List of Archived Posts

2017 Newsgroup Postings (04/23 - 05/17)

Ironic old "fortune"
How Desert Storm Destroyed the US Military
NPS, Gary A. Kildall Conference Room Dedication Ceremony, 21April2017
TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer
TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer
TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer
Panama Papers law firm boss sees tax shelter boom in US
Arthur Laffer's Theory on Tax Cuts Comes to Life Once More
Ironic old "fortune"
Terminology - Datasets
WD ships 'world's largest' 12TB HGST Ultrastar He12 Helium 7200 RPM Enterprise HDDs
The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
SS Trust Fund
The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
MVT doesn't boot in 16mbytes
cultural stereotypes, was Ironic old "fortune"
[CM] What was your first home computer?
Ironic old "fortune"
Ironic old "fortune"
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
Ironic old "fortune"
[CM] What was your first home computer?
1967 new computer installations
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
Ironic old "fortune"
[CM] What was your first home computer?
Mainframe Family tree and chronology 2
National Telephone Day
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
Mainframe Family tree and chronology 2
[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
[CM] What was your first home computer?
A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
Why Your Brain Loves You Not Having a Boss, According to Science
A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
[CM] What was your first home computer?
A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
[CM] What was your first home computer?
The Illusion Of Victory: America In World War I
Typesetting
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
I quit this NG
The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster
Domain Name System
[CM] What was your first home computer?
Orient to Reality
More Cyberdumb
[CM] What was your first home computer?
11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup
Typesetting
Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Typesetting
[CM] What was your first home computer?
Linear Thinking in a Nonlinear World
does linux scatter daemons on multicore CPU?
Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
The advent of ADVENT
I quit this NG
The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
Ransomware on Mainframe application ?
Ransomware on Mainframe application ?
Check out New Wave of Ransom Threats Seen in Unprecedented Attack - Bloomberg
Ransomware on Mainframe application ?
Migration off Mainframe to other platform
The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?
[CM] What was your first home computer?

Ironic old "fortune"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ironic old "fortune"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2017 17:22:24 -0700
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
I have Fortune installed, and every time I log in, it does issue some quote. But most of the time I don't pay attention or worse, notice something maybe interesting just as I start doing something that erases the quote.

I seem to recall there is a way to read them as a list or someting, rather than just waiting around till the same quote randomly appears again.


emacs fortune
https://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/Fortune
emacs zippy
http://ergoemacs.org/emacs/emacs_zippy.html

I started out doing zippy. However, when we installed 6670s (ibm copier 3 with computer connection) as departmental printers around the bldg .... we modified the driver to print a random selected phrase on the separater page. I modified zippy to randomly select between the 6670 files and the original zippy file ... and then a random entry. The original random selection only worked for up to 32kbytes ... if you had file larger than 32kbytes ... it ignored the rest of the file. I had to fix the code to handle much larger files.

misc. past posts mentioning zippy:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#5 360/67, was Re: IBM's Project F/S ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#77 Inserting autom. random signature
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#78 Inserting autom. random signature
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#7 disk write caching (was: ibm icecube -- return of
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004f.html#48 Random signatures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#48 Xah Lee's Unixism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#50 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#19 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#43 SNA: conflicting opinions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#55 Tell me something about how you use signature files!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#45 Taglines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#55 junking CKD; was "Social Security Confronts IT Obsolescence"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#6 Some fun with IBM acronyms and jargon (was Re: Auditors Don't Know Squat!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#19 US money
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#28 US money

other files mentioning 6670
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#42 Enter fonts (was Re: Unix case-sensitivity: how did it originate?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#43 Enter fonts (was Re: Unix case-sensitivity: how did it originate?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#52 Enter fonts (was Re: Unix case-sensitivity: how did it originate?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#29 20th March 2000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#81 Coloured IBM DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#1 What good and old text formatter are there ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#50 IBM 705 computer manual
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#5 New IBM history book out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#31 Hercules etc. IBM not just missing a great opportunity...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#52 Microsoft's innovations [was:the rtf format]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#24 IBM Selectric as printer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#29 6670
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#43 Early attempts at console humor?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#1 Oldest running code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#13 JSX 328x printing (portrait)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#61 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#34 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#48 1403 printers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#51 1403 printers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#54 1403 printers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#29 Job seperators
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#20 Seeking Info on XDS Sigma 7 APL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#44 Materiel and graft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#49 Materiel and graft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#1 Materiel and graft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#36 Special characters in passwords was Re: RACF - Password rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#27 The Complete April Fools' Day RFCs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#72 Parse/Template Function
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#51 It has been a long time since Ihave seen a printer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#8a Using Military Philosophy to Drive High Value Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#68 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#69 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#42 Password Rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#71 Password Rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#6 Timeline: The evolution of online communities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#1 Does this count as 'computer' folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#74 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#85 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#2 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#23 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#68 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#43 Boyd's Briefings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#57 IBM 029 service manual
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#59 IBM 029 service manual
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#49 GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#61 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#1 Is email dead? What do you think?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#89 Make the mainframe work environment fun and intuitive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#82 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#84 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#24 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#10 History of APL -- Software Preservation Group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#21 WHAT WAS THE PROJECT YOU WERE INVOLVED/PARTICIPATED AT IBM THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#62 Mixing Auth and Non-Auth Modules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#19 program coding pads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#21 program coding pads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#53 Virginia M. Rometty elected IBM president
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#77 Just for a laugh... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#95 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#97 Just for a laugh ... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#54 Yahoo Password Breach: 7 Lessons Learned - Security - Attacks/breaches - Informationweek
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#57 Displaywriter, Unix manuals added to Bitsavers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#22 I Need A Good Password
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#95 IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue would rather you forgot
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#26 23Jun1969 Unbundling Announcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#34 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#54 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#60 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#67 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#66 Is the IBM Official Alumni Group becoming a ghost town? Why?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Desert Storm Destroyed the US Military

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: How Desert Storm Destroyed the US Military
Date: 24 Apr 2017
Blog: Facebook
How Desert Storm Destroyed the US Military
http://usdefensewatch.com/2017/04/how-desert-storm-destroyed-the-us-military/

Desert Storm, 43days, only last 100hrs were land war. GAO air effectiveness study had (CAS) so easily taking out tanks (and other targets), that the Iraqis were walking away from them; sitting ducks, million A10 30mm shells, Burton ("Pentagon Wars") describes getting shells down from nearly $100 to $13, or $13M. 100hr land war describes horrific tank battles with coalition forces taking no damage (but don't mention if Iraqi tanks had anybody home).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_War

US had supported Iraq
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_War#Background
in the Iran/Iraq War
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_War
including WMDs
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war
sat. photo recon analyst informed White House that Saddam was marshaling forces for invasion of Kuwait. White House says that Saddam told them he would do no such thing and proceeded to discredit the analyst. then the analyst informed the White House that Saddam was marshaling forces for invasion of Saudi Arabia. Now the Bush1 has to choose between Saudi Arabia and Saddam.
http://www.amazon.com/Long-Strange-Journey-Intelligence-ebook/dp/B004NNV5H2/
Iraq invasion of Suadi Arabia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_War#Iraqi_invasion_of_Saudi_Arabia_.28Battle_of_Khafji.29

last decade, cousin of white house chief of staff Card ... was dealing with the Iraqis at the UN and was given evidence that WMDs had been decommissioned. She shared it with Card, Powell and others ... then is locked up in military hospital, book was published in 2010 (before decommissioned WMDs were declassified)
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

military-industrial-complex wanted a war so badly that corporate reps were telling former eastern block countries that if they voted for IRAQ2 invasion in the UN, they would get membership in NATO and (directed appropriation) USAID (can *ONLY* be used for purchase of modern US arms). From law of unintended consequences ... in the invasion, they were told to bypass ammo dumps looking for WMDs. When they got around to going back, a million metric tons had evaporated. Later started seeing large artillery shell IEDs ... even taking out Abrams
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

Claims are that Iraqis learned from Desert Storm to minimize targets for US air power.

White house initially justifies Iraq invasion based on claimed support for Al-Queda and that it would only cost $50B (there was going to be that much in shrink wrapped $100s). later they switch the justification to WMDs. The decommissioned WMDs tracing back to the US were found early in the invasion, but the information was classified until the fall of 2014 (4yrs after Card's cousin book was published).
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html

WMDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmds
military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

perpetual war (almost like old "star trek" episode)
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_war
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

success of failure
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

NPS, Gary A. Kildall Conference Room Dedication Ceremony, 21April2017

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: NPS, Gary A. Kildall Conference Room Dedication Ceremony, 21April2017
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:29:46 -0700
NPS, Gary A. Kildall Conference Room Dedication Ceremony, 21April2017
https://www.facebook.com/KildallLegacy/photos/a.1417318855178129.1073741828.1416558381920843/1877202059189804/
https://www.facebook.com/KildallLegacy/photos/a.1417318855178129.1073741828.1416558381920843/1877210825855594/

before ms/dos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS-DOS
there was seattle computer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Computer_Products
before seattle computer there was cp/m,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/M
before cp/m, kildall worked with cp67/cms
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP-67
at npg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Postgraduate_School

some of the ctss people went to the 5th flr to do multics and others went to the ibm science center on the 4th flr and did cp40/cms, cp67/cms, invented gml, lots of interactive and performance work
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System

science center, 545 tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

past refs mentioning Kildall:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#52 Kildall "flying" (was Re: First OS?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#53 Kildall "flying" (was Re: First OS?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#60 monterey's place in computing was: Kildall "flying" (was Re: First OS?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#38 [REALLY OT!] Overuse of symbolic constants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#40 Which Monitor Would You Pick??????
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#55 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#48 Early microcomputer (esp i8008) software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#29 PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#41 Is computer history taugh now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#32 Gone but not forgotten: 10 operating systems the world left behind
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#78 Gone but not forgotten: 10 operating systems the world left behind
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#8 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#4 Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#22 MS-DOS is 30 years old today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#31 The Most Expensive One-Byte Mistake
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#67 Wondering if I am really eligible for this group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#72 CRLF in Unix being translated on Mainframe to x'25'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#89 Innovation and iconoclasm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#96 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#100 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#6 Cloud apps placed well in the economic cycle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#24 Original Thinking Is Hard, Where Good Ideas Come From
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#15 Happy Webiversary!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#41 Hi, Does any one knows the true origin of the usage of the word bug in computers to design a fault?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#65 The old is new again - Not IBM related, but I hope interesting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#36 Should IBM allow the use of Hercules as z system emulator?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#59 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#95 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#58 Altair Star Trek in assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#98 Gordon Crovitz: Who Really Invented the Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#84 Did Bill Gates Steal the Heart of DOS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#94 Did Bill Gates Steal the Heart of DOS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#9 "execs" or "scripts"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#39 PC/mainframe browser(s) was Re: 360/20, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#7 Why former IBMers who left maybe years ago for any reason are still active on the Greater IBM Connection?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#22 What is a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#23 HCF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#28 Some interesting post about the importance of Security and what it means for the Mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#51 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#0 What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#51 Search for first Web page takes detour into US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#9 IBM commitment to academia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#3 A Brief History of Cloud Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#69 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#74 z/OS is antique WAS: Aging Sysprogs = Aging Farmers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#90 Enterprise Cobol 5.1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#103 Microsoft publishes MS-DOS, Word for Windows source code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#71 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#60 The Road Not Taken: Knowing When to Keep Your Mouth Shut
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#30 The joy of simplicity?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#39 Virtual Memory Management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#52 The Stack Depth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#90 Your earliest dream?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#8 New Line vs. Line Feed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#5 Some Trivia: Happy Birthday IBM PC - You're 34 Today!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#13 Ancient History (OS's) - was : IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#17 IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#28 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#33 The Network Nation, Revised Edition
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#54 PL/I advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#103 Multithreaded output to stderr and stdout
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#67 Was Microsoft built on stolen goods?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#33 OODA-loop and virtual machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#4 OODA in IT Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#12 Rolander, Tom oral history (DRI, CPM, etc)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#81 GREAT presentation on the history of the mainframe

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 14:41:01 -0700
Gerard Schildberger <gerard46@rrt.net> writes:
TSS/360 ran in HOW much memory? --- Or is this a case of a faulty sentence antecedent? _____________________________ Gerard Schildberger

TSS/360 originally claimed 256kbytes ... but customers kept being told that they had to add more memory.

The univ. had 768kbyte 360/67 ... and the IBM SE and I ran benchmark comparison early in 1968 .... synthetic benchmark, edit (with simulated wait times), fortran compile and execute. He ran tss/360 with four simulated users ... and I ran cp67/cms with 35 simulated users (even before I had made many performance enhancements) ... and the cp67/cms benchmark had better aggregate throughput and better interactive response (with 35 users) than tss/360 had (w/4 users).

Later TSS/360 was claiming that they did multiprocessor scaleup better than anybody ... a 2mbyte, 2proc, 360/67 getting 3.8 times the throughput of a 1mbyte, 1proc, 360/67. The real issue was that tss/360 kernel was such a memory hog ... that it was still extremely constrained in one mbyte of real memory. The "3.8" times factor was because in the SMP 2mbyte memory configuration it only had single copy of the tss/360 kernel (which still had hard time effectively running in 1mbyte memory) ... one of those cases where one is tempted to say "statistics lie".

the other issue vis-a-vis cp67/cms ... was tss/360 was page mapped filesystem ... and lots of stuff would be synchronous page faulting 4kbytes at a time .... which also plays a factor in the later future system effort that derived a lot of its single-level store page mapped from tss/360 ... past posts mentioning future system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

CMS file i/o could do large multi-block transfers (if contiguous, but didn't have explicit contiguous allocation) ... loading fresh filesystem from backup tape would tend to have some contiguous allocation, but could get fragmented over time.

In the early 70s at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

I did page mapped filesystem for cp67/cms ... but claimed I had learned what not to do from tss/360 ... (if available) contiguous allocation, read-ahead, write-behind, asynchronous operation, multi-block transfers etc. I could relatively easily show 3-4 times throughput of moderately filesystem active benchmarks, some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 14:53:48 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
The univ. had 768kbyte 360/67 ... and the IBM SE and I ran benchmark comparison early in 1968 .... synthetic benchmark, edit (with simulated

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#3 TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer

later, by the summer 1968, I was doing a lot of pathlength mostly targeted at improving os/360 throughput in cp67 virtual machine. Part of old IBM user group SHARE presentation ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18

CP/67 cpu cycles for running os/360 mft reduced from 534secs to 113secs.

Later I did pathlength improvements specifically for multi-user CMS, ordered seek queueing (helps concurrent cms file i/o as well as disk paging), 2301 fixed-head drum paging, multi-record rotational ordering (improved peak 2301 from 80/sec to 270/sec),

... and page replacement algorithm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#clock

also dynamic adaptive resource management, scheduling, and dispatching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 21:56:17 -0700
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
But I think it would be a stretch to call that *virtualization*, which, of course, is the basis of CP/67 and z/VM. And, normally, in a virtual machine operating system, one doesn't have applications programs issuing channel commands that get trapped - the applications programs work normally, doing their I/O by (what would be termed) monitor calls (on a PDP-8), with the normal operating system running under the hypervisor possibly (_not_ necessarily; there are various popular forms of quasi-virtualization - such as paravirtualization) issuing I/O machine instructions that get trapped.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#91 A Whirlwind History of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#3 TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#4 TSS/8, was A Whirlwind History of the Computer

360, 370, etc ... channel programs ran with real addresses. virtual machine trapped the I/O instructions ... then had to copy the virtual machine channel program substituting real addresses for the virtual addresses.

this is past post about the decision to move all systems/machines from real to virtual memory .... typical (real memory) 370/165 1mbyte MVT only could configure four regions .... MVT storage management was so bad, region sizes typically had to be four times larger than needed. Moving MVT to virtual memory VS2/SVS could increase number of regions by factor of four times ... with little or no paging.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

almost as if MVT was running in 16mbyte virtual machine.

Initial work just had to build single 16mbyte virtual tables and little bit of work to handle page fault. The big problem was that standard OS/360 convention is that channel programs are built by application library software and then does SVC0/EXCP to the kernel to execute the channel program. Moving to virtual memory ... the os/360 convention now has application channel programs with virtual addresses (not real) .... so operating system has to create copy of the channel programs, substituting real addresses for virtual (same problem faced by virtual machine). Initial implementation for VS2/SVS "borrowed" CCWTRANS (from CP/67).

at the bottom of this was that as processors got faster, faster than disks got faster ... so to maintain system throughput (proportionally to increase in processor speed) ... needed increased levels of multiprogramming, more concurrent execution (which needed increased number of regions).

I've mentioned before about periodically pointing out that processors were increasing faster, than disks were increasing faster. In the early 80s, claimed that relative system disk throughput had declined by a factor of tens times since 60s (360/67) and early 80s (3081). old post with comparison:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#31

disk executive took exception and assigned the disk division performance group to refute my statements. After a couple weeks, they came back and basically said that I had understated the problem. They then respun the analysis for IBM user group SHARE presentation (B874) on disk optimizing for improved throughput.

recent posts reference account of justification for moving all 370 to virtual memory:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#90 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#8 BSAM vs QSAM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#80 Great mainframe history(?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#81 GREAT presentation on the history of the mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#50 Univ. 709
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#61 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#76 Mainframe operating systems?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#83 Mainframe operating systems?

past posts mentioning B874
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#18 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#46 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#3 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#68 DASD Response Time (on antique 3390?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#5 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#71 308x Processors - was "Mainframe articles"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#7 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#34 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#52 Hercules; more information requested
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#67 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#1 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#70 25 reasons why hardware is still hot at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#31 Wax ON Wax OFF -- Tuning VSAM considerations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#32 OS idling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#33 History of Hard-coded Offsets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#18 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#35 CKD DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#61 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#1 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#5 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#32 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#73 Tape vs DASD - Speed/time/CPU utilization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#39 A bit of IBM System 360 nostalgia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#62 ISO documentation of IBM 3375, 3380 and 3390 track format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#72 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#90 What's the difference between doing performance in a mainframe environment versus doing in others
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#87 Death of spinning disk?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#0 Miniskirts and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#110 Is there a source for detailed, instruction-level performance info?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#12 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#21 What was a 3314?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#68 Raspberry Pi 3?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#38 How the internet was invented
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#40 Floating point registers or general purpose registers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#43 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#45 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#32 Virtualization's Past Helps Explain Its Current Importance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#70 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#61 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Panama Papers law firm boss sees tax shelter boom in US

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Panama Papers law firm boss sees tax shelter boom in US
Date: 25 Apr 2017
Blog: Facebook
Panama Papers law firm boss sees tax shelter boom in US
https://www.geo.tv/latest/138915-Panama-Papers-law-firm-boss-sees-tax-shelter-boom-in-US

The Panama Papers
https://panamapapers.icij.org/

tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax havens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arthur Laffer's Theory on Tax Cuts Comes to Life Once More

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Arthur Laffer's Theory on Tax Cuts Comes to Life Once More
Date: 25 Apr 2017
Blog: Facebook
Arthur Laffer's Theory on Tax Cuts Comes to Life Once More
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/25/us/politics/white-house-economic-policy-arthur-laffer.html

2002, congress lets the fiscal responsibility act lapse (spending can't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt). 2010, CBO report was that 2003-2009, tax revenue cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T, for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsible budget (first time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars). Since then only modest spending cuts, but not restored taxes so debt continues to increased.

fiscal responsibility act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

Spring 2009, IRS announces its is going after 52,000 wealthy Americans that owe $400B on money (illegally) hidden overseas. Spring 2011, Speaker of House announces that congress is cutting the budget for department responsible for recovering that money. Since then there was been references to a few billion in fines on the too big to fail that facilitated the tax evasion, but little on the $400B.

tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax havens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion
"too big to fail"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Milton Friedman
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Friedman
Friedman promoted an alternative macroeconomic viewpoint known as "monetarism", and argued that a steady, small expansion of the money supply was the preferred policy.[12] His ideas concerning monetary policy, taxation, privatization and deregulation influenced government policies, especially during the 1980s.
... snip ...

Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-01-12/milton-friedman-s-cherished-theory-is-laid-to-rest
Even now, when economic models have become far more complex than anything in Friedman's time, economists still go back to Friedman's theory as a mental touchstone -- a fundamental intuition that guides the way they make their models. My first macroeconomics professor believed in it deeply and instinctively, and would even bring it up in department seminars.
... snip ...

Economists and the Powerful: Convenient Theories, Distorted Facts, Ample Rewards
http://www.amazon.com/Economists-Powerful-Convenient-Distorted-ebook/dp/B009K44OW2

"The Undoing Project" goes into some detail how Kahneman and Tversky disproved economists' assumption that people make rational decisions ... loc1155-59:
He had listened to an American economist talk about how so-and-so was stupid and so-and-so was a fool, then said, "All your economic models are premised on people being smart and rational, and yet all the people you know are idiots."

Kahneman (a psychologist) gets Nobel prize in economics, in part for debunking some cherished economic theories

recent Friedman, Kahneman, and/or "Undoing Project"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#14 Japanese company replaces office workers with artificial intelligence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#17 Destruction of the Middle Class
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#24 Destruction of the Middle Class
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#26 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#29 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#31 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#34 If economists want to be trusted again, they should learn to tell jokes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#66 Deep learning algorithm does as well as dermatologists in identifying skin cancer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#92 Trump's Rollback of the Neoliberal Market State
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#93 The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds Kindle Edition
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#97 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#101 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#102 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#104 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#11 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#16 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#17 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#24 Disorder
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#25 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#26 Virtualization's Past Helps Explain Its Current Importance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#43 when to get out???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#0 Locking our own orientation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#65 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#67 Economists are arguing over how their profession messed up during the Great Recession. This is what happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#77 Trump delay of the 'fiduciary rule' will cost retirement savers $3.7 billion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#89 Understanding decisions: The power of combining psychology and economics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#93 United Air Lines - an OODA-loop perspective
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#96 Cognitive Bias Codex, 2016

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ironic old "fortune"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ironic old "fortune"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 26 Apr 2017 10:34:38 -0700
JimP. <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:
Some ati-virus/trojan programs were good when they first came out. Now they don't work as well and people stick with them instead of changing to something better.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#0 Ironic old "fortune"

rather than fixing virus/trojans ... look for "signatures" (and delete/quarantine them) ... originally few signatures and relative low rate of new signatures ... currently over six million with high rate of new/changed signatures
https://us.norton.com/security_response/definitions.jsp

i periodically mention 1996 moscone MDC where all the banners said "Internet" ... but constant refrain in all the sessions "was preserve you investment" ... i.e. from small, closed, safe, business LANs with automagically executed scripting embedded in datafiles. It was enabling the facility for the wild anarchy of the internet w/o any additional countermeasures ... sort of like launching people into vacuum of space only wearing their everyday clothes for the earth surface.

recent posts mentioning 1996 moscone mdc:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#87 On a lighter note, even the Holograms are demonstrating
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#35 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#90 These hackers warned the Internet would become a security disaster. Nobody listened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#35 [Poll] Computing favorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#39 [Poll] Computing favorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#106 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#69 Open DoD's Doors To Cyber Talent, Carter Asks Congress
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#79 Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#19 Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#38 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#92 Old hardware

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Terminology - Datasets

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Terminology - Datasets
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 26 Apr 2017 11:32:52 -0700
Jesse1.Robinson@SCE.COM (Jesse 1 Robinson) writes:
I have a rather jaundiced view. Every time the word 'legacy' rings, an angel in heaven is entitled to use the word 'weenie-ware' one more time.

Since the term 'data set' (is it one or two words?) is pretty much confined to mainframe, 'file' is useful for communicating to the unwashed masses. To avoid ambiguity, I try to use 'MVS file' or 'VM file' to distinguish it from Unix or Linux, both of which (can) live on mainframe. The problem with 'z/OS' is that it's a marketing/packaging term that is subject to meta-technical whims in the IBM boardroom.

BTW we once had a pitch on Linux on z that referred to traditional Unix applications as 'legacy'. Sweet.


IBM corporate sent out memo that all (company) datasets had to add security classification. I submitted a (cost saving) suggestion that CMS file areas are equivalent to MVS PDS datasets and individual CMS files are equivalent to PDS members .... so instead of classifying individual CMS files ... classify CMS file areas (analogous to MVS PDS datasets) ... saving the company $12M dollars/year (cost saving suggestions would also award submitter month savings).

It was rejected ... and then three months later implemented (so even tho it was implemented, there was no award). Periodically there is reference that "business ethics" is an "oxymoron". a couple old posts on the subject:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#88
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#42

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

WD ships 'world's largest' 12TB HGST Ultrastar He12 Helium 7200 RPM Enterprise HDDs

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: WD ships 'world's largest' 12TB HGST Ultrastar He12 Helium 7200 RPM Enterprise HDDs
Date: 26 Apr 2017
Blog: Facebook
WD ships 'world's largest' 12TB HGST Ultrastar He12 Helium 7200 RPM Enterprise HDDs
http://www.zdnet.com/article/wd-ships-worlds-largest-12tb-hgst-ultrastar-he12-helium-7200-rpm-enterprise-hdds/
The HGST Ultrastar He12 is a fourth-generation 3.5-inch helium hard drive, featuring an eight platter design that allows 20 percent more capacity than the seven platter drives, and Perpendicular Magnetic Recording (PMR) technology to cram more bits onto the surface of the platter.
... snip ...

recent post in ibm-main mailing list on 1980s disk "density"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#54

remember HGST use to be IBM San Jose (disk division) plant site
https://www.hgst.com/

late 80s, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at internal annual world-wide communication group conference supposedly on 3174 performance ... but opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had strategic responsibility for everything that crossed the datacenter walls and were fiercely fighting off client/server and distributed computing, trying to preserve their (emulated) dumb terminal paradigm and install base. The disk division was seeing data fleeing the data center to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with several solutions to address the problem but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group.

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

a few short years later, IBM has gone into the red and was being reorg'ed into 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company.

Seagate launches a monstrous 60TB SSD
https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/233358-seagate-unveils-the-worlds-largest-ssd-60tb

And now there are PCIe based disks ... getting closer to memory speed
http://www.anandtech.com/show/11208/intel-introduces-optane-ssd-dc-p4800x-with-3d-xpoint-memory
500K IOPS (4K random) for a single board. I suspect that will get better as the IO stack is optimized for low latency storage.
... snip ...

parent article, has bunch of other
http://www.anandtech.com/tag/pcie-ssd

for comparison, mainframe "peak I/O" benchmark (latest I can find) is z196 getting 2M IOPS using 104 FICON. About the same time, there was a fibre channel announced for e5-2600 blade claiming over million IOPS aka FICON is heavy-weight mainframe protocol running over fibre channel that drastically cuts the native throughput. post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
Date: 27 Apr 2017
Blog: Facebook
The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
https://www.bbvaopenmind.com/en/the-geniuses-that-anticipated-the-idea-of-the-internet/

Some of the (MIT) CTSS people went to 5th flr (tech sq, across from MIT campus) to do Multics and others went to the science center on the 4th flr and did virtual machines, lots of other online stuff, internal network, and invented "GML" in 1969. some science center posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

A decade after GML was invented in 1969, it morphs into ISO standard SGML, after another decade, it morphs into HTML at CERN. some past GML posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

The internal network was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s. At the time the arpanet/internet great change-over to internetworking protocol on 1Jan1983, there were approx. 100 IMP network nodes (and 255 connected host computers), at a time when the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

Co-worker at the science center was responsible for the internal network ... reference here ... also has account of visiting Cerf in the mid-70s to talk about internetworking protocol
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks
and some more here:
https://www.amazon.com/Its-Cool-Be-Clever-Hendricks/dp/1897435630

Note: one of the issues moving from NCP/IMP to TCP/IP was how to handle out-of-band control signals (NCP/IMP had separate data & control flows, while TCP/IP didn't, discussed in internet RFC721).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/internet.htm

In the early 80s we are working with director of NSF to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. We were suppose to get $20M, then congress cuts the budget, some number of other things happen and eventually an RFP is released (in part based on what we already had running). Internal politics prevent us from bidding and NSF director attempts to help by writting the corporation a letter (with support from other gov. agencies), but that just made the internal politics worse (as did references that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers, it evolves into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to the modern internet.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/
some NSFNET posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

The corporate sponsored univ. network (based on the internal network technology from the science center) for a time was also larger than the arpanet/internet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET
and BITNET posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

trivia: the first "webserver" outside europe is on the SLAC virtual machine system (originally from the science center):
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml
and
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/firstpages.shtml

In the late 80s, I'm working with national labs on scientific/technical cluster scaleup and with RDBMS vendors on commercial cluster scaleup ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa
and reference to Jan1992 meeting in Ellison's conference room
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
HA/CMP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

by Feb. 1992, cluster scaleup has been transferred, announced as supercomputer for scientific/technical *ONLY*, and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors. We then decide to leave a few months later. It turns out that some of the Oracle people have also left and show up at a small client/server startup responsible for something called "commerce server". We are brought in as consultants because they want to do payment transactions on the server, the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they want to use; the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". I have absolute authority over the servers to internet gateway to the payment networks, but can only make recommendations for the client/server side; some of which are almost immediately violated accounting for some number of exploits and vulnerabilities that continue to this day.

For the webserver to payment network gateway I have to do software and documentation compensating procedures to bring it up to "industrial strength" dataprocessing (types of stuff sometimes done behind the scenes by large ISPs today). Until he passes, the internet standards editor also use to let me help with the periodic STD1
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Postel

In the mid-90s, Postel also had me do a talk on "Why the internet isn't business critical dataprocessing" (based on compensating procedures for "electronic commerce") for people at ISI and USC computer security graduate students.

As an aside, in the late 80s and early 90s, (some parts of) Federal Government was mandating the elimination of TCP/IP and replacing with OSI ("GOSIP").

trivia: old post that includes a list of corporate sites around the world that added one or more network nodes during 1983
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8

other recent posts mentioning Edson:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#101 Internal Network, NSFNET, Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#8 What Does School Really Teach Children
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#31 How the internet was invented
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#53 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#108 Some (IBM-related) History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#124 Early Networking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#126 Five myths about the Web
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#13 Bullying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#6 INTERNET
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#5 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#43 Formed by Megafloods, This Place Fooled Scientists for Decades
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#62 Most people are secretly threatened by creativity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#62 People don't actually like creativity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SS Trust Fund

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: SS Trust Fund
Date: 27 Apr 2017
Blog: Facebook
SS Trust Fund
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_Trust_Fund

Reagan's budget director in the 80s takes credit for: 1) accelerating SS contribution increases (for handling future baby boomer retirements and living longer) ... so that the money could be "borrowed" (from the SS Trust fund) for military spending ... and 2) change to taxing SS benefits, SS contributions are originally payed from taxed income, but after the 80s change, then the benefits are taxed again ... increasing money available for military spending.

Baby boomers are four times as many as the previous generation, so during the baby boomer peak earning years, they were making more contributions into the SS Trust Fund than were being paid out in benefits each year, building up principle for baby boomer retirement (which was then being "borrowed" for spending on other items). The following generation is half the size of the baby boomer generation, so as baby boomers retire, the situation inverts (less contributions each year than benefits payed out). The following generation is now faced with being taxed for 1) paying back the borrowed baby boomer benefits and 2) make up what the borrowed baby boomer contributions were previously being spent for.

In 2002, congress lets the fiscal responsibility act lapse (spending can't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt, aka "paygo"). 2010 CBO report was that 2003-2009, tax revenue cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T gap compared to fiscal responsible budget (first time taxes cut to not pay for two wars). Since then taxes not restored and modest spending cuts so debt continues to increase. Sort of confluence of 1) Federal Reserve and wallstreet wanted huge federal debt, 2) wallstreet and special interests wanted huge tax cut, 3) military-industrial complex wanted huge spending increase.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

If somebody quotes current national debt as around $20T, then it includes the amount "borrowed" from the SS Trust Fund, when somebody quotes national debt as around $17T ... then it appears that they are assuming that the amount looted from the SS Trust Fund doesn't have to be repaid (sometimes same people might use both values at different times, depending on how they are spinning the national debt).

Part of Stockman's change to make benefits taxable was eliminating association (aka "account") between the contributions and the benefits. Stockman needed to tax the SS benefits, if the benefits came out of your contribution "account", you have already paid taxes on the contribution (and couldn't tax them again when benefits were paid out of your contribution account). Stockman had to eliminate direct association (account) between the (already taxed) contributions and the benefits ... in order to tax them again

other recent posts mentioning SS Trust Fund
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#5 The Champions of the 401(k) Lament the Revolution They Started
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#11 Attack SS Entitlements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#30 $16T National Debt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#42 Peak Savings: Wall Street Faces 20 Years Of Retirement Withdrawals As Boomers Hit 70 1/2
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#43 when to get out???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#67 Economists are arguing over how their profession messed up during the Great Recession. This is what happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#77 Trump delay of the 'fiduciary rule' will cost retirement savers $3.7 billion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
Date: 28 Apr 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#11 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_Open_Systems_Interconnection_Profile
1990 - The US specification requiring Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) protocols was first published as Federal Information Processing Standards document FIPS 146-1. The requirement for US Government vendors to demonstrate their support for this profile led them to join the formal interoperability and conformance testing for networking products, which had been done by industry professionals at the annual InterOp show since 1980.
... snip ...

.... note at Interop '88, there were lots of booths with OSI products. I had (IBM) unix workstation doing TCP/IP in (non-IBM) booth. Trivia, early Monday morning (before show starts) the floor nets were still crashing with broadcast storms ... before they finally isolate the problem. Solution then is mandated in RFC1122.

trivia: late 80s, I was on XTP technical advisory board and there was attempt to take XTP to ansi x3s3.3 (ISO chartered US standard committee for OSI level 3&4, network&transport) for standardization as HSP (high-speed protocol). It turns out that ISO had policy that no standardization for protocols that violate OSI. XTP/HSP was rejected because it violated OSI:
1) it supported internetworking, a non-existant layer in OSI sitting between layer 3&4.

2) it supported LAN MAC interface, a non-existant interface in OSI sitting approx. in middile of layer 3

3) it went directly from layer 4 to LAN/MAC ... bypassing layer 3/4 interface.


From internet perspective, IETF requires at least two interoperable internet implementations before standards progress while ISO standards don't even have to demonstrate that they are implementable.

some xtp/hsp posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#xtphsp

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2017 11:03:10 -0700
The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
https://www.bbvaopenmind.com/en/the-geniuses-that-anticipated-the-idea-of-the-internet/

Some of the (MIT) CTSS people went to 5th flr (tech sq, across from MIT campus) to do Multics and others went to the science center on the 4th flr
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System

and did virtual machines, lots of other online stuff, internal network, and invented "GML" in 1969.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

A decade after GML was invented in 1969, it morphs into ISO standard SGML, after another decade, it morphs into HTML at CERN.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

The internal network was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s. At the time the arpanet/internet great change-over to internetworking protocol on 1Jan1983, there were approx. 100 IMP network nodes (and 255 connected host computers), at a time when the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

Co-worker at the science center was responsible for the internal network ... reference here ... also has account of visiting Cerf in the mid-70s to talk about internetworking protocol
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks
and some more here:
https://www.amazon.com/Its-Cool-Be-Clever-Hendricks/dp/1897435630

Note: one of the issues moving from NCP/IMP to TCP/IP was how to handle out-of-band control signals (NCP/IMP had separate data & control flows, while TCP/IP didn't, discussed in internet RFC721).

In the early 80s we are working with director of NSF to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. We were suppose to get $20M, then congress cuts the budget, some number of other things happen and eventually an RFP is released (in part based on what we already had running). Internal politics prevent us from bidding and NSF director attempts to help by writting the corporation a letter (with support from other gov. agencies), but that just made the internal politics worse (as did references that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers, it evolves into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to the modern internet. MIT technical review article
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/
some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

The corporate sponsored univ. network (based on the internal network technology from the science center) for a time was also larger than the arpanet/internet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET
some old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

trivia: the first "webserver" outside europe is on the SLAC virtual machine system (originally from the science center):
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml
and
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/firstpages.shtml

In the late 80s, I'm working with national labs on scientific/technical cluster scaleup and with RDBMS vendors on commercial cluster scaleup ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa
and reference to Jan1992 meeting in Ellison's conference room
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

by Feb. 1992, cluster scaleup has been transferred, announced as supercomputer for scientific/technical *ONLY*, and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors. We then decide to leave a few months later. It turns out that some of the Oracle people have also left and show up at a small client/server startup responsible for something called "commerce server". We are brought in as consultants because they want to do payment transactions on the server, the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they want to use; the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". I have absolute authority over the servers to internet gateway to the payment networks, but can only make recommendations for the client/server side; some of which are almost immediately violated accounting for some number of exploits and vulnerabilities that continue to this day.

For the webserver to payment network gateway I have to do software and documentation compensating procedures to bring it up to "industrial strength" dataprocessing (types of stuff sometimes done behind the scenes by large ISPs today). Until he passes, the internet standards editor also use to let me help with the periodic STD1
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Postel

In the mid-90s, Postel also had me do a talk on "Why the internet isn't business critical dataprocessing" (based on compensating procedures for "electronic commerce") for people at ISI and USC computer security graduate students. related patent portfolio
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadssummary.htm

trivia: old post that includes a list of corporate sites around the world that added one or more network nodes during 1983
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8

some internet posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internet

As an aside, in the late 80s and early 90s, (some parts of) Federal Government was mandating the elimination of TCP/IP and replacing with OSI ("GOSIP"). Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_Open_Systems_Interconnection_Profile
1990 - The US specification requiring Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) protocols was first published as Federal Information Processing Standards document FIPS 146-1. The requirement for US Government vendors to demonstrate their support for this profile led them to join the formal interoperability and conformance testing for networking products, which had been done by industry professionals at the annual InterOp show since 1980.
... snip ...

.... note at Interop '88, there were lots of booths with OSI products. I had (IBM) unix workstation doing TCP/IP in (non-IBM) booth. Trivia, early Monday morning (before show starts) the floor nets were still crashing with broadcast storms ... before they finally isolate the problem. Solution then is mandated in RFC1122. some old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#interop88

trivia: late 80s, I was on XTP technical advisory board and there was attempt to take XTP to ansi x3s3.3 (ISO chartered US standard committee for OSI level 3&4, network&transport) for standardization as HSP (high-speed protocol). It turns out that ISO had policy that no standardization for protocols that violate OSI. XTP/HSP was rejected because it violated OSI:
1) it supported internetworking, a non-existant layer in OSI sitting between layer 3&4. 2) it supported LAN MAC interface, a non-existant interface in OSI sitting approx. in middile of layer 3 3) it went directly from layer 4 to LAN/MAC ... bypassing layer 3/4 interface.

From internet perspective, IETF requires at least two interoperable internet implementations before standards progress while ISO standards don't even have to demonstrate that they are implementable.

some xtp/hsp posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#xtphsp

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2017 16:09:03 -0700
hancock4 writes:
The above does mention Western Union telegraphy as being a contributor.

However, in the mid-1960s, Western Union foresaw the idea of a national "computer utility", which would operate much like the Internet operates today. W/U hoped to be the connector. (articles posted here previously).

Also, W/U was an early contractor to ARPA for packet switching and communications.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#11 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#13 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#14 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

lots of operations were starting to provide value added networks in the 60s & 70s .... this old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/internet.htm#email821022
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#email821022

mentions csnet connections via arpanet, telenet (GTE), and "phonenet"

tymshare
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymshare
was providing its cms-based online computer conferencing for free to IBM user group SHARE as VMSHARE starting in aug1976 ... archives here
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

and had its own network with local dialup in many markets
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymnet
http://cap-lore.com/Tymnet/ETH.html

however, internet started to replace lots of the private value added networks and they started to atrophy. By mid-90s WU wasn't doing well. First Financial and FDC (1992 spin off by AMEX in the largest IPO up until that time) were in competition to take-over (poorly) WU ... and FDC drops out. Later FDC and First Financial merge (and FDC has to spin-off MoneyGram as part of the merger). However, after the start of the century, WU business starts to explode (with illegal workers sending paychecks home) and by 2005, WU is half of FDC's bottom line. FDC then spins off WU (possibly contributing is the president of Mexico had invited FDC executives to Mexico to be thrown in jail for how much money WU was making off Mexican workers).

Some of the excuses for OSI not including internetworking layer was that it was heavily dominated by proprietary service providers ... which had blind spot (for one reason or another) about the need for internetworking (everybody would be locked into specific commercial service provider).

triva: june 17th of 1995 ... the largest online service provider started having some its internet facing servers crash. for the next two months they had everybody they could think of come in to look at it ... but they continued to crash. so aug. 17, somebody flew out to west coast and bought me a hamburger after work and while i ate it ... explained the symptoms. i then gave him a q&d work around patch that was applied later that night. afterwards i made the rounds of the usual vendors that sell stuff that involves tcp/ip and/or connecting to the internet ... suggesting that maybe they do something to address the problem; nobody was interested. almost exactly a year later a similar symptom hit a service provider in manhatten which made the press ... and now you saw the usual players telling the press about how fast they were addressing the problem. some past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#51 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#11 Caller ID "spoofing"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#21 recent mentions of 40+ yr old technology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#35 Builders V. Breakers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#11 Top 10 Cybersecurity Threats for 2009, will they cause creation of highly-secure Corporate-wide ntranets?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#60 Core characteristics of resilience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#104 On a lighter note, even the Holograms are demonstrating
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#25 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#79 Is it a lost cause?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2017 19:20:12 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
System/370 macro assembler (ASMF and HLASM) were such powerful tools they might as well have been HLLs - better, in fact, since they didn't have the limitations of an HLL. At one point I could code assembler faster than any other language, with about as few errors.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#86 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#100 [CM] What was your first home computer?

I did analysis of 360&370 assembler code failures ... part of assembler was programmer had to manage register contents and failures was register contents weren't correct .... especially with complex execution paths where some path didn't include loading correct register contents.

compiler eliminated having to manage register contents and the associated bugs

I've frequently pontificated that somewhat similar problem is with C-language where programmer has to manage buffer lengths ... and human mistakes result in buffer length mistakes ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#buffer

common in both assembler and C (and some other languages) is dynamic buffer use after release (with "dangling" pointers). One of the claims for JAVA (and some other languages) is the elimination of programmer mistakes associated with management of allocation and deallocation buffers.

Early in the days of REX (before rename to REXX and release to customers), I wanted to demonstrate that rex wasn't just another pretty scripting language ... object was to redo (in REX) IBM's IPCS (large IBM assembler problem determination/analysis program) in less than 3months working half time with tens times more function and running ten times faster (a little bit of slight of hand making interpreted rex run faster than assembler).

I finished early so started doing library of automated checking for failure signatures. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

I thot that IBM would release it in lieu of the existing IPCS ... but never happened (even tho it was in use by nearly every internal datacenter and customer support PSR). Finally I got approval to give presentations at user group meetings about how I did the implementation ... and within a few months, similar implementations started to appear.

The closest it came to release was the 3090 service processor (3092) people. It started out as 4331 running modified version of vm370 release 6 ... and the service processor menus were implemented in CMS IOS3270 (upgraded to pair of 4361s). some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#email861031
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#email861212

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2017 21:35:37 -0700
Dan Espen <dan1espen@gmail.com> writes:
Yes you have but I'm still not buying it. Easy enough to not overflow your buffers. I've written more than one C program with malloced buffers that expand when their capacity is exceeded.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#86 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#100 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#16 [CM] What was your first home computer?

then maybe mitre, nist, darpa, sans, UC davis, Oregon Graduate Institute, and more

old post about analysing all the CVE entries in 2004 ... I had talked to Mitre about getting people to fill in better descriptions, but at the time, Mitre said that they were lucky to even get people do that much
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#43 security taxonomy and CVE
and some more
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#58 Vintage computers are better than modern crap !

post following year
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#20 Buffer overruns

linux magazine feb. 2005, pg38 article on understanding buffer overflow ... nist reporting similar numbers that I had found:

According to NIST in the past 4 years, 871 buffer overflow vulnerabilities were exploited, commprising about 20 percent of all exploits
... snip ...

Original mainframe TCP/IP product had been implemented in VS/Pascal ... that had *none* of the buffer related problems that became epidemic in C-language implementations.

post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#8 Security flaws in software development

from above, 2002 article:

Study says buffer overflow is most common security bug; The computer vulnerability of the decade may not be the Y2K bug, but a security weakness known as the buffer overflow.

https://www.cnet.com/news/study-says-buffer-overflow-is-most-common-security-bug/
" Buffer overflows have been the most common form of security vulnerability for the past 10 years," according to a new paper published by the Oregon Graduate Institute of Science & Technology (OGI) and funded in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). "Because these kinds of attacks enable anyone to take total control of a host, they represent one of the most serious classes of security threats."
... snip ...

from 90s (& 2002 article referencing *buffer overflows* have been the most common form for the previous ten years) to the 2005 NIST reference ... the buffer overflows didn't really decline, it was other forms increased

(2002) Buffer Overflows for Dummies
https://www.sans.org/reading-room/whitepapers/threats/buffer-overflows-dummies-481

SCADA Security Hole
https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/05/scada_security.html

"These backend protocols are often based upon standards that pre-date Windows," Graham wrote in his blog. "They are horribly insecure because few people in the SCADA industry know what a 'buffer-overflow' is."

Watch the FUD please as all SCADA system software developers know what a "buffer-overflow" is as do almost all SCADA support personnel. SCADA system operators and their managers may not know but why should they? It's our job, SCADA support, to protect them from things of this nature.

.... snip ...

more recent buffer overflow exploits
http://www.pl-enthusiast.net/2016/02/01/software-security-ideas-ahead-of-their-time/

(NIST Nov2016) Defeating Buffer Overflow: One of the Most Trivial and Dangerous Bugs of All!
https://www.nist.gov/publications/defeating-buffer-overflow-one-most-trivial-and-dangerous-bugs-all

The C programming language was invented over 40 years ago. It is infamous for buffer overflows. We have learned a lot about computer science, language design, and software engineering since then. As it is unlikely that we will stop using C any time soon, we present some ways to deal with buffer overflows. By the way, many of these techniques are useful for other programing languages and other classes of vulnerabilities.
... snip ...

buffer overflow posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#overflow

the original mainframe vs/pascal implementation did have some performance issues getting 44kbytes/sec using 3090 processor. I then did the enhancements to support RFC 1044 and in some tuning tests at Cray Research between 4341 and Cray, got 4341 channel sustained throughput using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 2017 09:40:29 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
(NIST Nov2016) Defeating Buffer Overflow: One of the Most Trivial and Dangerous Bugs of All!
https://www.nist.gov/publications/defeating-buffer-overflow-one-most-trivial-and-dangerous-bugs-all

The C programming language was invented over 40 years ago. It is infamous for buffer overflows. We have learned a lot about computer science, language design, and software engineering since then. As it is unlikely that we will stop using C any time soon, we present some ways to deal with buffer overflows. By the way, many of these techniques are useful for other programing languages and other classes of vulnerabilities.

... snip ...

buffer overflow posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#overflow


major part of the issue is typically programmers have to (manually) manage (in their heads) buffer lengths ... and buffer length problems have been epidemic in C language implementations. also as I periodically mention that the mainframe tcp/ip implemented in vs/pascal had none of the buffer length problems (epidemic in c language implementations) ... it is about as hard to have buffer length problems in vs/pascal as it is has been easy to have them in C (analogous to issue to bugs managing register contents in assembler).

recent mention overflow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#17 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#16 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#65 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#29 ARM Cortex A53 64 bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#28 ARM Cortex A53 64 bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#58 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#46 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#33 Trump to sign cyber security order

A common bug in nearly all types of implementations has been dynamic buffer management and serialization issues with use after free (as opposed to buffer length issues). One of the claims for languages like JAVA is elimination of most serialization issues and "use after free" (but that carries with it some performance penalty).

trivia: the person that had invented compare-and-swap (chosen for CAS are his initials) at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

had also restructured the CP67 serialization mechanism that resulted in elimination of most use-after-free as well as "zombie" users. however that is after the VM370 group had started (morph of cp67 to vm370 included dropping and/or greatly simplifying many things from CP67).

As part of my moving from cp67 to vm370 (and internal csc/vm for internal datacenters)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

I rewrote the vm370 serialization mechanism similar to how it had been redone in cp67. with implosion of Future System (I continued to work on 360/370 stuff all thru FS and even periodically ridiculed their efforts)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

contributed to picking up some amount of csc/vm for vm/370 release 3 ... which included the serialization rewrite that eliminated all use-after-free and zombie users. However, a few months later after release, somebody mis-diagnosed a problem as serialization related and generated a "fix" that re-introduced zombie/hung users (VM13025). past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#61 VM13025 ... zombie/hung users
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#81 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#87 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#2 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#19 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#90 A History of VM Performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#81 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#33 The real cost of outsourcing (and offshoring)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#25 Mainframe technology in 2011 and beyond; who is going to run these Mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#29 Congratulations, where was my invite?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#79 Slackware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#27 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#59 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead

other parts of csc/vm was selected for release in my dynamic adaptive resource manager
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#clock

trivia: the shutting down of 370 programs during FS period is credited with giving clone processor makers a market foothold. Now the 23june1969 unbundling announcement started charging for (application) software and other stuff ... but they managed to make the case that kernel software would still be free
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

with the rise of the clone makers, the decision was made to start charging for kernel software ... initially incremental add-ons (until eventually all kernel was charged for) and my dynamic adaptive resource management was selected as initial guinea pig.

Eventually in the 80s, the transition was complete and charging for all kernel software was complete ... eliminating the transition period where there was base "free" kernel with various charged for addon options (then came the OCO-wars ... object code only).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

MVT doesn't boot in 16mbytes

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: MVT doesn't boot in 16mbytes
Date: 28 Apr 2017
Blog: Facebook
happened much earlier (I thnk at Univ. Illinois?) when MVT was brought up in a CP67 16mbyte virtual machine (Univ Illinois did a lot of MVT patching for optimization under CP67).

I shot the opposite problem when customer brought up VM370 on (unsupported) 370/125. VM370 had implemented DMKCPI to use MVCL w/16mbyte to clear core and check machine size. 360 architecture had instructions prechecking valid start and end operand addresses before starting instruction. 370 introduced MVCL&CLCL which executed incrementally. 115&125 had MVCL&CLCL microcode "bug" which pretested start & end operand addresses before starting (instead executing incrementally). 125 MVCL exited w/o executing (because end exceed real machine size) ... so machine looked like it had zero real memory.

One of the first internal network uses was joint project between endicott and cambridge to implement virtual memory 370 virtual machine in CP67 (running on 360/67) i.e. with 370 virtual memory format tables (as opposed to 360/67 format virtual memory tables). Eventually this was up and running ("CP67H") production a year before the first engineering 370/145 with hardware virtual memory was operational. A modified version of CP67 then was done ("CP67I") that ran with 370 format tables (in 370 virtual machine). Endicott then asked for CP67I when they thought engineering 370/145 was ready to test. Original boot failed. A little diagnoses turned out that the engineers had reversed the implementation of two of the new 370 "B2" instructions. CP67I was quickly patched with the reversed opcodes ... and everything ran fine (they had to eventually fix the incorrect "B2" opcode implementation).

We then ran into real problem with 370/165 ... it turns out that retrofitting the full 370 virtual memory architecture to 165 ... was going to cause 6month slip in virtual memory announce and ship. They then forced through dropping a bunch of the 370 virtual memory architecture to gain back the six months. All the processors that had already implemented the full architecture had to go back and strip away the dropped features. Also all the software that was using the additional virtual memor features had to be redone to only use the 165 subset.

This is recent post about transition of MVT to OS/VS2 SVS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#5

It reference old request from customers about IBM decision to move all 370s to virtual memory. An IBM'er involved responded ... archived post of his response to customer ibm mainframe mailing list
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73

basically MVT storage management was so bad, customers typically had to size regions four times larger than nominally used. As a result MVT on typical 1mbyte 370/165 was limited to four regions. Moving MVT to 16mbyte virtual address space memory could get four times the number of regions on the same machine with little or no paging.

past posts mentioning cp67h & cp67i systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#0 HONE was .. Hercules and System/390 - do we need it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#31 determining memory size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#74 DASD Architecture of the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#50 IBM 3614 and 3624 ATM's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#17 DOS/360: Forty years
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#50 virtual 360/67 support in cp67
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#38 Is VIO mandatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#7 About TLB in lower-level caches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#5 3380-3390 Conversion - DISAPPOINTMENT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#21 Virtual Virtualizers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#19 Source maintenance was Re: SEQUENCE NUMBERS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#1 Materiel and graft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#45 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#49 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#3 IBM sues maker of Intel-based Mainframe clones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#20 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#16 when was MMU virtualization first considered practical?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#74 GETMAIN/FREEMAIN and virtual storage backing up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#23 GETMAIN/FREEMAIN and virtual storage backing up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#49 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#1 PDP-10s and Unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#3 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#17 old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#51 Source code for s/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#63 Source code for s/360 [PUBLIC]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#60 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#23 Item on TPF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#31 Mainframe Executive article on the death of tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#69 Boeing Plant 2 ... End of an Era
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#72 IBM Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#80 TSO Profile NUM and PACK
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#27 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#34 Data Areas?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#62 Any cool anecdotes IBM 40yrs of VM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#71 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#22 [OT ] Mainframe memories
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#57 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#86 Computer/IBM Career
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#87 The ICL 2900

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

cultural stereotypes, was Ironic old "fortune"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: cultural stereotypes, was Ironic old "fortune"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 2017 14:58:19 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
That's the flip side of solidarity. Back in the 50s society used to enforce conformity, then things swung the other way and "everybody do your own thing" got way out of hand. I'd like to see something in the middle.

our culture has had long history of bullying/hazzing to enforce conformity (and stamp out creativity).

author active is some Boyd related groups ... "Command Culture" highlights bullying/hazing in (US) military schools to beat out non-conformity (enforce group-think, conformity and hierarchy).
http://www.amazon.com/Command-Culture-Education-1901-1940-Consequences/dp/B009K7VYLI/

one of the points was that Marshall (later Chief of Staff during ww2) was so badly injured in one such incident, he almost had to drop out.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#62 People don't actually like creativity

People don't actually like creativity.
http://amp.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2013/12/creativity_is_rejected_teachers_and_bosses_don_t_value_out_of_the_box_thinking.html

Most people are secretly threatened by creativity
https://qz.com/929328/most-people-are-secretly-threatened-by-creativity

Teachers Don't Like Creative Students
http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2011/12/teachers-dont-like-creative-students.html

... and former co-worker at science center ...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

Cool to be Clever: Edson Hendricks
http://downloads.zdnet.com/product/31709-75651341/

Loads of pre-Internet emails, anecdotes and other computer science archival material, 12 video interviews with Edson Hendricks and 3 audio interviews of author/composer Leanne Jones, exploration of the "genius" and "inventive" mind, predicting the future, first email virus, advice to programmers, the origin of tektites, and so much more. Ideal for all ages, especially clever children 6+ and anyone with an interest in Internet history and inventing. How was the Internet really invented?
... snip ...

It's Cool To Be Clever, The story of Edson C. Hendricks
https://www.amazon.com/Its-Cool-Be-Clever-Hendricks/dp/1897435630/

IT'S COOL TO BE CLEVER tells the true story of an inquisitive boy in the 1950s who doesn't fit in at school. Edson Hendricks is bullied because he is so smart (people accuse him of getting answers from his father who is the principal) and has red hair. He finds comfort in an imaginary world where he has machine parts, and no internal organs or emotions.

Years later, Edson's strange capacity to think like a machine helps him create a new way for computers to communicate. His "connectionless" network design paves the way for today's Internet.

... snip ...

above referenced:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#14 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

other past a.f.c. posts referencing Edson bullying book:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#10 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#12 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#2 Soups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#16 ARPANET's coming out party: when the Internet first took center stage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#33 Last Word on Dennis Ritchie
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#97 test
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#83 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#73 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#66 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#66 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#73 Miniskirts and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#53 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#5 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 2017 18:26:27 -0700
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
So if a buffer overrun is impossible on an IBM mainframe, why did I spend so damned much time a while back finding and fixing one?

I have the impression that it's been a long time since you touched heavy iron and that you have not written much C code in a mainframe environment.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#16 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#17 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#18 [CM] What was your first home computer?

ibm mainframe by itself didn't particularly protect against overrun, it was system & programming conventions that frequently explicitly carried length and standard operations made use of explicit lengths.

as undergraduate, I had added tty terminal support to cp67 ... and did programming trick with one byte operation (since line length was less than 256).

here ...
http://www.multicians.org/thvv/
this is story of cp67 crashing 27 times in single day
http://www.multicians.org/thvv/360-67.html

At MIT Urban Systems Lab CP67 datacenter ... across the tech sq quad from 545 (multics on 5th flr, science center on 4th flr)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

... they had ascii plotter(?) down at harvard and modified the cp67 tty max. line length to something like 1100 ... but didn't change/fix the one byte gimmick so the calculation for number of bytes read became negative then very large halfword ... operations then overran the buffer because the length calculations were incorrect.

another part of the story was it was part of motivation for Multics "new storage system" ... since Multics could take hour or more to recover filesystem after crash (there are references to unix being simplified multics ... unix obviously used the "old" file system salvage/recovery design).

some recent posts mentioning "thvv" cp67 story
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#40 PC history, was search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#14 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#51 Information on obscure text editors wanted
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#25 Was VM ever used as an exokernel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#11 Titles for the Class of 1978
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#48 origin of 'fields'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#22 Who hasn't caused an outage? What is the worst thing you have done?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#15 545 Tech Square
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#17 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#26 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#44 OT The inventor of Email - Tom Van Vleck
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#12 program coding pads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#31 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#22 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#17 a clock in it, was Re: Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#84 Did Bill Gates Steal the Heart of DOS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#52 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#30 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#84 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#24 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#38 Quote on Slashdot.org
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#39 [CM] Ten recollections about the early WWW and Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#24 Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#76 IBM Programmer Aptitude Test
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#57 The Stack Depth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#103 auto-reboot
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#77 Honeywell 200

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ironic old "fortune"

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ironic old "fortune"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2017 08:31:42 -0700
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
Yeah, they recovered but would they have if the US had continued pouring bombs on them instead of pouring money into them?

note that 3/4 german military was against russia ... russia would have eventually overrun germany (and possibly the rest of europe).

just started mcmaster's book on what went wrong with vietnam ... he starts out by talking about in ww2 McNamara started out logicstics statitician for US army air corp. he glosses over that McNamara was lemay's staff planning fire bombing German and Japanese cities.

John Foster Dulles played major role in rebuilding germany's industry and military during 20 & 30s ... then from the law of unintended consequences, when the 1943 US strategic bombing program needed coordinates of German industrial & military targets, they got the information from wallstreet. Later Dulles would make some excuse that all along he had been supporting Nazi Germany as part of opposing communism.

LeMay had been claiming that strategic heavy bombing could win the war without even having to invade Europe (1/3rd of all US WW2 spending went to strategic bombing program). the problem was that even with norden bombsights, it was still almost impossible to hit targets from 5-6 miles up .... which could help explain the switch of strategic heavy bombing to fire bombing cities ... since it would be almost impossible to not hit the target and nearly always show some kind of results.

the switch to fire bombing cities may have been helped along with finding that (norden bombsights) and strategic heavy bombers at Omaha beach did almost no damage ... while non-norden, low-level medium bombing of Utah beach was significantly more succesful. "The European Campaign: Its Origins and Conduct" (no precision strategic bombing), loc2582-85:

The bomber preparation of Omaha Beach was a total failure, and German defenses on Omaha Beach were intact as American troops came ashore. At Utah Beach, the bombers were a little more effective because the IXth Bomber Command was using B-26 medium bombers. Wisely, in preparation for supporting the invasion, maintenance crews removed Norden bombsights from the bombers and installed the more effective low-level altitude sights.
... snip ...

aka CAS/tactical as opposed to strategic, GAO Desert Storm Air Power report has tactical air campaign (only last 100hrs were land war) so effective that Iraqis were walking away from their tanks (as sitting ducks) ... the later land war tank battles (with little or no coalition damage) doesn't mention whether the enemy tanks had anybody home. Claim is that for Iraq2, enemy had learned from Iraq1 to minimize exposure to US air power.

After ww2, McNamara leaves for the auto industry, but comes back as SECDEF for vietnam ... where Laos becomes the most bombed country in the world (more bombs than germany and japan combined). In a 2003 documentary ("The Fog of War"), McNamara quotes LeMay as saying if we'd lost the war, we would have all been prosecuted as war criminals.

past posts mentioning 43 strategic bombing program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#52 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#69 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#13 Fully Restored WWII Fighter Plane Up for Auction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#37 End of vacuum tubes in computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#77 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#7 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#55 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#0 How Corporate America Invented Christian America; Inside one reverend's big business-backed 1940s crusade to make the country conservative again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#26 Putin's Great Crime: He Defends His Allies and Attacks His Enemies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#28 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#31 I Feel Old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#10 What Will the Next A-10 Warthog Look Like?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#49 Corporate malfeasance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#64 Isolationism and War Profiteering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#75 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#91 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#11 Study: Cost of U.S. Regulations Larger Than Germany's Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#88 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#56 "One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#64 Strategic Bombing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#63 America's Over-Hyped Strategic Bombing Experiment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#68 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#83 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#63 One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#97 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#91 Godwin's Law should force us to remember & fear our shared heritage with Nazi Germany
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#38 Imperial Hubris
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#55 Should America Have Entered World War I?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ironic old "fortune"

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ironic old "fortune"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2017 09:45:52 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
With some justification. The fascists got a lot of support from industrialists in their various countries just because they wee fighting the communists.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#22 Ironic old "fortune"

Brothers Dulles
http://www.amazon.com/Brothers-Foster-Dulles-Allen-Secret-ebook/dp/B00BY5QX1K/

loc865-68:

In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc905-7:

Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:

At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism
... snip ...

June1940, Germany had a victory celebration at the NYC Waldorf-Astoria with major industrialists. Lots of them were there to hear how to do business with the Nazis
http://www.amazon.com/Man-Called-Intrepid-Incredible-Narrative-ebook/dp/B00V9QVE5O/

Later 5000 industrialists from across the US had conference (also) at NYC Waldorf-Astoria and in part because they had gotten such bad reputation for the depression and supporting Nazi Germany, they approved a major propaganda campaign to equate capitalism with Christianity
http://www.amazon.com/One-Nation-Under-God-Corporate-ebook/dp/B00PWX7R56/

Part of the propaganda campaign resulted in "In God We Trust" being added to money and "Under God" being added to the pledge.

other Sullivan & Cromwell
http://interactive.fusion.net/dirty-little-secrets/

Of course, the U.S. had a big hand in shaping Panama's destiny, stretching back to days when the canal was still a pipe dream, and even laid the groundwork for its financial system today. A circle of American financiers, chief among them J.P. Morgan, made $40 million off the canal deal, following a stealthy lobbying effort to get lawmakers to choose Panama over Nicaragua, according to author Ovidio Diaz-Espino's critical history "How Wall Street Created a Nation." At the time, the canal arrangement was the most expensive land deal of all time. Afterwards, Morgan and William Nelson Cromwell, the chief lobbyist for the financiers, managed Panama's finances up until the 1930s. Cromwell, who co-founded the prominent law firm Sullivan & Cromwell, also became Panama's de facto attorney General.
... snip ...

Congress had already passed bill and appropriated money for Nicaragua, but lobbying on part of wallstreet, got it redone for Panama ... just part of the (US front) bananam republic histories and just some of "war is racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smedley_Butler
military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Sullivan & Cromwell still shows up in DC "revolving doors", firm members lobbying/representating wallsteet, do stint as federal regulators, back to lobbying/representing wallstreet.

post references to Sullivan/Cromwell:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#11 UK government plans switch from Microsoft Office to open source
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#36 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#28 channel islands, definitely not the location of LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#62 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#13 Keydriven bit permutations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#69 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#86 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#13 Fully Restored WWII Fighter Plane Up for Auction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#29 Eric Holder Returns as Hero to Law Firm That Lobbies for Big Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#7 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#0 How Corporate America Invented Christian America; Inside one reverend's big business-backed 1940s crusade to make the country conservative again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#26 Putin's Great Crime: He Defends His Allies and Attacks His Enemies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#28 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#39 Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#49 Corporate malfeasance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#64 Isolationism and War Profiteering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#75 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#78 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#79 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#11 Study: Cost of U.S. Regulations Larger Than Germany's Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#49 Fateful Choices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#88 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#27 British socialism / anti-trust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#56 "One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#94 The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#9 Wall Street Preparing Dodd-Frank Rule Workaround
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#2 Smedley Butler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#63 One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#54 Mary Jo White Seriously Misled The US Senate To Become SEC Chair
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#91 Godwin's Law should force us to remember & fear our shared heritage with Nazi Germany
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#55 Should America Have Entered World War I?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2017 10:51:14 -0700
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
The whole bondage-and-discipline aspect. With assembly lanuguage I could do whatever I wanted with a piece of data, without having some snooty compiler slap my wrist and say I couldn't do it. Yes, there are risks, but I learned to deal with them.

Didn't Pascal turn out to be totally inadequate for real-world applications until a few necessary extensions (e.g. I/O) were added?


some of people in the los gatos VLSI tools group were using DeRemer/Meraware TWS for various kinds of specifications, couple past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#71 What terminology reflects the "first" computer language ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#35 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#1 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#36 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#32 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#62 Which Books Can You Recommend For Learning Computer Programming?

then two of the LSG people used it to do pascal ... which eventually evolves into (mainframe) vs/pascal ... which is used for lots of applications ... including 50-60+k statement physical layout application. also the original mainframe tcp/ip product (which had none of the buffer overflow problems that were epidemic in C language implementations). some recent refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#60 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#80 Languages
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#58 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#25 ARM Cortex A53 64 bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#32 The very beginning of TCP/IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#72 more IBM online systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#17 [CM] What was your first home computer?

I also use it for redo of vm spool file system ... running (mostly) in virtual address space. Issue I had was HSDT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

I was doing both tcp/ip and rscs/vnet. rscs/vnet relied heavily on vm spool file system with a synchronous (blocking) 4k block transfer interface. with other concurrent use, rscs/vnet might get 6-8 4k block transfers/sec (24k-32k bytes/sec). I needed a couple mbytes throughput for multiple T1 (& higher speed) full-duplex links.

In the first part of the 90s, IBM has gone into the red and was being re-orged into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company. They also bring in new CEO to reverse the breakup and resurrect the company ... part of it is similar to what was done at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

Also involved was unloading various pieces of IBM ... including doing deal with major VLSI tool vendor ... where they give them lots of internal VLSI tools ... in return for vendor continues to support and make the tools available (including some number eof LSG people joining vendor). VS/Pascal was by then running on both mainframe and RS/6000 and the 50-60+k statement layout tool needs to be ported to industry standard platform (SUN).

I've left IBM, but get a contract to port the layout tool from VS/Pascal to SUN (pascal). A couple of issues 1) it appears that SUN pascal had never been used for much more than educational instruction uses and 2) SUN outsourced pascal to operation on the opposite side of the world (12 time zones away ... involved some former space engineers; I could drop by SUN hdqtrs everday, but didn't do much good). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#213 Why is Pascal no longer a leading development Language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#19 Beyond 8+3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#34 August 23, 1957
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#19 Top 10 Cybersecurity Threats for 2009, will they cause creation of highly-secure Corporate-wide Intranets?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#74 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#29 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#76 using an FPGA to emulate a vintage computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#54 PL/I vs. Pascal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#27 "Best" versus "worst" programming language you've used?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#21 The simplest High Level Language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#71 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#36 Quote on Slashdot.org
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#51 [Poll] Computing favorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#24 You thought IEFBR14 was bad? Try GNU's /bin/true code

trivia: for some reason, I've been added to the Facebook "New Stanford Pascal Compiler" group.

trivia: early on, one of the (two) original LSG people that did pascal, leaves, does several stints, including VP of software development at MIPS ... after SGI buys MIPS, becomes general manager of SUN business group that includes responsibility for JAVA. Also, early on, I talked the other person into looking at doing a C-language frontend ... I do a 6week lecture tour in europe and when I get back, he has left and joined Metaware. When the Palo Alto group is working on BSD unix for mainframe, I talk them into contracting with Metaware for the C-compiler. Before it ships, they get redirected to doing BSD for PC/RT instead ... which ships as "AOS" (still using Metaware C-compiler).

and some SFS (vs/pascal spool file rewrite) posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#43 Migrating pages from a paging device (was Re: removal of paging device)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#7 More newbie stop the war here!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#44 PDP-10 Archive migration plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#26 Microkernels are not "all or nothing". Re: Multics Concepts For
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#63 SPXTAPE status from REXX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#19 HERCULES
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#3 History of C
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#38 Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#28 MVCIN instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#35 Charging Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#21 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#45 The Complete April Fools' Day RFCs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#26 Does software life begin at 40? IBM updates IMS database
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#22 Was CMS multi-tasking?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#63 Operating Systems for Virtual Machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#12 Calling ::routines in oorexx 4.0
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#26 Was VM ever used as an exokernel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#35 Was VM ever used as an exokernel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#25 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#29 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#18 VM Workshop 2012
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#23 VM Workshop 2012
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#24 Co-existance of z/OS and z/VM on same DASD farm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#91 rebuild 1403 printer chain
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#77 Bell Picturephone--early business application experiments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#81 Mainframe operating systems?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2017 12:14:31 -0700
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
It's not so much "antiquated" as "different". Pretend it was all designed by space aliens and learn to work with it instead of fighting it and it goes much more smoothly than if you try to make UNIX out of it.

vast amount of internal IBM development was done on (virtual machine) cp67/cms and then vm370/cms.

some of the CTSS people went to 5th flr and did MULTICS (and folklore is that some of the multics belllabs people went home and did unix as simplified multics) and other of the CTSS people went to the science center on the 4th flr and did virtual machines, internal network, lots of performance and online stuff ... and also invented GML in 1969.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System
above CTSS references this history of ibm mainframe operating systems
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_IBM_mainframe_operating_systems

majority of the internal network was vm370 based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
... and lots of development ... even including MVS, was all done using vm370/cms.

part of the problem was that the mainstream development had a hard time adjusting to 23june1969 unbundling announcement ... including starting to charge for software (although they made the case that kernel software could still be free).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

"unbundling" also met that revenue from the product had to cover development and maintenance ... and typically did low, medium, and high forecasts (presumption that lowest price would have largest number of customers). JES2 development was largely done with vm370/cms ... but they couldn't find JES2 NJI networking price*customers (between $100 and any larger number) that covered development+maintenance (even with much of NJI source originally carrying "TUCC" in cols 68-71). They eventually come up with gimmick to announce NJI by making a joint NJI/VNET-RSCS announcement.

This was in the post-FS period when POK was vigorously working on killing off vm370 product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

and blocking VNET-RSCS product announcement ... which could have been around $30/month. The "joint" announcement was $600/month ... effectively using nearly all the money from "combined" product for just JES2 NJI. past posts mentioning HASP, JES2, NJI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#hasp

A couple years later, they loosened up the rules more and products just had to be in the same development group ... when they put vm370 performance products (cut back to 3people) in the same group as ISPF (with 200-some people). vm370 performance products was taken in more money than ISPF ... and was large enough to cover the ISPF revenue shortfall and make the numbers. past posts mentioning the ISPF revenue hack
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#17 Where's all the VMers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#33 XEDIT on MVS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#50 TSO and more was: PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#46 DEC-10 SOS Editor Intra-Line Editing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#6 Call for XEDIT freaks, submit ISPF requirements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#50 Call for XEDIT freaks, submit ISPF requirements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#84 Set numbers off permanently
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#106 SPF in 1978
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#62 Hard Disk Drive Construction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#64 Should you support or abandon the 3270 as a User Interface?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#36 The Subroutine Call
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#27 Unbuffered glass TTYs?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#89 Real Programmers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#2 ISPF (was Fujitsu Mainframe Vs IBM mainframe)

I've mentioned before about senior disk engineer claiming that communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division ... communication group was fighting off client/server and distributed computing, trying to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm and install base. Disk division was seeing fall in disk sales with data fleeing datacenters to more distributed computing friendly platforms. They had come up with a number of products to address the situation, but constantly being veto'ed by communication group. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

Somewhat as (partial) workarounds, the senior disk division VP of software funded POSIX on MVS project and some number of startups that would utilize mainframe disks. He also had us do some amount of consulting and visiting the startups he was funding (trying to help out). For instance one was NCAR filesystem spinoff "Mesa Archival". past posts mentioning "Mesa Archival"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#21 Disk caching and file systems. Disk history...people forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#22 Disk caching and file systems. Disk history...people forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#66 commodity storage servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#46 What goes into a 3090?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#61 GE 625/635 Reference + Smart Hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#29 360/370 disk drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#31 360/370 disk drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#6 IBM says AMD dead in 5yrs ... -- Microsoft Monopoly vs. IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#75 DASD Architecture of the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#29 FW: Is FICON good enough, or is it the only choice we get?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#12 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#15 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#16 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#19 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#29 CRAM, DataCell, and 3850
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#47 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#51 Barbless
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#58 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#42 Larrabee delayed: anyone know what's happening?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#69 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#71 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#85 3270 Emulator Software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#58 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#34 Last Word on Dennis Ritchie
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#27 NASA unplugs their last mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#47 IBM, Lawrence Livermore aim to meld supercomputing, industries
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#46 Slackware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#9 3270s & other stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#15 Quixotically on-topic post, still on topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#68 30 yr old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 GRS Control Unit ( Was IBM mainframe operations in the 80s)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#26 [Poll] Computing favorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#63 Zero-copy write on modern motherboards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#67 Zero-copy write on modern motherboards

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2017 12:52:15 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#16 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#17 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#18 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#21 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#24 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#25 [CM] What was your first home computer?

the change from 3272 controller and 3277 terminal to 3274/3278 moved a lot of the electronics out of the terminal and back into the controller ... to reduce manufacturing costs .... also greatly increased coax cable protocol chatter, latency, response, etc.

with the electronics in the 3277, could do some number of hacks to improve the interactive human factors (fifo between keyboard and head, eliminating keyboard lockup if you hit a key while system is writing the screen, changing repeat delay & repeat rate, etc).

a letter was written to the 3274/3278 product administrator complaining about how (newer) 3274/3278 made interactive computing human factors much worse. He eventually responded that 3274/3278 wasn't intended for interactive computing, it was purely for "data entry" (aka electronic key punch).

this was also in the period of papers on (interactive computing) response improving productivity ... at least subsecond and preferably quarter second. One of the premier research locations published that they had best in the world with .25sec interactive (system) response.

3277 had consistent .086 hardware response, to get quarter second seen by the user, needed .164sec system response. I pointed out to them that I had several systems with .11sec system response (with similar hardware and workload) ... they made some offhand comment about it wasn't fair to compare anybody else with my numbers.

3274/3278 hardware best case was .28secs and more typical .53secs. People would brag about TSO 1sec response (but normally, much, much worse ... so MVS users didn't notice change from 3277 to 3278.

past post with some performance numbers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#19 3270 protocol

other trivia: later with ibm/pc emulation ... a PC 3277 terminal emulation card had three times the upload/download speed of 3278 terminal emulation card.

terminal related posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ironic old "fortune"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ironic old "fortune"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2017 15:34:50 -0700
Andreas Kohlbach <ank@spamfence.net> writes:
Caused by an accident and Hitler's raged response. One Luftwaffe bomber accidentally bombed a civilian area. Causing Churchill to send bombers to Berlin. Hitler in rage then started the Blitz (bombing London and other cities directly), taking pressure off the RAF and industry, giving them time to recover.

Historians say if he continued to bomb British industry that might have brought Britain to its knees.


the story was accident of German bombing London docks a bomb went astray and hit nearby neighborhood, and Churchill raged response to bomb Berlin, followed by Hitler's response to (also) target non-military, civilian targets. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#52 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#53 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#89 Your earliest dream?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#38 End of vacuum tubes in computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#81 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#84 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

so then did churchill anticipate hitler's response and send 50 bombers to bomb berlin & civilians on purpose ... as part of relieving pressure on british industry and military targets (sacrificing civilians)?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2017 21:41:27 -0700
Dan Espen <dan1espen@gmail.com> writes:
Even better for C is a run time checker like Rational Purify. I used Purify on a system that was struggling for an extended period of time to get to a 1.0 release. Purify detects all out of bounds conditions, using uninitialized data, etc. That let me remove a bunch of hard to find bugs quickly and get the system to 1.0.

There are other non-commercial programs that do most of what Purify does. Great stuff.

Years ago IBM bought Rational. I keep thinking Purify might come to the mainframe, but so far, no joy.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#86 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#100 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#16 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#17 [CM] What was your first home computer?

Defeating Buffer Overflow: One of the Most Trivial and Dangerous Bugs of All!
https://www.nist.gov/publications/defeating-buffer-overflow-one-most-trivial-and-dangerous-bugs-all

from above:

Exact memory checkers, such as Address Sanitizer(ASan) or Purify, check memory allocation and layout. The overhead can be significant, up to twice the execution time and memory use, but this may be cheap insurance against vulnerabilities.
... snip ...

sanitizers (address, thread, memory)
https://github.com/google/sanitizers
AddressSanitizer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AddressSanitizer
Using gcc's 4.8.0 Address Sanitizer with Qt
http://blog.qt.io/blog/2013/04/17/using-gccs-4-8-0-address-sanitizer-with-qt/

buffer overflow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#buffer

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

1967 new computer installations

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 1967 new computer installations
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 May 2017 08:51:20 -0700
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
Well, *that's* certainly an inaccuracy to start off the list!

Not that they could be blamed for it.

Indeed, many sites may have had a 360/90 *on order*. But none were ever shipped, as before the first shipment, there was a change to the specs, and the computer was re-designated the 360/91.

John Savard


system summary
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/systemSummary/A22-6810-0_360sysSummary64.pdf

announced were 360/30, 360/40, 360/50, 360/60, 360/70 ... also mentions 360/62 that only differs in core storage speed.

the 360/60 & 360/70 had slower access memory. before ship, memory access was upgraded to 750ns and models shipped were 360/65, 360/75.

360 system timing
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/A22_6825-1_360instrTiming.pdf

360/60 was 2mic interleaved, 360/62 was 1mic, 360/70 was 1mic interleaved (pg. 3)

was replaced with 360/65 and 360/75 with 750ns interleaved (360/62 was dropped).

360/67 was 360/65 with virtual memory hardware ... at least for single processor. 360/67 SMP had multi-ported memory and channel controller.
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/funcChar/A27-2719-0_360-67_funcChar.pdf

recent discussion of 360/67 SMP multi-ported ... in discussion about memory access scaleup.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#74 The ICL 2900

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 May 2017 09:06:21 -0700
Bob Eager <news0006@eager.cx> writes:
My best bit was working round a hardware bug that ICL never admitted to:

http://www.bobeager.uk/anecdotes.html#hwhack


recent thread in facebook ibm retirees about problem getting mvt to ipl on 16mbyte machine ... ipl incrementally zero'ed storage and relied on program check at end of storage as indication of end of memory. with 16mbyte storage, it never program checked, addresses just wrapped.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#19 MVT doesn't boot in 16mbytes

I had similar but different problem with booting vm370 on 370/125 ... turns out that Boeblingen had implemented MVCL (& CLCL) on 125 (& 115) with 360 semantics rather than new 370 semantics for incremental/interruptable "long" instructions. Apparently vm370 boot was only software that uncovered the bug.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 May 2017 09:42:59 -0700
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Even with that attitude, if their memory management and I/O worked, there wouldn't be BSODs and reinstalling the entire system events which tainted MS's reputation.

recent posts about doing "electronic commerce"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#27 History of Mainframe Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#21 Pre-internet email and usenet (was Re: How to choose the best news server for this newsgroup in 40tude Dialog?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#38 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#75 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#61 [EXTERNAL] ComputerWorld Says: Cobol plays major role in U.S. government breaches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#96 ComputerWorld Says: Cobol plays major role in U.S. government breaches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#39 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#74 Trump delay of the 'fiduciary rule' will cost retirement savers $3.7 billion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#92 Old hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#101 Electronic Payments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#102 Electronic Payments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#11 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#14 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

at the start of the century there were several efforts for secure payments involving chip cards (and chip readers).

in the internet home pc market, one payment brand added chip to their card and started providing "free" card readers. However, these were serial-port, possibly obtained at fire sale as obsolete. The consumer support problems (BSOD, requiring systems to be re-installed) resulted in rapidly spreading opinion in the financial industry that consumer chipcards were not practical in the home market (it actually wasn't chipcards, or card readers, but serial port devices).

My wife organized a review in Redmond with the kernel security group, what members of the former PC/SC group that could be found and several reps of the financial industry ... but the net was that it wouldn't be possible to reverse the financial industry impression of problems with smartcards in the home market.

I've mentioned before that in the mid-90s that there were several presentations in financial industry conferences about moving from consumer dial-up banking to the internet ... primarily because of enormous consumer support problems of proprietary dial-up infrastructure (primarily all the problems with serial-port dial-up modems). Then a few short years later, all institutional memory of the problems appeared to have evaporated with deployment of free serial-port card readers.

As an aside, a major motivation for USB was all the problems with serial-port. Also, possible reason for the free serial-port cardreader give-away ... was that they got firesale on "obsolete" serial-port readers.

past posts on migration from dial-up banking to internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#dialup-banking

other trivia: at the same time the consumer dial-up banking operations were making presentations on moving to the internet, the commercial, cash-management dial-up banking operations were saying they would *NEVER* move to the internet because of a long list of vulnerabilities. Of course many have since moved to the internet ... and somewhat because of long list of problems, The FED has come out with advisory that businesses have a dedicated PC for online banking that is *NEVER* used for any other purpose.

also around the turn of the century there was a large pilot on the east coast for point-of-sale chipcard ... that was in their "YES CARD" period ... old reference to "YES CARD" presentation at cartes2002, gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

they had given me have copy of the presentation ... but it says "confidential" all over it (possibly because I had been proselytizing about the problems well before the presentation, and the people doing the pilot ignored me). Later FED LEO "YES CARD" presentation at ATM Integrity Taskforce meeting ... prompted somebody in the audience to proclaim that they managed to spend billions of dollars to prove that chips are less secure than magstripe.

In the wake of the "YES CARD" pilot ... all evidence of the pilot appeared to disappear w/o a trace, and the speculation was that it would be a long time before it was tried in the US again (allowing all the bugs to be worked out in jurisdictions). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

disclaimer: I had designed a chip in the 90s that had none of the exploits and vulnerabilities of the chips being done by the "YES CARD" people. Also transit had asked that the chip be able to do transaction with contactless power in 1/10th of second or less ... and cost a dollar or less ... and be more secure that chips for high-value financial transactions.

technical director for the agency information assurance directorate asked me to do a talk on it in assurance panel in the trusted computing tract at the intel developer's forum ... gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

The guy running TPM chip for trusted computing was in the front row, so I quip that it is nice to see that the TPM is beginning to look more and more like my chip. He quips back that I don't have committee of 200 people helping with chip design.

other refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 May 2017 10:19:14 -0700
Bob Eager <news0006@eager.cx> writes:
I had the reverse. I had a home brew operating system that IPLd correctly on a raw machine, but not on VM/XA.

Turned out that VM assumed the IPL program would be no longer than (I think) 4kB. Mine was much, much bigger because it was a mini-supervisor. It overwrote the code VM had put into the virtual machine to mimic the hardware IPL.

Ended up splitting the mini-supervisor into two parts, then moving the two parts (straddling the VM code) together after IPL.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#30 [CM] What was your first home computer?

original cp67 & vm370 didn't have to put anything in the virtual address space. 360/370 IPL was 24 byte read into location zero ... and then chained channel program to location 8 ... and when channel program finished loaded psw at location zero (assumed 24 byte read was psw followed by one or two read ccws). All cp67/vm370 had to do was simulate the 1st 24byte read, simulate CCW I/O at location 8, and then do simulated LPSW from location zero.

XA was increasingly tailored for MVS ... and made it more and more difficult to do virtual machine emulation.

3-card loader, first card was 24 bytes read into location zero, followed by two cards of program data read by ccw at location 8 & 16.

CP67 started out with all the assembled source card decks preceeded by BPS loader. CP67 had to make sure that CP67 card load didn't overlay BPS loader. BPS loader than transferred to CPINIT which wrote the memory image to disk ... with disk 24byte IPL that would reread CPINIT back into memory which would do a read instead of a write.

As undergraduate, I modified CP67 to support pageable kernel (provide more pageable memory in 360/67 real storage) ... which required splitting some modules into 4k chunks and added a whole lot of external symbols. I ran into big problem because I exceeded the BPS loader external symbol limit. I had to do all sorts of unnaturual things to stay within the BPS limit (while science shipped lots of my CP67 changes, this is one thing that didn't ship). Later at the science center, I found the source for BPS loader in a card cabinet. I was then able to modify it to support larger number of external symbols.

The VM370-spinoff group (from science center) did decide to ship pageable kernel. One of the things that they didn't pick up was I found that BPS loader passed its external symbol loader table in register. My modified pageable kernel included full external symbol table (passed from BPS loader). Then commands could make use of the full external symbol table ... and dump process could make sure it had prewrote the full external symbol table

VM370 IPCS had convention that the image of the printed external symbol table could be added to IPCS dump. When I was playing with IPCS ... recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#16 [CM] What was your first home computer?

I included support that if it was CSC/VM system with preloaded symbol table, it would be automagically used. past posts mentioning DUMPRX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

past posts mentioning 3card loader:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#135 sysprog shortage - what questions would you ask?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#87 "Bootstrap"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#1 IBM S/360 series operating systems history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#26 PDP-10s and Unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#15 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#7 IBM ad for Basic Operating System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#95 DEBE - card alternative

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ironic old "fortune"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Ironic old "fortune"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 May 2017 17:51:51 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#27 Ironic old "fortune"

past description
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#53 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#36 End of vacuum tubes in computers?

Luftwaffe had tightly focused radio beam for navigation ... with diagonally intersecting signals, first two signals automatic prepare for release of bombs, and the final signal automatic release of bombs.

British countermeasure was to jam signals and/or spoofing valid signals to misdirect bombers and release of bombs.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 02 May 2017 09:18:26 -0700
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
Who are you to claim what one _should have used_? FORTRAN and COBOL are not suitable for the vast majority of applications written in C.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#17 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#18 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#24 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#28 [CM] What was your first home computer?

some of the CTSS people went to 5th flr to do MULTICS ... and others went to the science center on the 4th flr.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System
above CTSS references this history of ibm mainframe operating systems
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_IBM_mainframe_operating_systems

folklore is that bellcore people working on MULTICS went back and did a simplified multics as UNIX ... and possibly simplified language.

MULTICS was written in PLI ... PLI designed to be all things to all peopled ... language also incorporating FORTRAN and COBOL features.
http://multicians.org/pl1.html

MULTICS (w/PLI) also did a lot better job handling buffer overflow issues

buffer overflow posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#overflow

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Mainframe Family tree and chronology 2

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Mainframe Family tree and chronology 2
Date: 02 May 2017
Blog: Facebook
Mainframe Family tree and chronology 2
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_FT2.html

there is currently discussion in a.f.c. on nearly identical subject. .... brought into question was there any actual 360/90 and basis for the CDC legal action brought against IBM ... recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#29 1967 new computer installations

Future System was early 70s effort that was completely different than 370 and was to completely replace 370. During FS, 370 efforts were being shutdown ... I continued to work on 360/370 stuff, even periodically ridiculing the FS activity (which wasn't exactly career enhancing activity). When FS imploded (w/o even being announced), 3033 and 3081 were Q&D efforts kicked off at the same time ... to get something quickly back into 370 product pipeline (lack of products during the FS period is credited with giving clone makers market foothold). 3033 was 168-3 logic mapped to 20% faster chips. 3081 was some warmed over FS technology that involved an enormous number of circuits (significantly worse performance than competition). Some long-winded analysis from the period
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

For 303x channel director they used 158 engine with integrated channel microcode and w/o the 370 microcode. A 3031 was 158 engine with 370 microcode (and w/o integrated channel microcode) and a 2nd 158 engine with integrated channel microcode (and w/o 370 microcode). A 3031 was slightly faster than 158-3 since it had separate engines to run the processor and channel microcode. A 3032 was 168-3 with new covers and configured to work with 303x channel director (as external channels). A 3033 was 168-3 logic remapped to 20% faster chips and 303x channel director for external channels.

We had a 16-way 370 multiprocessor project and con'ed the 3033 processor engineers into working on it in their spare time ... a lot more interesting than the 3033. Everybody thought it was really great, until somebody got around to telling the head of POK that it could be decades before the POK favorite son operating system had effective 16-way support. Then the head of POK invites some of us to never visit POK again (and directs the 3033 processor engineers to stop being distracted). Mainframe 16-way finally ships in 2000 (nearly 25yrs later). some SMP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

ther trivia ... end of ACS/360 ... executives were afraid it would advance state-of-the-art to fast and IBM would loose control of the market (Amdahl leaves after) ... lists some of ACS/360 features that show up over 20yrs later with ES/9000
https://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

some of the CTSS people went to the 5th flr to do Multics, others went to the IBM science center on the 4th flr and did virtual machines, internal network, bunch of online & performance stuff, and invented GML in 1969
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System above
CTSS references this history of ibm mainframe operating systems
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_IBM_mainframe_operating_systems

science center posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
internal network posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
gml posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

National Telephone Day

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: National Telephone Day
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 May 2017 09:29:36 -0700
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
I always liked that one. The way I heard it was slightly different: the receiving company (American when I heard it) opened the shipping crate to find a few parts packaged separately in a plastic bag. When asked, the Japanese company replied, "We don't know why you want (x) percent faulty parts, but for your convenience we packed them separately."

IBM was getting electronic disk from vendor for internal datasets ... "1655", could operate either simulated fixed-head per track 2305 or as native fixed block disk.

claim was vendor was using memory chips that failed processor memory tests ... but could still be used for simulated electronic disk. Claim was IBM couldn't do that ... because it so optimized its process that there were almost zero chips that failed processor memory tests.

there was separate case in the late 70s when they were letting me play disk engineer in bldgs 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

3350 had optional fixed-head feature ("A2F", "B2F") for small number of its tracks. I wanted to support multiple "exposure" like on 2305 (i.e. multiple subchannel addresses, supporting multiple concurrent channel programs ... helped mask rotational delay, different subchannel addresses could have channel programs selecting different rotational positions, hardware would select channel program for the closest rotational postions). In the 3350 FH option case ... would be able to do data transfer from fixed-head/track area overlapped while disk arm was moving for rest of disk.

Theere was group in POK doing real electronic disk, code named "VULCAN" (targeted as paging device) ... thought that 3350 FH multiple exposure might impact their market and got it blocked. Before VULCAN was announced/shipped it was shutdown because customers were then buying all the memory chips that IBM was producing as processor memory (at higher markup). For whatever reason, couldn't then resurrect the multiple exposure effort.

2305
https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_2305.html
3350
https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3350.html
http://chiclassiccomp.org/docs/content/computing/IBM/Mainframe/Hardware/DataStor/GA26-1638-2_ReferenceManual3350DAS_Apr77.pdf

recent posts mentioning 1655 &/or VULCAN
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#24 What was a 3314?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#23 Frieden calculator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#68 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#69 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#26 Multitasking, together with OS operations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#63 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#65 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#2 NPS, Gary A. Kildall Conference Room Dedication Ceremony, 21April2017

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 May 2017 09:52:09 -0700
mausg writes:
Before thecrisis, many compaanies here survived on `float', what cash would earn in the time between they were paid and they would have to pay the money on.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#31 [CM] What was your first home computer?

sometime in the 80s, vendors started complaining about a specific IBM plant site paying invoices late ... net30/net60/net90 were being pushed to 120 days. the financial officer was found to be improving his numbers with the interest on the extra days. investigation resulted in him getting fired.

there were all sorts of resistance by US banks in the past few decades to switching to same day settlement ... over the loss of float.

EU saw a large proliferation of "stored-value" chipcards in the late 80s and through the 90s. In the later half of 90s, I was asked to design bank-end dataprocessing needed to deploy one of the EU major brands in the US. Along the way, I also did mockup of the business case. It turns out most of the justification was float for the international body (that sold value to the country institutions, which sold value to financial institutions, which then sold value to the end user). Not too long later, EU central banks issued directive that the stored-value chipcards products could retain the float during the startup phase but would then need to start paying interest on unspent value in the consumer cards. Shortly afterwards, most of these products started to disappear (the financial motivation behind the products was eliminated).

some old financial related posts related to float
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsmore.htm#eleccash re:The Law of Digital Cash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#digcash IP: Re: Why we don't use digital cash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#echeck Electronic Checks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm7.htm#idcard2 AGAINST ID CARDS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay11.htm#42 Bank Float May Sink
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm14.htm#7 Bank Float May Sink
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm21.htm#1 Is there any future for smartcards?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#22 Payment systems - the explosion of 1995 is happening in 2006
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#23 Payment systems - the explosion of 1995 is happening in 2006
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm25.htm#31 On-card displays
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#41 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#42 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#26 Fixing SSL (was Re: Dutch Transport Card Broken)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#49 Price point

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 May 2017 10:43:42 -0700
Osmium <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
The rate I quoted was for US Bank, one of the largest banks in the USA. They have not paid any significant rate on my account since the 2009 crash. I would expect that rate to be quite common across the country.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#31 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#37 [CM] What was your first home computer?

Late 2008, SECTREAS pressured congress into passing TARP program with $700B appropriated to buy TBTF off-book toxic assets. However ye2008, just the four largest TBTF were carrying $5.2T in off-book toxic assets. As a result, TARP was used for other purposes and left to the federal reserve to bailout the TBTF. The federal reserve fought a long legal battle to prevent public disclosure about what it was doing (buying TBTF off-book toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar and and providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds). When the federal reserve lost the legal battle, the chairman held press conference where he said that he had assumed that TBTF would use the ZIRP funds to help mainstreet, but when they didn't, he had no way to force them. Note that the chairman had been selected in part because he was a student of the depression, however the federal reserve had tried something similar then with the same results, so there should have been no expectation for different result this time. Claim was that TBTF were using the ZIRP funds for buying US Treasuries and making something like $300B/yr on the spread.

"Too Big To Fail" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too.big.to.fail
toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo
fed chairman posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
ZIRP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

federally chartered depository institutions used to compete for funds by paying interest on deposits, with the advent of tens of trillions in ZIRP funds, they're getting all the funds that that they could possibly hope for, little or no motivation to pay interest.

2002, congress lets the fiscal responsibility act lapse (spending can't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt). 2010, CBO report was that 2003-2009, tax revenue cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T, for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsible budget (first time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars). Since then only modest spending cuts, but not restored taxes so debt continues to increased. Sort of confluence of 1) Federal Reserve and wallstreet wanted huge federal debt, 2) wallstreet and special interests wanted huge tax cut, 3) military-industrial complex wanted huge spending increase.

fiscal responsibility act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsbility.act

1999 I was asked to try and help prevent the coming economic mess by improving the integrity of securitized mortgages supporting documents. securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild was office bldgs in Dallus/FtWorth that turn out to be empty lots). They then find that they can pay rating agencies for triple-A ratings (when rating agencies know that they aren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans (and no longer had to care about borrower's qualification or loan quality). It was major factor in being able to do over $27T 2001-2008 (especially selling to institutions restricted to dealing only in "safe" investments, like large pension funds). From the law of unintended consequences, the largest TBTF economic mess fines so far are for the robo-signing mills fabricating the missing documents.

There was facade that TARP funds were appropriated to buy the TBTF offbook toxic assets but just the four largest TBTF were still carrying $5.2T ye2008. Also Jan2009 there was news about it was too hard to evaluate value of these offbook toxic assets for purchase ... but it was "too hard" because they were no-documentation, liar loans, also several tens of billions in offbook toxic assets had gone for 22cents on the dollar late summer 2008; if the offbook toxic assets had been bought at that price, the TBTF would had been declared insolvent and forced to be liquidated. In Jan2009 references to facade of evaluating offbook toxic assets, there was mention of one of the commercial service bureaus (virtual machine) CP67 spinoffs participating in the evaluations (firm had early moved upstream into providing online financial information, and also in the 70s had bought the pricing services division from one of the rating agencies).

Note, those doing securitized instruments had found that they could design securitized instruments to fail, pay for triple-A, sell to their customers, and take out CDS gambling bets, creating enormous demand for bad loans. The largest holder of CDS gambling bets was AIG and was negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar when the SECTREAS steps in and has them sign document that they can't sue those making the bets and take TARP funds to pay off at face value. The largest recipient of TARP funds is AIG and the largest recipient of face-value payoffs is the firm formally headed by SECTREAS.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 May 2017 12:52:20 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#31 [CM] What was your first home computer?

After doing "electronic commerce" was asked to participate in x9a10 financial standard working group that had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments (not just internet). We studied end-to-end threats and vulnerabilities for a number of different retail payments ... and came up with standard that slightly tweaked the existing infrastructure ... a side effect was that it eliminated needing to hide account information ... to secure the transactions ... which then also eliminated the major use of "SSL" in the world today. It didn't eliminate the motiviation for breaches, but eliminated the much of the motivation for doing those breaches (using information from previous transactions for doing fraudulent transactions). some refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959

long-winded discussion that wanders around a bit ... but includes discussion about financial transaction vulnerabilities, replay attack, dual-use, security proportional to risk, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#54

aka replay attacks mean that crooks can use information from previous transactions to perform fraudulent transactions. profit for merchant on transaction can be a couple dollars (for transaction processor a few cents) ... the "profit" for crook on transaction information can be account balance or (open to buy) credit limit ... so a crook may afford to spend 100 times more attacking a merchant than merchant can spend defending (aka security proportional to risk). security proportional to risk posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proportional.to.risk

"dual-use" vulnerability ... transaction information is required for dozen of business processes at millions of location around the world ... but since the same information can be used by crooks ... it must be kept completely confidential and never divulged (diametrically opposing requirements) ... I've pontificate that even if the world was buried under miles of information hiding crypto, it still wouldn't stop info leakage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#harvest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#secrets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#payments

even tho the change was relatively trivial technical change for end-to-end integrity, it was a major business disrupter ... since it drastically reduced the barrier for doing payments and threatened the major stakeholders

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Mainframe Family tree and chronology 2

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Mainframe Family tree and chronology 2
Date: 03 May 2017
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#35 Mainframe Family tree and chronology 2

there were a number of 3033 issues. the 20% faster chips were straight-forward remap ... but compared poorly with clone makers. The faster chips also had ten times the circuits but straight remap didn't use the extra circuits. Eventually there was some critical logic rework to take advantage of onchip performance and 3033 got up to 1.5 times 168-3 (3mips to 4.5mips)

other issues were huge MVS bloat and system design. Move from OS/VS2 SVS to OS/VS2/MVS gave 16mbyte address space to each application. However os/360 paradigm was heavily pointer passing based (with direct addressing of application parameter) ... and so included an 8mbyte image of MVS system in each address space (so system code could directly address application space). A bigger issue was subsystems are now in their own separate address space ... in order to support pointer-based parameter calls, they created the common segment area, a 1mbyte area in each address space (application use is now down to 7mbyte), where applications allocate space for subsystem API calls (addressable by application and all subsystems). The issue is that total common space needed is somewhat proportion to number of applications and number of subsystems, so in the 3033 time-frame CSA had evolved to common system area and 5-6mbytes (leaving 2-3mbytes for application), but threatening to increase to 8mbytes (leaving nothing for applications).

the other issue was kernel and subsystem real storage (for the larger 3033) systems was approach 16mbytes ... so even a 16mbyte 3033 was in danger of page thrashing ... and two processor 3033MP made the problem worse (more work with no increase in max memory). A gimmick was done to allow greater than 16mbyte real storage ... even though still limited to 370 24bit addressing. Two undefined bits in 370 16bit page-table entries were scavenged for real page numbers. The two bits were added to existing 12bit page number (addressing 16mbyte of 4k pages) for 14bit page number (addressing up to 64mbyte of 4k pages). This was the start of the "above" the line and "below" the line (needed for 24bit CCWs and other stuff). I/O (including page i/o) could be performed above the line using (existing 370) 31bit IDALs (but CCWs and IDALs themselves had to be below the line).

There were cases where virtual page above the line had to be brought down below the line. The VM370 group started out with gimmick to write an "above-the-line" page to disk and then read it back in "below the line". I gave them a different hack, using a specially constructed page table with page table entries for both the above the line and below the line real addresses ... and then all it had to do was do a move between the two different virtual addresses.

370xa included architecture to address the MVS pointer passing paradigm ... access registers ... which could have simultaneous pointers for multiple different address spaces. A subset of this was retrofitted to 3033 as dual-address space (no longer needed area in CSA, subsystems could address anywhere in application space, but required subsystems to be modified to support the new addressing).

then there was benchmarks that the 3081D (claimed 5mips/processor) single processor throughput was actually worse than 3033 ("4.5mips"). the 3081K cache size was doubled claiming 40% performance improvement (7mips) but many single processor benchmarks came in around 3033.
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

some other recent 3033 posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#8 BSAM vs QSAM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#50 Mainframes after Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#81 GREAT presentation on the history of the mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#61 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 04 May 2017 09:07:22 -0700
Huge <Huge@nowhere.much.invalid> writes:
American retail banking is like something from the Dark Ages.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#31 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#37 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#38 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#39 [CM] What was your first home computer?

the original rhetoric on the floor of congress about the primary purpose of GLBA (now better known for repeal of Glass-Steagall) was that if you already had banking charter, you got to keep it, if didn't already have a banking charter, you couldn't get one (aka keep new competition with latest technology, more efficient technology out of banking).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramm%E2%80%93Leach%E2%80%93Bliley_Act

primary person behind GLBA is #2 on times list responsible for the economic mess.
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

not so much for GLBA ... but for preventing regulation of "over the counter derivatives" (CDS gambling bets), originally billed as gift to ENRON. When the chair of CFTC suggested regulating derivatives, the chair was quickly replaced by the wife of #2, preventing regulation while her husband got bill passed. She then resigns and joins the ENRON board and audit committee.

Greenspan Slept as Off-Books Debt Escaped Scrutiny ... gone 404, http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=aYJZOB_gZi0I but, web search for copy
http://investpost.org/cash/greenspan-slept-as-offbooks-debt-escaped-scrutiny/
That same year Greenspan, Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin and SEC Chairman Arthur Levitt opposed an attempt by Brooksley Born, head of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, to study regulating over-the-counter derivatives. In 2000, Congress passed a law keeping them unregulated.
... snip ...

Gramm and the 'Enron Loophole'
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/17/business/17grammside.html
Enron was a major contributor to Mr. Gramm's political campaigns, and Mr. Gramm's wife, Wendy, served on the Enron board, which she joined after stepping down as chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
... snip ...

Gramm's wife must have fairly quickly replaced Born, before resigning to join Enron board (and audit committee).

Phil Gramm's Enron Favor ... also gone 404 http://www.villagevoice.com/2002-01-15/news/phil-gramm-s-enron-favor/ but lives on at wayback machine
https://web.archive.org/web/20080711114839/http://www.villagevoice.com/2002-01-15/news/phil-gramm-s-enron-favor/
A few days after she got the ball rolling on the exemption, Wendy Gramm resigned from the commission. Enron soon appointed her to its board of directors, where she served on the audit committee, which oversees the inner financial workings of the corporation. For this, the company paid her between $915,000 and $1.85 million in stocks and dividends, as much as $50,000 in annual salary, and $176,000 in attendance fees
... snip ...

past posts mentioning ENRON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

Note to be eligible for Federal Reserve ZIRP funds, TBTF have to have banking charter. There were some of the Federal Reserve TBTF friends there were still straight investment banks that also didn't have banking charter. From the law of unintended consequences, the Federal Reserve then hands out banking charters to its TBTF friends (that don't already have one, in order to make them eligible for tens of trillions in ZIRP funds), theoritically in violation of GLBA. As mentioned upthread, the largest recipient of TARP funds was AIG, and the largest recipient of AIG face-value (CDS gambling bet) payoffs was firm formally headed by SECTREAS last decaded (also was one of the firms that got brand spanking new banking charter). The SECTREAS in the 90s, had also formally headed that firm (and current SECTREAS is also from that firm), one of the jokes that the US Treasury is that firm's branch office in Washington.

posts mentioning TBTF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
posts mentioning ZIRP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp
posts mentioning Percora Hearings and/or Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

Middle of last decade, the largest retailer in the US (something like 25-30% of transactions) announced it was going to acquire an Utah ILC (special kind of banking charter) ... in order to become its own merchant acquirer (responsible for sponsoring merchants to perform credit card transactions). Its existing (TBTF) merchant acquirer started publicity program to have congress block the merchant from acquiring the Utah ILC ... claiming the retailer would adversely affect the community banks and credit unions around the country ... when it would really mean that the TBTF would loose its enormous (credit card) interchange fees from that merchant. recent post mentioning interchange fees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#102 Electronic Payments

Unrelated, I had come up with process where somebody could do a transaction at merchant checkout counter that would magically turn into FDIC banking transaction ... without violating any of the laws and regulations designed to prevent such activity ... and had some meetings with the retailer ... but there was quick action to close the loopholes.

some discussion more recent legal actions
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Payment_Card_Interchange_Fee_and_Merchant_Discount_Antitrust_Litigation
older legal action
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9B05E1D8163DF93BA35752C1A9619C8B63
http://www.mit.edu/~thistle/v12/2/credit.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 04 May 2017 09:26:49 -0700
Morten Reistad <first@last.name.invalid> writes:
There are a number of types of banks, and they all differ widely in their margins and business models.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#31 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#37 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#38 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#39 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#41 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?

around the turn of the century (before TBTF had really started to take hold), I was given a copy of a periodic financial industry publication to evaluate. It had 60 lines per page, and 100+ pages of financial numbers for every possible type of banking operations. It gave the avg. of the number for 20 regional banks compared to the avg. of the number fo 10 national banks (just raw numbers with no analysis). After looking at the numbers for half hour, it became apparent that the regional banks were slightly more efficient than the national banks ... aka even before TBTF really kicks in, it was already evident that national banks had exceeded some size threashold ... basicly too big to manage. I've pontificated that the TBTF justification was primarily based on top executive compensation proportional to size of institution ... unrelated to efficiency/quality of operation.

posts mentioning Too Big To Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

past posts mentioning periodic financial industry publication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#16 Fake debate: The Senate will not vote on big banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#21 Fake debate: The Senate will not vote on big banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#43 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#67 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#7 What banking is. (Essential for predicting the end of finance as we know it.)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#28 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#39 Kabuki Theater 1603-1629
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#14 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#83 The banking sector grew seven times faster than gross domestic product since the beginning of the financial crisis and Too-Big-to-Fail: Banks Get Bigger After Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#25 You may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#1 The Dallas Fed Is Calling For The Immediate Breakup Of Large Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#9 JPM LOSES $2 BILLION USD!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#84 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#3 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#2 IBM Relevancy in the IT World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#63 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#55 Piketty Shreds Marginal Productivity as Neoclassical Justification for Supersized Pay
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#63 The Fed Just Acknowledged Its Too Big To Jail Policy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#23 What were the complaints of binary code programmers that not accept Assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#31 Bernie Sanders Proposes A Bill To Break Up The 'Too Big To Exist' Banks

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 04 May 2017 10:32:28 -0700
Morten Reistad <first@last.name.invalid> writes:
Our banking crisis in the early 1990s tells us that a properly triangulated bank rescue can actually be profitable, after 10-15 years.

repeal of Glass-Steagall didn't (directly) cause the economic mess, (Glass-Steagall had kept regulated, safe depository institutions separate from the risky unregulated investment banks), but did enable "Too Big To Fail" which was excuse used for not prosecuting and throwing the crooks in jail.

posts mentioning Too Big To Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

claim is that during the economic mess, financial services sector tripled in size (as percent of GDP) ... w/o providing any measurable benefit for society (in fact just the opposite).

VP and former CIA director repeatedly claims no knowledge of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

another family member then presides over the economic mess 70 times larger than the S&L crisis. S&L crisis had 1000 criminal convictions with jailtime, proportionally the economic mess should have 70,000.

the public references I first noticed for too big to prosecute and "too big to jail" was accounts of "too big to fail" were found to be money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists ... and just being asked if they would please stop (which they didn't).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering

I was asked Jan2009 to HTML'ize the Pecora Hearings (30s congressional hearings into '29 crash that resulted in Glass-Steagal, criminal convictions and jail time) with lots of internal HREFs and URLs between what happened this time and what happened then (comments that the new congress might have appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call saying it won't be needed after all (comments about enormous mountains of wallstreet money totally burying capital hill).

posts mentioning Percora Hearings and/or Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

recent related posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#31 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#37 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#38 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#39 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#41 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#42 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 04 May 2017 12:09:26 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
VP and former CIA director repeatedly claims no knowledge of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

another family member then presides over the economic mess 70 times larger than the S&L crisis. S&L crisis had 1000 criminal convictions with jailtime, proportionally the economic mess should have 70,000.


How Much Does a Politician Cost? A Groundbreaking Study Reveals the Influence of Money in Politics.
https://theintercept.com/2017/05/04/how-much-does-a-politician-cost-a-groundbreaking-study-reveals-the-influence-of-money-in-politics/

from above:
According to the Roosevelt study, that was why Volcker had to go:

Baker's [explanation for why Volcker should not be reappointed] was startlingly direct: Possible repeal of Glass-Steagall was the signature issue used by investment bankers, led by then-Goldman Sachs executive Robert Rubin, to raise money for the Democratic Party from their cohorts on Wall Street. Getting rid of Glass-Steagall, Baker explained, would alter the balance of power between the two major parties by depriving the Democrats of a central revenue stream.

... snip ...

Rubin was then SECTREAS in the 90s when repeal of Glass-Steagall is added to GLBA (another head of the firm was SECTREAS last decade) ... and another from the firm is current SECTREAS (joke that Treasury Department is the firm's branch office in DC).

Gerstner was in competition to be next CEO of AMEX and wins. The looser leaves, taking their protegee with them to Baltimore, taking over what was called a loan-sharking business. They make some number of other acquisitions, eventually acquiring CITI in violation of Glass-Steagall. Greenspan gives them an exemption while they lobby Wash. DC for repeal. They enlist some number in DC including SECTREAS (Rubin). Repeal of Glass-Steagall is added to GLBA and once it is under way, the SECTREAS resigns and becomes what was described at the time as co-CEO of CITI.

posts mentioning Percora Hearings and/or Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
fed chairman posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
posts mentioning Gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

trivia: GLBA initially passes along party lines (54-44) and folklore is that POTUS was prepared to veto it. They then went back and added amendments and it eventually passed with veto proof 90-8 (along with claim that there was total of $240M from wallstreet for congress, divided R$125M & D$115M)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramm%E2%80%93Leach%E2%80%93Bliley_Act

Milton Friedman
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Friedman

from above:
Friedman promoted an alternative macroeconomic viewpoint known as "monetarism", and argued that a steady, small expansion of the money supply was the preferred policy.[12] His ideas concerning monetary policy, taxation, privatization and deregulation influenced government policies, especially during the 1980s.
... snip ...

Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-01-12/milton-friedman-s-cherished-theory-is-laid-to-rest

from above:
Even now, when economic models have become far more complex than anything in Friedman's time, economists still go back to Friedman's theory as a mental touchstone -- a fundamental intuition that guides the way they make their models. My first macroeconomics professor believed in it deeply and instinctively, and would even bring it up in department seminars.
... snip ...

Economists and the Powerful: Convenient Theories, Distorted Facts, Ample Rewards
http://www.amazon.com/Economists-Powerful-Convenient-Distorted-ebook/dp/B009K44OW2

"The Undoing Project" goes into some detail how Kahneman and Tversky disproved economists' assumption that people make rational decisions ... loc1155-59:
He had listened to an American economist talk about how so-and-so was stupid and so-and-so was a fool, then said, "All your economic models are premised on people being smart and rational, and yet all the people you know are idiots."
... snip ..

Kahneman (a psychologist) gets Nobel prize in economics, in part for debunking some cherished economic theories

2002, congress lets the fiscal responsibility act lapse (spending can't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt). 2010, CBO report was that 2003-2009, tax revenue cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T, for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsible budget (first time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars). Since then only modest spending cuts, but not restored taxes so debt continues to increased. Sort of confluence of 1) Federal Reserve and wallstreet wanted huge federal debt, 2) wallstreet and special interests wanted huge tax cut, 3) military-industrial complex wanted huge spending increase.

fiscal responsibility act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#31 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#37 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#38 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#39 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#41 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#42 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#43 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?

recent posts mentioning Friedman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#17 Destruction of the Middle Class
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#24 Destruction of the Middle Class
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#26 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#29 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#31 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#32 Star Trek (was Re: TV show Mannix observations)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#34 If economists want to be trusted again, they should learn to tell jokes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#64 Improving Congress's oversight of the intelligence community
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#66 Deep learning algorithm does as well as dermatologists in identifying skin cancer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#92 Trump's Rollback of the Neoliberal Market State
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#97 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#101 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#102 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#10 IBM 1970s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#11 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#16 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#17 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#24 Disorder
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#25 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#26 Virtualization's Past Helps Explain Its Current Importance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#35 Former CIA Analyst Sues Defense Department to Vindicate NSA Whistleblowers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#43 when to get out???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#0 Locking our own orientation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#5 NSA Deputy Director: Why I Spent the Last 40 Years In National Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#25 Hamilton and "Fake News"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#32 Hamilton and "Fake News"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#67 Economists are arguing over how their profession messed up during the Great Recession. This is what happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#77 Trump delay of the 'fiduciary rule' will cost retirement savers $3.7 billion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#89 Understanding decisions: The power of combining psychology and economics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#93 United Air Lines - an OODA-loop perspective
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#96 Cognitive Bias Codex, 2016
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#97 IBM revenue has fallen for 20 quarters -- but it used to run its business very differently
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#7 Arthur Laffer's Theory on Tax Cuts Comes to Life Once More

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 May 2017 09:51:56 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Gerstner was in competition to be next CEO of AMEX and wins. The looser leaves, taking their protegee with them to Baltimore, taking over what was called a loan-sharking business. They make some number of other acquisitions, eventually acquiring CITI in violation of Glass-Steagall. Greenspan gives them an exemption while they lobby Wash. DC for repeal. They enlist some number in DC including SECTREAS (Rubin). Repeal of Glass-Steagall is added to GLBA and once it is under way, the SECTREAS resigns and becomes what was described at the time as co-CEO of CITI.

posts mentioning Percora Hearings and/or Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
fed chairman posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
posts mentioning Gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#44 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?

the "protegee" early in the century leaves CITI and becomes CEO of one of the other four largest TBTF (i.e. CITI and three other TBTF were still holding $5.2T in toxic assets ye2008; TARP originally appropriated to buy these toxic assets, but with only $700B, couldn't have done more than slight dent in the problem).

(triple-A rated) toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

and:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#41 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
Middle of last decade, the largest retailer in the US (something like 25-30% of transactions) announced it was going to acquire an Utah ILC (special kind of banking charter) ... in order to become its own merchant acquirer (responsible for sponsoring merchants to perform credit card transactions). Its existing (TBTF) merchant acquirer started publicity program to have congress block the merchant from acquiring the Utah ILC ... claiming the retailer would adversely affect the community banks and credit unions around the country ... when it would really mean that the TBTF would loose its enormous (credit card) interchange fees from that merchant. recent post mentioning interchange fees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#102 Electronic Payments

... snip ...

This particular TBTF is also the institution that the "protegee" (previously at AMEX & CITI) became (and still is) CEO of.

other Gerstner/AMEX/etc trivia ... AMEX and KKR are in competition for private-equity LBO of RJR and KKR wins. KKR runs into issues with RJR and hires away president of AMEX to turn it around
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco
IBM has gone into the red and was being re-orged into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company. The board then hires away former president of AMEX to reverse the breakup and resurrect IBM ... using some of the same techniques used at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

After leaving IBM, former president of AMEX goes on to head up one of the other largest private-equity companies ... which will take-over betlway bandit that will employ Snowden
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

same timeframe that IBM has gone into the red, AMEX spins off a lot of its dataprocessing and financial outsourcing in the largest IPO (up until that time) as FDC. FDC last decade, was doing "outsourced" processing for something over half of all credit cards in the US (in addition to owning WU); got very small percent of interchange fee for the actual processing ... including for the TBTF institution headed up by "protogee" that was previously at AMEX & CITI.

I've previously mentioned that middle of last decade, FDC spins of Western Union. Then after WU is spun off, KKR does a private-equity LBO of remaining FDC (in the largest LBO up until that time, 15yrs after FDC had been the larges IPO).

posts mentioning private-equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

recent posts mentioning (FDC &) Western Union
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#45 Western Union Admits Anti-Money Laundering and Consumer Fraud Violations, Forfeits $586 Million in Settlement with Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#15 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#16 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#3 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#77 Trump's crackdown focuses on people in the U.S. illegally - but not on the businesses that hire them
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#9 Which States Account for Our Trade Deficit with Mexico?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#15 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 May 2017 10:35:54 -0700
Huge <Huge@nowhere.much.invalid> writes:
Unless one's written microcode, one is obviously some kind of idiot.

in the wake of IBM's Future System failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

I get caught up in endicott project for (370) 138/148 for microcode assist. IBM low-end & mid-range were implemented in vertical microcode ... that executed an avg. of ten native instructures for every 370 instruction ... something like the current Hercules mainframe emulator.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hercules_(emulator)

they had 6k bytes of available microcode storage. objective was to identify the 6k bytes of most executed vm370 kernel pathlengths ... and move them into microcode ... 6kbyte pathlengths accounted for about 80% of kernel execution ... and move of 6k bytes of 370 to 6k bytes of native got a 10:1 speedup.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist

Then POK started doing something similar for MVS on 3033. High-end mainframe processors were horizontal microcode that could have a bunch of overlap for each machine cycle. 370/165 was about 2.1 machine cycles per 370 instruction. Move to 370/168 was (larger &) faster real storage, but also microcode optimization improved things to 1.6 machine cycles per 370 instruction.

With failure of FS, 3033 and 370/xa were kicked off in parallel. 3033 started off mapping 168-3 logic to 20% faster chips
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

that would only moved from 3mips to 3.6mips ... which didn't compare well with clone processors. The 20% faster chips also had ten times the circuits ... the additional circuits going unused. There was then some redesign of some core logic to take advantage of additional circuits and get speedup with more onchip processing. There was also improvement in the microcode improving it to about one machine cycle per 370 instruction (from 2.1 in 165 and 1.6 in 168). Combination got 3033 to 1.5 times 168-3 ... or around 4.5mips.

On 3033, there was little or no difference between executing something in 370 instructions and executing the same logic in horizontal microcode. As a result the various MVS microcode assists on 3033, showed little or not performance improvement ... and in some cases ran slower. Things moving to microcode would only show improvement if it could be done in totally different way that actually reduced processing needed.

I did several presentations on the VM370 ECPS microcode assist at user group meetings that got quite a bit of interest from people at Amdahl. They explained that they had developed "macrocode" for their (highend, horizontal microcode) machines ... basically looked & felt like 370 ... but ran in microcode mode (significantly easier to program than horizontal microcode, with little loss of performance).

Starting with 3033, there seemed to be a constant stream of relatively trivial "microcode assists" ... supposedly for performance improvements ... but some conjecture that they actually was countermeasure to the clone processor makers (newer operating system releases always required the latest feature tweaks). There was some implication that Amdahl's "macrocode" was to make it relatively easy & trivial to track the constant stream of IBM's microcode assist tweaking.

Amdahl "macrocode" also made it relatively easy for them to implement "hypervisor" ... basically a subset of virtual machine vm370 function directly as part of the machine (w/o needing a vm370 operating system). This was in IBM's 3090 timeframe ... and it took IBM quite a bit longer to respond to Amdahl's hypervisor with 3090 LPAR supprot (since it had to be done in native horizontal microcode, which was significantly more complex to program).

past posts mentioning amdahl's "macrocode":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#44 Linux paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#48 Linux paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#9 Mainframe System Programmer/Administrator market demand?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#56 Wild hardware idea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#59 Misuse of word "microcode"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#60 Misuse of word "microcode"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#24 Description of a new old-fashioned programming language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#14 Multicores
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#29 Documentation for the New Instructions for the z9 Processor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#40 POWER6 on zSeries?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#43 POWER6 on zSeries?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#48 POWER6 on zSeries?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#38 blast from the past ... macrocode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#9 Mainframe Jobs Going Away
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#32 Code density and performance?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#35 Code density and performance?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#39 Using different storage key's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#42 old hypervisor email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#33 Assembler question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#34 Assembler question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#20 Ranking of non-IBM mainframe builders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#1 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#3 Has anyone ever used self-modifying microcode? Would it even be useful?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#9 Has anyone ever used self-modifying microcode? Would it even be useful?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#84 VLIW pre-history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#74 Non-Standard Mainframe Language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#96 some questions about System z PR/SM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#32 New Opcodes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#33 New Opcodes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#42 New Opcodes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#26 Op codes removed from z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#27 CPU time/instruction table
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#74 z millicode: where does it reside?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#93 Irrational desire to author fundamental interfaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#102 Question on PR/SM dispatcher
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#3 Is Microsoft becoming folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#58 Was MVS/SE designed to confound Amdahl?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#68 Linear search vs. Binary search
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#27 World's worst programming environment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#46 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#17 Write Inhibit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#20 Write Inhibit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#19 DG Nova 1200 as console
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#100 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#161 Slushware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#85 a bit of hope? What was old is new again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#44 John Titor was right? IBM 5100
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#37 IBM LinuxONE Rockhopper

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 May 2017 11:07:37 -0700
A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/business/2015/05/30/net-of-insecurity-part-1/
But as the attack raged in November 1988, crashing thousands of machines and causing millions of dollars in damage, it became clear that the failure went beyond a single man. The worm was using the Internet's essential nature -- fast, open and frictionless -- to deliver malicious code along computer lines designed to carry harmless files or e-mails
... snip ...

We looked at this in the 70s & 80s on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s). Similar technology was also used for the corporate sponsored university network (which was also larger than arpanet/internet for a time)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET
but they (also) ignored some of the same issues as internet/arpanet ... and had a problem Dec1987, a year earlier than the internet Nov1988.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Tree_EXEC
http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistir/threats/subsubsection3_3_2_1.html

internal network posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
bitnet posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet
internet posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internet

I mentioned being brought into small client/server startup as consultant that wanted to do payment transactions, they had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". I had absolute authority on the server to gateway for the payment networks, but could only make recommendations on the client/server side, some of which were immediately violated/ingored, which account for some of the exploits that continue to this day. For the server/gateway I had to do compensating processes (documentation and software) to create what I considered industrial strength dataprocessing.

Until he passed, the internet standard RFC editor
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Postel
use to let me help with periodic STD1. Also, he had me do a talk at ISI/USC (including USC computer security graduate students) on "Why the internet isn't business criticial dataprocessing".

recent ref:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#14 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#15 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 May 2017 13:17:51 -0700
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
The Burroughs medium systems mainframes had an instruction that 'instated' a task (process/job/pick-your-favorite-name-for-a-schedulable entity). Originally called "BRE" (Branch Reinstate). This instruction took care of setting up the processor state for the new task/thread.

around 1980, when the Omega architecture was developed which significantly expanded the addressibility of a task (from 500Kbytes to Petabytes), the instruction mnemonic was changed from BRE to BRV (Branch Reinstate Virtual) which loaded the 8 active base-limit registers from the tasks current memory access table (MAT) in the current environment. Each base/limit was still restricted to 500Kb because of the 6-digit address field in the instructions. A 7th digit in the index registers selected which of bases 0 through 7 the address field in the instruction was relative to (although branch addresses were always implicitly assigned to base 1)

An index register was an 8-digit (4-byte) register with the format

CbOOOOOO

Where 'C' is the sign digit (C positive, D negative), b is the base indicant and OOOOOOO is an offset value.

The final memory address for an indexed access is derived by

sys_addr = base[base-indicant] + offset-from-instruction-operand-field + OOOOOO

Base 0 included the stack and the fixed memory locations from prior systems (e.g. the B2500). Base 1 was for the executable code. Bases 2 through 7 were up to the application to use.

http://vseries.lurndal.org/doku.php?id=instructions:brv


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#46 [CM] What was your first home computer?

engineer working on 370/158 added virtual machine mode ... and original VM-assist. Normally, virtual machines were run in problem state mode and supervisor instructions interrupted into virtual machine kernel for emulation. Original VM assist added flag bit in control registers and modified microcode for some number of supervisor instructions to test for virtual machine mode ... and execute according to virtual machine rules ... w/o having to interrupt back into the kernel for software emulation.

Basic ECPS just added a bunch of new op-codes ... for each kernel path moved to microcode ... and the specific op-code was inserted in front of the kernel code ... and would complete with the next instruction after the set of instructions moved to microcode. The system boot process would test if ECPS microcode was installed and then go around, replacing all the ECPS opcodes with no-ops.

The ECPS effort also added one or two additional supervisor instructions that were supported by VM assist (supervisor instructions that could execute according to virtual machine rules).

The 370/xa architecture (started after the failure of FS and shows up finally in 3081) didn't support directly moving from virtual machine supervisor to virtual machine mode (like in 360 & 370) ... so they invented the SIE instruction for being able to enter virtual machine mode

As I've previously mentioned, the head of POK got VM370 product killed and all the people moved to POK as part of MVS/XA development (endicott did manage to save the vm370 product mission, but had to recreate a development group from scratch).

Some of the former VM370 people created the virtual machine TOOL ... for MVS/XA testing ... purely for internal only use and never intended to be released to customers. As part of that effort SIE was originally developed. However, performanance wasn't a specific issue and there wasn't enough space in 3081 for all the SIE function. It turns out that when SIE was too large for the available 3081 microcode space ... and so had to be "swapped" in each time it was executed (making it a rather time consuming process).

Later 3090 people go into some detail how they re-engineered SIE for performance ... and then later SIE microcode was critical part of LPAR microcode ... aka there wasn't a virtual machine supervisor that executed instructions on behalf of virtual machine ... the physical machine was split into multiple Logical PARtititons (LPAR) and operated as if they physically different machines (although relied heavily on lots of the microcode used for virtual machine operation). The original LPAR implementation couldn't run a virtual machine supervisor ... but didn't support virtual machine assist by the supervisor ... since it wasn't recursive implementation. Later it was enhanced to be recursive so virtual machine supervisor running in LPAR could use virtual machine assist for performance of its virtual machines.

LPARS also started out being contiguous range of real storage with base/limit bounds.

old email mentioning SIE for 3090
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#email810630
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#email831118

past posts mentioning SIE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#37 SIE instruction (S/390)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#50 VM (not VMS or Virtual Machine, the IBM sort)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#51 VM (not VMS or Virtual Machine, the IBM sort)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#52 VM (not VMS or Virtual Machine, the IBM sort)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#29 z900 and Virtual Machine Theory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#21 Root certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#71 IBM 9020 FAA/ATC Systems from 1960's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#73 Most complex instructions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#38 CMS under MVS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#53 TSS/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#6 Microcode?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#44 PDP-10 Archive migration plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#15 Home mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#18 Everything you wanted to know about z900 from IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#40 Linux paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#44 Linux paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#48 Linux paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#5 vax6k.openecs.org rebirth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#6 vax6k.openecs.org rebirth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#7 vax6k.openecs.org rebirth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#0 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#54 ECPS:VM DISPx instructions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#56 ECPS:VM DISPx instructions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#42 Flash 10208
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003n.html#13 CPUs with microcode ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#52 Virtual Machine Concept
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#57 System/360; Hardwired vs. Microcoded
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#17 {SPAM?} DCSS as SWAP disk for z/Linux
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#9 Mainframe Jobs Going Away
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#27 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#29 How to implement Lpars within Linux
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#31 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#22 Virtual Virtualizers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#44 Any resources on VLIW?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#42 old hypervisor email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#1 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#21 history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#49 SVCs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#61 ISA Support for Multithreading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#65 IBM S/360 series operating systems history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#39 FBA rant
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#72 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#59 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#96 some questions about System z PR/SM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#42 mainframe performance, was Is a RISC chip more expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#9 Open z architecture and Linux questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#27 CPU time/instruction table
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#29 Status of Arpanet/Internet in 1976?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#51 "Portable" data centers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#66 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#70 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#44 Need tool to zap core
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#51 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#76 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#71 "SIE" on a RISC architecture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#72 "SIE" on a RISC architecture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#55 z millicode: where does it reside?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#74 z millicode: where does it reside?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#62 When will MVS be able to use cheap dasd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#71 Fujitsu starts shipping 800 rack 80,000 chip 'K' supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#28 Personal histories and IBM computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#62 SIE - CompArch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#18 Melinda Varian's history page move
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#70 vm/370 3081
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#87 A History of VM Performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#30 vm370 running in "XA-mode"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#22 First 5.25in 1GB drive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#27 First 5.25in 1GB drive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#39 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#2 WHAT WAS THE PROJECT YOU WERE INVOLVED/PARTICIPATED AT IBM THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#68 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#63 Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation (Cambridge skunkworks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#30 CMS load module format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#113 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#114 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#115 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#116 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#117 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#118 Start Interpretive Execution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#39 SIE - CompArch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#50 SIE - CompArch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#37 Regarding Time Sharing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#43 Regarding Time Sharing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#67 Was MVS/SE designed to confound Amdahl?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#46 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#62 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#17 Write Inhibit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#40 The mainframe turns 50, or, why the IBM System/360 launch was the dawn of enterprise IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#10 R.I.P. PDP-10?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#19 DG Nova 1200 as console
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#78 Microcode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#37 IBM LinuxONE Rockhopper
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#53 Multics Timeline
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#80 Great mainframe history(?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#81 GREAT presentation on the history of the mainframe

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 May 2017 13:27:30 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#47 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

... some of this prompted by ongoing thread on the article in facebook

the telco were really conflicted about all the "dark" fiber in the 80s ... it enormously increased available bandwidth ... however they were in a extreme chicken&egg situation. Their business model was "use" charges necessary to support very high run rate. They would have to drastically reduce the "use" charges in order to motivate the innovation needed for new high-bandwidth applications. However, it would take years for the high-bandwidth applications to evolve ... during which time the telcos would be operating at enormus loss. Somehow they had to break the chicken/egg deadlock.

the other part was that telcos were heavily involved in OSI model ... basically telco institutional centric paradigm ... no internetworking.

NSF provided support for internconnecting the NSF supercomputer centers ... and as regional networks connect into the centers, it evolves into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to modern internet. Telco resources provided to the backbone was something like 4-6 times the gov. funds awarded in the RFP ... basically significantly over provisioning ... helping encourage the development and evolution of new generation of bandwidth hungry applications ... and at the same time, the commercial use of the backbone was forbidden (minimizing telcos having to worry about loosing all their commercial "use charges"). past NSF email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

Then in the very late 80s and early 90s, gov. agencies started to mandate the elimination of TCP/IP (and internetworking) and move to OSI (with telco institutional centric paradigm).

Of course it didn't quite work out that way ... but they have constantly trying to move back to institution centric controlled operation.

Part of the "compensating processes" .... was dealing with business trouble call desks for payment transactions ... moving to the internet. They had standard of 5mins elapsed time for 1st level problem determination ... starting with various circuit-based analysis diagnostics.

One of the original large scale pilot project (retailer that advertised during NFL halftime games), there was trouble call ... that spent 3hrs of intensive trouble desk time and eventually closed with NTF (no trouble found). I had to create a whole bunch of stuff to provide them with the equivalent of their circuit-based diagnostics in a packet-based environment (and try and meet 5min 1st level problem determination).

past posts mentioning moving circuit-based operation to packet-based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm5.htm#asrn3 Assurance, e-commerce, and some x9.59 ... fyi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm16.htm#20 Ousourced Trust (was Re: Difference between TCPA-Hardware and a smart card and something else before
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#21 Reliable Connections Are Not
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#53 The One True Identity -- cracks being examined, filled, and rotted out from the inside
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#50 Egghead cracked, MS IIS again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#24 Computers in Science Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#62 IBM says AMD dead in 5yrs ... -- Microsoft Monopoly vs. IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#15 A Dark Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#37 The BASIC Variations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#8 Mars Rover Not Responding
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#51 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#52 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#53 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#57 high speed network, cross-over from sci.crypt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#30 Data communications over telegraph circuits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#24 is a computer like an airport?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#29 Which entry of the routing table was selected?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#10 The top 10 dead (or dying) computer skills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#15 What if phone company had developed Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#23 Outsourcing loosing steam?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#25 LAX IT failure: leaps of faith don't work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#34 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#54 Industry Standard Time To Analyze A Line Of Code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#53 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#37 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#63 To what extent do IP networks meet the stringent requirements of High Availability (HA) where the target performance is 99.999%? What performance is obtained in practice
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#33 IBM touts encryption innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#31 comp.arch has made itself a sitting duck for spam
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#41 Follow up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#62 TV Big Bang 10/12/09
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#66 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#61 A computer at home?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#23 Commentary--time to build a more secure Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#27 History of Mainframe Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#21 Pre-internet email and usenet (was Re: How to choose the best news server for this newsgroup in 40tude Dialog?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#38 Trump to sign cyber security orde

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 May 2017 14:24:51 -0700
hancock4 writes:
In the 1950s, kids at MIT learned about Bell System toll access codes, and promptly exploited them to make free long distance calls.

In 1968, time sharing computer systems--even back then--blacked out the password when someone logged on. (For one thing, they had a password in addition to a user ID).

So, even in the rarefied environment of the early Internet community, it was crystal clear that controls would be needed against both stupid and malicious use.

I don't know enough about the actual planners of inter-connected networks. But I dare say that a good financial-auditor person should've been included in the design to have developed adequate protective security controls. While an auditor of the time likely wouldn't have known much about computer networking, they would've been family with attempts at fraud, abuse, and theft and methods of protection and control.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#47 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#49 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

the ibm cambridge science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

port apl\360 to cp/67-cms for apl\cms ... fixed garbage collection for large (multi-mbyte) virtual paged storage (had been created for 16kbyte swapped workspaces) and added API support of calling system services (including file read/write) ... allowing lots of real-word applications.

One such was the business planning group in Armonk hdqtrs, which loaded the most prized corporate data (detailed customer info) on the system and used APL\CMS to do business modeling (remotely from Armonk).

Now this required some amount of security since the science center had lots of non-ibm employees from local univ, like BU & MIT ... including students.

internal network (originated at the science center) was larger than arpanet/internet from just about beginning until sometime mid-80s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

one of the requirements was that all links (physically leaving datacenter bldg) had to have link encryptors. In the mid-80s, one of the major vendors said that the internal network had more than half of all the link encryptors in the world ... this created lots of conflict with various governments ... especially when links crossed national boundaries.

... at the time of the internet/arpanet great change-over to internetworking on 1jan1983, the internet/arpanet had approx. 100 IMP network nodes (and 255 connected hosts) ... at time when the internal network was rapidly approaching 1000 nodes ... past post with list of corporate locations that added one or more network nodes during 1983
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8

trivia: in the 70s while I was at the science center, IBM hired a new CSO that used to be gov. employee (at one time had been head of presidential detail) and I was asked to run around with him visiting IBM locations and talk about computer security (and I learned a little about physical security).

can't just criticize univ. environment. There has been recent threads about gov. cyberdumb ... adversaries dancing through "secure" networks gathering all sort classified information ... including detailed specification & design for major military weapons.

When former AMEX president leaves IBM ... he goes to head up major private equity company that will acquire the beltway bandit that will employ Snowden. Last decade there was enormous uptic in gov. outsourcing to for-profit companies ... especially private-equity subsidiaries (including 70% of the intelligence budget and over half the employees)
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

private equity companies are under intense pressure to cut corners and provide money to their parents nearly any way possible, example
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

Security clearances outsourced to private-equity subsidiaries were found to be filling out the paperwork, but not actually doing the background investigations.

In the wake of the Snowden incident they head of the agency announces something about (re-)instituting(?) multi-party for sensitive operations (like sysadm/root privileges) as countermeasure to insider threats (something that was standard practice in the industry by at least the 80s and presumably also the gov).

private-equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

past cyberdumb posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#3 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#47 Stolen F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China's Stealth Fighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#49 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#0 Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#32 The dark side of digital banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#82 The NSA and Snowden: Securing the All-Seeing Eye
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#90 A Drone Could Be the Ultimate Dogfighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#18 After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#25 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#31 The Designer Of The F-15 Explains Just How Stupid The F-35 Is
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#49 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#90 Friden Flexowriter equipment series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#12 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#20 US No Longer Tech Leader in Military War Gear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#22 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#23 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#28 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#34 UN to Five Eyes nations: Your mass surveillance is breaking the law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#65 New Military Gear Doesn't Have to Cost a Fortune
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#102 A-10 Warthog No Longer Suitable for Middle East Combat, Air Force Leader Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#8 Super Cane's Computers run Windows
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#32 Univac 90 series info posted on bitsavers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#43 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#45 Is coding the new literacy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#76 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#6 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#10 NYT on Sony hacking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#11 NYT on Sony hacking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#55 Do we really?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#75 How Russia's S-400 makes the F-35 obsolete
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#9 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#20 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#21 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#34 The joy of simplicity?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#42 No, the F-35 Can't Fight at Long Range, Either
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#75 American Gripen: The Solution To The F-35 Nightmare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#8 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#19 Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#20 DEC and The Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#95 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#17 Cybercrime
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#38 [BBC] US nuclear force 'still uses floppy disks'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#104 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#104 How to Win the Cyberwar Against Russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#17 Why Large Companies Can't Innovate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#0 Snowden
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#28 China's spies gain valuable US defense technology: report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#40 The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#67 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#76 The F-35 Stealth Fighter Is Politically Unstoppable----Even Under President Trump
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#62 Big Shrink to "Hire" 25,000 in the US, as Layoffs Pile Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#15 China's claim it has 'quantum' radar may leave $17 billion F-35 naked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#34 CBS News: WikiLeaks claims to release thousands of CIA documents of computer activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#47 WikiLeaks CIA Dump: Washington's Data Security Is a Mess

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 May 2017 07:46:54 -0700
Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:
No it is not - C programmers should rarely need to think about anything lower than the C language specification and the standard C libraries. In most cases they should be concerned about portability and algorithmic efficiency. They should usually be deliberately ignoring details of the system they happen to be developing on or for, not building in dependencies in order to squeeze a little more performance.

there are periodic discussions in a.f.c. about "thinking" in programming language similar to proficiency in natural language where people "think" & "dream" in natural language ... which also has correlation with natural language proficiency studies of multi-lingual people ... that there is differencies in how they handle concepts when they are "thinking" in different languages ... along with implication that different languages deal with various concepts better or worse. The trivial scenario is the differences in how well COBOL and FORTRAN handle different kinds of problems (conceptual frameworks).

more recent in how language shapes how things are thought about

Language shapes how the brain perceives time
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-05/lu-lsh050217.php

if it works for times, the implication is language also affects how brain perceives (& deals with) other concepts as well.

past posts referencing proficiency in programming language similar to proficiency in naturual language (thinking/dreaming in the language rather than say thinking in english ... and having to translate to programming language).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#11 Where did the hacker ethic go?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#64 Programming in School (was: Re: Common uses...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#39 Wrapping up the FBEMBA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#39 Compressing the OODA-Loop - Removing the D (and maybe even an O)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#74 Time to competency for new software language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#48 Is coding the new literacy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#49 Ada's fate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#65 Is coding the new literacy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#118 By the time we get to 'O' in OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#55 Do we really?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 May 2017 08:20:12 -0700
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
If the Fortran compile can efficientlly allocate processing among a hundred thousand CUDA cores and several thousand X86 cores then by all means let it do the heavy lifting. If it can't then the numerical analyst has to work a lot closer to the metal than you might expect.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#51 [CM] What was your first home computer?

old reference to holy grail of programming is programming language that makes handling parallel processing simple/easy for majority of programmers (ceo of m'soft telling Intel senior VP to stop with the multi-core stuff and go back to making increasingly fast single processors ... because parallel programming was "too hard").

old post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#77 Sizing CPU

Microsoft super sizes multi-threaded tripe
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/05/01/mundie_mundie/

from above:
Microsoft, to its credit, has multi-threaded the calculations in Office Excel 2007. But that's about where the credit ends.

Intel and AMD executives fail to hide their disappointment with Microsoft well on the multi-threaded software front.

During a speech last June, Intel SVP Pat Gelsinger said the following:

"A couple of years ago, I had a discussion with Bill Gates (about the multi-core products). He was just in disbelief. He said, 'We can't write software to keep up with that.'"

Gates ordered the Intel executive to keep pumping out faster product. "No, Bill, it's not going to work that way," Gelsinger informed him.

... snip ...

other old threads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#78 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#24 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#26 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#34 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#38 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#60 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#63 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#2 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#5 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#13 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#14 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#19 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#22 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#26 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#29 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#36 Future of System/360 architecture?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#37 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#39 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#49 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#51 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#52 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#53 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#54 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#58 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#59 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#61 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#70 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#1 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#3 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#6 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#25 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#28 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#38 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#39 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#42 Panic in Multicore Land
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#15 Why do people say "the soda loop is often depicted as a simple loop"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#44 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#90 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#28 I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#48 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#85 Parallel programming may not be so daunting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#118 By the time we get to 'O' in OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#56 Which Books Can You Recommend For Learning Computer Programming?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#60 Which Books Can You Recommend For Learning Computer Programming?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#48 The ICL 2900

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 May 2017 08:42:20 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
trivia: for some reason, I've been added to the Facebook "New Stanford Pascal Compiler" group.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#24 [CM] What was your first home computer?

from posting today:
I just tested a Pascal/VS program from 1991, which translates TABU reports (a RPG like language from the polish ODRA computer) to COBOL programs.

The program ran without change successfully on Windows; it only took me 5 minutes to set up a CMD file to do the file assignments etc.; see the CMD file below. The resulting COBOL program was identical to old COBOL results from 1991 - no difference; this is remarkable, because the original program ran on VM/CMS using the EBCDIC codepage and the IBM Pascal/VS compiler - and todays run was on Windows, using the New Stanford Pascal compiler, and ASCII.

... snip ...

other recent posts mentioning pascal/vs (or vs/pascal):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#53 COBOL and POSIX pipes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#58 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#60 [EXTERNAL] ComputerWorld Says: Cobol plays major role in U.S. government breaches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#32 The very beginning of TCP/IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#72 more IBM online systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#17 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#18 [CM] What was your first home computer?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 May 2017 08:52:49 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#24 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#53 [CM] What was your first home computer?

and from: "The beauty of runtime checks in Stanford Pascal"
https://www.facebook.com/notes/new-stanford-pascal-compiler/the-beauty-of-runtime-checks-in-stanford-pascal/375317846185196/
I would like to emphasize that it is not me who invented this; the honour of course belongs to the original authors of the compiler and (in this case) the P-Code translator, who invented this kind of runtime check. I only recently optimized the ASSEMBLER listing and, BTW, introduced an error here, and, by repairing it, analyzed and unterstood the technique used here.
...
This is almost 40 years old compiler technology, but in my opinion it is very interesting and still relevant today.
... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Your Brain Loves You Not Having a Boss, According to Science

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Why Your Brain Loves You Not Having a Boss, According to Science
Date: 06 May 2017
Blog: Facebook
Why Your Brain Loves You Not Having a Boss, According to Science
https://www.inc.com/wanda-thibodeaux/why-your-brain-loves-you-not-having-a-boss-according-to-science.html
Having a boss might be the norm, but that doesn't mean it's best for your brain or productivity.
... snip ...

"Your brain works completely differently when you're able to direct yourself versus when someone else is directing you"

Somewhat related xcover from AI thread

There is also language affects perception/understanding ... recent reference: Language shapes how the brain perceives time
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-05/lu-lsh050217.php

and concept that programmers can achieve proficiency/fluency in computer language analogous to natural language (where they think/dream in the language). Some number of "bugs" can occur by less proficient programmers in translating from some (natural) language to programming language (translating from one conceptual frame of reference/framework to a different one). recent thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#51 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#52 [CM] What was your first home computer?

fingerspitzengefuhl and Coup d'oeil ... sometimes "intuition" ... thinking/conceptualizing in non-natural language, recent refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#49 Strategy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#59 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#62 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#10 Boyd OODA-loop Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#14 New words, language, metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#84 We Use Words to Talk. Why Do We Need Them to Think?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#14 Rogue sysadmins the target of Microsoft's new 'Shielded VM' security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#24 US Air Power
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#33 OODA-loop and virtual machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#79 Defense Meltdown
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#4 OODA in IT Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#7 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#73 Note on dis-orientation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#55 60 Minutes interview with Grace Hopper

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 May 2017 19:39:57 -0700
hancock4 writes:
Outsourcing was the great goddess of an era--it would supposedly provide increased productivity yet lower costs as opposed to using inhouse employed staff. Except for certain specialized skills or for very small organizations, outsourcing is a bad idea.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#47 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#49 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#50 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

in the case of the intelligence community ... there was enormous uptic in outsourcing last decade ... especially to private-equity subsidiaries (including beltway bandits being bought up by large private-equity firms).

Law prohibits gov. agencies from lobbying congress, and gov. contractors can't spend money from gov. contracts to lobby congress (beltway bandits with gov. only source of income) ... however, private-equity owners are free to spend as much money as they want to on congress.

It also contributed to rapid spreading success of failure culture by "for profit" companies (especially private-equity subsidiaries) ... make more money from sequence of failures
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

congress has huge motivation for appropriating funds to companies that in turn, provide money back to congress.

note besides the snowden affair and a few others (employed by private-equity subsidiaries) ... the OPM breach also involved a private-equity subsidiary.
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas/
and
https://fcw.com/articles/2015/06/24/house-oversight-opm.aspx

success of failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

folklore ... one excuse put forward for the outsourcing was that top level technology salaries had increased to the point that it would put several thousands gov. positions at level requiring congressional approval ... exceeding available congressional time available. recent ref
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#25 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#75 ComputerWorld Says: Cobol plays major role in U.S. government breaches

It was easier for congress to appropriate tens/hundreds of billions in outsourced contracts than to approve several thousand individual gov. employees.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 May 2017 09:18:36 -0700
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
I blame it on the anti-GOTO idiots. In today's terms, that's when FORTRAN was politically incorrect and the attitude has not changed. Look at the trash talk about COBOL in this newsgroup.

in the early 70s, I wrote PLI program to analyze 360/370 assembler programs, creating abstract representation ... including execution paths and looking for register "use-before-set" ... as well was trying to represent program in higher level psuedo-code, if/then/else, do/while, etc.

One of the things was some relatively straight-forward (highly optimized) cp67 kernel code with branches (goto), could turn into (complex) if/then/else nested 10-15 levels deep ... and much harder to understand.

the issue with branch/goto ... was after failure, trying to reconstruct execution path and how things got to the failure point (program forensics) ... especially if likely involved incorrect set register values. past posts mentioning redoing IPCS dump analysis program in REX(X)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

trivia: very early 70s, there was IBM technical conference at the old DC/arlington marriott (just off end of bridge on virginia side, no longer exists) with the IBM FSD guy doing superprogrammer and goto-less.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#20 How many Megaflops and when?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#24 How many Megaflops and when?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#25 How many Megaflops and when?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#64 Does the word "mainframe" still have a meaning?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#48 Whom Do Programmers Admire Now???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#49 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#51 windows office xp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#2 Share in DC: was somethin' else
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#40 Share lunch/dinner?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#25 Timeless Classics of Software Engineering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#26 Timeless Classics of Software Engineering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#51 Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#19 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#1 3270 response & channel throughput

past posts mentioning PLI program doing 360/370 assembler analysis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#12 360 "OS" & "TSS" assemblers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#41 Domainatrix - the final word
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#36 Assembly language formatting on IBM systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#8 "Clean" CISC (was Re: McKinley Cometh...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#21 REXX still going strong after 25 years
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#36 Vintage computers are better than modern crap !
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#35 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#16 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#72 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#52 Where should the type information be?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#45 IBM's POWER6
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#32 transputers again was: The demise of Commodore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#1 Greatest Software Ever Written?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#24 A Day For Surprises (Astounding Itanium Tricks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#53 Is the teaching of non-reentrant HLASM coding practices ever defensible?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#31 To RISC or not to RISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#32 To RISC or not to RISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#41 Is this true? (Were gotos really *that* bad?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#21 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#35 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#64 IBM System/360 DOS still going strong as Z/VSE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#48 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#57 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#30 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#43 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#32 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#65 You know you've been Lisp hacking to long when
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#37 Language first, hardware second
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#49 "How do you feel about 'gotos'"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#69 [Poll] Computing favorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#24 You thought IEFBR14 was bad? Try GNU's /bin/true code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#25 Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#97 ABO Automatic Binary Optimizer

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 May 2017 09:51:55 -0700
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Which pioneers are you talking about? DEC was extremely security conscious. We sold machines to NSA and other government entities which required security clearance. That included bits going through wires.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#47 A flaw in the design; The
Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#49 A flaw in the design; The
Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#50 A flaw in the design; The
Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#56 A flaw in the design; The
Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

trivia from long ago and far away, gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

Note: i didn't have security clearance, but some would show up at computer/security classes I would teach periodically.

folklore form around 1980, the agency wanted exact source for a specific executing MVS (for evaluation). IBM spent $5M researching the issue and eventually came back and said that it wasn't practical.

Multics was on the (5th) flr above (from science center on 4th flr) and sold some number into gov. agencies. One of the customers was AFDS,
http://www.multicians.org/mga.html#AFDSC

old email about AFDS planning on coming by and discussing getting 20 4341s, when they got around to coming by, it had increased to 210 4341s.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404 in multics &
a.f.c. posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#12 Multics Nostalgia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#15 departmental servers

other sites
http://www.multicians.org/sites.html
including
http://www.multicians.org/mgd.html#DOCKMASTER
http://www.multicians.org/mgs.html#SiteN

IBM required link encryptors on all links leaving company facilities, middle 80s, major vendor claimed the internal network had half of all link encryptors in the world.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

I had project HSDT with T1 & faster speed links
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

... and didn't like what I had to pay for T1 link encryptors and higher speed link encryptors were almost impossible to find ... so I got involved doing link encryptor with objective of less than $100 to make and would handle multiple mbytes/sec. Initially the company crypto group said that it significantly weakened the crypto standard. It took me 3months to figure out how to explain that it actually was significantly stronger than the crypto standard ... but it was hollow victory. I was then told that there was only one organization in the world that could use such crypto, I could make as many as I wanted, but they all would have to be sent to location in Maryland. It was when I realized ther was three kinds of crypto in the world; 1) the kind they don't care about, 2) the kind you can't do, 3) the kind you can only do for them. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#87 New test attempt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#86 Own a piece of the crypto wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#32 Getting Out Hard Drive in Real Old Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#27 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#43 Internet Evolution - Part I: Encryption basics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#20 TELSTAR satellite experiment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#60 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#0 We list every company in the world that has a mainframe computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#63 ARPANET's coming out party: when the Internet first took center stage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#85 Key Escrow from a Safe Distance: Looking back at the Clipper Chip
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#63 Reject gmail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#70 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#47 T-carrier
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#31 The Vindication of Barb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#69 The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#77 German infosec agency warns against Trusted Computing in Windows 8
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#88 NSA and crytanalysis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#10 "NSA foils much internet encryption"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#50 Secret contract tied NSA and security industry pioneer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#9 NSA seeks to build quantum computer that could crack most types of encryption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#7 Last Gasp for Hard Disk Drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#25 Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#27 TCP/IP Might Have Been Secure From the Start If Not For the NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#54 IBM Programmer Aptitude Test
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#77 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#85 On a lighter note, even the Holograms are demonstrating
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#2 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#39 GM to offer teen driver tracking to parents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#3 PROFS & GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#101 Internal Network, NSFNET, Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#31 How the internet was invented
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#106 How to Win the Cyberwar Against Russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#0 Snowden

some past refs referencing agency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#25 virtual machines for security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#20 Secure OS Thoughts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#30 Public disclosure of discovered vulnerabilities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#35 Determining processor status without IPIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005p.html#0 Article: The True Value of Mainframe Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#23 winscape?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#44 winscape?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#36 Mainframe Applications and Records Keeping?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#37 Mainframe Applications and Records Keeping?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#51 Channel Distances
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#11 Some credible documented evidence that a MVS or later op sys has ever been hacked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#14 Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#2 The System/360 Model 20 Wasn't As Bad As All That
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#3 Not Your Dad's Mainframe: Little Iron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#52 the more things change, the more things stay the same
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#0 Patent buster for a method that increases password security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#6 GCN at 25: VAX for the memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#13 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#31 Wylbur and Paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#20 Does anyone know of a documented case of VM being penetrated by hackers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#48 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#38 It's No Secret: VMware to Develop Secure Systems for NSA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#47 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#57 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#4 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#60 Job ad for z/OS systems programmer trainee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#32 Interesting Mainframe Article: 5 Myths Exposed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#67 Virtualization's security threats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#68 Virtualization's security threats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#26 CA ESD files Options
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#58 Virtualization: History repeats itself with a search for security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#46 Whitehouse Emails Were Lost Due to "Upgrade"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#74 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#81 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#62 German court finds Bank responsible for malwared PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#40 IBM--disposition of clock business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#68 New technology trends?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#30 Macs for security (now, with new improved NSA hardening tips!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#47 Virtualization Adopters Hit The Tipping Point
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#67 Invitation to Join Mainframe Security Guru Group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#42 Password Rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#62 Virtualization: What is it exactly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#9 Comprehensive security?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#65 Did you think about Virtualization Security?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#5 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#45 Security experts identify 25 coding errors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#49 The 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#56 Data losses set to soar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#6 ATMs At Risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#11 Lack of bit field instructions in x86 instruction set because of ?patents ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#18 System/360 Announcement (7Apr64)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#33 greenbar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#24 Top 10 Cybersecurity Threats for 2009, will they cause creation of highly-secure Corporate-wide Intranets?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#38 Top 10 Cybersecurity Threats for 2009, will they cause creation of highly-secure Corporate-wide Intranets?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#11 China deploys secure computer operating system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#24 IBM security expert: X86 virtualization not ready for regulated, mission-critical apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#22 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#77 More named/shared systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#5 Moving to the Net: Encrypted Execution for User Code on a Hosting Site
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#31 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#3 Hacker charges also an indictment on PCI, expert says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#12 33 Years In IT/Security/Audit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#39 Status of Arpanet/Internet in 1976?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#33 U.S. house decommissions its last mainframe, saves $730,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#38 U.S. house decommissions its last mainframe, saves $730,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#21 Is Cloud Computing Old Hat?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#47 Is C close to the machine?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#56 Crypto dongles to secure online transactions ... addenda
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#59 EU agency runs rule over ID cards for online banking logins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#68 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#63 Source code for s/360 [PUBLIC]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#97 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#62 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#59 More calumny: "Secret Service Uses 1980s Mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#74 Is Security a Curse for the Cloud Computing Industry?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#9 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#40 someone smarter than Dave Cutler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#53 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#17 Personal use z/OS machines was Re: Multiprise 3k for personal Use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#61 Information on obscure text editors wanted
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#37 Mainframe Hacking -- Fact or Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#73 Mainframe hacking?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#77 ZeuS attacks mobiles in bank SMS bypass scam
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#19 Virtualization: Making Seductive Promises a Reality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#26 Global Sourcing with Cloud Computing and Virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#1 origin of 'fields'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#13 Sandboxing: Understanding System Containment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#34 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#73 From OODA to AAADA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#18 Plug Your Data Leaks from the inside
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#35 VMSHARE Archives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#15 545 Tech Square
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#86 Utility of find single set bit instruction?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#15 History of copy on write
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#66 Boeing Plant 2 ... End of an Era
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#78 RISCversus CISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#79 A History of VM Performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#8 Security flaws in software development
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#23 Fear the Internet, was Cool Things You Can Do in z/OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#24 Fear the Internet, was Cool Things You Can Do in z/OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#61 z/OS System Programmer Needed East Coast
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#5 Robert Morris, man who helped develop Unix, dies at 78
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#7 Innovation and iconoclasm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#10 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#29 It's Cool To Be Clever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#35 How old is the oldest email in your current email inbox?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#50 ISBNs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#15 1979 SHARE LSRAD Report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#61 Hybrid computing -- from mainframe to virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#75 VM sysprogs don't need the keys to the door locks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#47 You Don't Need a Cyber Attack to Take Down The North American Power Grid
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#49 Do you know where all your sensitive data is located?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#59 A computer metaphor for systems integration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#2 What are the implication of the ongoing cyber attacks on critical infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#54 Open source and the National Security Agency, together again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#73 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#44 Simulated PDP-11 Blinkenlight front panel for SimH
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#6 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#98 Gordon Crovitz: Who Really Invented the Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#1 Gordon Crovitz: Who Really Invented the Internet?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#64 Guest Post: Beakley on Boyd, Aerial Combat and the OODA-Loop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#63 Is it possible to hack mainframe system??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#22 What is a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#28 Some interesting post about the importance of Security and what it means for the Mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#79 Still not convinced about the superiority of mainframe security vs distributed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#61 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#19 What Makes sorting so cool?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#15 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#19 It was 30 Years Ago Today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#51 Search for first Web page takes detour into US
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#10 EBCDIC and the P-Bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#63 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#3 A Brief History of Cloud Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#19 A Brief History of Cloud Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#38 Quote on Slashdot.org
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#69 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#20 Why IBM chose MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!' made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#58 The CIA's new "family jewels": Going back to Church?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#103 Microsoft publishes MS-DOS, Word for Windows source code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#36 Semi-OT: Government snooping was Re: Is there any MF shop using AWS service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#95 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#40 Named Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#54 IBM Programmer Aptitude Test
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#11 360/85
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#15 Do we really need 64-bit addresses or is 48-bit enough?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#35 BBC News - Microsoft fixes '19-year-old' bug with emergency patch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#60 The Road Not Taken: Knowing When to Keep Your Mouth Shut
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#39 Virtual Memory Management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#57 The Stack Depth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#11 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#50 The joy of simplicity?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#54 Mainframes open to internet attacks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#81 DEC and The Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#63 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#40 The real story of how the Internet became so vulnerable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#69 Open DoD's Doors To Cyber Talent, Carter Asks Congress
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#95 Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#40 Misc. Success of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#33 OODA-loop and virtual machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#4 OODA in IT Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#21 History of Mainframe Cloud

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 May 2017 10:12:47 -0700
Bob Eager <news0006@eager.cx> writes:
I was using Lattice C on the PC in 1985.

I was also using it on VAX/VMS, but I think that's a bit new-fangled even for Barb, even if she was a DEC person.


a co-worker left IBM was doing a lot of contracting work in silicon valley for chip companies ... including working for senior VP of engineering (who was using vm/370-cms and had used cp/67-cms back in the 60s as young engineer). Former coworker had ported AT&T C to vm/370-cms and done a lot of performance code optimization improvements ... and ported berkeley chip design tools to CMS. One of the C vendors, picked up his work and used it for mainframe C product.

One day the IBM salesman came by and asked him what he was doing. He said that he was adding ethernet support to vm370 to support SGI workstations. The salesman told him that he should do token-ring support instead or mainframe service calls wouldn't be handled in such timely matter. I then get a call and need to listen to an hour of four letter words. The next morning the company has a press conference announcing they were moving off IBM mainframe to SUN workstations.

IBM then has corporate wide task force looking at how to keep VLSI industry on IBM mainframes and why they might leave ... strictly limited to only considering purely technical details ... and not allowed to consider the (real) non-technical reasons.

old post looking for 5.25in diskette drive, wanting to image a bunch of old 5.25in diskettes ... somebody sends me a diskette drive, i'm able to read most of diskettes and upload them to some repository
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#35 Turbo C 1.5 (1987)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#36 Turbo C 1.5 (1987)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#37 Turbo C 1.5 (1987)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#56 Turbo C 1.5 (1987)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#57 Turbo C 1.5 (1987)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#4 Turbo C 1.5 (1987)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Illusion Of Victory: America In World War I

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Illusion Of Victory: America In World War I
Date: 07 May 2017
Blog: Facebook
The Illusion Of Victory: America In World War I
https://www.amazon.com/Illusion-Victory-America-World-War-ebook/dp/B00AFYVIDO/

The members of congress responsible for the neutrality laws leading up to WW2 said they did it because of the enormous war profiteering they saw in WW1 ... it was the war profiteers that were spinning it as isolationism.

author was congressman during first couple decades leading up to WW1, "Triumphant plutocracy" loc6265-74:

XXX. THE LEAGUE TO PERPETUATE WAR The war has just begun. I said that when the Armistice terms were published and when I read the Treaty and the League Covenant I felt more than ever convinced of the justice of my conclusion. The Treaty of Versailles is merely an armistice -- a suspension of hostilities, while the combatants get their wind. There is a war in every chapter of the Treaty and in every section of the League Covenant; war all over the world; war without end so long as the conditions endure which produce these documents.
... snip ...

and there is "Smedley Butler"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smedley_Butler
with "War Is a Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

John Foster Dulles was major force in rebuilding Germany's industry and military during the 20s & 30s (from the law of unintended consequences, when the 1943 US Strategic Bombing Program needed locations of German industry and military targets, they got the coordinates from wallstreet)
http://www.amazon.com/Brothers-Foster-Dulles-Allen-Secret-ebook/dp/B00BY5QX1K/

loc865-68:

In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc905-7:

Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:

At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism
... snip ...

June1940, Germany had a victory celebration at the NYC Waldorf-Astoria with major industrialists. Lots of them were there to hear how to do business with the Nazis (and circumvent the neutrality laws)
http://www.amazon.com/Man-Called-Intrepid-Incredible-Narrative-ebook/dp/B00V9QVE5O/

Later 5000 industrialists from across the US had conference (also) at NYC Waldorf-Astoria and in part because they had gotten such bad reputation for the depression and supporting Nazi Germany, they approved a major propaganda campaign to equate capitalism with Christianity, in part, in the early 50s, it leads to "In God We Trust" on money and "under God" in the allegiance.
http://www.amazon.com/One-Nation-Under-God-Corporate-ebook/dp/B00PWX7R56/

perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war
military-industrial(-congressional) complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Typesetting

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Typesetting
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 08 May 2017 09:17:10 -0700
andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) writes:
This is not a million miles different from using hypervisors today. Imagine a hypervisor which moves higher into the operating system and engulfs the kernel too, but pushes things like filesystems, device drivers, etc back into user-space processes, and the hypervisor itself is implemented as CPU hardware (or unchangable firmware such as a microcoded instruction set CPU).

(tymshare) Capability based GNOSIS was all software running on straight 370. Later capability-based implementations based on GNOSIS tried to combine MACH-like microkernel with GNOSIS capability ... moving lots of kernel stuff into user-space. ... recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#59 The ICL 2900
references
http://cheri-cpu.org
Capability Hardware Enhanced RISC Instructions (CHERI)

"This project is an outgrowth of our earlier Capsicum project, which explored hybrid capability models in the context of UNIX operating system design. While a successful project, we identified a number of limitations to current CPU designs that made application compartmentalisation tricky, despite enhanced operating system support. CHERI is a hardware-software interface research project seeking to revise ISA design in order to better support software compartmentalisation. CHERI transposes the Capsicum hybrid capability model into the CPU architecture space, allowing fine-grained compartmentalisation within process address spaces ... while continuing to support current software designs."

... snip ...

other recent
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#41 What are mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#76 Mainframe operating systems

more references
http://www.cap-lore.com/Agorics/Library/KeyKos/Gnosis/keywelcome.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EROS_(microkernel)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOSIS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CapROS
http://www.capros.org/

Future System moved lots into the hardware ... one of the nails in the coffin was analysis that if Eastern's "System One" (ACP, airline control program) running on 370/195, if moved to the fastest possible FS box ... it would have throughput of 370/145 (about 30 times slow down).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

Folklore is that some of the FS people retreated to Rochester and did a much simplifieed FS as S/38 (for low end market that had much fewer issues with throughput).

About the time (1975) I was asked to work on ECPS microcode assist for 370 138/148 (moving selected kernel code segments into microcode), recent refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#46 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#48 [CM] What was your first home computer?
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist

I also got con'ed into working on 5-way SMP 370/125. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#bounce

where I put even more into m'code ... basically all of ECPS ... but also queued task (dispatch) interface (akin to later i432) and queued I/O interface (superset of 370/xa) ... both had machine/hardware pulling elements off todo queue and putting things on completed queued interface.

Asilomar ACM SIGOPS (81 or 83?) conference, i432 people gave presentation about one of their major problems ... these complex, high-level functions were being done directly in silicon ... and everytime they had a bug, they had to fab new silicon. for the 5-way SMP 370/125, it was all microcode ... so it was effectively as shipping new software release (possibly even simpler to install new microcode boot diskette). part of intro from iAPX 432 Architecture, references s/38 and burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#48 Famous Machines and Software that didn't

other posts mentioning i432
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#57 iAPX-432 (was: 36 to 32 bit transition
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#62 iAPX-432 (was: 36 to 32 bit transition
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#6 Ridiculous
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#36 What was object oriented in iAPX432?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#27 iAPX432 today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#46 IBM Mainframe at home
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#19 Computer Architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#5 Anyone here ever use the iAPX432 ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#54 Reviving Multics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#23 Intel iAPX 432
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#24 Intel iAPX 432
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#47 Intel 860 and 960, was iAPX 432
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#52 Infiniband - practicalities for small clusters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#60 Will multicore CPUs have identical cores?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#64 Will multicore CPUs have identical cores?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#73 Athlon cache question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#64 Misuse of word "microcode"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#46 Performance and Capacity Planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#31 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#47 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#42 Why is zSeries so CPU poor?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#44 Any resources on VLIW?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#15 "25th Anniversary of the Personal Computer"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#7 32 or even 64 registers for x86-64?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#36 Oracle Introduces Oracle VM As It Leaps Into Virtualization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#54 Throwaway cores
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#32 CPU time differences for the same job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#22 CLIs and GUIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#52 Lack of bit field instructions in x86 instruction set because of patents ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#13 Microprocessors with Definable MIcrocode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#18 Microprocessors with Definable MIcrocode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#46 U.S. begins inquiry of IBM in mainframe market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#74 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#1 IA64
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#45 IA64
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#8 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#40 Faster image rotation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#22 Personal use z/OS machines was Re: Multiprise 3k for personal Use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#7 RISCversus CISC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#91 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#79 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#2 68000 assembly language programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#15 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#42 i432 on Bitsavers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#14 International Business Marionette
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#57 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#40 history of Programming language and CPU in relation to each other
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#33 Delay between idea and implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#75 Bloat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#23 1950: Northrop's Digital Differential Analyzer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#107 IBM 360/85 vs. 370/165
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#62 PL/I advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#63 PL/I advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#115 IBM History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#38 British socialism / anti-trust

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 08 May 2017 10:13:00 -0700
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
<grin> IBM's mindset really didn't change. When JMF was doing the ORNL work, IBM completely dismissed heterogenous networks, where hetero means all manufacturers' systems to each other. DEC got the contract because we didn't care who our systems talked with. This was 1970.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#59 [CM] What was your first home computer?

as undergraduate in the 60s, worked on clone (of communication group) controller ... and four of us got written up as responsible for (some part of) clone controller business.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

this has reference that major motivation in Future System was to make host/controller interface so complex that it would significantly "raise the bar" for clone controller competition
http://www.ecole.org/en/session/49-the-rise-and-fall-of-ibm

some speculation that the complex SNA vtam/37x5ncp (pu5/pu4) interface was one of the few survivors of failed FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

trivia ... during the early days of formation of SNA ... my wife was co-author of AWP39, peer-to-peer networking architecture ... aka they had to included "peer-to-peer" ... because communication group had co-opted "network" as part of SNA ... which doesn't have a network layer. Later she was con'ed into going to POK to be in charge of loosely-coupled (mainframe for cluster) architecture ... where she developed peer-coupled shared-data architecture ... she didn't remain long, one reason was constant battle with communication group trying her to force her into using SNA/VTAM for loosely-coupled operation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

from the law of unintended consequences ... during FS they were shutting down 370 efforts ... and the lack of 370 offerings during the FS period is credited with giving market foothold for clone processors.

in the 80s, recent posts about working NSF director about interconnecting the NSF supercomputer centers ... as regional networks connect into the centers, it grows into NSFNET backbone, precursor to modern internet:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#10 Encryp-xit: Europe will go all in for crypto backdoors in June
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#32 The very beginning of TCP/IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#11 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#14 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

communication group was increasing vigorously fighting off client/server and distributed computing ... attempting to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm and install base.

internally they were spreading all sorts of mis-information ... mis-information claims about needing to convert the internal network to SNA/VTAM ... and mis-information claims that SNA/VTAM could be used for NSFNET.

old email about the internal backbone meetings got restricted to "management only" (didn't want technical details confusing their SNA/VTAM objectives)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#email870302
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#email870306

somebody gathered up the communication group SNA/VTAM useable for NSFNET misinformation email ... and forwarded to use ... heavily snippted and redacted to prevent the guilty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109

and as frequently mentioned the senior disk engineer that gave the talk about how the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of disk division
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

In the same time-frame as the claims about communication group was going to be responsible for demise of disk division, my wife was co-author of response to government request for large, distributed super-secure government operation ... where she included 3-tier architecture and middle layer. We were then out doing customer executive presentations including 3-tier architecture (and taking all sorts of arrows from the communication group)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 May 2017 09:06:33 -0700
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
Intel has public documentation and various levels of non-public (for new CPUs) documention. Yellow covers, Orange covers and Red covers with each page watermarked both visibly and sometimes invisibly.

early 70s, after 370 was announced/shipped ... but before virtual memory for all 370s was announced ... a copy of virtual memory specification document leaked to industry publication. Detailed investigation (sort of like pentagon papers) didn't conculsively find where the copy came from ... but afterwards, all corporate copying machines were retrofitted with unique number under the glass that would appear on all copies. copy of old Jim Gray paper made on such a copy machine (IBM-SJ-086)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

little topic drift, discussion on decision to have add virtual memory to all 370 machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

IBM had Registered Confidential ... each page had large faded red number of the copy ... each copy was registered for specific person ... and required to keep under double lock ... and periodically audited by site security.

circa 1980, IBM brought trade-secret lawsuit against disk clone maker for couple billion dollars ... for having acquired detailed unannounced new (3380) disk drive. Judge ruled that IBM had to show security proportional to risk ... or "security proportional to value" ... i.e. temptation for normal person finding something not adequately protected and taking it for money ... couldn't be blamed (analogous to requiring requiring fences around swimming pools because children couldn't be expected to not jump in unprotected pool). fences around plant site, guards at gate checking people, access control for buildings, access control inside high security rooms inside buildings, frequent employee education about protecting corporate information, etc.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proprotional.to.risk

In that time frame, I had full set of all the "Registered Confidential" documents for unannounced/unshipped 370/xa architecture (which would eventually show up on 3081).

For some reason, I got a call from head hunter asking me to interview for job of technical assistant to president of clone 370 processor company (that resold machines manufactured on the other side of the pacific). During the interview there were hints dropped that they were interested in new 370/xa architecture. I politely mentioned that I had submitted changes to IBM Employee ethics booklet because I didn't think that it had strong enough ethics guidelines. The interview ended shortly later ... and I never heard from them again.

Later the overseas company was involved in federal court case about industrial espionage and because I was listed on the US company's lobby checkin, I had 3hr interview with FBI agent. Afterwards, I wondered who had leaked the information (that I had full copy of the XA documents) ... that likely resulted in the job interview.

past posts mentioning Registered Confidential
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#30 IBM OS Timeline?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#8 Security Proportional to Risk (was: IBM Mainframe at home)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#9 Security Proportional to Risk (was: IBM Mainframe at home)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#42 Moving assembler programs above the line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#26 IEH/IEB/... names?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#20 Old PCs--environmental hazard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#2 WHAT WAS THE PROJECT YOU WERE INVOLVED/PARTICIPATED AT IBM THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#12 Clone Processors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#61 Was MVS/SE designed to confound Amdahl?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#1 RSA 2014: Target Breach Has Bigger Impact on Data Security than Snowden, says Vormetric
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#27 Complete 360 and 370 systems found

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 May 2017 10:07:18 -0700
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
Itel? NAS?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#63 [CM] What was your first home computer?

HITACHI GUILTY IN I.B.M. CASE
http://www.nytimes.com/1983/02/09/business/hitachi-guilty-in-ibm-case.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 May 2017 11:11:12 -0700
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
DEC FORTRAN had bitwise logical operators, as I discovered when I went to port Dungeon. I had to write my own functions to replace them. (And then there were the RAD50 constants...)

old refs about tymshare had ported adventure from stanford pdp10 sail machine
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colossal_Cave_Adventure

to vm/370-cms ... and I got a copy (including source), email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email780405
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email780405b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#email780414
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#email780517

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#44 Call for folklore - was Re: So it's cyclical.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#43 Hardest Mistake in Comp Arch to Fix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#18 The History of Computer Role-Playing Games
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#4 Zork and Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#6 Zork and Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#14 New machine code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#41 Colossal Cave Adventure in PL/I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#96 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

a few (different) internal employees (independently) converted it from fortran to pli (and added more points).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 May 2017 11:19:52 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
old refs about tymshare had ported adventure from stanford pdp10 sail machine
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colossal_Cave_Adventure


re:
http:www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#65 [CM] What was your first home computer?

from wiki:
One of the first efforts to port the code was by Jim Gillogly of the RAND Corporation in 1977. Gillogly, with agreement from Crowther and Woods, spent several weeks porting the code to C to run on the more generic Unix architecture. It can be found as part of the BSD Operating Systems distributions, or as part of the "bsdgames" package under most Linux distributions, under the command name "adventure". The game was also ported to Prime Computer's super-mini running PRIMOS in the late 1970s, utilising FORTRAN IV, and to IBM mainframes running VM/CMS in late 1978, utilizing PL/I. In the late 1970s a freeware Commodore PET version was produced by Jim Butterfield; some years later this version was ported to the Commodore 64. Microsoft also released versions of Adventure in 1980 for the Apple II Plus and TRS-80 computers.
... snip ...

as per previous email, tymshare had it on vm/370-cms (fortran) by at least early 1978 ... and several employees almost immediately ported to pli, spring 1977.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 May 2017 11:42:30 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
In that time frame, I had full set of all the "Registered Confidential" documents for unannounced/unshipped 370/xa architecture (which would eventually show up on 3081).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#63 [CM] What was your first home computer?

I've mentioned a number of times in this thread that after the failure of future system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

3033 & 3081 (370/xa) were kicked off in parallel, some ref
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

the 370/xa documents were referred to as "811" for their nov1978 publication date ... 370/xa ship was still several years in the future (mvs/xa wasn't even announced until 1981).

mentioning futuresys in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#18 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#25 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#46 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#62 [CM] What was your first home computer?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

I quit this NG

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: I quit this NG
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Thu, 11 May 2017 08:37:53 -0700
Study uncovers how brain damage increases religious fundamentalism
http://www.psypost.org/2017/05/study-uncovers-brain-lesions-increase-religious-fundamentalism-48860
Suffering a brain injury can make you more religious, scientists say
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/suffering-brain-injury-lesion-ventromedial-prefrontal-cortex-religious-beliefs-northwestern-a7722946.html

we have friend that went into walter reed with five brain aneurysm ... and lived. He complained that his IQ dropped 70pts to only 130 ... but he also became quite religious ... that he recognized and complained about, but couldn't do anything.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster
Date: 11 May 2017
Blog: Facebook
The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster
http://www.businessinsider.com/the-knives-are-out-for-hr-mcmaster-2017-5

just finished: Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff
https://www.amazon.com/Dereliction-Duty-Johnson-McNamara-Chiefs-ebook/dp/

In "Dereliction of Duty", he referenced McNamara was statistician for Army Air Corp during WW2, but doesn't refer to McNamara was LeMay's staff planning fire bombing German & Japanese cities towards the end (McNamara later quotes Lemay if US had lost ww2, they would have been prosecuted for war crimes). He also references 4817-19:
Ball, a member of the American Strategic Bombing Survey team of 1944–45, which concluded that bombing had actually increased, rather than decreased, the resolve of the German people, was familiar with the inflated claims and expectations of air power enthusiasts
... aka one of the other issues was hard to hit target from 5-6 miles up.

European Campaign, loc2582-85:
The bomber preparation of Omaha Beach was a total failure, and German defenses on Omaha Beach were intact as American troops came ashore. At Utah Beach, the bombers were a little more effective because the IXth Bomber Command was using B-26 medium bombers. Wisely, in preparation for supporting the invasion, maintenance crews removed Norden bombsights from the bombers and installed the more effective low-level altitude sights.
... fire bombing cities, nearly impossible not to hit something.

John Foster Dulles was major force in rebuilding Germany's industry and military during the 20s & 30s (from the law of unintended consequences, when the 1943 US Strategic Bombing program needed locations of German industry and military targets, they got the coordinates from wallstreet)
http://www.amazon.com/Brothers-Foster-Dulles-Allen-Secret-ebook/dp/B00BY5QX1K/

loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc905-7:
Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism
... snip ...

"perpetual war" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war
military-industrial(-congressional) complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Domain Name System

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Domain Name System
Date: 11 May 2017
Blog: Facebook
One of he issues with the advent of PKI "SSL" digital certificates in the early 90s, was the burgeoning industry wanted to make a lot of money off it. The simplest DNSSEC scenario would be authenticating that the webserver you are talking to is the same webserver that registered the domain name (as countermeasure to things like "impersonating" and "man-in-the-middle" attacks). However, that would involve little or no any money ... there was a lot of smoke & mirrors about identifying/proving the webserver represents the organization that you believe it is ... inflating authentication to identification (periodic rant about confusing authentication and identification) as part of financial justification (even tho standard PKI company T&Cs typically disclaim any liability)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#sslcert
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#catch22

I was brought in as consultant into small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server, they had also invented this technology they called "SSL" they wanted to use, it is now frequently called "electronic commerce". I had completely authority over the webserver to gateway to the payment networks ... but could only make recommendations on the client/server side, some of which were almost immediately violated, accounting from some number of exploits that continue to this day.

Original browser/SSL model is that the user understands the relationship between the URL they enter and the corresponding webserver entity they wish contact. "SSL" then (supposedly) provides the assurance that the webserver they contact corresponds to the URL they entered ... which combined, completes the end-to-end between the webserver they are talking to is the webserver that corresponds to the organization they think they are talking to.

This was almost immediately violated when merchants found that SSL cut their throughput by 90-99% and they dropped back to using non-SSL, unauthenticated URL (open to impersonation and man-in-the-middle attack). Then there is a "checkout/pay" button (provided by an unauthenticated website). Since the checkout/pay URL is no longer provided by the enduser, it breaks the underlying assumption underlying the browser/SSL model.

The PKI industry was also floating $20B/annum business case on wallstreet, based on financial industry underwriting $100/year/person certificate (200M people). When that wasn't happening, the industry was heavily lobbying govs to mandate person digital certificates ... including the cal. state electronic signature act (disclaimer: I was brought in to help wordsmith the act, possibly as countermeasure to the PKI industry influence).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#signature

I had HSDT project in early 80s with T1 and faster speed links and was working with director of NSF. We were suppose to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget, some other things happen and finally NSF releases an RFP.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/
HSDT posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

Internal politics prevent us from bidding. The NSF director tries to help by writting the company a letter (copying CEO) with support from other agencies, but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers, it evovolves into the NSFNET backbone (precursor to modern internet). old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

Telcos had huge problem in the early 80s with enormous bandwidth in dark fiber. They had bit/time use based charging model. In order to encourage new generation of bandwidth hungry applications, they would have to enormously drop their bandwidth charges ... which would mean that they operate at a loss for at least several years. Folklore is that various telcos provided resources several times larger than the RFP award ... as part of incubator for developing the bandwidth hungry applications ... with the additional restriction that the resources couldn't be used by commercial entities (which might have impacted their revenue). Lots of requirements for security were ignored. In the 90s until he passes, Internet RFC editor Postel use to let me help with STD1. He also sponsored a talk at ISI (along with USC graduate computer security) for me on why Internet wasn't business critical dataprocessing.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

I started referring to the SSL digital certificates, "comfort certificates" ... since they had become a source of comfort for the public (not necessary any security). A couple years ago at georgetown conferece, they had NSA director talk and people line up to ask questions. I got in line but the director had to leave for WH meeting before I got to the front. I stayed in line because they then had panel with former NSA director, former NSA COO, and some others. I finally got to the front and asked about the agency promoting confusion between authentication and identification. COO turned it into a joke about security acronym PAIN (privacy, authentication, identification, non-repudiation), I've had this conflict with them in the past.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#privacy

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 May 2017 12:55:30 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#86 [CM] What was your first home computer?

When I went to science center in 1970 ... got to rewrite even more of the production cp/67-cms system ... and 2741 access at home mar1970 (have had online access at home continuously since then). I had full access to rewritting all system software and could do some amount of (non-benchmark, non-throughput related tests in virtual machines).

ibm leased mainframes and most installations keeped accounting for use (even tho internally IBM, it was all "funny" money). At one point, I was told that I accounted for at least 1/2 of all time and could I do something about it. I suggested that maybe I could work less; it never came up again. other past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#41 When Does Folklore Begin???

one of the funny things, the reference apparently was just from the cp67 userid-based use accounting. It apparently didn't include the weekend off-shift dedicated time I used (as undergraudate at the univ., I had been use to getting datacenter all to myself from 8am sat until 8am monday, 48hrs w/o sleep could make monday classes difficult).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Orient to Reality

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Orient to Reality
Date: 11 May 2017
Blog: Google+
Orient to Reality
https://plus.google.com/104140272098689841413/posts/92bVXHzK36A

Open Operations Forum: "Just Grow Stories" - or - Continuous Development Of Our Own Further Development
http://openmonetaryopsforum.blogspot.com/2013/08/just-grow-stories-or-continuous.html

The way forward for progressives
http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=35980

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

More Cyberdumb

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: More Cyberdumb
Date: 11 May 2017
Blog: Facebook
Raytheon awarded 3DELRR radar contract. Again.
http://www.defensenews.com/raytheon-awarded-3delrr-radar-contract-qgain
Although Lockheed did not win, they appear to have a fan of their offering -- in 2014, a Chinese radar bearing heavy similarity to the Lockheed design appeared at a trade show. The company was famously hacked in 2009, with consensus that the Chinese government was behind it.
... snip ...

more "cyberdumb", most major classified weapon systems

Report: China gained U.S. weapons secrets using cyberespionage
http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/28/world/asia/china-cyberespionage/
Confidential report lists U.S. weapons system designs compromised by Chinese cyberspies
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/confidential-report-lists-us-weapons-system-designs-compromised-by-chinese-cyberspies/2013/05/27/a42c3e1c-c2dd-11e2-8c3b-0b5e9247e8ca_story.html
REPORT: Chinese Hackers Stole Plans For Dozens Of Critical US Weapons Systems
http://www.businessinsider.com/china-hacked-us-military-weapons-systems-2013-5
A list of the U.S. weapons designs and technologies compromised by hackers
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/a-list-of-the-us-weapons-designs-and-technologies-compromised-by-hackers/2013/05/27/a95b2b12-c483-11e2-9fe2-6ee52d0eb7c1_story.html

OODA-Loop 2.0: Information, Not Agility, Is Life
http://breakingdefense.com/2017/05/OODA-loop-2-0-information-not-agility-is-life/
The F-35 is a high bandwidth, networked, highly capable sensor/weapon, low observable platform that is superior in the information domain over all other types of aircraft. It will continue to win the "information dog fight" against all other adversaries if it maintains its IM advantage. This is information dominance. This same principle is also true for the Third Offset warfare areas of Electromagnetic Maneuver (EMW) and Cyber Warfare.
... snip ...

or more cyberdumb???

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

past cyberdumb posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#21 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#8 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#19 Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#20 DEC and The Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#95 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#104 How to Win the Cyberwar Against Russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#0 Snowden
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#28 China's spies gain valuable US defense technology: report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#67 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#15 China's claim it has 'quantum' radar may leave $17 billion F-35 naked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#34 CBS News: WikiLeaks claims to release thousands of CIA documents of computer activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#47 WikiLeaks CIA Dump: Washington's Data Security Is a Mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#50 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 May 2017 08:54:01 -0700
mausg writes:
One of the few amusing things about the Vietnam War was how the population grew during the period 1950-end.

just finished: "Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff" by McMaster
https://www.amazon.com/Dereliction-Duty-Johnson-McNamara-Chiefs-ebook/dp/

quite critical of Johnson, McNamara, Westmoreland, body count, and whole counterinsurgency program (when Johnson was asked what they were suppose to do in Vietnam, he consistently replies, "kill more viet cong" ... also long litany of Johnson & McNamara lying to congress).

65-74 deaths, allied 282k, NVA/VC 444k, civilian 624k
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War_casualties

recent post over in facebook group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#69 The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster

which seems remarkable about claims McMaster is strong proponent of counterinsurgency that has been going on in Afghanastan for over 15yrs.

Doesn't get as far as Nixon's "treason" in manipulating peace talks to improve his winning election (but does talk about Johnson lying about vietnam and manipulating opinion to help him win election)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#98 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#21 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#22 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#23 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#61 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#75 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#87 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#34 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#39 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#68 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#73 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#76 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#22 Nixon and the war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#23 Nixon and the war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#24 Nixon and the war

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: 11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup
Date: 11 May 2017
Blog: Facebook
11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

grid triva: late 70s, got con'ed into doing 4341 benchmarks (on engineering machine, before product ship) for LLNL that was looking at getting 70 for compute farm. old 4300 related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

Other things along the way, included getting asked in 1988 to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they were playing with, which quickly evolves into fibre channel standard. We were then doing our HA/CMP product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

and starting to work on cluster scaleup for both technical/scientific (working with national labs) and commercial (working with RDBMS vendors). In Jan1992 we have meeting on (commercial) cluster scaleup in Ellison's office ... old reference to the meeting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
some old cluster scaleup email, including efforts with LLNL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

Within a few weeks of the Ellison meeting, cluster scaleup is transferred, announced as IBM supercomputer (for scientific/technical ONLY) and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors. We then leave IBM within a few months. Two of the Oracle people mentioned in the Ellison meeting have also left and are at a small client/server startup responsible for something called "commerce server". We are brought in as consultants because they want to do payment transactions on the server.

also 17Feb1992 press about scientific/technical only
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1

We are brought in as consultant into small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server, they had also invented this technology they called "SSL" they wanted to use, it is now frequently called "electronic commerce". I had completely authority over the webserver to gateway to the payment networks ... but could only make recommendations on the client/server side, some of which were almost immediately violated, accounting from some number of exploits that continue to this day.

Original browser/SSL model is that the user understands the relationship between the URL they enter and the corresponding webserver entity they wish contact. "SSL" then (supposedly) provides the assurance that the webserver they contact corresponds to the URL they entered ... which combined, completes the end-to-end between the webserver they are talking to is the webserver that corresponds to the organization they think they are talking to.

This was almost immediately violated when merchants found that SSL cut their throughput by 90-99% and they dropped back to using non-SSL, unauthenticated URL (open to impersonation and man-in-the-middle attack). Then there is a "checkout/pay" button (provided by an unauthenticated website). Since the checkout/pay URL is no longer provided by the enduser, it breaks the underlying assumption underlying the browser/SSL model.

The PKI industry was also floating $20B/annum business case on wallstreet, based on financial industry underwriting $100/year/person certificate (200M people). When that wasn't happening, the industry was heavily lobbying govs to mandate person digital certificates ... including the cal. state electronic signature act (disclaimer: I was brought in to help wordsmith the act, possibly as countermeasure to the PKI industry influence).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#signature

1980, I was con'ed into doing channel-extension support (over microwave) for STL (even tho the lab was only a couple years old, it was already bursting at the seams), they were moving 300 people from the IMS group to offsite bldg ... but with dataprocessing support back into the STL datacenter. They had tried "remote" 3270 support but found the human factors totally unacceptable (use to vm370/cms local channel attached 3270 controllers). It turns out that the support downloaded channel programs to a channel emulator at the remote site for execution which radically reduced the latency and channel protocol chatter overhead on the real channels. A combination of factors resulted in them not seeing any degradation and because lots of channel protocol chatter was moved off the real IBM channels, total system throughput increased 10-15% (reduced channel busy for the 3270 operations). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

The vendor wanted to get IBM to let them release my support ... but there was a group in POK working on some serial stuff that got it blocked, because they felt if it was released, it would make it harder to get their stuff released.

In 1988, I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial channel stuff they had, which quickly becomes fibre channel standard ... including the support for downloading I/O programs to minimize latency and overhead. In 1990, the POK people get their serial stuff released as ESCON with ES/9000, when it was already obsolete. Later, some POK channel engineers get involved with fibre channel standard and define an extremely heavyweight protocol (that drastically reduces the throughput of the native standard), that is eventually released as FICON

Relatively recently, IBM published peak I/O benchmark that used 104 FICON getting 2M IOPS on z196 (I haven't been able to find anything similar published since then) ... at about the same time, a native fibre channel was announced for e5-2600 blade claiming over million IOPS (two such fiber channel with higher throughput than 104 FICON running over 104 fibre channel). About the same time there was specification for enhanced FICON protocol using TCWs ... a little like what I had done originally in 1980 ... but it claimed only about 30% improvement compared to the base FICON (104 to maybe 70 FICON, as opposed to 2 native fibre channel)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

Besides (HSDT) channel-extender ... also had HSDT T1 and faster speed links and was working with director of NSF. We were suppose to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget, some other things happen and finally NSF releases an RFP (in part based on what we already had running)
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/
some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

Internal politics prevent us from bidding. The NSF director tries to help by writing the company a letter (copying CEO) with support from other agencies, but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers, it evolves into the NSFNET backbone (precursor to modern internet).

Telcos had huge problem in the early 80s with enormous bandwidth in dark fiber. They had bit/time use based charging model. In order to encourage new generation of bandwidth hungry applications, they would have to enormously drop their bandwidth charges ... which would mean that they operate at a loss for at least several years. Folklore is that various telcos provided resources several times larger than the RFP award ... as part of incubator for developing the bandwidth hungry applications ... with the additional restriction that the resources couldn't be used by commercial entities (which might have impacted their revenue). Lots of requirements for security were ignored. In the 90s until he passes, Internet RFC editor Postel use to let me help with STD1. He also sponsored a talk at ISI (along with USC graduate computer security) for me on "Why Internet wasn't business critical dataprocessing".

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Typesetting

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Typesetting
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 May 2017 09:20:16 -0700
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
The question being addressed was whether there was a market for microcontrollers with the operating system hardwired for security purposes. If such a microcontroller would not prevent the particular scenario that is suggested then that scenario is not evidence of such a market.

I did security chip where everything was hardwired ... a little bit of eeprom for data. I wanted EAL5 or EAL6 ... somebody got an EAL6 evaluation on similar chip that wasn't hardwired (nearly all software was loaded later, operation with software wasn't being evaluated). Problem turned up was that the crypto was also hardwired and just before evaluation, NIST pulled the crypto evaluation criteria ... so all I could get was EAL4+. old ref
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#37 The bank fraud blame game

post in long-winded thread about how banks make money off of fraud.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#39 a fraud is a sale, Re: The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#40 a fraud is a sale, Re: The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#43 a fraud is a sale, Re: The bank fraud blame game

chip objective was to be less than dollar ... and only objective was to provide authentication.

prototype (in software) demo'ed at annual world-wide BAI retail banking show. part of press release
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#224 X9.59/AADS announcement at BAI this week

NACHA pilots in debit network ... some ref
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aadsnacha
NACHA reference gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine (results of pilot in 23july2001 reference)
http://web.archive.org/web/20070706004855/http://internetcouncil.nacha.org/News/news.html

old a.f.c. ref about chip being done in new security chip fab in dresden and doing security walkthru of the dresden fab
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#53 Getting old

from old a.f.c. thread, evaluation, security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#39 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#40 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#41 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#42 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#43 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#46 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#47 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#48 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based

the difficulty was that it commoditized strong security and strong authentication ... vested interests wanted to preserve branding and proprietary infrastructure with additional software features.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 May 2017 09:37:41 -0700
pedro1492 writes:
What about the NSA, who allowed their shit to be leaked, and some opportunist drove a truck through one of their backdoors? Presumably this was intended to be used by the white hats, but who thinks it is a good idea letting govco have these tools?

they would have reps at (crypto) financial standards meeting and I would periodically go on about the dangers of bankdoors.

note that much of their leaks have actually been done by contractors working for for-profit operations (frequently private-equity owned and under intense pressure to cut corners and make moeny every way possible ... part of snowden scenario was that the private-equity companies that security clearances were outsourced to were filling out the paper work ... but not actually doing background checks).

last decade enormous increase in outsource, 70% of the budget and over half the people for the intelligence community, not just NSA
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

and contributes to the rapidly spreading success of failure culture, a series of failures results in more money for the for-profit companies (and plausably, breaches means more appropriations for security monitoring, watched a midsummer murders last night with that theme, security company was doing home robberies when threatened by budget cut)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

trivia: the former president of AMEX, after he leaves IBM goes on to head up a major private-equity company that will acquire the beltway bandit that will employ snowden.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

some recent refs on (gov) cyberdumb ... including breaches involving most major classified weapons systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#0 Snowden
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#28 China's spies gain valuable US defense technology: report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#40 The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#67 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#76 The F-35 Stealth Fighter Is Politically Unstoppable----Even Under President Trump
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#62 Big Shrink to "Hire" 25,000 in the US, as Layoffs Pile Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#15 China's claim it has 'quantum' radar may leave $17 billion F-35 naked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#34 CBS News: WikiLeaks claims to release thousands of CIA documents of computer activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#47 WikiLeaks CIA Dump: Washington's Data Security Is a Mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#50 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#73 More Cyberdumb

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 May 2017 10:05:02 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#76 Typesetting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#77 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?</a>

TD for the agency information assurance directorate is doing assurance panel in the trusted computing tract at the IDF and asks me to do talk on the chip ... gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

the guy doing the TPM chip is sitting in the front row ... so I guip that it is nice to see the TPM is starting to look more and more like my chip ... he quips back that I don't have a committee of 200 people helping me with the chip design.

other recent posts mentioning that IDF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#39 History of Mainframe Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#41 History of Mainframe Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#10 Encryp-xit: Europe will go all in for crypto backdoors in June
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#92 Old hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#31 [CM] What was your first home computer?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Typesetting

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Typesetting
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 May 2017 10:54:39 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
prototype (in software) demo'ed at annual world-wide BAI retail banking show. part of press release
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#224 X9.59/AADS announcement at BAI this week


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#76 Typesetting

triva: press release mentions a number of companies involved ... one was a kerberos startup ... including being hired by m'soft to do the their original kerberos implementation
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa378170(v=vs.85).aspx

interesting thing was their ceo at the time had once been head of IBM mainframe POK ... and then went on to be head of IBM/PC Boca ... and had been in the middle of the OS2/windows thing that went on with m'soft.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/11/27/the_os_wars_os2_25years_old/

and when he was in POK, he had con'ed my wife into coming to POK to be in charge of loosely-coupled (mainframe) architecture (aka mainframe for cluster). when my wife was in POK, she did peer-coupled shared data architecture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

she didn't remain long because of 1) little uptake, except for IMS hot-standby (much later, sysplex & parallel sysplex) and 2) constant battles with the communication group trying to force her into using sna/vtam for loosely-coupled operations.

even more topic drift ... above OS2/windows wars as 25yrs before 27nov2012, recent post about 25yrs before 11may2017
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#75 11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup

somewhat topic drift back towards "Typesetting" ... our HA/CMP cluster project
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

was originally kicked-off because somebody at IBM had promised NYTimes something with regard to Atex
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atex_(software)

some past posts mentioning Atex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#22 DOS history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#23 DOS history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#21 DOS C prompt in "Vista"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#57 Ikea type font change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#58 Ikea type font change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#60 Ikea type font change

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 May 2017 11:17:44 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
I've frequently pontificated that somewhat similar problem is with C-language where programmer has to manage buffer lengths ... and human mistakes result in buffer length mistakes ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#buffer


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#16 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#17 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#21 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#24 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#28 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#34 [CM] What was your first home computer?

Google found over 1,000 bugs in 47 open source projects
https://www.helpnetsecurity.com/2017/05/09/fuzzing-open-source/
OSS-Fuzz combines various fuzzing engines (initially, libFuzzer) with Sanitizers (initially, AddressSanitizer) and provides a massive distributed execution environment powered by ClusterFuzz.
... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Linear Thinking in a Nonlinear World

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Linear Thinking in a Nonlinear World
Date: 13 May 2017
Blog: Facebook
Linear Thinking in a Nonlinear World
https://hbr.org/2017/05/linear-thinking-in-a-nonlinear-world

from the law of diminishing returns.

old post regarding details of ECPS microcode assist. low/mid-range mainframe 370 avg. 10 microcode instructions per 370 instruction. New 138/148 had 6kbytes of available microcode space. Objective was to find the 6kbytes of highest used 370 kernel instructions and move them into microcode for 10:1 performance improvement. following shows highest used 6kbytes accounted for 79.55%
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21

also
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#75 11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

does linux scatter daemons on multicore CPU?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: does linux scatter daemons on multicore CPU?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 May 2017 13:41:05 -0700
re: MP/M
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MP/M
One of the primary uses of MP/M, perhaps to the surprise of DRI, was as a "power user" version of CP/M for a single user. The ability to run several programs at the same time and address large amounts of memory made the system worth the extra price.
... snip ...

i have vague memories of SLAC meeting, a cp/67 (then vm/370) Amdahl guy saying one of his co-workers was doing the mp/m (muli-programming) implementation version of cp/m ... but it may have been mp/m-86
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MP/M#MP.2FM-86

above then mentions in the 80s
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FlexOS

one question is there any overlap between the mainframe Flex-ES emulator running on i86 hardware ... originally by some former Amdahl people ... and FlexOS. some old flex-es posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#63 Sizing the application
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#13 FlexEs and IVSK instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#39 Flex Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003d.html#10 Low-end processors (again)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#0 IBM 3380 and 3880 maintenance docs needed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#21 IBM tried to kill VM?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#26 Check out Computer glitch to cause flight delays across U.S. - MarketWatch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#29 Check out Computer glitch to cause flight delays across U.S. - MarketWatch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#42 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#68 Entry point for a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#71 Entry point for a Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#32 history of RPG and other languages, was search engine history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#13 AMC proposes 1980s computer TV series Halt & Catch Fire
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#41 System Response

Platform Solutions ref:
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/01/22/platform_solutions_sues_ibm/
PSI has ported the mainframe systems architecture developed by Amdahl to Intel's Itanium chip. Set up in 2003, the privately-held company is backed by Blueprint Ventures, Goldman Sachs, Intel and others.
... snip ...

and (also includes mention of FLEX-ES)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdahl_Corporation#Amdahl_customer_options

The vestiges of Amdahl's ESA/390 emulation project were resurrected under a new name: Platform Solutions Inc. Using capital from Intel, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft, and other major investors they designed a line of Itanium-based computers and software to emulate z/Architecture machines so that they could run zSeries operating systems, with zSeries channels for attaching real IBM equipment as well as virtual simulators for most hardware to minimize the need for IBM's peripheral equipment. Its LPARs hosted not only IBM operating systems but 64-bit Intel Itanium Linux, HP-UX, Solaris, and potentially other operating systems.
... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 May 2017 18:28:37 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
CHRISTMA EXEC?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#77 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#78 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

recently mentioned:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#47 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 May 2017 21:35:43 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
and contributes to the rapidly spreading success of failure culture, a series of failures results in more money for the for-profit companies (and plausably, breaches means more appropriations for security monitoring, watched a midsummer murders last night with that theme, security company was doing home robberies when threatened by budget cut)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#77 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#78 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#83 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

Top NSA Whistleblower: Ransomware Hack Caused by "Swindle of the Taxpayers" by Intelligence Agencies
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-05-13/top-nsa-whistleblower-ransomware-hack-caused-%E2%80%9Cswindle-taxpayers%E2%80%9D-intelligence-agenci
Binney is the real McCoy. As we noted in 2013, Binney has been interviewed by virtually all of the mainstream media, including CBS, ABC, CNN, New York Times, USA Today, Fox News, PBS and many others.
... snip ...

William Binney (U.S. intelligence official)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Binney_(U.S._intelligence_official)

from above, part of success of failure
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trailblazer_Project

Bio: William Binney and J. Kirk Wiebe
https://www.whistleblower.org/bio-william-binney-and-j-kirk-wiebe

whistleblower posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 May 2017 10:53:50 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#77 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#78 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#83 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#84 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

Warren Buffett's cybersecurity wake-up call -- are we listening?
http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/technology/333026-warren-buffetts-cybersecurity-wake-up-call-are-we-listening

During his Senate confirmation hearing, Clayton -- who had spent more than 20 years working for Wall Street companies on mergers, acquisitions and federal regulatory compliance -- said he did not think public companies were providing investors with enough information about cybersecurity.
... snip ...

dates back at least 20yrs, long winded post from jan1999 on the subject (thread between risk management and information security)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm

Risk management is the art of managing earnings. A good description of the process would be to develop the ability to hindsight as much in advance, before an event occurs. Essentially senior management has to address the task of managing earnings in an uncontrollable environment. Managing a corporate entity is a process of making decisions based on insufficient data, of inadequate quality, facing an unknown future, within an uncontrollable environment.
... snip ...

In the 90s at the financial industry meetings in the white house annex
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_infrastructure_protection
a major concern was that the ISAC be created in such a way that it not be subject to FOIA (they especially didn't want publicity about cyber crime).
https://www.fsisac.com/

we were brought in to help wordsmith the cal. state electronic signature law ... recent refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#70 Domain Name System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#75 11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup

several of the participants were heavily involved in privacy issues and had done detailed public privacy surveys and the #1 problem was fraudulent financial transactions primarily from breaches. There was little or nothing being done about these breaches and it was hoped that publicity from data breach notification legislation would prompt corrective action. The issue is entities normally take security measures in self-protection, the problem with the breaches was the institutions weren't at risk, it was their customers and the public.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_breach_notification_laws
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_S.B._1386

later there were a number of federal (preemption) notification bills introduced (none yet passed) that would effectively eliminate nearly all notification requirements.

electronic signature law posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#signature
data breach notification posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 14 May 2017 16:21:36 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#77 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#78 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#83 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#84 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#85 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

more than decade ago, somebody gave a talk at conference about cyber crime had exceeded drug crime ... which got picked up by the press and reverberated around the world. I then got email asking if I find open source references to cyber crime had exceeded drug crime. The major LEO websites had drug crime numbers readily available ... but asking about cyber crime required special authentication on "need to know". I eventually found an extremely obscure reference (that hadn't been redacted).

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#25 Cybercrime Could Be As Destructive As Credit Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#44 Cybercrime cost $1 trillion last year, study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#38 Cybercrime running into trillions, experts claim
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#47 Cyber crime 'more profitable than drugs'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#56 Credit cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#58 Credit cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#20 Electronic Theft Costs Businesses More Than Physical Theft
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#31 Cyber-crime: bigger than the drugs trade, and growing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#40 The Great Cyberheist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#53 What do you think about fraud prevention in the governments?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#27 Measuring Cyberfraud, the fall rate of sky, and other metrics from the market for Silver Bullets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#9 NSA chief criticises media and suggests UK was right to detain David Miranda
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#13 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#49 Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#15 Banking Culture Encourages Dishonesty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#19 Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#17 Cybercrime

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The advent of ADVENT

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The advent of ADVENT
Date: 14 May 2017
Blog: Google+
The advent of ADVENT
http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=7536

I would stop by Tymshare periodically and one visit found that had ported fortran from Stanford PDP10 to VM370/CMS and I got a copy spring 1978. I would make it available on the internal network and very soon there were PLI versions.

recent post (with some spring 1978 email)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#65 [CM] What was your first home computer?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

I quit this NG

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: I quit this NG
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Sun, 14 May 2017 18:43:47 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Study uncovers how brain damage increases religious fundamentalism
http://www.psypost.org/2017/05/study-uncovers-brain-lesions-increase-religious-fundamentalism-48860
Suffering a brain injury can make you more religious, scientists say
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/suffering-brain-injury-lesion-ventromedial-prefrontal-cortex-religious-beliefs-northwestern-a7722946.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#68 I quit this NG

Damage To Specific Site In The Brain May Be Linked To Religious Fundamentalism
http://www.iflscience.com/brain/damage-to-specific-site-in-the-brain-may-be-linked-to-religious-fundamentalism/
Biological and cognitive underpinnings of religious fundamentalism (June 2017)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0028393217301318
Neurologists Have Identified Brain Lesions That Could Be Linked to Religious Fundamentalism (May 2017)
https://www.sciencealert.com/damage-to-a-specific-part-of-the-brain-could-result-in-religious-fundamentalism
earlier, 2008 from NIH: Neurobiology of Spirituality
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3190564/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 15 May 2017 09:01:40 -0700
The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
https://www.vox.com/2017/5/11/15610908/census-bureau-john-thompson

mid 90s we consulted (essentially for free) for the backend dataprocessing for the 2000 census. They still had 70s (burroughs) systems that were used for the 80s&90s census. The 70s systems were rolled out spring 1997 and the 90s systems were rolled in ... so there was plenty of time to work with the new systems getting ready for the 2000 census. When the effort was audited, they had me spend all day in front of the room answering questions.

Later we tried to do something similar for VA dataprocessing, which was coming off a failed billion dollar effort and were gearing up for a couple billion dollar project. However, doing something essentially for free is big threat to beltway bandits ... and the emerging success of failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

success of failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

contributing to the rapidly spreading success of failure culture was the massive uptic in outsourcing to for-profit companies last decade ... for intelligence, 70% of the budget and over half the people
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

past posts mentioning 2000 census:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#16 Why are Mainframe Computers really still in use at all?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#21 Methods of payment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#43 Methods of payment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#63 was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#92 Billion-dollar IT failure at Census Bureau
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#21 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#56 Handling multicore CPUs; what the competition is thinking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#56 What's the most interesting thing you do in your non-work life?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#87 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#11 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#98 ACA (Obamacare) website problems--article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#37 OT this guy salary one dollar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#72 George W. Bush: Still the worst; A new study ranks Bush near the very bottom in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#39 Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#107 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#18 FBI Rewrites Federal Law to Let Hillary Off the Hook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#12 Why a Single-Payer Health Care System is Inevitable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#40 Misc. Success of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#76 GLBA & Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#71 ComputerWorld Says: Cobol plays major role in U.S. government breaches

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ransomware on Mainframe application ?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Ransomware on Mainframe application ?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 15 May 2017 10:32:08 -0700
0000000433f07816-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UA.EDU (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
A recurrent question in these fora is, "How can I make links appearing in documents viewed in a mainframe editor active?" Cbttape.org probably has an answer. Or an ISV.

Many years ago, when the risks of TCP/IP were first suspected (the perceived hazard then was information theft), someone suggested hereabouts that only authorized data administrators should be allowed use of TCP/IP. No, was the counter, people with such authority should be forbidden TCP/IP, which shoulc be allowed only to users with weak, harmless IDs and no access to sensitive data.

Years ago, at the height of the Good Times virus hoax, the conventional and correct wisdom was that viruses spread only by floppy disks, not by email. Microsoft and others jumped in to fill that void.


predating morris worm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_worm

by nearly year, was xmas exec (email) on bitnet (this fora originated on corporate sponsored university bitnet).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Tree_EXEC

we had looked at problem before that ... but people wanted to do things like that anyway.

recent thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#47 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#49 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#50 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#56 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#59 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#83 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#85 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?

at 1996 Moscone MDC, all the banners said "internet" but the constant refrain in all the sessions was "preserve your investment". The issue was that a paradigm of automatic executed scripts included in data files had grown on on small, private, safe, business lans ... and was being extended to the wild anarchy of the internet w/o any additional countermeasures.

Until he passes, the Internet RFC standards editor use to let me help with STD1. He also sponsored my talk on Why the internet isn't business critical dataprocessing for ISI and USC computer security graduate students (in part based on the compensating procedures I had to do for "electronic commerce"). recent reference
http://www.galric.com/~lynn/2017e.html#11 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet
http://www.galric.com/~lynn/2017e.html#14 The Geniuses that Anticipated the Idea of the Internet

Shortly after graduation and joining IBM, the science center had (also) ported APL\360 to CP/67-CMS for CMS\APL ... redoing memory management for large virtual memory, demand paged environment, also adding API to system services (like file i/o), opening APL to doing real world applications. One of the early users of CMS\APL on the science center system were the business planners in Armonk hdqtrs, loading the most valuable corporate data ... detailed customer information, and doing business models. The science center also had a lot of non-employee users, including staff and students from universities in the boston area (mit, bu, etc). As a result, we had to demonstrate a very high level of integrity and security.

A couple years later, IBM had hired former gov. employee as CSO (at one time had been head of presidential detail) and I got assigned to run around with him ... talking about computer security (and learning a little about physical security).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ransomware on Mainframe application ?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Ransomware on Mainframe application ?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 15 May 2017 12:03:26 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#90 Ransomware on Mainframe application ?

trivia from long ago and far away, gone 404, but lives on at the way back machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

I didn't learn about them until much later. As undergraduate did lots of work on IBM software and I would even get requests from IBM for enhancements ... in retrospect, some of the requests may have originated from these guys.

ibmmain post from march about learning that there were three kinds of crypto around the mid-80s.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#69 ComputerWorld Says: Cobol plays major role in U.S. government breaches
also referenced in this more recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#58 A flaw in the design; The Internet's founders saw its promise but didn't foresee users attacking one another

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Check out New Wave of Ransom Threats Seen in Unprecedented Attack - Bloomberg

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Check out New Wave of Ransom Threats Seen in Unprecedented Attack - Bloomberg
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 15 May 2017 14:51:12 -0700
0000000433f07816-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UA.EDU (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
Anyone can take anyone to court. That's not the question. As [a] Civil Procedure professor said, "You can sue the Bishop of Boston for bastardy. But can you collect?" (Origin obscure.)

when I first moved to boston area and joined the ibm science center, a parish north of boston was about to sue the cardinal, they had a bond for something like $26M for building new catholic high school. As soon as it was built, cardinal sells off the new high school and keeps the money (leaving the parish still on the hook for the $26M bond). The parish was about to sue the cardinal for the money, when the cardinal has late night, backroom (described as cigar smoke filled) session with the legislature ... which passes special law allowing cardinal to keep the money (and immune from civil liability). It was explained to me that such things go on in the boston area all the time.

recent posts mentioning ransoms:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#84 Time to sack the chief of computing in the NHS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#90 Ransomware on Mainframe application ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#91 Ransomware on Mainframe application ?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Ransomware on Mainframe application ?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Ransomware on Mainframe application ?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 15 May 2017 15:17:03 -0700
mainframe@BIGENDIANSMALLS.COM (Chad Rikansrud) writes:
As Charles pointed out - the hypothetical attack is about just taking over the privileged user's PC and launching from there.

when corporations first started using VPN software over internet into corporate sites ... we pointed out trivial attack to take over the PC via the internet connection ... and then from the PC, tunnel through the VPN connection into corporate dataprocessing.

in IBM Retirees facebook discussion, there has been a lot about recent news articles on buffett unloading IBM:

Buffett cuts stake in IBM and shares slide
https://phys.org/news/2017-05-buffett-stake-ibm.html
Not Just Buffett: IBM Unit Sells IBM, Wells Fargo
http://www.barrons.com/articles/not-just-buffett-ibm-unit-sells-ibm-wells-fargo-1494590407

But Buffett has also waded in on cybersecurity

Warren Buffett's cybersecurity wake-up call -- are we listening?
http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/technology/333026-warren-buffetts-cybersecurity-wake-up-call-are-we-listening

recent post about this predates Buffett recent reference going back more than 20yrs
http://www.garlic.ccom/~lynn/2017e.html#85 Time to sack the cheif of computing in the NHS

includes reference to conference that Tandem/Compaq & Atalla (ATM machine crypto company that Tandem had bought) put on for me ... really long winded posting from Jan1999:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm

I have prototype secure chip (strong authentication for both sessions and transactions) demos/booth at world wide retail banking show Dec1999:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#224 X9.59/AADS announcement at BAI this week

trivia: the CEO of one of the security companies that participated in both the conference and the BAI demo ... had at one time been head of mainframe POK.

recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#90 Ransomware on Mainframe application ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#91 Ransomware on Mainframe application ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#92 Check out New Wave of Ransom Threats Seen in Unprecedented Attack - Bloomberg

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Migration off Mainframe to other platform

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Migration off Mainframe to other platform
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 15 May 2017 18:13:08 -0700
Tom Longfellow <tlongfellow@verizon.net> writes:
Let the pedantry begin: Superdome, Xeon, Rack servers, Blades, etc. For this discussion they are all the same: A separately maintained set of many boxes (with some virtualization to extend their reach) versus the Great Satan, called MAINFRAME. I have been in places where the P7 platform came in a big monolithic box that had three times the memory and 'activated' CPU cores. Looked a lot like the classic CMOS mainframe to me from the outside.

trivia: Itanium architecture was in large part done by long time IBMer who went to HP in the early 80s (originally working on "snake", HP's risc processors). One of the last thing he did at IBM was retrofit subset of 370/XA access registers to 3033 as dual-address space mode. Itanium was suppose to be wide-spread next generation 64bit "server" machine. When AMD did 64bit I86 ... which was taking over the market instead ... Intel also moved to 64bit I86. XEON is (supposedly) 64bit I86 with RAS features borrowed from Itanium.

SCI was fiber optic protocol adapted for a number of things ... including channel I/O ... but also a scalable (64-port) multiprocessor memory interface. Sequent (& Data General) used it for 256-way server with 64 four I486 chip boards (ibm later buys sequent).

Convex does a 128-way "snake" ... SCI with 64 two processor "HP snake" chip boards. HP then buys Convex. An engineer that had been at Cray, then IBM Kingston engineer&scientific, then IBM Austin RS6000 is hired by HP to do superdome ... sort of a less expensive convex machine.

some multiprocessor posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

After leaving IBM, we did some consulting for both Sequent and Convex. Then the guy doing superdome tries to talk us into joining him. At the time we were doing some work for major payment card processor and HP had bought one of major point-of-sale terminal companies. The former CEO of the point-of-sale terminal company and the guy doing superdome both report to the same HP executives ... and we have to have meetings with all of them for different reasons.

all of these mostly predate ibm cmos highend mainframes.

While still at IBM, in 1988 I had been asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they have that quickly becomes fibre channel standard, including some stuff I had worked with in 1980 for channel extender. Later some POK channel engineers become involved and define a heavy weight protocol that radically reduces the native throuput that is eventually released as FICON.

some FICON posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

latest peak I/O benchmark that I've found is z196 getting 2M IOPS with 104 FICON (running over 104 fibre standard). At about the same time a fibre channel was announced for e5-2600 claiming over million IOPS (two such have higher throughput than 104 FICON). There is reference to TCW for zHPF that is little like what I did in 1980, but it only claims 30% improvement (say 70 FICON instead of 104).

some channel-extender posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

e5-2600v1 in the time-frame of z196 had between 400-530BIPS (depending on model) compared to 80-way z196 rated at 50BIPS.

Since then there have been 101 ec12 at 75BIPS and 141 Z13 at 100BIPS, and e5-2600 v2, v3, and v4 ... with v4 somewhere around 1500BIPS.

before IBM sold off its I86 server business it had announced an high-density e5-2600 rack with something like 64 e5-2600 blades ... or around 3500 BIPs for v1 e5-2600 and nearly 10,000 BIPS for v4 (something like equivalent of 100 z13).

the large megadatacenters with hundreds of thousands of blades ... have done an enormous amount of automation, a typical megadatacenter run by staff of 80-120 people. However, the enormous optimization in blade cost, blade operation, automation, etc ... by the large megadatacenters likely contributed to IBM selling off its i86 server business.

part of z196 performance claims (compared to z10) is the introduction of memory latency compensation features (out of order execution, branch prediction, etc) that have been in many of these other chip platforms for decades; with further improvements for ec12 and z13 ... although
z900, 16 processors, 2.5BIPS (156MIPS/proc), Dec2000
z990, 32 processors, 9BIPS, (281MIPS/proc), 2003
z9, 54 processors, 18BIPS (333MIPS/proc), July2005
z10, 64 processors, 30BIPS (469MIPS/proc), Feb2008
z196, 80 processors, 50BIPS (625MIPS/proc), Jul2010
EC12, 101 processors, 75BIPS (743MIPS/proc), Aug2012


early z13 specs said 30% more performance than ec12 (100BIPS) with 40% more processors (or 710MIPS/processors??) ... some current z13 specs says 40% more performance (w/40% more processors, so maybe same MIPS/proc).

some recent e5-2600 blade posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#19 follow up to dense code definition
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#73 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#6 How do BIG WEBSITES work?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#16 System z: I/O Interoperability Evolution - From Bus & Tag to FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#1 GREAT presentation on the history of the mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#17 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#25 ARM Cortex A53 64 bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#57 What are mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#58 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#88 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#10 WD ships 'world's largest' 12TB HGST Ultrastar He12 Helium 7200 RPM Enterprise HDDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#75 11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 15 May 2017 21:28:39 -0700
Jon Elson <elson@pico-systems.com> writes:
Ummm, 350 million cards would actually be fairly LARGE. if you had a card reader that could read them at 100 per second, that would take 40 days to read them just to extract one kind of data. I wouldn't want to be the data clerk on such a project!

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#89 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge

350M standard ibm punch cards, 2000cards/box, 175,000 boxes, 5 boxes/carton, 35,000 cartons.

2540 reader, 1000 cards/minute, 350,000 minutes, 5833hrs, 243days, large shifts of people constantly feeding cards, maybe several 2540 readers, since they would need to have regular maintenance every day (possibly every shift). anybody know duty cycle of 2540 (i would expect it would be well under 350M cards).

maybe 100 2540s, 10 2540s in serial sequential streams and 10 parallel streams ... get things down to 24days.

all starts with census back in 1890s
https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/history/year_1890.html
Herman Hollerith's tabulating system is used in the U.S. Census, reducing a nearly 10-year long process to two and a half years and saving $5 million.
... snip ...

more history
https://www.census.gov/history/www/innovations/technology/tabulation_and_processing.html
and more
http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/object-groups/tabulating-equipment?ogmt_page=census-to-rand&edan_start=0&edan_fq=name%3A%22Remington+Rand%22&ogmt_view=list

past posts mentioning census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#16 Why are Mainframe Computers really still in use at all?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#41 How will current AI/robot stories play when AIs are real?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#39 DOD 5200.28-STD capable OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#28 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#45 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#13 Cost of patching "unsustainable"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#12 Danger: Derrida at work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#33 [IBM-MAIN] NY Times editorial on white collar jobs going
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#2 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#42 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#18 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#48 Data Display & Modeling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004h.html#18 Low Bar for High School Students Threatens Tech Sector
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#21 Methods of payment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#43 Methods of payment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#18 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#48 Mozilla v Firefox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#43 Academic priorities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#50 Maximum RAM and ROM for smartcards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#44 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#20 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#21 Taxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#63 DEC's Hudson fab
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#7 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#18 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#24 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#70 illegal aliens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#79 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#7 Newbie question on table design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#31 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#51 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#85 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#30 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#22 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#12 ANT Censuses of the Internet Address Space
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#29 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#39 competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#63 was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#92 Billion-dollar IT failure at Census Bureau
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#31 Billion-dollar IT failure at Census Bureau
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#5 Republican accomplishments and Hoover
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#39 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#82 Tell me why the taxpayer should be saving GM and Chrysler (and Ford) managers & shareholders at this stage of the game?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#22 Is Pride going to decimate the auto Industry?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#55 Can outsourcing be stopped?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#20 Five great technological revolutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#23 Fresh start for lost file formats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#62 some '83 references to boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#43 Larrabee delayed: anyone know what's happening?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#38 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#21 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#33 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#34 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#35 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#36 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#37 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#39 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#45 not even sort of about The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#46 not even sort of about The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#51 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#54 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#56 Handling multicore CPUs; what the competition is thinking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#62 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#67 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#69 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#76 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#79 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#81 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#84 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#86 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#87 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#18 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#19 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#62 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#63 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#69 No command, and control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#80 Chinese and Indian Entrepreneurs Are Eating America's Lunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#42 z/OS SYSLOG to UNIX syslog daemon?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#48 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#36 The Next Convergence: The Future of Economic Growth in a Multispeed World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#18 Great Brian Arthur article on the Second Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#125 UC-Berkeley and other 'public Ivies' in fiscal peril
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#56 What's the most interesting thing you do in your non-work life?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#75 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#18 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#36 Race Against the Machine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#87 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#73 These Two Charts Show How The Priorities Of US Companies Have Gotten Screwed Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#11 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#98 ACA (Obamacare) website problems--article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#66 Salesmen--IBM and Coca Cola
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#47 Stolen F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China's Stealth Fighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#32 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#37 OT this guy salary one dollar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#54 How do we take political considerations into account in the OODA-Loop?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#72 George W. Bush: Still the worst; A new study ranks Bush near the very bottom in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#4 Decimal point character and billions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#39 Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#107 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#18 FBI Rewrites Federal Law to Let Hillary Off the Hook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#12 Why a Single-Payer Health Care System is Inevitable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#40 Misc. Success of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#76 GLBA & Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#71 ComputerWorld Says: Cobol plays major role in U.S. government breaches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#27 US Education
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#94 A 40-year "conspiracy" at the VA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 May 2017 09:21:45 -0700
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/productivity

Productivity has been on a pretty much linear increase since 1950.


this has productivity from end of ww2 up thru the 2011 article, and shows who benefited changed around 1980.
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html
article
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

some drift, general middle class, but a little more focused on pensions

AMEX is in competition with KKR for LBO of RJR. KKR wins but runs into problems and hires away the president of AMEX to help turn it around
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

IBM has gone into the red and was being reorganized into the 13 baby blues in preparation for breaking up the company. The board then hires away the former AMEX president to resurrect the company and reverse the breakup ... using some of the techniques at RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

IBM couldn't just pull the plug on the subsidy, because pension law doesn't allow a company to take away a benefit a person has already earned or take away a pension right or feature the company has granted. "So we had to design something different," Sauvigne said. Enter Louis V. Gerstner Jr., IBM's new president. He'd headed RJR Nabisco in 1993 when it faced a similar dilemma: how to reduce pensions and remove the retirement subsidy without obviously violating the law or provoking an employee backlash. Gerstner and IBM turned to Watson Wyatt, the same consulting firm that had helped Nabisco solve its pension problem.
... snip ...

Gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

Friedman
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Friedman

Friedman promoted an alternative macroeconomic viewpoint known as "monetarism", and argued that a steady, small expansion of the money supply was the preferred policy.[12] His ideas concerning monetary policy, taxation, privatization and deregulation influenced government policies, especially during the 1980s.
... snip ...

Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-01-12/milton-friedman-s-cherished-theory-is-laid-to-rest

Even now, when economic models have become far more complex than anything in Friedman's time, economists still go back to Friedman's theory as a mental touchstone -- a fundamental intuition that guides the way they make their models. My first macroeconomics professor believed in it deeply and instinctively, and would even bring it up in department seminars.
... snip ...

The Champions of the 401(k) Lament the Revolution They Started
http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-champions-of-the-401-k-lament-the-revolution-they-started-1483382348?mod=e2fb

Economists and the Powerful: Convenient Theories, Distorted Facts, Ample Rewards
http://www.amazon.com/Economists-Powerful-Convenient-Distorted-ebook/dp/B009K44OW2

loc1200-1206:

There are plenty of examples from other countries to copy: the US individual retirement account system is based on the Chilean pension reform of 1980/81 that in turn was based heavily on proposals made in the book Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman. In response to the Chilean system facing a likely collapse in a few decades time, it was substantially overhauled in 2008 to require mandatory participation of all citizens in exchange for universal pension coverage.
... snip ...

The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds
https://www.amazon.com/Undoing-Project-Friendship-Changed-Minds-ebook/dp/B01GI6S7EK/

goes into some detail how Kahneman and Tversky disproved Economists' assumption that people make rational decisions ... loc1155-59:

He had listened to an American economist talk about how so-and-so was stupid and so-and-so was a fool, then said, "All your economic models are premised on people being smart and rational, and yet all the people you know are idiots."
... snip ...

Kahneman (a psychologist) gets Nobel Prize in economics, in part for debunking Friedman economic theories

Peak Savings: Wall Street Faces 20 Years Of Retirement Withdrawals As Boomers Hit 70 1/2
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-01-16/peak-savings-us-demographic-time-bomb-ready-explode-boomers-hit-70-12-years

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 May 2017 09:30:33 -0700
Osmium <r124c4u102@comcast.net> writes:
It seems to me that a bigger factor is a bunch of European guys, after WW I, carving up the middle east with a pen and a map. We had similar carving, in Europe and India after WW II. Except India seems to have been done by one guy.

The World Crisis, Vol. 1, Churchill explains the mess in middle east started with move from 13.5in to 15in guns before WW1 (which requires moving from coal to oil) loc2012-14:

From the beginning there appeared a ship carrying ten 15-inch guns, and therefore at least 600 feet long with room inside her for engines which would drive her 21 knots and capacity to carry armour which on the armoured belt, the turrets and the conning tower would reach the thickness unprecedented in the British Service of 13 inches.

loc2087-89:
To build any large additional number of oil-burning ships meant basing our naval supremacy upon oil. But oil was not found in appreciable quantities in our islands. If we required it, we must carry it by sea in peace or war from distant countries.

loc2151-56:
This led to enormous expense and to tremendous opposition on the Naval Estimates. Yet it was absolutely impossible to turn back. We could only fight our way forward, and finally we found our way to the Anglo-Persian Oil agreement and contract, which for an initial investment of two millions of public money (subsequently increased to five millions) has not only secured to the Navy a very substantial proportion of its oil supply, but has led to the acquisition by the Government of a controlling share in oil properties and interests which are at present valued at scores of millions sterling, and also to very considerable economies, which are still continuing, in the purchase price of Admiralty oil.
... snip ...

Iran Elected leader was going to review the Anglo-Persion contracts ... CIA Confirms Role in 1953 Iran Coup
http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB435/
including
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kermit_Roosevelt,_Jr.
in
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_Iranian_coup_d%27%C3%A9tat
and to help keep the shah stay in power, US (including Norman Schwarzkopf senior) trained
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAVAK

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 May 2017 09:59:47 -0700
mausg writes:
Waiting in an airport once, I was studying the 3d barcode on my ticket. Reputed to be used by what is laughingly called US Intelligence (CIA?NSA?FBI?) to identify threats to the US.. Wouldn't take much..

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#89 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#95 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge

success of failure, original post ... includes lots of dataprocessing modernization projects over the years ... including intelligence, especially with the huge uptic in outsourcing last decade
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
70% of intelligence budget and over half the people
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

success of failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

recent ref to "Dereliction of Duty"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#69

repeatedly mentions belief that US prestige in the world would suffer more if it just pulled out of Vietnam than if it stayed in Vietnam and lost ... all the detailed analysis that regardless of the military victories, that US would eventually loose politically ... all the deaths were just cannon fodder for the politicians, 65-74 deaths, allied 282k, NVA/VC 444k, civilian 624k
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War_casualties

and now we have perpetual war (almost like old "star trek" episode)
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_war
and "perpetual war" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

WMD posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmds
military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 May 2017 11:04:33 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Iran Elected leader was going to review the Anglo-Persion contracts ... CIA Confirms Role in 1953 Iran Coup
http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB435/
including
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kermit_Roosevelt,_Jr.
in
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_Iranian_coup_d%27%C3%A9tat
and to help keep the shah stay in power, US (including Norman Schwarzkopf senior) trained
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAVAK


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#97 [CM] What was your first home computer?

after the Iran revolt against the Shah and SAVAK, the US was supporting Iraq in the iran/iraq war
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_War
including supplying WMDs
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war
the VP and former CIA director claims no knowledge of
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry, in part influence of Friedman, recent mention
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#96 [CM] What was your first home computer?
... creating S&L crisis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

last decade, another family member presides over the economic mess 70 times larger than the S&L crisis. S&L crisis had 1000 criminal convictions with jailtime, proportionally the economic mess should have 70,000.

80s VP has become president and Iran/Contra prosecutors are working with former SECDEF on evidence ... including against the sitting president. The president then "pardons" the former SECDEF. However, they now have evidence that the president was involved in the Iran/Contra afair
https://www.amazon.com/Profiteers-Bechtel-Men-Built-World-ebook/dp/B010MHAHV2/

loc2752-54:
Pollard had accidentally "busted the most secret White House operation of modern times," as one account put it. "Neither Pollard nor the government of Israel was aware that they had smashed George Bush's first shipment of arms to Iran."

loc2764-65:
Despite his best efforts to silence Pollard, Weinberger would not escape his own entanglement in the Iran-Contra conspiracy, for which he would ultimately face criminal charges.
... snip ...

early 90s, a sat. photo recon analyst informed White House that Saddam was marshaling forces for invasion of Kuwait. White House says that Saddam told them he would do no such thing and proceeded to discredit the analyst. then the analyst informed the White House that Saddam was marshaling forces for invasion of Saudi Arabia. Now Bush1 has to choose between Saudi Arabia and Saddam.
http://www.amazon.com/Long-Strange-Journey-Intelligence-ebook/dp/B004NNV5H2/

Iraq round 2 last decade, initially an invasion was justified on Iraq aiding Al Qaeda (and it would only cost $50B). Then justification was changed to (fabricated) WMDs (they had been given proof that the WMDs from Iran/Iraq war had been decommisioned). Early in the invasion the decomossioned WMDs (tracing back to US in the Iran/Iraq war) were found, but that information was classified until fall of 2014.
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html

the two (nearing 20yrs) wars now $5T ... 100 times larger than the original Iraq invasion justification (and no end in sight)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmds

old long-winded post from Jan1999 including mention of securitized mortgages.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm

1999 I was asked to try and help prevent the coming economic mess by improving the integrity of securitized mortgages supporting documents. securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (posterchild was office bldgs in Dallus/FtWorth that turn out to be empty lots). They then find that they can pay rating agencies for triple-A ratings (when rating agencies know that they aren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony). Triple-A rating trumps supporting documentation and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans (and no longer had to care about borrower's qualification or loan quality). It was major factor in being able to do over $27T 2001-2008 (especially selling to institutions restricted to dealing only in "safe" investments, like large pension funds). From the law of unintended consequences, the largest TBTF economic mess fines so far are for the robo-signing mills fabricating the missing documents.

"too big to fail" postings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
(triple-A rated) toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 May 2017 11:37:22 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
old long-winded post from Jan1999 including mention of securitized mortgages.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#97 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#99 [CM] What was your first home computer?

recent post in ibmmain mailing list
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#93 Ransomware on Mainframe application ?

references the Jan1999 post, it was a conference that compaq/tandem and atalla (ATM machine crypto company Tandem had bought) had sponsored for me.

It then mentions booth/demo I had in Dec1999 at the worldwide retail banking BAI show in Miami.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#224 X9.59/AADS announcement at BAI this week

The CEO of a security (originally kerberos startup) company that participated in both events ... had previously been head of POK high-end mainframe, and then head of Boca IBM/PC (and involved in the windows/OS2 deals with m'soft). At the time, the company also had contract to do m'soft's Kerberos implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#79 Typesetting

past posts also doing strong authentication implementation for Kerberos (not just strong authentication for financial operations)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#kerberos
as well doing strong authentication implementation for radius
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#radius

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 May 2017 17:33:44 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
Reminds me of the recent post on Bletchley Park going thru 20,000 cards a week (IIRC). What the heck could they do with them? What about storage? The source doesn't say.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#89 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#95 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#98 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge

20,000 cards is about ten boxes, two cartons ... 20mins to process at 1000/min. card trays held about box&half or around 3000 cards. web search comes up with pictures of two-wide, 7 high card tray cabinents ... or 14 trays, @3000, 42,000 cards.

when I first started, univ was (still) using mark sense cards for class registration ... which got punched
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_514
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/rochester/rochester_4011.html

and run through 2540. I did driver for registration that would read into middle stacker ... and on error/problem, application would punch (into middle stacker) colored (top edge) stripe card behind card with problem ... had somewhere between 20&30 thousand cards (ten card trays).

regular cards were all manila, so it was easy to spot problem registration in the card trays flagged with colored stripe.

past posts mentioning 2540 middle stacker
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#53 punch card editing, take 2
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#20 HELP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#59 IBM System/360 DOS still going strong as Z/VSE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#71 IBM System/3 & 3277-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#0 IBM System/3 & 3277-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#47 IBM 029 keypunch -- 0-8-2 overpunch -- what hex code results?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#64 Reproducing Punch (513/514)--consecutive numbering, mark sense reading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#73 History: Mark-sense cards vs. plain keypunching?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#80 Got to remembering... the really old geeks (like me) cut their teeth on Unit Record
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#8 Last card reader?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#12 IEBPTPCH questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#92 360/20, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#100 IBM's 96 column punch card (was System/3)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#27 Old IBM Mainframe Systems

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 May 2017 19:34:08 -0700
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
How were they planning on persuading the Germans to go along with that plan?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#72 A Coal Fire May Have Helped Sink the 'Titanic'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#33 CBS News: WikiLeaks claims to release thousands of CIA documents of computer activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#90 Economist, Harry Dent Hints: Global Banks Facing a Serious Crisis in Months Ahead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#59 Breaking: Entire Nation Experiencing Collective Amnesia About Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#97 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#99 [CM] What was your first home computer?

Roosevelt complained that Churchill was constantly trying to postpone the invasion of europe ... with the objective of letting Russia and Germany to continue to slug it out until both were exhausted. Roosevelt said that would mean the war would drag on until 1947 and the American public wouldn't stand for it. some recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#60 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#80 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#85 US vs German Armies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#89 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#14 Trump to sign cyber security order

with both russia and germany taken out, that would leave britain a free hand in europe after the war.

US enters 8Dec41 ... 1947 ... would have been less than six years ... hardly anything compared to recent perpetual war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war
military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 May 2017 07:22:16 -0700
mausg writes:
There is lots of evidence that the less resources a third-world country has, the more prosperous it is. Instance, Switzerland is very well off, while Zaire-Congo is very poor. Resources attract predators, who take over the local government, and appoint corrupt politicians. (Again, Congo). These predators do little investment in the country (after all, who would invest in such a dump). Strip the assets and repatriate them.

"Botswana illustrates the natural resource curse"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#44 Kabuki Theater 1603-1629
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#70 The Army and Special Forces: The Fantasy Continues
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#81 GBP13tn: hoard hidden from taxman by global elite
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#69 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#67 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

i.e. Europe & later US, would loot resource rich countries. Example was Burma and portions of India had the highest standard of living and highest literacy rates in the world until British came in and looted the country. Burma went from the highest literacy rate & standard of living to the lowest.

US either compromise the ruler ... or replace with one that can be compromised .. and then loot the country ... "Economic Hit Man" (not stricly colonization done by european countries in earlier ages)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#63 21st Century Management approach?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#80 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#111 Matt Taibbi with Xmas Message from the Rich
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#25 You may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#57 Study Confirms The Government Produces The Buggiest Software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#70 The Army and Special Forces: The Fantasy Continues
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#83 Protected: R.I.P. Containment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#2 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#95 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#98 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#7 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#51 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#78 Has the US Lost Its Grand Strategic Mind?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#69 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#80 The REAL Reason U.S. Targets Whistleblowers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#40 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#38 Can America Win Wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#62 UK government plans switch from Microsoft Office to open source
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#41 UK government plans switch from Microsoft Office to open source
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#49 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#37 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#38 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#47 Stolen F-35 Secrets Now Showing Up in China's Stealth Fighter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#66 Revamped PDP-11 in Brooklyn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#104 No Internet. No Microsoft Windows. No iPods. This Is What Tech Was Like In 1984
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#1 do you blame Harvard for Puten
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#4 Pay Any Price: Greed, Power, and Endless War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#5 Swiss Leaks lifts the veil on a secretive banking system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#8 Shoot Bank Of America Now---The Case For Super Glass-Steagall Is Overwhelming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#67 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#30 Analysis: Root of Tattered US-Russia Ties Date Back Decades
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#44 No, the F-35 Can't Fight at Long Range, Either
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#45 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#11 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#14 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#122 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#31 Putin holds phone call with Obama, urges better defense cooperation in fight against ISIS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#7 Why was no one prosecuted for contributing to the financial crisis? New documents reveal why
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#69 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#22 US and UK have staged coups before
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#3 Smedley Butler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#38 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 May 2017 07:33:03 -0700
mausg writes:
Columbus's's :) first voyage coincided with the decision to eliminate the Muslim state of Al Andelus, very roughly Grenada and environments, and outlaw the Muslim and Jewish faiths that were tolerated there. There are some (two?) ports in the Magreb, which were captured around that time, Cueta, [another?] as part of an anti-Muslim war, and are still occupied by spain. In recent times, George W. Bush described the Iraq invasion as a crusade, it would seem that he and his advisors were not aware that the Original Crusades had a very poor memory in the east. The Teutonic Order's drive to the east was also described as a Crusade.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#74 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#99 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#102 [CM] What was your first home computer?

note that the military-industrial complex wanted the iraq2 invasion so badly that corporate reps were telling former soviet block countries that if they would vote for the invasion in the UN, they would get NATO membership and (directed appropriation) USAID (that could only be spent on military weapons from US companies)
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

... much of the rest could be considered "Kabuki Theater"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

WMDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmds
military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

past refs to corporate reps lobbying for Iraq2 invasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#54 How do we take political considerations into account in the OODA-Loop?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#74 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#108 Occupy Democrats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#17 Why do we keep losing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#29 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95 ^A^K boy scouts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#34 43rd President
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#67 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#1 Jeb: George W. Bush is a top foreign policy adviser
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#76 Pentagon remains stubbornly unable to account for its billions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#78 New hard drive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#33 The wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan were lost before they began, not on the battlefields
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#48 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#71 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#39 Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#53 Trump Is Right, Bush Lied: A Little-Known Part of the Bogus Case for War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#107 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#40 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#50 Iraqi WMDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#81 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#125 Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#48 Report: Nearly $5 Trillion Spent on Iraq and Afghanistan Wars So Far
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#81 The baby boomers' monumental quagmire in Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#102 Chain of Title: How Three Ordinary Americans Uncovered Wall Street's Great Foreclosure Fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#86 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#33 CBS News: WikiLeaks claims to release thousands of CIA documents of computer activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#42 Profitable Companies, No Taxes: Here's How They Did It
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#13 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#55 Should America Have Entered World War I?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#59 Breaking: Entire Nation Experiencing Collective Amnesia About Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#1 How Desert Storm Destroyed the US Military

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] What was your first home computer?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 May 2017 10:08:25 -0700
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
"Botswana illustrates the natural resource curse"

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#74 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#99 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#102 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#103 [CM] What was your first home computer?</h4><pre>
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#104 [CM] What was your first home computer?</h4><pre>

The resource curse
https://journal.probeinternational.org/2004/09/10/resource-curse/
As the United States, the United Nations, and the Iraqi Governing Council struggle to determine what form Iraq's next government should take, there is one question that, more than any other, may prove critical to the country's future: how to handle its vast oil wealth.
... snip ...

above was 2004, it is now coming up on almost 15yrs later and if anything, things have gotten worse

Beating the Resource Curse The Case of Botswana
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/412021468227707937/pdf/multi0page.pdf
Reverse the Curse: Botswana as a Beacon of Hope, and an Economic Model
https://isrj.wordpress.com/2010/07/10/reverse-the-curse-botswana-as-a-beacon-of-hope-and-an-economic-model/
The Natural Resource Curse
http://voiceofdjibouti.com/the-natural-resource-curse/
Mining institutional quality: how Botswana escaped the natural resource curse
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/article/Indian-Journal-Economics-Business/169308056.html
Does the Resource Curse Inhibit States from Democratization?
http://www.academia.edu/7534603/Does_the_Resource_Curse_Inhibit_States_from_Democratization
The All-natural Resource Curse - Degree Level Situation Studies
http://studies.nu/the-all-natural-resource-curse-degree-level-situation-studies/

and

The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man
https://www.amazon.com/New-Confessions-Economic-Hit-Man-ebook/dp/B017MZ8EBM/
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessions_of_an_Economic_Hit_Man
More Confessions of an Economic Hit Man: This Time, They're Coming for Your Democracy
http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy/more-confessions-of-an-economic-hit-man-this-time-theyre-coming-for-your-democracy-20160318
The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man
http://evonomics.com/the-new-confessions-of-an-economic-hit-man-perkins-reality/

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

as well as "Smedley Butler"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smedley_Butler
with "War Is a Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970




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