happened in other countries. See the wiki EMV entry for more information.

Given the tendency to rewrite history and stories about wiki wars on other subjects ... I wonder if there will be attempts to rewrite the EMV entry.

...

posts mentioning YES CARD clones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 11:04:36 -0700
greymausg <maus@mail.com> writes:
One of the favourite memories was that Alan Sugar, of Amstrad, coughed up cash to join IBM's new standard. Again, from possible faulty memory, that standard was an attempt to relegate the PC to a client of IBMs main machines?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#37 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

past posts mentioning communication group dumb terminal (& emulation) paradigm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

besides kneecaping the PS2 microchannel adapter cards ... there was also "SAA" (note no relation)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Systems_Application_Architecture

which claimed that it was attempting to allow any application to run on any machine ... but that was mostly facade to obfuscate efforts moving all the PC applications back to the mainframe and just use the PC as display device.

strategically token-ring was to address the 3270 coax cable floor loading problems. large corporate locations with point-to-point coax cables from the data center out to every 3270 (or PC emulated) terminal was starting to hit bldg. weight limits from the massive amounts of coax cable.

in the same time-frame as origin of SAA, my wife was co-author for IBM response to a fed. gov RFI for an extremely large and extremely secure campus distributed environment ... and wrote 3-tier architecture into the response. Then we were out making customer executive pitches that included middle layer/3-tier architecture ... and taking lots of arrows in the back from the communication group (who were putting huge effort into preserving their dumb terminal paradigm and fighting off client/server and distributed computing) ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

in the early 90s, one of the people that I worked with in the mid-70s on ECPS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist

was promoted to head of SAA with large corner office on the top floor of the new IBM bldg. in Somers. We would go by periodically to ridicule SAA.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 11:38:26 -0700
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
Even Rod is right once in a while. IBM had one thing going for them, credibility. And IBM, more than anything else, made PCs credible. A huge company like IBM had enormous overhead, the tiny dibble of money that was even possible profits from PCs would clearly be overwhelmed by the draining of sales from their product line.

The decimal points are all out of whack. Simply compare monthly *rentals* of the era with a PC purchase, *forever* for $2K.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#37 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#40 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

look at it from the customer standpoint ... large commercial companies would have business cases justification for tens of thousands of 3270 terminals. it was relatively trivial change to the business case for IBM/PCs that were approx. the same price and provided 3270 terminal emulation and some local computing capability in the same desktop footprint.

this is compared to generating a business case from scratch for 2nd desktop footprint that only provided local computing capability ... and you still needed the 3270 terminal.

the communication group fight to preserve the dumb terminal paradigm and the stanglehold on ibm mainframe datacenters was major contributor to ibm going into the red in the early 90s. the recent ibm financial related news has kicked off lots of discussions in various ibm-related onlinegroups and I had couple opportunities to reference the time article from dec1992 about ibm re-org into the 13 "baby-blues" (preparing for breakup) ... which is behind paywall but copies had been available at the wayback machine. I just had opportunity to recheck the wayback URLs and they now only show the paywall version (the full copies have apparently been removed).

my brother use to be regional apple marketing rep (largest region in CONUS) ... when he came into town, I could sometimes go to business dinners ... where I got to argue the point with the MAC developers (before MAC was announced). Today it would somewhat be analogous to expensive local computing device that didn't have cloud connectivity. some past posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#28 IBM S/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#22 IBM promotional items?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#13 IBM's mess (was: Re: What the hell is an MSX?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#38 IBM Dress Code, was DEC dress code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#24 computers and stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#29 computers and stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#66 unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#49 Origin of "Function keys" question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#44 Mainframe Emulation Solutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#14 were dumb terminals actually so dumb???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#46 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#47 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#21 Tru64 and the DECSYSTEM 20
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#28 Canon Cat for Sale
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#8 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#56 old lisa info
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#3 The Genealogy of the IBM PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#4 The Genealogy of the IBM PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#68 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#63 The Development of the Vital IBM PC in Spite of the Corporate Culture of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#3 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#32 IBM THINK original equipment sign
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#5 What if the computers went back to the '70s too?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#16 Orwellian Apple ad celebrates 25th birthday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#9 Existence of early 360 software ( was Re: Continous Systems Modelling Packa
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#62 Need the Name of a "Don Lancaster" type person
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#91 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#80 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#14 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#38 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#56 Steve Jobs passed away
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#66 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#69 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#8 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#24 How to Stuff a Wild Duck
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#3 Did Bill Gates Steal the Heart of DOS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#63 Today in TIME Tech History: Piston-less Power (1959), IBM's Decline (1992), TiVo (1998) and More
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#3 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#55 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#10 Mac at 30: A love/hate relationship from the support front
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#48 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#97 IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 17:19:17 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#31 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#33 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#34 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#35 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#36 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

IBM's chip business sale to UAE investor firm to get U.S. security review
http://slashdot.org/submission/3931009/ibms-chip-business-sale-to-uae-investor-firm-to-get-us-security-review
IBM's chip business sale gets national security scrutiny
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2837426/ibms-chip-business-sale-gets-national-security-scrutiny.html

GlobalFoundries created from AMD spin-off
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/globalfoundries-created-amd-spin-off-the
AMD, ATIC Launch Chip Manufacturing Company Globalfoundries
http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Desktops-and-Notebooks/AMD-ATIC-Launch-Chip-Manufacturing-Company-GlobalFoundries/

from above:
As predicted, Advanced Micro Devices has announced the creation of Globalfoundries, the business formed through the spinoff of the AMD's own chip manufacturing business. Globalfoundries is a joint venture between AMD and Advanced Technology Investment Company, of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:00:09 -0700
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
They need the chips, hopefully to sell systems that they do make a profit on.

So, how can you lose billions of dollars making chips for systems that you probably make millions, if not billions on?

Trick accounting.

The deal does not bode well for IBMs future.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#31 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#33 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#34 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#35 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#36 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#42 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

IBM 1qtr2014 financial numbers for (latest mainframe) EC12 processor sales were the equivalent of 14 max configured systems, 56 on an annualized basis. The current EC12 processor chips are in 32nm technology. Intel has invested $5B on new 14nm technology fab that may also be doing 450mm wafers. Straight map of EC12 32nm processor chip to 14nm, a 14nm technology 450mm wafer would have approx. a whole years sales of EC12 mainframe processors. My past experience with fab wafer production ... has minimum fab run of six wafers ... or a single, minimum wafer fab run would have enough for several years of mainframe processor sales.

Fab has to sell several hundred thousand to million wafers per year to recover $5B investment on newest generation fab technology every couple years.

in the past IBM business units have had conflicts separating what needed to be proprietary and what needed to be sold openly in order to achieve profitable operation (unable to resolve internal politics, some units had to be spun off). more and more of IBM systems have moved to non-proprietary, commodity components ... because their high-margin operations don't have large enough volume to justify the investment needed.

originally the IBM workstation division was supposedly designated an Independent Business Unit (IBU) not subject to the normal IBM internal politics. However, that was mostly just wishful thinking and rarely was able to achieve in actual practice ... power/rs6000 being forced to use low-throughput PS2 microchannel adapter cards just one simple example.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#37 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

recent posts mentioning 14nm fab:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#8 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#9 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#10 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#11 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#20 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#57 [CM] Mainframe tech is here to stay: just add innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#61 Are you tired of the negative comments about IBM in this community?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#68 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#56 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#0 The SDS 92, its place in history?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#86 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#87 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#89 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#90 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#91 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#93 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#5 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#24 Unisys CEO ousted, shares slip

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:13:57 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
originally the IBM workstation division was supposedly designated an Independent Business Unit (IBU) not subject to the normal IBM internal politics. However, that was mostly just wishful thinking and rarely was able to achieve in actual practice ... power/rs6000 being forced to use low-throughput PS2 microchannel adapter cards just one simple example.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#37 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#43 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

probably even playing factor in our HA/CMP scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

within approx. month after this meeting in Jan1992 on commercial HA/CMP scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

it had been transferred, announced as supercomputer for scientific and technical only and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors. some old email around that time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

shows we were working on both commercial scaleup for RDBMS as well as scientific & technical with national labs and other organziations. However, the mainframe DB2 people were complaining that if we were allowed to proceed (with the commercial part), it would be at least five years ahead of them. As i've mentioned in the past, some of the same execs that were involved in the scaleup transfer (and telling us that we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors) ... had earlier been involved in not allowing us to bid on what became the NSFNET backone (precursor to modern internat) ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:24:25 -0700
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
DEC sold the LSI-11 as bottom mini computers with a mini computer price. A personal $2000 micro computer that is mini computer computer had a market. Bottom end could go for RS232 rather than DECNET.

"An LSI-11 on every desk and a VAX in every department" could have been the dream.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#37 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#40 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#41 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

as i've mentioned before 4300s and VAX sold similar numbers in small unit orders ... the big difference was large corporate orders for several hundred 4300s at a time that went out into departmental areas ... sort of the leading edge of distributed computing tsunami (similar to the large corporate tens of thousands 3270 terminal orders that could trivially turn into IBM/PC orders).

endicott was planning that 4361/4381 (followon to 4331/4341) would see similar explosive growth in sales ... but by that time, the mid-range market was starting to move to workstations and large PCs.

decade of vax sales, sliced and diced by model, year, US/non-US ... showing downturn by mid-80s (some temporary with micro-vax):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0 Computers in Science Fiction

some old 4300 email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

above includes reference to getting con'ed into doing 4341 benchmarks .. on engineering 4341 model in the disk engineering test lab ... post mentioning getting to play disk engineer in bldgs. 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

(before 4341s shipped) for LLNL ... which was looking to get 70 4341s for compute farm.

This reference has AFDS initially looking at 20 distributed 4341s that grew to 210.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404b

This reference has Jim Gray chiding about helping Bank Of America with 60 distributred 4341s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email800311b
for System/R (original SQL/relational implementation)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

So a decade later ... I'm working with rs/6000 cluster scaleup and packing large numbers of rs/6000 processors in large number of racks ... for both commercial RDBMS operations as well as national lab scientific and technical computing ... recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#44 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

ha/cmp posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp
and old cluster scaleup email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

the 3270 dumb terminal emulation contributed to early large explosion in ibm/pc sales ... but then the communication group trying to protect that huge dumb terminal (emulation) install base ... fighting off client/server and distributed computing ... contributed significantly to downturn in mainframe datacenters and the corporation going into the red in the early 90s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#emulation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 14:46:14 -0700
"290jkl" <290jkl@nospam.com> writes:
IBM never did make much money on any of the PCs or laptops and what ended up with Lenovo and Lexmark.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#37 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#40 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#41 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#45 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Once the ibm/pc market grew large enough and with the large ibm markup on ibm/pc ... it made very attractive targets for the clone makers ... they could undercut the ibm price and still make significant profit.

I use to post on internal newsgroups, quantity one clone prices from sunday sjmn ... which were less than half what Boca were claiming they were. The former head of mainframe POK was sent to Boca to head up PS2 & OS2. At one point he did large consulting contract with Dataquest (since acquired by Gartner) to look at where the personal computer business was heading. The contract included requirement for several hr video tape roundtable discussion by Silicon Valley PC experts. I knew the person at Dataquest quite well and they asked me to be one of the Silicon Valley PC experts ... I cleared it with my immediate management and then got Dataquest to garble my introduction.

Gartner
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gartner

from above:
In the course of its growth, Gartner has acquired numerous companies providing related services, including Real Decisions (which became Gartner Measurement, now part of Gartner's consulting division), and Gartner Dataquest (Gartner's market research firm). It has also acquired a number of direct competitors, including NewScience in the late 1990s, Meta Group in 2005 and AMR Research and Burton Group in early 2010.

... snip ...

past post referencing either the dataquest contract and/or the SJMN quantity prices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#79 a.f.c history checkup... (was What specifications will the standard year 2001 PC have?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#55 Moore law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#56 Moore law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#21 What ever happened to Tandem and NonStop OS ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#81 IBM to the PCM market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#0 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#60 more on (the new 40+ yr old) virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#5 Houses
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#6 Houses
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#69 Intel's Future is integrated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#62 How long before Microsoft goes the way of DEC (and in part, IBM)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#10 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#78 SLIGHTLY OT - Home Computer of the Future (not IBM)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#44 Slackware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#4 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#20 9th Feb 2014
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#26 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#62 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 20:04:23 -0700
"290jkl" <290jkl@nospam.com> writes:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VisiCalc#History

Another, more complex, port was made to the IBM PC, and it was one of the first commercial packages available when it shipped in 1981.


one of the people responsible for visicalc had been at MIT and then was at one of the first cp67/cms (later vm370) virtual machine based online service bureaus that had quickly moved up the value stream to offering (online) financial information & services.

recent mention:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#2 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#46 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#50 curly brace languages source code style quides
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#84 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#6 HP splits, again

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:46:55 -0700
andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) writes:
I suspect the sale of POWER systems is not profitable nowadays, in particular the cost of chip design and manufacture is not paid back by the rapidly reducing volumes of what's now seen as legacy proprietary systems, but those sales enable IBM Global Services to continue making lots of money, and IBM to make money from software licenses, etc. So if IBM has had to cross-subsidize the hardware side of its business to keep the other sides running, it's still going to need to do that even if it sells that part of the business to someone else.

Much the same happened with HP and Itanium ten years ago - they handed over their chip designers and a large wad of money so that Intel would continue designing the chips HP needed in small quantities and no one else wanted anymore.


current is OpenPower attempt to increase volumes ... recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#34 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
referencing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenPOWER_Foundation

note that the Austin organization had been quite proprietary when their ROMP risc/801 displaywriter was canceled and they decided to retarget to unix workstation market (hiring the company that had done the at&t unix port for pc/ix to do one for ROMP ... which becomes AIX). However, they also worked hard on infusing it with huge amount of IBM proprietary features ... and wrote an enormous number of subcontracts for the features (schizophrenic trying to use traditional IBM proprietary and "added value" in a market that had been strongly open). By the time of RS/6000 and AIXV3 there was a signifcant software development "debt" that they would never be able to recover. The AIX software group then was reorganized and combined with the IBM/PC software group (to mask the debt)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

I've mentioned this approach being used a number of times in the past, especially when IBM was under much stricter gov. software pricing rules and regulation, especially combining VM370 with MVS software development ... it was used for the announce of the original JES2 networking product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#84 Set numbers off permanently
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#6 Mainframe upgrade done with wire cutters?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#33 Andrew developments in Rochester
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#87 Scanning JES3 JCL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#4 Dennis Ritchie
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#106 SPF in 1978
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#27 Unbuffered glass TTYs?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#28 SNA vs TCP/IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#75 NJE Clarifications

and it was also used for MVS ISPF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#17 Where's all the VMers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#42 CMS load module format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#106 SPF in 1978
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#103 TSO Test does not support 65-bit debugging?

other posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#31 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#33 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#35 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#36 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#42 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#43 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#44 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2014
Subject: IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
Blog: Facebook
IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- And It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
http://www.businessinsider.com/ibm-gives-up-on-its-2015-promise-2014-10

Goldman Makes It Official That the Stock Market is Manipulated, Buybacks Drive Valuations
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/10/goldman-makes-it-official-that-the-stock-market-is-manipulated-buybacks-drive-valuations.html
GOLDMAN: We're Blaming The Stock Market Sell-Off On A Pullback In Buybacks
http://www.businessinsider.com/goldman-on-buybacks-and-market-volatility-2014-10

They are hiring more censors on linkedin ... I post these news URLs/articles w/o comment in ibm groups ... I get flagged as posting inappropriate material, the posts are deleted and I'm blocked from new posts

from (Mike's) IBMJARGON:
Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

I got blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s, folklore is that when the executive committee was informed about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. Referenced term comes from a trip report that I distributed after visiting Jim Gray at Tandem (had left IBM San Jose Research the previous fall for Tandem).

At the time when IBM formed SBS (with Aetna and Comsat) IBM had something like 14 levels of management for 485,000 employees. So many IBMers populated SBS that they recreated/duplicated an organization structure with the same levels of management for 2,000 employees (half the employees were director or above).

posts mentioning internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
posts mentioning online computer conferencing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2014
Subject: IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
Blog: IBM Retirees
IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- And It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
http://www.businessinsider.com/ibm-gives-up-on-its-2015-promise-2014-10

23jun1969 unbundling ... also starting to charge for software ... however they did manage to make the case that kernel software was still free. FS in the early-to-mid 70s was completely different from 370 and going to completely replace 370, during FS period internal politics were killing off 370 efforts. The lack of 370 products during the period is credited with giving clone processors a market foothold. With the death of FS, there was mad rush to get products back into the 370 pipeline .... as well as changing decision about starting to charge for kernel software (my resource manager was selected as 1st guinea pig).

posts mentioning unbundling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle
posts mentioning Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

There were enormous problems that needed fixing when IBM got new CEO in the 90s ... and the company went through significant change. However the CEO came out of private-equity background and the way he fixed things may not have been the way many people would have thought they should have been fixed. Stockman describes the "stock buybacks" as mini-form of (private equity) LBOs. The industry had gotten such a bad reputation during the S&L crisis, that they changed their name to "private equity" and "junk bonds" became "high-yield bonds". The new 90s CEO had previously been in competition for the next CEO of AMEX. The looser leaves and takes his protegee Jamie Dimon with him. AMEX is in competition with KKR for private-equity LBO of RJR and KKR wins.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate_%28film%29

KKR runs into problems with RJR and hires the future IBM CEO to turn-around RJR. IBM is being re-organized into the 13 "baby-blues" in preparation for breakup. Old 28Dec92 article ... sometimes behind paywall but lives free at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.htm

The board then hires a new CEO to reverse the breakup and resurrect IBM. http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml The new CEO eventually leaves and goes on to head up one of the largest private-equity companies. The looser in competition for the next CEO of AMEX (& protegee) go to Baltimore and take over what has been described as loan sharking business, they take over some number of other businesses and eventually acquire Citibank in violation of Glass-Steagall. Greenspan gives them an exemption while they pour huge amounts of money into Capital Hill to repeal Glass-Steagall (major enabler for too big to fail). The protegee then leaves and takes over another one of the too big to fail.

posts mentioning gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
posts mentioning private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity
posts mentioning glass-steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

well, well, the full (ibm baby blue breakup) time article had previously been available at the wayback machine ... but now it is just showing the paywall version ... eariler captured full versions apparently removed???

Mark Cuban Slams IBM: It's 'No Longer A Tech Company. They Have No Vision.'
http://www.businessinsider.com/mark-cuban-ibm-is-not-a-tech-company-2014-10

from above:
"IBM is no longer a tech company," Cuban told CNBC. "They have no vision. What they've evolved into is a company that does [arbitrage] on acquisitions. It's stock buybacks. Who is IBM anymore?"

... snip ...

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A View From Beneath the Dancing Elephant

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2014
Subject: A View From Beneath the Dancing Elephant
Blog: IBM Retirees
A View From Beneath the Dancing Elephant
http://grandpaguysstories.com/2014/10/21/a-view-from-beneath-the-dancing-elephant/

part of one of the comments from above:
I am glad I could give you a great trip down memory lane in the first half of the book. The one chapter on Tom Watson Sr. was 2.5 years of research. His funding of the IBM retirement plan, as best I can tell, has never been told before. It was a little exasperating having all that time reduced down to one chapter but it was also the most enjoyable part of writing the book.

... snip ...

recent post mentioning book:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#58 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

in contrast to:

Retirement Heist
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

posts mentioning gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
posts mentioning private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 11:09:27 -0700
hancock4 writes:
The basic key for IBM's future is simply if has enough products and services it can sell at a profit. I think IBM's main business line these days is services, not hardware or software, though Campbell Kelly says IBM makes good money from mainframe software rentals, like CICS. (It amazes me how much money CA can charge for ancient software products that need virtually no support).

IBM: Can it transform fast enough?
http://www.zdnet.com/ibm-can-it-transform-fast-enough-7000034862/#ftag=RSSf468ffe

software has 87.6% gross profit margin

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:20:27 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#47 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

traditional ibm culture was make incredable investment in added-value, proprietary features ... but doing it for AIX then has to turn around and sell into the open system unix market. A large part of POSIX was enabling market to readily/easily move to best price/performance compatible platform (not being locked into proprietary platform) ... there was almost a view that POSIX was there to enable everybody to move to proprietary AIX platform at which time they could be locked in.

it put them at tremendous disadvantage selling against vendors that do a straight-forward unix port with minimal investment.

forcing rs/6000 to use the kneecapped ps2 microchannel adapter cards then put them at further disadvantage against other players in the workstation market.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#40 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

in this reference we were working with Hursley Harrier which weren't built to/for the (terminal emulation) PS2 market ... and demonstrated significant higher disk throughput compared to SCSI benchmarks (partially because of the PS2 SCSI cards weren't particularly high-throughput and partically because standard SCSI was still end-to-end half-duplex).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

but was also working towards full fibre-channel standard (also not PS2 cards) ... and as mentioned, wanting Harrier to be interoperable as fractional fibre-channel ... unfortunately it evolves into (non-interoperable) SSA
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_Storage_Architecture

fibre channel
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibre_Channel

as I mentioned before, in 1988 I was asked if I could help LLNL with fibre channel standardization.

past posts mentioning ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

old email mentioning cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

later there is a heavy-weight protocol defined for fibre channel that runs mainframe channel protocol and is eventually released as ficon
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 22:08:22 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Once the ibm/pc market grew large enough and with the large ibm markup on ibm/pc ... it made very attractive targets for the clone makers ... they could undercut the ibm price and still make significant profit.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#46 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

80-84 market
http://arstechnica.com/features/2005/12/total-share/4/
84-87 market
http://arstechnica.com/features/2005/12/total-share/5/
87-90 market
http://arstechnica.com/features/2005/12/total-share/6/

for the clones ... the two factors were size of the market and the profit margin ... lots of clone price efficiency is volume operation so is dependent on size of the market ... but also looking at base product having significant profit margin so there is lots of room coming in under the base price (and still have significant profit).

past posts mentioning the arstechnica article:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#4 What is the protocal for GMT offset in SMTP (e-mail) header
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#56 Steve Jobs passed away
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#80 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#28 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LA Times commentary:  roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:59:43 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
recent item in closed, linkedin Financial Risk, Fraud and Security where there were comments about why hadn't US ever deployed chip&pin and that there has never, ever been any problems with chip&pin. i provided some counter examples (but there continued to be posts/refrains about there never, ever having been any problems)

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#39 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

and similar but different thread:

This One Tool Could Help Prevent Massive Credit Card Fraud In America
http://www.businessinsider.com/how-emv-could-prevent-credit-card-fraud-2014-10

for a long time we referred to the current paradigm as security proportional to risk; the value to the crooks of previous transaction information (in breaches) is the account balance or credit limit (several hundred to several thousand); the value of the same information to merchants is the profit on the transaction, possibly only a couple dollars (and for transaction processors possibly only a couple pennies). As a result, the crooks/attackers can afford to outspend the merchant/processor/defenders by two orders of magnitude.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proportional.to.risk

another reference we've periodically used with regard to current paradigm is "dual-use" ... the account number is used as both 1) something you know authentication (just the account number is frequently sufficient to perform a fraudulent transaction), and as such needs to be kept completely confidential and *NEVER* divulged (not even including the account number in transactions) .... and 2) required in dozens of business processors at millions of places around the world and as such needs to be readily available. As result we've commented that even if the planet was buried under miles of information hiding encryption, it still wouldn't stop leakage.

in the 90s, we were also tangentially involved in the cal. state data breach notification legislation (original in the country). we had been brought in to help wordsmith the cal. state electronic signature law and many of the participants were heavily involved in privacy issues. they had done extensive, in-depth public surveys and found the number one issue was "identity theft", primarily the form of fraudulent financial transactions as a result of breaches. The issue was most entities take security measures in self-protection ... the issue with breaches was that the institutions weren't at risk, it was their customers; and little or nothing was being done. It was hoped that the publicity from the notifications would prompt corrective action. Note that since the cal. legislation there has been numerous federal breach bills introduced (so far none passed), about evenly divided between those similar to the original cal. state bill and those that effectively eliminate most requirements for notification (for instance requiring multiple different types of personal information which eliminates notification for nearly all the financial transaction breaches)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#signature
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

In the interest of full disclosure, long ago and far away, we were brought in as consultants to small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server; the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use; the result is now frequently called electronic commerce.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#sslcert

Somewhat as a result of having done "electronic commerce", in the mid-90s we were asked to participate in the x9a10 financial transaction working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for ALL retail transactions ... and we were co-authors of the resulting financial transaction standard for *ALL* retail payments (ACH, credit, debit, POS, attended, unattended, internet, online, etc; this was about the same time that the card associations were drafting their credit POS-only chip specification in Europe). Note the X9A10 financial transaction standard did nothing directly about skimming, evesdropping, or data breaches; however it tweaked the current paradigm and eliminated the ability of crooks to use information from previous transactions for fraudulent transactions ... and therefor eliminated the risk and motivation for skimming, evesdropping and data breaches. Now the major use of SSL in the world is this earlier work we did for electronic commerce, "hiding" transaction details, but the new standard eliminated the necessity for hiding transaction details and therefor also eliminated the major use of SSL in the world today.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959

One of the complaints were that the chips they (euro card association chip implemenation) used were slow, expensive, used lots of power (requiring contacts), and poor security. I was asked to design a chip that was small fraction of the cost of the chips they were using, significantly more secure, super-fast and power efficient (could even meet the transportation standard for transit turnstyle for contactless chips and elapsed time). We demonstrated a chip that could be used both in contact and contactless modes, was significantly more secure at a fraction of the cost (even able to meet transit turnstyle contactless power & elapsed time requirements) ... and even interoperate with EMV POS terminals. This was demo'ed in multiple booths at the 1999 world-wide retail banking show held in Miami that year.
http://www.atmmarketplace.com/news/bai-retail-delivery-99-to-focus-on-technology/

A major shortcoming was that the standard/chip combination significantly lowered the barrier to entry for getting into the payment industry (with radical reduction in fraud at very small faction of the cost, nearly anybody might get into the payment transaction business).

We were even invited in to talk to the guy in charge of payments in Bentonville. Note however, 1999 was also the year that GLBA passed ... which is now better known for repeal of Glass-Steagall (major contributor to too big to fail), but the rhetoric on the floor of congress at the time was that the primary purpose of GLBA was to keep new competition out of the banking&payment business (specifically mentioning Walmart and Microsoft).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Gave a talk here to main ballroom with standing room only
http://csrc.nist.gov/nissc/1998/index.html

Then top technical technical director in the info assurance directorate, asked me to give at talk in the trusted computing track at 2001 IDF (gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

The guy running TPM program
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trusted_Platform_Module

was in the front row, so I commented that it was nice to see the TPM starting to look more & more like my chip ... he quipped back that I didn't have a committee of 200 people helping me with the chip design.

the start of the century there were several factors in the pullback from safe payment products, including the large Yes Card deployment in the US where it was trivial to clone the chipcards (as cloning magstripe cards) resulting in worse fraud (since business rules had been moved out into the chip) and loss in credibility ... see Yes Card reference at the end of this cartes2002 trip report (gone 404, but lives on at the wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html
past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

this has result of NACHA pilot of our stuff ... but using their own chip that was less secure and cost more ... gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine ... see 23july2001 report
http://web.archive.org/web/20070706004855/http://internetcouncil.nacha.org/News/news.html

I did a lot of work aggressively cost reducing the chip while making it more secure ... some of this were processes inside the chip fabrication plant ... and some was eliminating post-fab processing steps for secure chips. However, at the same time I did a lot of work supporting shift from an institutional-centric to person-centric paradigm ... the same issued chip could be used for any purpose including gov high-security physical access (it was possible to rely on certification at time of chip manufacturing). One of the implications was that any payment processor could use any issued chip. The NACHA pilot had a chip that was otherwise programmed to operate the same but was precluded from being used by any but the issuing institution.

First part of the century, this and other "safe" payment products were pitched to the major internet commerce sites (accounting for upwards of 90% of total e-commerce transactions) and found high acceptance ... and then the cognitive dissonance sets in. Merchants had been indoctrinated for decades that a large part of payment fees were fraud proportional surchange and they were looking at "safe" payment products reducing their payment fee by upwards of 90%. However the financial institutions told them that instead of "safe" payment products reducing their payment fee, there would effectively be a large surcharge on top of the highest fee they were already paying ... and the whole thing collapses.

Part of the issue was report that less than 10% of EU financial institutions' bottom line came from payment fees while it is 40%-60% at US financial institutions (a 90% reduction in 60% of bottom line would be a hefty hit). Part of what has been seen since that time is aggressive effort to have major payment fee surcharges based on things other than fraud (like consumer cash-back and point programs) ... allowing for gradual shift away from a fraud-based profit bottom line (to things like a cash-back-based profit bottom line).

past references to financial institutions having a fraud-based profit bottom line:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#31 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#32 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#33 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#34 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#35 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#37 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#38 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#39 a fraud is a sale, Re: The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#40 a fraud is a sale, Re: The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#41 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#42 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#43 a fraud is a sale, Re: The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#81 not crypto, but fraud detection
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#6 Ridiculous
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#30 Is the media letting banks off the hook on payment card security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#15 Public Computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#75 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#79 PIN entry on digital signatures + extra token
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#4 GPG
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#5 GPG
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#7 Payments start-up Noca takes aim at interchange Achilles heel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#29 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#32 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#37 The 20th Century of Central Banking is over
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#51 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#60 Cobol hits 50 and keeps counting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#62 Solving password problems one at a time, Re: The password-reset paradox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#64 What happened to X9.59?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#51 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#52 Credit cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#49 Hacker charges also an indictment on PCI, expert says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#62 August 7, 1944: today is the 65th Anniversary of the Birth of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#1 IT Story New Standard For EU-Compliant Electronic Signatures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#17 Chip and PIN is Broken!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#21 Should the USA Implement EMV?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#54 Trust Facade
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#69 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#10 Wal-Mart to support smartcard payments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#26 Root Zone DNSSEC Deployment Technical Status Update
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#39 Compressing the OODA-Loop - Removing the D (and maybe even an O)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#52 Payment Card Industry Pursues Profits Over Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#40 The Great Cyberheist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#38 Looking for a real Fortran-66 compatible PC compiler (CP/M or DOSor Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#42 Looking for a real Fortran-66 compatible PC compiler (CP/M or DOSor Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#11 Credit cards with a proximity wifi chip can be as safe as walking around with your credit card number on a poster
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#42 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#43 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#48 On Protectionism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#23 Fight Fraud with Device ID
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#48 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#58 Pipeline and Network Security: Protecting a Series of Tubes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#56 Does outsourcing cause data loss?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#38 ISBNs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#39 ISBNs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#15 Wicked Problems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#71 Password shortcomings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#78 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#69 Freefall: America, Free Markets, and the Sinking of the World Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#32 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#32 Zeus/SpyEye 'Automatic Transfer' Module Masks Online Banking Theft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#32 Use another browser - Kaspersky follows suit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#10 Does the IBM System z Mainframe rely on Security by Obscurity or is it Secure by Design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#58 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#8 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#47 Pirate Bay co-founder charged with hacking IBM mainframes, stealing money
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#52 U.S. agents 'got lucky' pursuing accused Russia master hackers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#70 Teaching Smart People How to Learn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#60 Target Offers Free Credit Monitoring Following Security Breach
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#77 In a Cyber Breach, Who Pays, Banks or Retailers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#40 Missed Alarms and 40 Million Stolen Credit Card Numbers: How Target Blew It
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#17 Is it time for a revolution to replace TLS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#37 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#44 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#53 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

This Chart From IBM Explains Why Cloud Computing Is Such A Game-Changer

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014
Subject: This Chart From IBM Explains Why Cloud Computing Is Such A Game-Changer
Blog: IBM Wild Ducks
This Chart From IBM Explains Why Cloud Computing Is Such A Game-Changer
http://www.businessinsider.com/this-chart-from-ibm-explains-why-cloud-computing-is-such-a-game-changer-2014-4

Two Key Reasons Why Microsoft Is Leaving IBM And Hewlett-Packard Behind
http://seekingalpha.com/article/2598125-2-key-reasons-why-microsoft-is-leaving-ibm-and-hewlett-packard-behind

max configured mainframe ec12 with 101 processors is rated at 75BIPS and goes for $33M or $440,000/BIPS. e5-2600V1 rack blade IBM had base list price of $1815 and rated at 400-500+ BIPS (as little as $3.44/BIPS). For at least decade, large cloud megadatacenters have been claiming that they assemble their own blades at 1/3rd the cost of brand name blades using the most cost & power efficient components ($1/BIPS or less). Their system costs have dropped so dramaticly that power & cooling has become increasing the major expense for cloud operation. The large cloud megadatacenters have had major impact on design of chips for power & cooling efficiencies ... so they can have huge number of idle systems for on-demand requirements (using no power when idle but able to instantly come up to full operation on-demand). Large cloud operations view systems as cost (rather than profit) motivating the aggressive cost cutting and also contributing to IBM's unloading its server business.

Cambridge Science Center did CP67/CMS which was extensively used for online, ondemand operation in the 60s. This was in the period when there was lots of work on CP67 to extend it to 7x24 operation. Part of the issue was datacenters tried to recover operation costs with use charges. Initially moving from first shift to 7x24 availability, there was little offshift use that wasn't sufficient to justify leaving the system up (but w/o 7x24 availability, it wasn't going to encourage offshift use). One of the first things that had to be done was support darkroom operation with no human operator (offshift automatic operation). This was also in period when computers were rented, charges based on the processor system meter (ran whenever the processor and/or any I/O channels were active). A special CP67 channel program was done that primed for incoming/outgoing data but allowed the I/O channels to go idle when there was no actual data transmission. The processor and all I/O channels had to be idle for at least 400ms before the system meter actually stopped. Note that the POK favorite son mainframe system had a operating system task that woke up every 400ms (guaranteeing the system meter never stopped) long after market had moved from rent/leased to sales.

Jim Gray did study at tandem in 80s that normal hardware reliability was getting to the point that the majority of service outages had shifted to people mistakes, software and environmental (power outages, floods, etc) ... presentation from part of that study:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

e5-2600 is XEON which supposedly has some of the itanium enterprise reliability features. However a cloud megadatacenter has hundreds of thousands of systems and millions of processors (single megadatacenter more processing than aggregate of all mainframes in the world today) ... and large cloud operator will have several such megadatacenters around the world providing for replication and masking for all sorts of outages and failures.

The e5-2600v1 benchmarks are drystone which is number of iterations compared to baseline 370/158 assumed to be 1MIP processor. It is difficult to determine what the Z numbers are based on and/or even find details of Z benchmarks. RISC & I86 have used lots of cache-miss & memory latency masking technologies for a couple decades (out-of-order execution, branch prediction, etc). The claim is that over half of the per processor throughput improvement from Z10 to Z196 was the first introduction of such features ... with further enhancements from Z196 to EC12.

Jim Gray was also responsible for original TPC benchmarks ... while IBM has released loads of results for formal TPC numbers for its non-mainframe platforms. There hasn't been mainframe TPC numbers for couple decades.

IBM did publish peak I/O throughput benchmark for z196 ... which got 2M IOPS using 104 FICONs. FICON is a heavy weight mainframe channel emulation protocol layer on industry standard fibre channel standard that drastically reduces the native throughput. About the same time as the Z196 peak I/O benchmark, there was announce of native fibre channel for e5-2600 claiming over 1M IOPS (for single fibre channel, aka 2 such native fibre channel having higher throughput than 104 FICON). Disclaimer, fibre channel comes out of some work at LLNL ... in 1988 I was asked if I could help LLNL standardize what becomes fibre channel standard. Later some mainframe channel engineers define the mainframe channel protocol layer that is later announced as FICON (drastically reducing native throughput). EC12 publication just says to expect 30% higher I/O than z196. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

EC12 processor chip is 32nm technology. Intel recently announces $5B for 14nm technology with possibly 450mm wafers. 1qtr2014 IBM financials has the equivalent of 14 max. configured EC12 sales (56 on annualized basis). Straight map of EC12 to 14nm tech 450mm wafers has full years EC12 sales in one wafer. My past experience with fab production is minimum run is six wafers ... or single minimum wafer run would provide for several years of EC12 processor sales.

recent refs to cloud megadatacenters:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#23 Scary Sysprogs and educating those 'kids'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#94 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#97 Santa has a Mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#4 IBM Plans Big Spending for the Cloud ($1.2B)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#27 IBM sells x86 server business to Levono
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#72 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#22 US Federal Reserve pushes ahead with Faster Payments planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#108 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#4 Can the mainframe remain relevant in the cloud and mobile era?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#8 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#12 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#53 IBM hopes new chip can turn the tables on Intel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#80 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#86 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#4 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#14 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#20 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#65 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#5 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#24 IBM Opens New SoftLayer Data Center In Hong Kong
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#33 Can Ginni really lead the company to the next great product line?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#46 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#57 [CM] Mainframe tech is here to stay: just add innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#68 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#5 "F[R]eebie" software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#87 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#2 Flat (VSAM or other) files still in use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#0 HP splits, again

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 15:44:41 -0700
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
Hmm. I have both learned and observed that one boss can handle 12 people. Even the 13th(or 14th, really) becomes a stress on the group, and at somewhere between 17 and 20 you have a breakdown of the group; at the best two independent groups forms.

The same applies further up, one boss can handle 12 subordinate bosses, but only if command lines are reasonably straight.

12 squared is 144, not far from the 150 stated. This is where a boss's boss can impose their will on the grunts, but a 3rd level boss cannot.


for a long time inside IBM it supposedly was 7 ... although some organizations were almost veritical with 1 or 2.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Span_of_control

from above:
Firstly, it depends on the capabilities of the organizational members, managers and workers. It was assumed, that no manager would be capable of supervising more than 5-6 direct subordinates. However, this conclusion built on the assumption, that the superior must actively monitor the work of all subordinates. Later on, this statement was diversified, and Davis (1951) divided managerial work into two categories, one requiring the attention to physical work, the other one requiring mental activity. Depending on the type of supervision, a span of 3-8 subordinates for managers at higher levels was considered adequate, while first level supervisors, i.e. those supervising shop floor personnel could have up to 30 subordinates.

... snip ...

when IBM was preparing for breaking up the company in the early 90s, the disk division ("adstar") was sheading lots of middle management (flattening the organization) and was going to 12-13 per manager.

I recently mentioned that at one time, IBM had 14 levels of management for 485,000 employees (less than 7**7, even less than 3**12) about the same time IBM formed SBS (with Aetna and Comsat) and so many IBMers went over (recreating same structure) that SBS had 14 levels of management for 2000 employees. This was after a post by somebody that mentioned in the late 90s, the CEO was their 5th-line manager and four years later (after CEO change and organizational shuffle), the CEO was their 11th-line manager.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LA Times commentary:  roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:11:44 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#69 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#70 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#55 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#58 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

slightly related to previous comment over "safe payment products" collapsing over "cognitive dissonance"

Here's why Rite Aid and CVS turned off Apple Pay
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2839144/heres-why-rite-aid-and-cvs-turned-off-apple-pay.html

from above:
The battle goes back to at least 1996, when Walmart, Sears and other big retailers filed a class-action lawsuit arguing that Visa and MasterCard violated antitrust laws. The credit card companies ultimately agreed to pay the retailers $3 billion to settle the suit in 2003.

In the current skirmish, the issue is over retailers paying 2% or more in fees, better known as "swipe fees," to credit card companies for customers to use Apple Pay or other systems that rely on major credit cards.

Retailers and credit card companies have been going to war for years [over the fees retailers pay]


... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 1401 upgrade--differences between 1460, 1410, and 7010?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM 1401 upgrade--differences between 1460, 1410, and 7010?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 16:25:44 -0700
"Joe Morris" <j.c.morris@verizon.net> writes:
You are correct to the point that each device (more exactly, each device address) has a one-to-one mapping to a specific Unit Control Block (UCB) in the nucleus. The UCB, however, is an operating system artifact and is without significance until the operating system nucleus has been loaded into memory and its basic initialization completed. What's "dialed in" using the rotary switches in the OCP is the *device address*.

microcode has UCW ... which could be plugged shared/non-shared for the fun of it: vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/browse?fn=ALTCHAN&ft=MEMO
Append on 09/03/87 at 11:14 by Joe Morris / The MITRE Corporation:

Mike: I don't run XA, but as I understand it the control unit is unaware of the type of operating system in the mainframe, and thus cannot alter its actions to suit the host. If that is so, the response MUST be returned over the path which originated the I/O. The control unit has no idea whether two paths which reach it are from one CPU or two, and thus must ensure that the originator receives the response.

There is a special case for unsolicited interrupts (specifically, Control Unit End) in which some control units include a 'multi-tag' switch which indicates whether the interrupt must be received by all interfaces, or only one before the control unit is available for data. The switch is not present on the 3880 controllers.

In the non-XA world, there is a UCW for each (unshared) device. The UCW is marked busy when the SIO is accepted, and remains busy until the device end is received from that device...another reason why the device must send CE and DE on the originating interface.

In the XA world the interface between the channel and operating system is scrambled in the channel director in the CPU, but I think the external (i.e., bus/tag interface) is the same.

Joe

*** APPENDED 09/03/87 11:14:05 BY MTW/JOE ***


--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014
Subject: IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
Blog: IBM Retirees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#49 IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#50 IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company

The Buyback Of Things: IBM To Repurchase Another $5 Billion In Stock In Next Two Quarters
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-10-28/buyback-things-ibm-repurchase-another-5-billion-stock-next-two-quarters

and just barely squeaks in at 100 (dropping 10 places)

The World's 100 Most Desirable Employers
http://www.businessinsider.com/linkedin-100-most-desirable-employers-2014-10

from Stockman in "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America" pg464/loc9995-10000:
IBM was not the born-again growth machine trumpeted by the mob of Wall Street momo traders. It was actually a stock buyback contraption on steroids. During the five years ending in fiscal 2011, the company spent a staggering $67 billion repurchasing its own shares, a figure that was equal to 100 percent of its net income.

pg465/10014-17:
Total shareholder distributions, including dividends, amounted to $82 billion, or 122 percent, of net income over this five-year period. Likewise, during the last five years IBM spent less on capital investment than its depreciation and amortization charges, and also shrank its constant dollar spending for research and development by nearly 2 percent annually.

... snip ..

Stockman equates it with form of private-equity LBO (the business had gotten such a bad rep during the S&L crisis, they changed the name to "private equity" and "junk" bonds became "high-yield" bonds). There is also analogy with "house flipping" ... except instead of having to pay off the existing mortgage when the company goes public again, the loan to buy company stays on the (sold) company's books (i.e. they can even resell the company for much less than they paid and still walk away with boat load of money). NYT had article that over half the corporate defaults were companies that had been through the private-equity mill.

posts mentioning private equity industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

recent posts mentioning Stockman's book:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#14 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#25 IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#48 IBM Dumps Its Server Business On Lenovo For $2.3B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#79 Shocking news: Execs do what they're paid to do
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#101 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#54 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#107 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#75 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#33 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#48 IBM hopes new chip can turn the tables on Intel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#54 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#80 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#111 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#0 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#36 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 10:03:59 -0700
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
I wasn't trying to affix blame, just trying to see how bad the problem is. If I recall what I saw earlier, there were more Lt. Colonels than 2nd Lieutenants. Not germane, but interesting to me there were 11,000 recruits (E1), new people in the army during the year. It was not as top heavy, general wise, as I had feared. But there was this HUGE cluster of Lt. Col. I suspect this is caused by rules interactions: we don't want 40 year old second Lieutenants and congress says only so many field grade officers. I'm digging way back in my memory for "field grade", but something such as that.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#57 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Pentagon cuts general and flag positions to reduce top-heavy force Marine Corps has smallest ratio, Air Force the largest
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2011/sep/27/star-creep-pentagon-cuts-general-and-flag-position/
The Pentagon's Biggest Overrun: Way Too Many Generals
http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/5920:the-pentagons-biggest-overrun-way-too-many-generals
The Pentagon Has Too Many Generals. This bloat at the top has had a trickle-down effect that hinders troops and wastes money.
http://www.usnews.com/opinion/blogs/world-report/2013/07/24/the-pentagon-has-too-many-troops
How bad is our bloat of generals? How does it compare with other armies?
http://fabiusmaximus.com/2012/09/10/american-military-force-changed-43153/

there were also articles about how SECDEF was managing the reduction so that during the period there was actual increase. Most recent there seems to be call for large reduction in the lowest ranks and elimination of benefits ... so the funds can be shifted to projects done by for-profit companies (MICC).

Part of one of Boyd's briefing was that entry to WW2, the US had to deploy and enormous number of inexperienced and untrained soldiers ... and as a result created a rigid, top-down, heavy-weight command&control structure to leavage the few skills available. As part of that it needed heavy-weight bureaucracy starting with 11% officers (compared to 3% for Germans), later growing to 20%. He noted that by the 80s the paradigm was contaminating US corporate culture, as former military officers climbed the corporate later. This has also been used to account for stories about the ratio of top executive to worker compensation exploding to over 400:1 (after being 20:1 for long time and 10:1 in much of the rest of the world), aka only those at the very top know what they are doing (and requires tight control of everybody else, all success is attributed to skill of the CEO).

however, much more severe than top-heavy infrastructure is top levels divorced from their business, congress&pentagon owned by industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industry.complex

revolving doors where top officials are acting in the interest of industry that they expect will give them lucretive job when they retire.

various articles recently about the severely broken procurement process and whether or not it would ever get fixed ... there is law from mid-90s that all federal agencies pass an annual financial audit ... which DOD has never been able to do ... 2010 report that previous decade that DOD budget was increased by a little over $2T over baseline ... a little over a trillion for the two wars and a little over another trillion that couldn't be accounted for (other reports that the costs of the two wars eventually exceed $5T including long term veteren benefits and health costs).

Boyd had story about reviewing several of the large scale wargames in the 70s & 80s ... the generals & admirals would play golf all year while their staff practiced ... and then when it came to the actual exercise, the generals/admirals had no "finger-feel" (Fingerspitzengefuehl) for the tempo and information flow in the warroom.

George Will Confirms Nixon's Vietnam Treason
http://www.commondreams.org/views/2014/08/12/george-will-confirms-nixons-vietnam-treason

Boyd had another story about reviewing the new air force air-to-air missile before vietnam. They showed stats, tests, and movie showing missile hitting flares on drone everytime. Boyd then said it would hit less than 10% of the time and asked then to replay the movie, just before the missile hits a flare, he has them stop the film and asks what kind of guidance, they say heat-seaking. He asks them what kind of heat-seaking and eventually gets them to say pin-point. He then asks them what is the hottest part part of jet fighter and they say the jet engine. He says wrong, it is the plume way behind the plane ... the only time the missle will hit is when it is shot straight up the tail-pipe. They gather up all the material, leave and suppress his evaluation.

Roll forward to vietnam and Boyd proves correct. At one point, the one-star in vietnam grounds all the fighters and have them converted from the air force missile to the navy sidewinder (which had better than twice the hit rate). He lasts 3months before relieved and called back to the pentagon. He has impacted the air force budget, loosing less fighers and pilots and not using air force missiles ... and worse yet has increasing navy budget (using sidewinders). Pentagon was almost totally removed from the actual war other than how it affected their budget and inter-service rivalry.

posts & web URLs referencing Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

recent posts mentioning the 400:1 compensation ratio:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#14 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#15 Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#29 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#81 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#33 Power grid groans, blackouts roll through L.A. area as heat wave nears peak

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:29:07 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Part of one of Boyd's briefing was that entry to WW2, the US had to deploy and enormous number of inexperienced and untrained soldiers ... and as a result created a rigid, top-down, heavy-weight command&control structure to leavage the few skills available. As part of that it needed heavy-weight bureaucracy starting with 11% officers (compared to 3% for Germans), later growing to 20%. He noted that by the 80s the paradigm was contaminating US corporate culture, as former military officers climbed the corporate later.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#57 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#61 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

winning WW2 was attributed to having massive, overwhelming resources ... and that germany had 3/4ths of its military resources against russia and japan had 2/3rds of its military resources against china.

one of boyd's examples was tiger had 10:1 kill rate over sherman ... but the US could afford to win by attrition (although it had some downside on the morale of the US tank crews)

there was recent article that tiger also had very short lease, tightly tied to its supply/maintenance/repair) infrastructure (restricting freedom of operation). however, this has also been attributed to US Abrams M1 and used to explain the failure to execute the left hook (cutting off the republican guards retreat) in Boyd's battle plan for desert storm (abrams tightly tied to its supply/maintenance/repair infrastructure)

recent posts mentioning Abrams
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#42 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#61 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#64 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#79 Army Modernization Is Melting Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#36 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#38 Can America Win Wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#46 The Pentagon Wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#68 Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#36 The Designer Of The F-15 Explains Just How Stupid The F-35 Is

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 12:03:53 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
winning WW2 was attributed to having massive, overwhelming resources ... and that germany had 3/4ths of its military resources against russia and japan had 2/3rds of its military resources against china.

one of boyd's examples was tiger had 10:1 kill rate over sherman ... but the US could afford to win by attrition (although it had some downside on the morale of the US tank crews)


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#57 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#61 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

late 80s, the commandant of the Marine Corps leveraged boyd for make-over of the corp
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_M._Gray,_Jr.
same picture shows up here
https://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic_heritage/hall_of_honor/2008/index.shtml

.... however it is ongoing battle
https://www.mca-marines.org/gazette/attritionist-letters-archives
and
https://www.mca-marines.org/files/The%20Attritionist%20Letters%20Anthology_0.pdf

Gray will still show up at Boyd conferences at Marine Corps Univ.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:26:08 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Some progressive owners, like Kaiser, provided his workers with numerous support services to reduce absentism. He had things like health care and child care. Some owners saw that housing or transportation were located near the plant. Others made a point to truly listen to their workers concerns and grievances.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#57 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#61 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#63 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

however a recent item

Hawaiian Workers Fight Kaiser Pension Take-Away
http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/10/29/73700/

this is along the lines of recent threads in (facebook) IBM Retirees discussions about retirement benefits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#50 IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#51 A View From Beneath the Dancing Elephant

....

A View From Beneath the Dancing Elephant
http://grandpaguysstories.com/2014/10/21/a-view-from-beneath-the-dancing-elephant/

part of one of the comments from above:
I am glad I could give you a great trip down memory lane in the first half of the book. The one chapter on Tom Watson Sr. was 2.5 years of research. His funding of the IBM retirement plan, as best I can tell, has never been told before. It was a little exasperating having all that time reduced down to one chapter but it was also the most enjoyable part of writing the book.

... snip ...

in contrast to:

Retirement Heist
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

....

the above mentions Gerstner using Watson Wyatt at RJR Nabisco and then again at IBM ... posts mentioning Gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

in the facebook thread, somebody quoted:
"It is not until they are ready to retire that they understand how little they are actually getting," said a Watson Wyatt actuary at a 1998 panel.

... and it is the precursor to Towers-Watson that IBM currently uses to manage retirees health/medical benefits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Towers_Watson

for other drift, more recent looting retirement funds

Private Equity Consultants Flounder Over Question About Abusive "Evergreen Fees" at CalPERS Board Meeting
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/10/private-equity-consultants-flounder-question-abusive-evergreen-fees-calpers-board-meeting.html

from above:
If you want to understand why private equity general partners have gotten away for so long with what the SEC has come perilously close to calling outright embezzlement, along with other serious compliance abuses, you need look no further than the last CalPERS board meeting to get a clue.

... snip ...

SEC Official Describes Widespread Lawbreaking and Material Weakness in Controls in Private Equity Industry
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/05/sec-official-describes-widespread-lawbreaking-material-weakness-controls-private-equity-industry.html

posts mentioning private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 09:25:48 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Based on a hazy memory, I think the smallest size was _roughly_ 32 bytes. It may have varied by device.

For the 2314 disk, we had to consult a reference card table which listed the blocks per track. The idea was to optimize the size based on what a track could accomodate tightly--too small a block was inefficient, but too large a block was wasteful too as it left wasted space.

Today optimum allocation is automatic (actually has been for many years)


dasd capacity formulae from gcard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/gcard.html#26.3

starting with 3380/3375 ... even CKD physical format was form of FBA ... where length had to be rounded up to 'cell' boundary ... however there hasn't been even 3380/3375 form of CKD manufactured for decades ... all CKD is really simulated on industry standard FBA ... POK "favorite son" operating system unable to come up with FBA support ... misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

cp67/cms from mid-60s simulated a form of FBA even on CKD disks ... originally 800 bytes ... and the cms (cp67&vm370) TAPE utility used 800 byte blocks ... and the vm370 tape distribution program, VMFPLC, was a modified version of TAPE.

when I first did the internal CMSBACK backup/archive facility in the late 70s, I started with a version of VMFPLC that I modified for larger tape block size and other features
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#backup
and some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#cmsback

Later cmsback morphs into the workstation datasave product (various workstation/PC clients added that interacted with the cmsback backend), which becomes ADSM (for adstar storage manager, since renamed TSM when the disk division was unloaded). misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#66 Holy Satanism! Re: Hyper-Threading Technology - Intel information.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#3 IBM's "old" boss speaks (was "new")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#10 Deleting files and emails at Arthur Andersen and Enron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#29 Computers in Science Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#25 Beyond 8+3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#43 VMFPLC2 tape format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#9 IBM says AMD dead in 5yrs ... -- Microsoft Monopoly vs. IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#52 HSM Functionality for Microsoft, using the Mainframe as the
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#47 Slashdot: O'Reilly On The Importance Of The Mainframe Heritage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#48 incremental cms file backup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#20 Systems software versus applications software definitions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#4 Athlon cache question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#36 backup/archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#34 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#56 Q ALLOC PAGE vs. CP Q ALLOC vs ESAMAP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#42 VMFPLC2 to load EREP PTFs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#9 How to restore VMFPLC dumped files on z/VM V5.1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#21 IBM up for grabs?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#2 Mount a tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#14 Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#19 Mainframe Linux Mythbusting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#29 CRAM, DataCell, and 3850
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#64 The Fate of VM - was: Re: Baby MVS???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#12 Trying to design low level hard disk manipulation program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#20 Why these original FORTRAN quirks?; Now : Programming practices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#24 CMSBACK
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#35 V2X2 vs. Shark (SnapShot v. FlashCopy)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#32 Patents, Copyrights, Profits, Flex and Hercules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#16 VM TSM server support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#13 LINC-8 Front Panel Questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#46 Whitehouse Emails Were Lost Due to "Upgrade"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#7 We're losing the battle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#31 What is "timesharing" (Re: OS X Finder windows vs terminal window weirdness)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#72 tape blocking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#28 What if the computers went back to the '70s too?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#8 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#72 IBM Revamp Venerable Tivoli Storage Software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#59 Backup and Restore Manager for z/VM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#66 Evolution of Floating Point
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#67 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#18 How to analyze a volume's access by dataset
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#33 Was VM ever used as an exokernel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#0 Old EMAIL Index
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#43 PROP instead of POPS, PoO, et al
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#35 Tivoli Storage Manager for z/OS (Functionally Stablized & Impending Demise)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#18 Melinda Varian's history page move
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#28 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#34 CMS load module format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#73 Tape vs DASD - Speed/time/CPU utilization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#64 Layer 8: NASA unplugs last mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#4 Hard drives: A bit of progress
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#46 Slackware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#70 END OF FILE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#78 END OF FILE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#83 Does anyone remember what mainframe backup products were for VMs around 2000/2001
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#11 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#92 write rings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#58 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#79 IBM Programmer Aptitude Test

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 10:42:46 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Memory size was one of the reasons IBM used virtual memory on its mainframes. If someone had a program which required 150k but only 100k space available, the program would run, though with slower performance due to paging*. Indeed, even before virtual memory, some IBM programs (like its sort) were dynamic--automatically using whatever memory was available and farming the rest out to disk (or tape). Bigger memory meant less I/O and faster processing.

In the old days, application programmers often wrote routines that were farmed out to disk (done semi-automatically in COBOL with Segmentation), however, these weren't dynamic. If a site upgraded to a larger machine, the programs would have to be modified and recompiled to exploit the advantages of more memory (though of course it would still run unmodified).


this is old post about justification for moving to virtual memory for all 370s.

as systems were getting faster, disks improvements weren't keeping up ... so there was requirement to have higher levels of multiprogramming to keep systems usefully occupied (concurrent overlap with disk access). MVT had particular horrible storage management requiring contiguous (real) storage for each application/task ... but on the average only able to effectively use 25% of that space. Going to virtual memory allowed increasing concurrent executing tasks from four to 16 (on typical 370/165 one mbyte real storage), with little or no paging.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

In the 70s, I had been pontificating onthe increasing mismatch between disk throughput and system throughput. In the early 80s I was saying that over 15yr period, the relative system throughput of disks had declined by order of magnitude (systems got 40-50 times faster, disks throughput only got 4-5 times faster). Some disk division executives took exception to the comment and assigned the division performance group to refute the statement. After a couple weeks, they came back and effectively said that I had slightly understated the case.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#31 Big I/O or Kicking the Mainframe out the Door

they then turned the analysis into a (IBM user group) SHARE presentation on optimizing disk for increased throughput ... old references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#18 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#46 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#3 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#68 DASD Response Time (on antique 3390?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#5 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#9 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#88 CPU time differences for the same job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#71 308x Processors - was "Mainframe articles"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#7 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#34 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#52 Hercules; more information requested
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#67 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#1 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#70 25 reasons why hardware is still hot at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#31 Wax ON Wax OFF -- Tuning VSAM considerations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#32 OS idling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#33 History of Hard-coded Offsets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#18 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#30 IBM Historic computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#35 CKD DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#61 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#1 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#59 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#5 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#32 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#73 Tape vs DASD - Speed/time/CPU utilization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#39 A bit of IBM System 360 nostalgia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#62 ISO documentation of IBM 3375, 3380 and 3390 track format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#72 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#49 Mac at 30: A love/hate relationship from the support front

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LA Times commentary:  roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 11:05:48 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
This One Tool Could Help Prevent Massive Credit Card Fraud In America
http://www.businessinsider.com/how-emv-could-prevent-credit-card-fraud-2014-10


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#55 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

there is recent thread in the crypto mailing list almost the opposite ("EMV as a fraud enabler") ... something i posted in the thread

There are various quotes about those that don't learn from history are doomed to repeat the same mistakes.

the current payment infrastructure somewhat grew up during the days of trusted value added networks (VANs) during the 70s&80s ... which were mostly obsoleted by the internet over the last 20yrs.

about the time the card associations were first drafting the POS/EMV in Europe, they also had a totally different group drafting a payment specification for the Internet. They shared the characteristic that the integrity checking was being done at the perimeter/boundary ... which is then dependent on internal trusted VAN (lots of business interest in preserving that status quo) ... however it creates an enormous attack surface ... both at the boundary/perimeter as well as inside the infrastructure.

Not long after the early deployment of their internet payment specification, some of the business people discovered that they were getting transactions that had flag set that the perimeter had performed the crypto integrity check ... and they could prove no such crypto was ever involved (not all the different from the current attacks nearly 20yrs later).

In the internet case, the attempts to preserve the status quo of the existing payment networks (trusted VAN) were masked by selecting crypto technology that bloated the payload size of a payment transaction by two orders of magnitude (100 times) ... resulting in the justification that the crypto integrity checks had to be performed at the boundary and only a single bit sent through (indicating successful integrity check) because the payment networks couldn't stand a factor of 100 times increase in transaction payload size. Note that there is little or no evidence of that early standard still in existence. past references to the enormous payload size bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#bloat

There were other teething problems with the POS version. There was a large early deployment in the US during the YES CARD period ... it turns out that it was possible to use the same skimming technology (used to create a counterfeit magstripe) to create a counterfeit chip. The fraud was actually worse because a countermeasure to counterfeit magstripe is to deactivate the account number. However for the YES CARD, business rules had been moved into the chip ... and a (counterfeit) chip could tell the POS terminal that correct PIN was entered (regardless of what was typed), that the transaction was offline (no online checking for deactivated account) and the transaction was approved. In the wake of the YES CARD, all evidence of the US deployment disappears and speculation that it would be quite some time before it is tried again (the people involved loosing credibility). Reference to the YES CARD at the bottom of this Cartes2002 trip report (gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html
past posts mentioning YES CARD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

disclaimer: we had been brought in as consultants to small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server, they had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use; the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce".

In part for having done "electronic commerce", we were asked to participate in the x9a10 financial standard working group (about the same time the card associations were drafting their POS and internet specifications) which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments.

For this financial transaction standard we slightly tweaked the paradigm and defined end-to-end integrity ... with fast crypto and minimal payload size so that it could easily travel through the existing payment networks ... but because of end-to-end integrity no longer required trusted VANs or hiding the transaction information. As a result it enormously reduces the attack surface.

Now since the major use of SSL in the world today is this early ecommerce work for hiding transaction details ... the standard also eliminates the requirement for SSL for that purpose. It also eliminates the motivation for most of the current financial breaches since crooks can't use the information from previous transactions for fraudulent transactions.

other recent posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#26 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#39 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#58 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:06:30 -0700
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
That's an interesting thought, how many people in the US Air Force are pilots? My guess is around 2 to 3%.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#57 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#61 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#63 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#64 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

one of boyd's criticsm of the air force academy was that they mainly produced accountants and bean counters ... trained for the budget wars in the pentagon and congress.

this is past article about air force requiring pilot officers for drone operation in Afghanistan ... but that the army uses non-pilot sergeants to operate nearly identical drones ... and the army has lower accident losses
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/04/29/young_usaf_predator_pilot_officer_slam/

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#16 USAF officers slammed for pranging Predators on manual
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#42 Mission Control & Air Cooperation -- Part I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#64 another item related to ASCII vs. EBCDIC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#8 No command, and control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#50 Itanium at ISSCC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#0 Mainframe technology in 2011 and beyond; who is going to run these Mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#52 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#19 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#8 Super Cane's Computers run Windows

Burton gave talk at recent Boyd get together. He was in the first class to graduate from the air force academy and on fast track for general ... when Boyd challenged him to do the right thing ... and his career slammed into brickwall (for offending MICC and various for-profit industrial operations).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pentagon_Wars

from above:
In the incredulous summation of Burton and his assistant, Sgt. Fanning (Viola Davis), the finished Bradley is "a troop transport that can't carry troops, a reconnaissance vehicle that's too conspicuous to do reconnaissance, and a quasi-tank that has less armor than a snowblower, but has enough ammo to take out half of D.C."

... and
In a postscript, it is explained that the Bradley was extensively redesigned in response to Burton's demands, which significantly reduced casualties from its use during the Persian Gulf War. However, the system was too strong: Partridge and his cronies earned their promotions and lucrative private sector jobs, while Colonel Burton was forced to retire.

... snip ...

trivia ... the first air force academy class were all given trip to hawaii ... and the local hosts had to line up all the officer daughters on the island as dates. the general's wife was insisting that all the girls wear long formal gowns ... and my wife refused ... saying it was too hot in the islands and she would wear short gown ... and then all the other girls wanted to also (and general's wife got really mad, saying that my wife was ruining her event).

posts mentioning military-industrial-congressional complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
posts & URLs referencing Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

recent posts with "Pentagon Wars" references:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#65 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#83 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#29 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#32 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#36 IBM Historic computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#46 The Pentagon Wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#68 A-10 Attack Jets Rack Up Air-to-Air Kills in Louisiana War Game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#90 A Drone Could Be the Ultimate Dogfighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#31 The Designer Of The F-15 Explains Just How Stupid The F-35 Is
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#52 EBFAS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#61 Are you tired of the negative comments about IBM in this community?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#90 Friden Flexowriter equipment series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#98 Friden Flexowriter equipment series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#102 A-10 Warthog No Longer Suitable for Middle East Combat, Air Force Leader Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:10:13 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#66 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

mvt had multiple related storage management issues ... needing contiguous (real) storage and typically needing to allocate four times as much storage than would be typically used. the justification for 370 addressed both, enabling 16 concurrent tasks on typical 370/165 1mbyte real storage configuration.

lots of customers had been sold virtual memory 360/67 for tss/360 ... but when tss/360 had problems reaching production quality ... lots of locations just dropped back to using them as 360/65 with os/360 (not using virtual memory). Stanford and UofMich. wrote their own virtual memory operating systems for 360/67. Some number of customers installed the ibm science center virtual machine cp67/cms system.

boeing huntsville had gotten two processor 360/67 to be used with tss/360 ... for running 2250 graphics design applications. when tss/360 wasn't maturing they dropped back to running as two separate 360/65 systems. however, the mvt storage management problems were serverely exacerbated with long running applications (storage fragmentation and not being able to acquire contiguous storage). Boeing modified MVT release 13 to run with virtual memory (but w/o paging) ... the virtual memory size was the same as real-storage ... but they were able to use virtual memory to compensate for the MVT storage fragmentation issue (creating illusion of contiguous storage).

recent refs to page replacement and page thrashing control algorithms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#14 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#97 IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#98 z/OS physical memory usage with multiple copies of same load module at different virtual addresses
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#22 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

recent refs to justification for virtual memory on all 370s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#49 Mac at 30: A love/hate relationship from the support front
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#71 assembler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#54 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#102 Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#66 z/OS physical memory usage with multiple copies of same load module at different virtual addresses
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#33 Univac 90 series info posted on bitsavers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#56 R.I.P. PDP-10?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#99 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#87 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#10 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#11 360/85
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#19 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:13:35 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
At PPOE the systems guys had them and the applications programmers made do with 3278s or something until they got PCs. I loved my 3290 so much I stuck with it for years after everyone had moved on to PCs, although I did also have a PC I would use if I needed to do some PC-specific thing.

I kept my 3277 for ages (after 3278s came out) with keyboard hack for speed of repeat & cursor move in keyboard and the FIFO between the keyboard and head that masked half-duplex (keyboard would normally lock if you happen to hit key same time screen was being written).

for the 3274/3278 ... they moved a lot of the electronics back into the shared controller ... and it was no longer possible to do human factors hacks to the 3278. moving the electronics back into the controller also significantly drove up the protocol chatter over the coax as well as the processing and latency.

this was during the period when all sorts of human factors studies were being published about the benefits of having quarter second or better response. the 3274/3278 latency was worse than quarter second ... so it was impossible to achieve quarter second "system" response (as seen by human). old post with some performance/response/latency results
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#19 3270 protocol

later with ibm/pc terminal emulation ... 3277 emulation cards got at least three times the upload/download throughput of 3278 emulation cards (in part because of the overhead of the shared 3274 controller processing and the increased coax protocol chatter required by 3278).

posts reference human factor response studies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#53 3270 Terminal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#84 Is there an SPF setting to turn CAPS ON like keyboard key?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#12 Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#13 From Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#15 Who originated the phrase "user-friendly"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#2 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#19 Writing article on telework/telecommuting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#15 cp67, vm370, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#37 Why File transfer through TSO IND$FILE is slower than TCP/IP FTP ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#37 PDP-10 and Vax, was System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#1 3270 response & channel throughput
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#44 System Response

posts mentioning upload/download thruput
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#10 IBM System/3 & 3277-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#53 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#36 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#94 coax (3174) throughput
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#41 My first mainframe experience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#84 Is there an SPF setting to turn CAPS ON like keyboard key?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#3 printer history Languages influenced by PL/1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:30:37 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
Or fix them up and put them back in service. I read some particularly disgusting details on this. A hit with an armor-piercing shell would spew red hot shrapnel all over the inside of the tank, so recovery often involved cleaning up small bits of the crew followed by steam cleaning. Apparently repaired tanks always smelled like decaying flesh, which probably greatly improved the morale of the new crew.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#63 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

one of my uncles joined up before he was 18 and went over with some of the first to africa and then was over there until the war was over. he was tank maintenance/support. I've seen accounts that they were loosing so many tank crews that they were conscripting every warm body they could lay their hands on for replacement crews ... however my uncle was too large to fit in sherman (he *never* talked about his experience)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 12:36:57 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
For a raw recruit who doesn't know better it probably sounds like a nicer job. Instead of slogging around in the mud you get a ride with lots of horsepower, armor plate, and a really nice gun :-) Of course in those days you usually didn't get a choice; you were assigned where they needed you.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#63 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#64 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#68 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#71 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

my uncle growing up had lots of experience working with and maint/repairing farm machinary, motor vehicles, trucks ... so he was already very high skilled. I got a some of that when I was growing up, but not nearly as much as he did (by 12, expected to be able work 10-12hr day and do anything somebody 10-20yrs my senior).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2014 09:56:29 -0700
Stan Barr <plan.b@bluesomatic.org> writes:
On my text-only machine one thing I do several times a day is chack the weather on my brother's website using lynx. I have a script to save typing and usually the text is on the screen by the time my finger leaves the enter key. This gui machine takes several seconds. There are a few sinple graphics to render though.

related to 1/4 sec response post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#70 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

with regard to 3274/3278 ... I've mentioned before that we also "wrote" the 3274/3278 product administrator that the 3278 is much worse for interactive work than 3277 ... eventually the response was that the 3278 wasn't designed for interactive work, it was designed for data entry (aka electronic keypunch).

past posts mentioning loading lots of URLs in background tabs ... so they are already loaded when I get around to looking at them.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#54 Is there a way to configure your web browser to use multiple
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#48 Mozilla v Firefox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#50 Mozilla v Firefox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#55 Mozilla v Firefox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#60 Mozilla v Firefox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#66 Mozilla v Firefox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#8 big endian vs. little endian, why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#15 1.8b2 / 1.7.11 tab performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#41 Moz 1.8 performance dramatically improved
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#13 RFC 2616 change proposal to increase speed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#51 Intel abandons USEnet news
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#85 Which of the latest browsers do you prefer and why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#29 How were you using the internet 10 years ago and how does that differ from how you use it today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#54 Windowed Interfaces 1981-2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#72 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#22 OT: PC clock failure--CMOS battery?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#39 Unix systems and Serialization mechanism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#61 Agents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#19 Writing article on telework/telecommuting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#90 Just for a laugh ... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#39 PDP-10 and Vax, was System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#25 GUI vs 3270 Re: MVS Quick Reference, was: LookAT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#88 Parallel programming may not be so daunting

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2014 18:06:42 -0700
jgk@panix.com (Joe keane) writes:
Tanks assume a complement of infantry, just some guys with hand grenades and rifles.

The 'bigger, bigger, bigger' strategy does have its limits. Eventually you end up with one extremely large tank.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

there was big infrastructure project in germany reinforcing bridges, roads, overpasses, etc for abrams m1 because it was so heavy. some past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#58 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#9 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards

congress cut the abrams budget for the army ... but the pentagon forced the marines to use their budget to order enough extra abrams ... so the pentagon could get the volume discount(?) ... the problem is that the abrams is twice as heavy as the infrastructure load limits in 90% of marines mission profiles (basically forcing that part of the marines into adjunct to the army; there is been periodic efforts to absorb the marines into the army in any case). past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#21 Goodbye, OODA-Loop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#29 Jedi Knights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#69 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?

there have been number of articles that nearly all the expected future conflicts are "small" &/or "urban" wars ... both unsuited for the abrams ... which was designed for the plains of eastern europe (and even at that required local infastructure reinforcement).

abrams was also not designed for IEDs ... large flat, relatively vulnerable floor. I referenced before that in Iraq that they were loosing so many abrams to IEDs that they had to start carefully scouting a route before taking out the vulnerable abrams. some past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#2 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#48 John Boyd's Art of War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#42 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#61 Royal Pardon For Turing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2014 19:57:27 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#74 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

M1 Abrams Tank Debacle (from BlacktailDefense)
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB8D732D4D74C9FCC

more recent Dare to Compare --- M1A2 Abrams SEP versus Vickers Mk.VII!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFyAoOFUxSU&list=UU5bytSjxUNOBW4FAfSCWLpA

some others

Dare to Compare --- M1A2 Abrams SEP versus EE-T1 Osorio!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItCWNDRbb2k&list=UU5bytSjxUNOBW4FAfSCWLpA
Dare to Compare --- M1A2 Abrams SEP versus Tiger II!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYKJ-jWIIFM&list=UU5bytSjxUNOBW4FAfSCWLpA
Dare to Compare --- M1A2 Abrams SEP versus AMX-30!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31hK9ivAoHw&list=UU5bytSjxUNOBW4FAfSCWLpA
Dare to Compare --- M1A2 Abrams SEP versus Pz.68!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGh5-kgSxsY&list=UU5bytSjxUNOBW4FAfSCWLpA
Dare to Compare --- M1A2 Abrams SEP versus Merkava Mk.III!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNktsGcpUf0&list=UU5bytSjxUNOBW4FAfSCWLpA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

This Was the Very First Website In the US

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: This Was the Very First Website In the US
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2014 23:07:21 -0700
This Was the Very First Website In the US
http://gizmodo.com/this-was-the-very-first-website-in-the-us-1653433238

i've been referencing page for at least a decade ... some old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#53 COMPUTER RELATED WORLD'S RECORDS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#0 Xah Lee's Unixism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#34 Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#35 Fw: Tax chooses dead language - Austalia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#55 The System/360 Model 20 Wasn't As Bad As All That
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#29 old tapes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#39 old tapes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#24 Newbie question on table design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#23 What if phone company had developed Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#40 Why isn't OMVS command integrated with ISPF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#17 Amazon's "Simple" Database
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#65 How does ATTACH pass address of ECB to child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#15 more on (the new 40+ yr old) virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#47 System z10 announcement (in English)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#100 OS X Finder windows vs terminal window weirdness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#86 CLIs and GUIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#88 CLIs and GUIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#59 CHROME and WEB apps on Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#64 CHROME and WEB apps on Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#91 How did http get a port number as low as 80?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#67 Web Security hasn't moved since 1995
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#1 ooRexx scripting on Linux
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#56 Hurrah Berners-Lee! Web celebrates 20th anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#41 20 Years Ago Today: Birth of the Dot-Com Era
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#43 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX? (Are settlements a good argument for overnight batch COBOL ?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#76 Tiny-traffic DoS attack spotlights Apache flaw
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#16 TIME's Annual Journey: 1989
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#18 Another one bites the dust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#92 Larrabee delayed: anyone know what's happening?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#45 sysout using machine control instead of ANSI control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#69 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#80 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#60 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#82 history of RPG and other languages, was search engine history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#35 First among SQLs; COBOL for lawyers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#53 IBM 029 service manual
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#10 25 reasons why hardware is still hot at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#76 What is the protocal for GMT offset in SMTP (e-mail) header
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#41 Unix systems and Serialization mechanism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#53 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#55 GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#61 GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#58 So why doesn't the mainstream IT press seem to get the IBM mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#9 The IETF is probably the single element in the global equation of technology competition than has resulted in the INTERNET
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#46 Is email dead? What do you think?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#6 IBM 360 display and Stanford Big Iron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#58 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#31 TCP/IP Available on MVS When?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#73 Wylbur, Orvyl, Milton, CRBE/CRJE were all used (and sometimes liked) in the past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#38 IBM Assembler manuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#26 Web version of mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#36 First Website Launched 20 Years Ago Today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#75 Somewhat off-topic: comp-arch.net cloned, possibly hacked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#67 NeXT, give Steve a little credit for the Web
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#0 Before Netscape: the forgotten Web browsers of the early 1990s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#33 Last Word on Dennis Ritchie
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#19 Deja Cloud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#64 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#46 What s going on in the redbooks site?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#72 Original Thinking Is Hard, Where Good Ideas Come From
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#83 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#91 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#15 Happy Webiversary!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#20 Writing article on telework/telecommuting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#42 Oh hum, it's the 60s and 70's all over again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#89 Defense acquisitions are broken and no one cares
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#74 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#23 OT but important Wall Street Journal article on Internet regulation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#83 Gordon Crovitz: Who Really Invented the Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#84 Did Bill Gates Steal the Heart of DOS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#72 zEC12, and previous generations, "why?" type question - GPU computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#68 Should you support or abandon the 3270 as a User Interface?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#39 PC/mainframe browser(s) was Re: 360/20, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#7 Why former IBMers who left maybe years ago for any reason are still active on the Greater IBM Connection?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#22 What is a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#23 HCF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#52 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#40 Happy birthday Mosaic! 20 years of the graphical Web browser
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#45 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#51 Search for first Web page takes detour into US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#68 Boyd's cycle: the path to guaranteed success + 6 big companies as evidence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#12 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#37 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#34 World Wide Web turns 25 years old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#44 [CM] Ten recollections about the early WWW and Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#88 Silicon Valley: an army of geeks and 'coders' shaping our future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#98 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#61 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 02 Nov 2014 12:33:33 -0800
rpw3@rpw3.org (Rob Warnock) writes:
These mappings may change depending om time of day, due to changes in loading, maintenance windows, etc., so caching one of those IP addresses isn't reliable.

during very early days of google growth & scaleup ... they started with a-record rotation ... but DNS caching (large ISPs, local machine &/or gateway, etc) would mask the behavior ... this is way before they were offering their own DNS server ... so the next stage was to enhance their boundary routers to do load-balancing across their backend servers (their boundary routers mapped an IP-address to a service ... and had table of all the associated backend servers and load levels).

a couple old posts mentioning the subject:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#13 RFC 2616 change proposal to increase speed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#61 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#8 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 02 Nov 2014 16:45:37 -0800
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btopenworld.com> writes:
By its nature copy is I/O bound. Discs store more than in 1979 but turn at about the same speed.

3600rpm -- 60rps ... needed to get smaller platter to turn at faster rate ... now have 7200rpm, 10,000rpm and even 15,000rpm
http://www.zdnet.com/new-15000-rpm-disk-drives-why-7000026940/

3380s started out with 20 track-width spacings between tracks ... and then reducing spacings between tracks to get more tracks per platter.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#email871122

person responsible for 801/risc roped me into looking at wide (thin-film) r/w head that did 18 (adjacent) tracks at time 16 data tracks between 2 servo (tracking) tracks.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#email871230

the post (with the above email)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#30 Why magnetic drums was/are worse than disks?

... also discusses 2305-1 (fixed-head disk) with pairs of r/w heads per track offset on track 180degrees that r/w in parallel ... doubled the transfer rate from 1.5mbytes/sec to 3mbytes/sec (later 3380 disk drives did standard 3mbyte/sec) but also cut the avg. rotational delay in half (w/o increasing rotational speed aka only needed quarter revolution to get start of record in position instead of half revolution)

part of getting higher density were light-weight, thin-film r/w heads that fly closer to surface resulting in "smaller" binary bits ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#43 FBA rant
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#63 The first personal computer (PC)

followed by verticle recording ... multiple bits recorded per position. other posts mentioning veritcal recording:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#48 Competitors to SABRE?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#74 Where did text file line ending characters begin?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#2 How many overwrites for secure erase?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#57 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#60 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#69 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#3 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#9 Demonstrating Moore's law

CKD disks could format tracks for individual data record size ... but as technology advanced, went to fixed sized blocks on track, because POK favorite son mainframe operating system was so tied to CKD, they continue to simulate CKD characteristics on industry standard fixed-block disks ("real" CKD disks haven't been made for decades) recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#65 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

posts mentioning fba, ckd, multi-track search, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

for a lont time FBA disk block size has been 512bytes ... but recently there has been move to 4096byte block size (getting more effective data per track)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Format

posts mentioning getting to play disk engineer in bldgs. 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

I've mentioned air-bearing simulation work ... design of the light-weight, thin-film heads flying near the surface relying on physical form to provide gap between r/w head and platter surface.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#39 195 was: Computer Typesetting Was: Movies with source code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#30 Weird
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#63 Help me find pics of a UNIVAC please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#74 They Got Mail: Not-So-Fond Farewells
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#51 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#52 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#69 Multics Concepts For the Contemporary Computing World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#20 360 Microde Floating Point Fix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#45 hung/zombie users ... long boring, wandering story
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004.html#21 40th anniversary of IBM System/360 on 7 Apr 2004
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#15 harddisk in space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#15 360 longevity, was RISCs too close to hardware?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#25 CKD Disks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#8 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#4 System/360; Hardwired vs. Microcoded
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#5 System/360; Hardwired vs. Microcoded
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#44 Intel engineer discusses their dual-core design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#29 IBM microwave application--early data communications
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#6 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#0 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#13 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#14 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#6 Google Architecture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#18 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#42 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#41 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#18 Why so little parallelism?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#27 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#31 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#44 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#46 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#83 Disc Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#13 Interrupts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#64 Disc Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#52 Drums: Memory or Peripheral?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#77 Disk drive improvements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#60 recent mentions of 40+ yr old technology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#32 What if the computers went back to the '70s too?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#9 Assembler Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#49 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#75 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#51 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#16 Looking for a real Fortran-66 compatible PC compiler (CP/M or DOS or Windows, doesn't matter)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#36 CKD DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#57 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#60 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#26 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#87 Gee... I wonder if I qualify for "old geek"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#36 Last Word on Dennis Ritchie
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#26 Deja Cloud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#134 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#59 ISO documentation of IBM 3375, 3380 and 3390 track format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#70 bubble memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#23 Old data storage or data base

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 03 Nov 2014 09:09:02 -0800
"Osmium" <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
I would expect a 1 TB solid state drive to be kind of pricey. The last three external drives I bought are all 2 TB, but I could live with 1 TB. .

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#37 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#45 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#65 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#66 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#78 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Chinese Startup Halves Cost of SSD
http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1324469

from above:
A Chinese startup has come out of stealth mode with promises to cut the price of solid state disk (SSD) technology in half. The company, Sage Microelectronics, is currently shipping an SSD controller IC capable of packing up to 5 terabytes on a single PCB with a standard 2.5-inch form factor.

... snip ...

there was some recent news that TB spinning disk would be $40 by xmas

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LA Times commentary:  roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 03 Nov 2014 20:23:10 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#39 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#55 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#58 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#67 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud

latest

Flaw in New 'Secure' Credit Cards Would Let Hackers Steal $1M Per Card
http://www.wired.com/2014/11/chip-n-pin-foreign-currency-vulnerability/

from above:
"With just a mobile phone we created a POS terminal that could read a card through a wallet," Martin Emms, lead researcher of the project that uncovered the flaw, noted in a statement about the findings. "All the checks are carried out on the card rather than the terminal so at the point of transaction, there is nothing to raise suspicions. By pre-setting the amount you want to transfer, you can bump your mobile against someone's pocket or swipe your phone over a wallet left on a table and approve a transaction."

... snip ...

more part of moving business rules into chip

similar but different to YES CARD rules moved into chip ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 04 Nov 2014 09:01:39 -0800
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
Meanwhile I suppose the lag of hard disks' speed and also RAM speed is the major reason we see such small increase in apparent performance despite the enormous increase in cpu speed. Hard drive speed is compensated by buffering and virtual memory and RAM by increased processor sophistication.

hard drive throughput was also compensated for with multiprogramming ... having lots of different concurrent tasks available (something could run while something else was waiting for disk i/o).

as i've recently referenced the decision to go to virtual memory on all 370s was that that MVT could increase the multiprogramming level by four times using virtual memory with little or no paging (because of the extremely inefficient way MVT managed storage) ... sort of the analogy to hardware processor caches.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#66 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#69 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

60s disk i/o elapsed time measured in number of 60s processor cycles is compareable to current memory access elapsed time measured in number of current processor cycles.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#62 Optimization, CPU time, and related issues
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#97 IBM ACS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#12 The IBM Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#51 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#5 The SDS 92, its place in history?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#74 Bell Picturephone--early business application experiments

there was processor caches, trying to keep the most recently used data closer than memory (360/85).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#11 360/85

processors now do hyperthreading (hardware processor equivalent of multiprogramming), out of order execution (bypass stalled instruction waiting for memory and try and execute other instructions). 195 (360 & 370) pipeline did out of order execution ... and i've commented before about getting sucked into project that worked on hyperthreading for 370/195 that never shipped. however, the 195 pipeline would stall on conditional branches. today out-of-order execution has branch prediction and speculative execution (can execute instructions along predicted branch, but if wrong, undo the executed instructions).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#5 The SDS 92, its place in history?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#32 Univac 90 series info posted on bitsavers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#44 curly brace languages source code style quides
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#99 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#74 Bell Picturephone--early business application experiments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#76 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#56 This Chart From IBM Explains Why Cloud Computing Is Such A Game-Changer

In the early 80s, IBM added a cache to the 3880 disk controller (for the 3380s disk), sheriff/3880-13 ... which did full-track caching (any read to a track would read the full track into the cache). One of the IBM documents claimed a 90% cache hit rate ... their example was application sequentially reading 4k-byte records with 3380 track formated ten 4k records/track. The first record read on the track, brought the whole track into the cache and the next nine records read would already be in cache (90% "hit" rate). If the application had changed the file i/o options to do ten-record i/o buffering (and multiple buffering with overlapped i/o), the hit rate would have dropped to zero. Frequently caching is thought of keeping a previously used record around that it might be used again in the future ... however in this case it was purely sequential read with no future record reuse.

other posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#37 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#40 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#41 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#45 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#46 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#47 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#54 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#65 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#70 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#73 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#77 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#78 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#79 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?

past posts mentioning 3880-13:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#18 Disk caching and file systems. Disk history...people forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#61 Disks size growing while disk count shrinking = bad performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#17 database (or b-tree) page sizes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#49 VTOC position
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#68 I/O contention
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#53 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#54 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#55 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#63 MVS History (all parts)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#55 Storage Virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#3 PLX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#52 ''Detrimental'' Disk Allocation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#7 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#72 A few Z990 Gee-Wiz stats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#13 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#17 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#20 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#21 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#22 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#29 FW: Looking for Disk Calc program/Exec
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#28 IBM's mini computers--lack thereof
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#50 non ECC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#4 Average Seek times are pretty confusing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#46 Hercules 3.04 announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#45 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#46 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#41 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#14 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#32 Why magnetic drums was/are worse than disks ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#31 MB to Cyl Conversion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#10 A way to speed up level 1 caches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#38 FBA rant
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#15 Flash memory arrays
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#52 Throwaway cores
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#41 American Airlines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#39 The Internet's 100 Oldest Dot-Com Domains
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#47 locate mode, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#51 locate mode, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#11 Mainframe Executive article on the death of tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#55 Mainframe Executive article on the death of tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#20 How to analyze a volume's access by dataset
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#14 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#67 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#68 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#34 nested LRU schemes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#47 nested LRU schemes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#72 megabytes per second
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#75 megabytes per second
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#78 megabytes per second
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#3 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#96 z/OS physical memory usage with multiple copies of same load module at different virtual addresses

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SEC probing private equity performance figures

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 4 Nov 2014
Subject: SEC probing private equity performance figures
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
SEC probing private equity performance figures
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/29/us-sec-privateequity-idUSKBN0II08K20141029

More Private Equity Fibbing: Marketing Materials Often Exaggerate Returns
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/11/private-equity-fibbing-marketing-materials-often-exaggerate-returns.html

posts mentioning private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity
posts mentioning financial reporting fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 4 Nov 2014
Subject: How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-11-03/how-much-does-it-cost-keep-jpmorgan-fx-riggers-out-jail

JP Morgan Under Criminal Investigation for Foreign Exchange Trading Abuses
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/11/jp-morgan-criminal-investigation-foreign-exchange-trading-abuses.html

J.P. Morgan Being Probed by Justice Department; Criminal Investigation Focusing on Foreign-Exchange Operations
http://online.wsj.com/articles/j-p-morgan-being-probed-by-justice-department-1415054825

David Dayen: Out of Control -- New Report Exposes JPMorgan Chase as Mostly a Criminal Enterprise
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/david-dayen-out-of-control-new-report-exposes-jpmorgan-chase-as-mostly-a-criminal-enterprise.html

posts mentioning libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#libor
posts mentioning too big to fail, too big to prosecute, too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Uncovering insider trading with big data

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 4 Nov 2014
Subject: Uncovering insider trading with big data
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Using graphs to uncover insider trading schemes
https://linkurio.us/using-graphs-to-uncover-insider-trading-schemes/

Has discussion of not opening information that might show (illegal) naked short sales
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depository_Trust_%26_Clearing_Corporation

Long ago and far away we were brought in as consultants to small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their servers, they also had invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use; the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". Because of work on "electronic commerce", in the mid-90s we were asked in to the X9A10 financial standard working group that had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments. One of the other participants was from NSCC (before they merged with DTC to form DTCC) and we were asked to look at improving the integrity of exchange trading transactions. I worked on it for awhile and then was told that the work was suspended, a side-effect of the integrity work would have greatly improved trade transparency and visibility; totally antithetical to wallstreet culture.

In the Madoff congressional hearings, they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get the SEC to do something about Madoff. They asked him if new regulations were needed (to prevent future Madoffs), he replied that while new regulations might be needed, much more important would be transparency and visibility.

posts mentioning madoff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 6 Nov 2014
Subject: How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#83 How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?

Meet the woman JPMorgan Chase paid one of the largest fines in American history to keep from talking
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-9-billion-witness-20141106

Bank Of America Finds It Did Some More Crime In Q3, Revises Previously Released Earnings Lower By $400 Million
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-11-06/bank-america-finds-it-did-some-more-crime-q3-revises-previously-released-earnings-lo

Regulators Edge Toward Foreign-Exchange Settlement With Banks
http://online.wsj.com/articles/regulators-edge-toward-foreign-exchange-settlement-with-banks-1415358693

Meet The (First) Seven Banks Who Rigged The FX Market
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-11-07/meet-first-seven-banks-who-rigged-fx-market

posts mentioning too big to fail, too big to prosecute, too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

posts mentioning griftopia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#griftopia

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Brand-name companies' secret Luxembourg tax deals revealed

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 6 Nov 2014
Subject: Brand-name companies' secret Luxembourg tax deals revealed
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Brand-name companies' secret Luxembourg tax deals revealed
http://www.publicintegrity.org/2014/11/05/16167/brand-name-companies-secret-luxembourg-tax-deals-revealed

Leaked files bring 80 reporters together for new ICIJ project
http://www.icij.org/blog/2014/11/leaked-files-bring-80-reporters-together-new-icij-project
Luxembourg Leaks: Global Companies' Secrets Exposed
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks
Big 4 Audit Firms Play Big Role in Offshore Murk
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/big-4-audit-firms-play-big-role-offshore-murk
Explore the Luxembourg tax documents
http://www.publicintegrity.org/2014/11/05/16227/explore-luxembourg-tax-documents
Explore the Documents: Luxembourg Leaks Database
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/explore-documents-luxembourg-leaks-database
'This story is global, it can only be told with a global eye'
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/story-global-it-can-only-be-told-global-eye
Dyson, Glanbia Among British and Irish Firms Using Luxembourg to Cut Tax Bills
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/dyson-glanbia-among-british-and-irish-firms-using-luxembourg-cut-tax-bills
Brazilian Banks Cut Secret Deal with Luxembourg to Save $90.2M in Tax
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/brazilian-banks-cut-secret-deal-luxembourg-save-902m-tax
'We Will Take Action:' Australian Tax Chief Calls For Global Probe Into Leak Revelations
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/we-will-take-action-australian-tax-chief-calls-global-probe-leak
Canadian Federal Pension Board Used Offshore Deal to Skirt Foreign Taxes
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/canadian-federal-pension-board-used-offshore-deal-skirt-foreign-taxes
Why IKEA's Australian Profits Are Mostly Tax Free
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/why-ikeas-australian-profits-are-mostly-tax-free
Tricks of the Trade
http://www.icij.org/luxleaks/tricks-trade
'Lux Leaks' Revelations Bring Swift Response Around World
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/lux-leaks-revelations-bring-swift-response-around-world
The "Magical Fairyland" of Corporate Tax Scams
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2014/11/magical-fairyland-corporate-tax-scams.html
Bill Black: The "Magical Fairyland" of Corporate Tax Scams
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/11/bill-black-magical-fairyland-corporate-tax-scams.html

posts mentioning "tax evasion", "tax havens", "tax avoidance"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM sees boosting profit margins as more important than sales growth

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 6 Nov 2014
Subject: IBM sees boosting profit margins as more important than sales growth
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
From the 80s the the traditional ibm computer market moved from high margin to commodity ... and ibm almost went under. Now ibm has small niche mainframe market of customers where it is more expensive to convert than the margins they pay ibm ...however that can slowly erode with new re-engineering activities. Even much of ibm mainframe hardware is now largely based on industry standard parts with high margin compatibility layer

Late 80s, a senior engineer got a talk scheduled at the internal annual, world-wide communication group conference supposedly on 3174 performance ... however he opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had strategic responsibility for everything that crossed the datacenter walls and were strongly fighting off distributed computing and client/server trying to preserve their dumb terminal (emulation) install base. The disk division was seeing data fleeing datacenters to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to correct the problems, but they were constantly vetoed by the communication group. As something of a work-around one of the disk division executives was out funding startups for mainframe distributed computing offerings (we would be periodically bring us in to help and evaluate technologies). some past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

4341s sold into the mid-range market in similar numbers to vax/vms ... for small number orders. The difference was large corporations ordering hundreds of 4341 at a time for putting out into departmental areas (inside IBM dept. conference rooms became scarce commodity) ... sort of the leading edge of the distributed computing tsunami. They were expecting that 4381 would continue with the explosive increase in sales ... but by that time the mid-range market was starting to move to workstations and large PCs. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

Before 4341s shipped, I got roped into doing benchmarks for LLNL on an engineering 4341 ... they were looking at getting compute farm of 70 4341s ... sort of the leading edge of modern supercomputers. Note that you could get a cluster of 4341s that had higher throughput than 3033, much cheaper than 3033, much smaller space & environmental footprint, etc. At one point head of POK got allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing component cut in half.

In 1988 I was also asked to help LLNL standardize some serial technology they had, which evolves into the fibre channel standard. The IBM fiber from the period was released in 1990 as ESCON with ES/9000 when it was already obsolete (much less throughput than fibre channel standard). Later some POK channel engineers define a heavy-weight protocol that runs on top of fibre channel standard (and drastically cuts the native throughput) which is eventually released as FICON. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM sees boosting profit margins as more important than sales growth

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 7 Nov 2014
Subject: IBM sees boosting profit margins as more important than sales growth
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#87 IBM sees boosting profit margins as more important than sales growth

In the early 70s, IBM had the FS project which was completely different from 360/370 which it was going to replace (internal politics was also killing off 370 efforts which is credited with giving clone processors market foothold). When FS imploded there was mad rush to get (hardware & software) products back into the 370 pipeline.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

The head of POK managed to convince corporate to kill-off the vm370 product, close the vm370 development location in Mass. and move all to the people to POK (or otherwise, they wouldn't be able to make MVS/XA shipped date some 6-8yrs later). Endicott managed to save the vm370 product mission ... but had to reconstitute a development group from scratch ... the are comments in the (IBM user group) SHARE (online discussion group started Aug1976) VMSHARE archives about the code quality during this period.
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

POK kicked off quick&dirty efforts 303x and 3081XA in parallel. 303x channel director was 158 engine with just the 158 integrated microcode and no 370 microcode. A 3031 was 158 engine with 370 microcode and 2nd 158 engine for the 303x channel director. A 3032 was 168 configured to use 303x channel director. A 3033 was 168 logic mapped to warmed over FS chips that were 20% faster. 3081XA was some other warmed over FS technology (it isn't until 3090 that you see really new machine) ... some more references here:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

Endicott was doing 138/148 as followon to 135/145 (148 had significant better scientific power than 145) and much larger memory. However, it came up short compared to some competition. Endicott strategy was to provide microcode assists for operating system performance to somewhat level the playing field. Endicott con'ed me into helping them with the microcode assists and then doing a lot of the presentations to the business planners and forecasters (I spent year on&off running around the world helping them with presentations). In the US, the regions forecasted numbers, but the built (unsold) units stayed on the books of the manufacturing plant. Regional forecasters tended to do forecasts based on whatever hdqtrs said was strategic (and at the time hdqtrs was saying that there was no competition). Outside US, country forecasted numbers resulted in products being built and put on the books of that country (in the US, manufacturing plants had to eat bad forecasts, while outside the US, the country forecasters were held accountable). Endicott had to respond to pressure in world trade market from competition ... while in the US, hdqtrs & regional forecasts basically were saying there was no competition that needed response (which limited the latitude that Endicott had in doing new things). Also since there was no accountable for forecasts in the US ... manufacturing plants had to do their own US forecasts to get numbers that could be trusted.

4331/4341 were then followon to 138/148, and were significantly better machines and competed strongly with competition including DEC's vax/vms (not just clone processors) in the mid-range market.

note: about the time the vm370 development group was closed in mass, some number of people escaped ... and a lot of them went to DEC to work on what was then brand-new VAX effort. There was joke that head of POK was one of the largest contributors to DEC's VAX/VMS.

When I was undergraduate ... I was brought into Boeing as full time employee to help setup Boeing Computer Services ... consolidate dataprocess into independent business unit to better monetize significant investment, including offering services to non-Boeing entities. At the time, I thot Renton was possibly largest mainframe datacenter in the world with upwards of $300M (60s dollars) in IBM mainframes ... which was in the process of being replicated up in the new Everett plant (to handle disaster scenario where Mt. Rainer heats up and mudslide takes out Renton).

Later I would sponsor John Boyd's briefings at IBM, His bios' have him in command of "spook base" about the time I was at Boeing ... which they list as a $2.5B "windfall" for IBM (again 60s dollars). "spook base" ref gone 404, but lives on at the wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

While he was Air Force col and primary force behind the F16, F18, and major redesign of F15 (cut its weight in half), by the time of his passing the Air Force had pretty much disowned him. It was the marines that were at Arlington and his effects went to Quantico ... (circa 1990, the Marine Corps commandant had leveraged Boyd for corp makeover). One of the Boyd acolytes, Burton claims Boyd was responsible for ruining his career when Boyd challenged him to do what was right ... HBO made a movie from Burton's book:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pentagon_Wars

posts and URLs that reference Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Forbes perspective on IBM's troubles

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 8 Nov 2014
Subject: Forbes perspective on IBM's troubles
Blog: IBM - Past and Present Employees
IBM's Potemkin Prosperity
http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2014/10/26/ibms-potemkin-prosperity/

Alex explains ZIRP -- why 7 years of easy central bank money didn't go far
https://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001527.html

also google+
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/ANzfZRebmpK

Note at one point Bernanke says that he assumed that the too big to fail would turn around and lend the FED "free" money to mainstreet ... but they didn't and he had no way to force them to. Note that something similar happened after the '29 crash ... so Bernanke should have known better since one of the qualifications that he supposedly had for FED chairman was expert in the '29 crash.

past posts mentiong too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
past posts mentioning Bernanke (&/or fed chairman)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#bernanke

not mentioned as often was that the sellers of toxic CDOs were paying the rating agencies for triple-A ratings (when they both knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional hearing testimony). A big reason for getting the "triple-A" ratings was to open the market for toxic CDOs to ('loot') the large institutional retirement funds that were required to only deal in "safe" investments.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

Over $27T was done during the bubble:
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

During the hearings, business news commentators were saying the rating agencies would avoid federal prosecution because they were able to blackmail the gov. with rating downgrade.

summer/fall of 2008, toxic CDOs were going for 22cents on the dollar. Besides ZIRP for the too big to fail ... the FED then starts buying toxic CDOs for 98cents on the dollar.

disclaimer: Jan2009 I was asked to HTML'ize the Pecora Hearings (30s senate hearings into the '29 crash; had been scanned the fall before at Boston Public Library) with extensive internal x-refs and URLs between what happened this time and what happened then (some comment that the new congress might have an appetite to do something). I worked on it for awhile and then got a call saying that it wouldn't be needed after all (some reference to enormous piles of wallstreet money totally burying capital hill).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (but w/o triple-A rating ... which limited their market). In the late 90s, we were asked to look at improving the integrity of the supporting documents (as a countermeasure).

However, when they discovered that they could pay the rating agencies for triple-A rating ... they found that triple-A rating trumps documentation and could do "no-documentation" mortgages ... and of course "no-documentation" mortgages eliminates the requirement for supporting document integrity.

And from the law of unintended consequences ... later they have to setup the document mills in order to fabricate the (fraudulent) documents required for foreclosures.

Stockman has "stock buybacks" as a mini-form of (private equity) LBOs with hundreds of billions (in stock buybacks) done since start of the century. Private equity LBOs has been compared to house flipping, except the "mortgage" is placed on the books of the sold company (they can even sell for less than they paid and still walk away with boat load of money).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

Cheap money for propping up stock market, private equity LBOs and stock buybacks date back at least to "Greenspan PUT" from the late 80s through the 90s.

Bubble bursts in 2008 and then Federal Reserve gives out additional bank charters to wallstreet too big to fail (that don't already have them), starts buying trillions in toxic CDOs at 98cents on the dollar and pumping in an additional $6T-10T ZIRP into wallstreet too big to fail which turn around and buy US treasuries, clearing possibly $200B/annum or more, for the last six years.

GLBA is now better known for repeal of Glass-Steagall and enabling too big to fail, but rhetoric on floor of congress at the time was its primary purpose was to limit banking competition by not allowing new banking charters (which Federal Reserve theoretical violates giving out new banking charters to some wallstreet too big to fail).

too big to fail also spawns too big to prosecute and too big to jail, which now appears to result in condoning even money laundering for terrorists and drug cartels.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering

The baseline budget had all federal debt retired in 2010. In 2002, congress allows the fiscal responsibility act to expire (required spending not exceed revenue).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

In middle of last decade, the comptroller general is including in speeches that nobody in congress is capable of middle school arithmetic for how they are savaging the budget.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

2010 CBO report has tax revenues reduced by $6T and spending increased by $6T (compared to baseline) for $12T budget gap (since grown to $17T; which is part of the slight of hand fueling too big to fail, if there was no federal debt, where would too big to fail get their guaranteed income). 2010 report also has $2+T (of the $6T spending increase) going to DOD, $1+T going for the two wars and $1+T that they can't account for.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

too big to fail during the bubble cleared/skimmed possibly $4T-$5T in fees and commissions on the $27+T in transactions that flowed through wallstreet. They also get trillions more out of designing (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs to fail, selling them to their customers and then making gambling CDS bets that they would fail.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What's the difference between doing performance in a mainframe environment versus doing in others

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 8 Nov 2014
Subject: What's the difference between doing performance in a mainframe environment versus doing in others
Blog: Mainframe Experts
Max. configured ec12 with 101 processors is rated at 75BIPS and goes for $33M (or $440,000/BIPS). e5-2600v1 blades have ratings of 400-500+BIPS and IBM had base price of $1815 ($3.44/BIPS). This difference is so great that during the 90s, it was cheaper to buy extra hardware (even if met running it at only 10% utilization) than to find/pay human resources to manage at higher load levels.

Last decade the rise of virtualization for non-mainframe platforms met that they could consolidate 4-10 ten servers on single platform (with little change in human resources needed). In parallel with that the rise of the large cloud megadatacenters have hundreds of thousands of servers, some with tens of millions of processors (a single such datacenter has more processing power than the aggregate of all mainframes in the world today) that are managed with staff of 70-100 people.

By the mid-70s, I was making comments that systems were getting much faster than disk throughput. I did a report in the early 80s that over the course of 15 yrs that (mainframe) disks had declined in relative system throughput by factor of ten times (mainframe systems had gotten 40-50 times faster, disks had only gotten 4-5 times faster). The disk division executives took exception and assigned the division performance group to refute my statements. After a couple weeks, they came back and basically said I had understated the problem. This later turns into SHARE presentation B874 on optimizing DASD for improved system throughput.

Note CKD disks haven't been manufactured for decades, all being emulated with an layer on top of industry standard fixed-block disks, introducing additional overhead, latency and complexity.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

Today, memory access latency ... aka cache misses, etc ... when measured in count of processor cycles is apporx. the same as 60s disk access latency (when measured in count of 60s processor cycles). For the past couple decades, non-mainframe processors have done extensive work on compensating for the increasing mismatch between processor speed and memory latency (out-of-order execution, branch prediction, hyperthreading, speculative execution, etc). The claim is that approx. half the improvement in Z10->Z196 is starting to introduce such features in mainframe, and further improvement from z196->ec12 is additional features.

In 1988, I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial technology they have which quickly becomes fibre channel standard. However, then IBM releases some serial stuff they have in 1990 with ES/9000 as ESCON (when it is already obsolete). Then some POK channel engineers become involved in defining a channel protocol layer ontop of fibre channel standard (that significantly cuts the native i/o throughput) that eventually is released as FICON.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

IBM has released peak/max i/o throughput benchmark done on z196 that used 104 FICON (emulated on 104 fibre channel) to achieve 2M IOPS (so far only statement I've seen for EC12 is that it will have 30% more i/o throughput than z196). About the same time there was announcement of native fibre channel for e5-2600 blade claiming over one million IOPS (on single fibre channel, aka two such fibre channel having greater native throughput than 104 FICON).

Note that some of the throughput numbers for mainframe/non-mainframe is against desktop grade hardware ... rather than non-mainframe server hardware.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM 1401 and Zeus Z1 projects share the leading computer conservation award

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM 1401 and Zeus Z1 projects share the leading computer conservation award
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2014 13:14:40 -0800
IBM 1401 and Zeus Z1 projects share the leading computer conservation award; This year's Tony Sale Award, presented by the Computer Conservation Society (CCS), has been shared by the restoration of two IBM 1401 transistor-based computers and the Free University of Berlin's virtual reconstruction of Konrad Zuse's mechanical Z1.
http://www.zdnet.com/ibm-1401-and-zeus-z1-projects-share-the-leading-computer-conservation-award-7000035576/

Computer History Museum IBM 1401 Restoration Wins Computer Conservation 2014 Tony Sale Award
http://www.computerhistory.org/press/2014-tony-sale.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 8 Nov 2014
Subject: How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#83 How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#85 How Much Does It Cost To Keep JPMorgan FX-Riggers Out Of Jail?

also Google+
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/BQtzDjKk78c

Matt Taibbi and Bank Whistleblower on How JPMorgan Chase Helped Wreck the Economy, Avoid Prosecution
http://www.democracynow.org/2014/11/7/matt_taibbi_and_bank_whistleblower_on
Matt Taibbi and Alayne Fleischmann Discuss JP Morgan Mortgage Fraud, Eric Holder CoverUp on Democracy Now
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/11/matt-taibbi-alayne-fleischmann-discuss-jp-morgan-mortgage-fraud-eric-holder-coverup-democracy-now.html

post mentioning too big to fail, too big to prosecute, too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Brand-name companies' secret Luxembourg tax deals revealed

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Date: 8 Nov 2014
Subject: Brand-name companies' secret Luxembourg tax deals revealed
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#86 Brand-name companies' secret Luxembourg tax deals revealde

'Lux Leaks' causes 'tax storm' of government, media response
http://www.icij.org/blog/2014/11/lux-leaks-causes-tax-storm-government-media-response
OECD Tax Chief: Corporate Tax Avoidance While Taxpayers Suffer 'Simply Not Acceptable'
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/oecd-tax-chief-corporate-tax-avoidance-while-taxpayers-suffer-simply-not
Luxembourg Finance Minister: 'European Commission Has No Authority to Request All of Our Rulings'
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks/luxembourg-finance-minister-european-commission-has-no-authority-request
G20 experts to act on corporations' internal loans that help cut tax
http://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/nov/07/g20-tax-experts-shakeup-corporations-internal-loans

As Luxembourg Takes the Heat, the World's Worst Tax Haven - the City of London - Remains Hidden in Plain Sight
http://wolfstreet.com/2014/11/08/as-luxembourg-takes-the-heat-the-worlds-worst-tax-haven-the-city-of-london-remains-hidden-in-plain-sight/

posts mentioning "tax evasion", "tax havens", "tax avoidance"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

weird apple trivia

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: weird apple trivia
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:41:58 -0800
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
I don't follow. YHOO* reports April 2003 as 14.05 so that part makes sense. But AAPL just closed at 109.01. What are you trying to say? Is that some kind of inflation number?

AAPL has turned out to be a great investment. The batch of shares I'm holding now were bought in April of this year at 519, then we had a 7/1 split. I'm still looking at a 50% gain including dividends.


Do Apple Inc.'s Massive Stock Buybacks Make Sense?
http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/10/13/do-apple-incs-massive-stock-buybacks-make-sense.aspx

Apple borrowing billions to pay shareholders is everything wrong with capitalism today
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/11/04/apple-borrowing-money-to-pay-shareholders-is-everything-wrong-with-capitalism-today/?Post+generic=%3Ftid%3Dsm_twitter_washingtonpost

And The Biggest "Source Of Equity Demand In Recent Years", According To Goldman Sachs, Is...
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-11-09/and-biggest-source-equity-demand-recent-years-according-goldman-sachs

from above:
In other words, not only has the Fed made a mockery of fundamentals, the resulting ZIRP tsunami means that corporations can issue nearly-unlimited debt to yield chasing "advisors" managing other people's money, and use it to buyback vast amounts of stock, which brings us to the latest aberation of the New Abnormal: the "Pull the S&P up by the Bootstaps" market, in which the only relevant question is which company can buyback the most of its own stock.

... snip ...

Alex explains ZIRP -- why 7 years of easy central bank money didn't go far
http://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001527.html

recent posts mentioning Stockman & "Great Deformation":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#14 IBM to invest 1.2B into Cloud Data Centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#25 IBM Asian Revenues Crash, Adjusted Earnings Beat On Tax Rate Fudge; Debt Rises 20% To Fund Stock Buybacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#48 IBM Dumps Its Server Business On Lenovo For $2.3B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#79 Shocking news: Execs do what they're paid to do
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#93 Maximizing shareholder value: The Goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#101 Defense Department Needs to Act Like IBM to Save Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#24 IBM sells Intel server business, company is doomed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#54 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#55 Maximizing shareholder value: The goal that changed corporate America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#107 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#91 IBM layoffs strike first in India; workers describe cuts as 'slaughter' and 'massive'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#75 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#33 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#48 IBM hopes new chip can turn the tables on Intel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#54 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#80 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#111 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#0 The Decline and Fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#36 IBM 'major announcement' points to deal on chip manufacturing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#60 IBM's Ginni Rometty Just Confessed To A Huge Failure -- It Might Be The Best Thing For The Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#89 Forbes perspective on IBM's troubles

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

weird apple trivia

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: weird apple trivia
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 09 Nov 2014 19:29:37 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#94 weird apple trivia

apple is one of the most aggressive in parking revenue in offshore tax havens and avoiding taxes, even when earned in the US (, UK, Austrailia, etc)

How Does Apple Avoid Taxes?
http://www.forbes.com/sites/leesheppard/2013/05/28/how-does-apple-avoid-taxes/
Apple, Google Among Top U.S. Companies Parking Cash Offshore To Reduce Taxes, Study Says
http://www.forbes.com/sites/connieguglielmo/2013/08/01/apple-google-among-top-u-s-companies-parking-cash-offshore-to-reduce-taxes-study-says/
Apple Tax Evasion
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tag/apple-tax-evasion/
Apple faces 'billions of euros' costs in tax avoidance probe, report says
http://www.cnet.com/news/apple-faces-billions-in-fines-in-tax-avoidance-probe/
Crackdown on Apple in Ireland Opens Front on Tax Avoidance War
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-09-30/crackdown-on-apple-in-ireland-opens-front-on-tax-avoidance-war.html

Some claims are that there are trillions parked offshore and appear to be waiting until they can buyoff congress allowing them to bring the money back (w/o having to pay more than token taxes).
http://www.uspirg.org/news/usp/offshore-tax-havens-cost-average-taxpayer-1259-year-small-businesses-3923

More U.S. Profits Parked Abroad, Saving on Taxes
http://online.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887324034804578348131432634740

from above:
A Wall Street Journal analysis of 60 big U.S. companies found that, together, they parked a total of $166 billion offshore last year. That shielded more than 40% of their annual profits from U.S. taxes, though it left the money off-limits for paying dividends, buying back shares or making investments in the U.S

... snip ...

so the alternative is to borrow ZIRP funds ... which has been used to illustrate two different parts of the system corruption ... the special tax loopholes for parking money offshore ... and the use of ZIRP funds for stock buybacks.

posts mentioning tax evasion, tax havens, tax loopholes, tax avoidance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

recent series on the subject:

Luxembourg Leaks: Global Companies' Secrets Exposed
http://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks

and older ongoing

Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.icij.org/offshore

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970






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