List of Archived Posts

2013 Newsgroup Postings (03/29 - 04/13)

What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA
The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet >>>and more
How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
Relative price of S/370 AP and MP systems
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Relative price of S/370 AP and MP systems
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
April 1st RFCs
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
New HD
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
It's a Banker's World
More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
PGP and Navy SEALs take on privacy
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
32760?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
32760?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
How Criticizing in Private Undermines Your Team - Harvard Business Review
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?
What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Continuing cloud computing
What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
KPMG quits as Skechers and Herbalife auditor amid insider trading allegations
Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze

What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
Date: 29 Mar 2013
Blog: IBMers
virtual machines
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP-67

some of the CTSS people went to the 5th flr and did multics. Others went to the science center on the 4th flr and did virtual machines, internal network, lots of online applications. GML (named for first letter of last name of the 3 inventors) was invented at the science center in 1969 (decade later morphs into SGML, and after another decade, morphs into HTML). Original virtual machine was cp40 on a 360/40 with special virtual memory hardware support. When standard 360/67 with virtual memory becomes available cp40 morphs into cp67. past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
and past posts mentioning gml/sgml/html
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

some of the internal network technology from the science center is used for ibm supported/funded univ. network BITNET (& EARN in Europe)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET

co-worker at the science center responsible for the internal network
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

also from above:
In 1976, MIT Professor Jerry Saltzer accompanied Hendricks to DARPA, where Henricks described his innovations to the principal scientist, Dr. Vinton P. Cerf. From that point on, Vint and other DARPA scientists adopted Hendricks' connectionless approach. The result developed into the Internet as we know it today.

... snip ...

Grid Computing; Hook enough computers together and what do you get? A new kind of utility that offers supercomputer processing on tap.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

from above:
Back in the 1980s, the National Science Foundation created the NSFnet: a communications network intended to give scientific researchers easy access to its new supercomputer centers. Very quickly, one smaller network after another linked in-and the result was the Internet as we now know it. The scientists whose needs the NSFnet originally served are barely remembered by the online masses.

... snip ...

since also morphed into cloud computing

as I've periodically mentioned, tcp/ip is the technology basis for the modern internet, nsfnet backbone was the operational basis for the modern internet and cix was the business basis for the modern internet.

originally we were to get $20M to tie together the NSF supercomputer centers, then congress cuts the budget and a few other things happened, finally NSF released an RFP. Internal politics prevents us from bidding on the RFP. The director of NSF tries to help by writing the company a letter (copying the CEO) ... but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does references like what we already have running is at least five years ahead of all RFP responses). old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

and as for ms/dos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS-DOS
before ms/dos there was seattle computer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Computer_Products
and before seattle computer there was cp/m
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/M
and before cp/m, kildall worked on cp67/cms at npg school (gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20071011100440/http://www.khet.net/gmc/docs/museum/en_cpmName.html
npg reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Postgraduate_School

I use to sponsor Boyd's briefings at IBM ... his biographies have him doing stint in command of spook base circa 1970 ... which is listed as $2.5B "windfall" for IBM (nearly $20B in today's dollars) ... it is not clear what all was involved in that $2.5B ... although Boyd would comment that the datacenter was the largest air conditioned bldg in that part of the world. reference to spook base ... gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

and for something similar but different:

Inside IBM's $67 billion SAGE, the largest computer ever built
http://www.extremetech.com/computing/151980-inside-ibms-67-billion-sage-the-largest-computer-ever-built

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
Date: 29 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Ending Subsidies to Megabanks ; The Beginning of the End of Too-Big-to-Fail?
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/28/the-beginning-of-the-end-of-too-big-to-fail/

and

The Confiscation Scheme Planned for US and UK Depositors
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/28/the-confiscation-scheme-planned-for-us-and-uk-depositors/

from above:
The 15-page FDIC-BOE document is called "Resolving Globally Active, Systemically Important, Financial Institutions." It begins by explaining that the 2008 banking crisis has made it clear that some other way besides taxpayer bailouts is needed to maintain "financial stability." Evidently anticipating that the next financial collapse will be on a grander scale than either the taxpayers or Congress is willing to underwrite

... snip ...

recent posts mentioning deposits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#4 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#24 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#28 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#29 Bank Holiday In Cyprus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#81 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#82 What Makes Economic History Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#85 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#90 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

other past posts in this discussion:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#65 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#74 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#3 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#5 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#42 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#55 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#78 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA
Date: 29 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Insight: German reliance on Deutsche Bank outweighs scandals
http://www.newsdaily.com/stories/bre92q0be-us-deutschebank-culture-insight/

from above:
Germany has become so dependent on Deutsche Bank to grease the wheels of its export driven economy that it looks willing to gloss over scandals involving its largest bank.

... snip ...

IT'S OFFICIAL: Banks In Europe May Now Seize Deposits To Cover Their Gambling Losses
http://www.businessinsider.com/implications-of-the-cyprus-bailout-2013-3

When You Weren't Looking, Democrat Bank Stooges Launch Bills to Permit Bailouts, Deregulate Derivatives
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/when-you-werent-looking-democrat-bank-stooges-launch-bills-to-permit-bailouts-deregulate-derivatives.html

from above:
In the US, depositors have actually been put in a worse position than Cyprus deposit-holders, at least if they are at the big banks that play in the derivatives casino. The regulators have turned a blind eye as banks use their depositaries to fund derivatives exposures. ... The 2005 bankruptcy reforms made derivatives counterparties senior to unsecured lenders. Lehman had only two itty bitty banking subsidiaries, and to my knowledge, was not gathering retail deposits. But as readers may recall, Bank of America moved most of its derivatives from its Merrill Lynch operation its depositary in late 2011.

... snip ...

and back in the US:

Lanny Breuer Cashes in After Not Prosecuting Wall Street Execs, Will Receive Approximate Salary of 4 Million Dollars
http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/item/17885-lanny-breuer-cashes-in-after-not-prosecuting-wall-street-execs-will-receive-approximate-salary-of-4-million-dollars

Wall Street's Role in the Crisis in Cyprus
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/29/wall-streets-role-in-the-crisis-in-cyprus/

from above:
Most large Wall Street firms were in similar positions in 2008 when, because of the U.S.'s ability to produce unlimited "bailout" funds through the Federal Reserve's digital "printing press," the funds they needed to return to faux solvency were simply handed to them. But because it belongs to the European Currency Union Cyprus does not have this option of "printing" its way to American style bank catatonia.

....
But limiting blame to Wall Street's, including Germany's Deutsche Bank's, role in creating and selling garbage assets understates the role the broader system of finance capitalism has played in the rolling economic catastrophes of the European 'periphery.'

... snip ...

related ... mentions over $27T done during the bubble (since then buyers have been ridiculed for trusted the triple-A ratings ... at least partially attempting obfuscation & misdirection regarding the role that the rating agencies played)

Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

Back in the USA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcI8AiCO9cU
Ben Bernanke: 'I Agree With Elizabeth Warren 100 Percent' On Too Big To Fail
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/20/bernanke-warren-too-big-to-fail_n_2916970.html
Wall Street Blocked Elizabeth Warren From Her Consumer Protection Board And This Is What They Got
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/17/wall-street-warren-video_n_2707016.html
Elizabeth Warren Goes After NRA, Big Banks, GOP
http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2013/03/elizabeth-warren-speech-consumer-federation-nra-big-banks-gop
Elizabeth Warren Talks About Big Banks and the big bucks they use to purchase congressmen and women.
http://johnhively.wordpress.com/2013/03/31/elizabeth-warren-talks-about-big-banks-and-the-big-bucks-they-use-to-purchase-congressmen-and-women/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2013 10:39:13 -0400
article about almaden lab

The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/400229/the-big-bad-bit-stuffers-of-ibm/

from above:
The ferocious progress in disk storage densities has come thanks to an IBM lab that was slated for elimination -- until it met the "gigabit challenge."

... snip ...

old post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#30 Why magnetic drums was/are worse than disks ?

old email with reference to IBM Almaden come up with method for increasing DASD density by factor of 50
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#email871122

discussing both inter-track spacing and vertical recording on 3380s (vertical recording increasing track capacity by factor of ten, reducing inter-track spacing increasing number of tracks by factor of ten ... potential for increase of 100).

then this email the following month
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#email871230

the person responsible for 801/risc wants me to help with disk head that would handle 18 closely-packed track widths. platter has 16 data tracks separated by servo track. disk head would track two servo-tracks on boths sides of the 16 data-tracks and read/write 16 data-tracks in parallel; gigabit transfer rate (16 tracks in paralle) and gigabyte storage on 5in surface.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
Date: 30 Mar 2013
Blog: IBMers
Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
http://www.businessinsider.com/oracle-fires-back-at-ibm-your-customers-are-being-wildly-over-charged-2013-3

... not directly oracle; IBM has base list price for an e5-2600 blade of $1815 ... which has processor rating of 527BIPS or $3.44/BIPS. Large (public&private) cloud operators claim that the cost of building their own blades is 1/3rd the price of brand name blades (DELL, HP, IBM, etc) ... which makes it close to dollar/BIPS.

Max. configured mainframe z196 (80 processors) goes for $28M ... which has processor rating of 50BIPS or $560,000/BIPS. Recent IBM financials has mainframe processor revenue at 4% of total but total mainframe revenue is 25% of total (and 40% of profits) with software, services and storage included i.e. mainframe customers are spending 6.25 times the processor price when everything is factored in. That makes a $28M z196 total $175M or $3.5M/BIPS. That puts total price mainframe processing a million times blade processing (or 3.5 million times major cloud blade processing).

Original relational DBMS/SQL is System/R done at san jose research (before research moves up to the new almaden bldg) on (virtual machine) vm370 platform. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

In 1988, I'm asked to help LLNL with standardizing some serial technology they have ... this turns into Fibre Channel Standard. A loosely-coupled, cluster scaleup support for RS/6000 is developed using the Fibre Channel Standard. IBM has no non-mainframe RDBMS so we work with number of non-IBM RDBMS vendors. Standard Unix RDBMS doesn't have cluster scaleup, but most of the non-IBM RDBMS vendors share the same source base with their DEC vax-cluster product. I do a HA/CMP implementation of vax-cluster DLM to ease deploying non-IBM RDBMS in cluster scaleup mode. The non-IBM RDBMS vax-cluster vendors had various opinions about major deficiencies in the DEC vax-cluster implementation. Starting from scratch implementation, I was able to avoid the DEC short-comings for HA/CMP implementation.

Early Jan1992, we have meeting in Ellison's conference room to discuss Oracle support for 128-way cluster operation. Several old emails about HA/CMP cluster scaleup for commercial, numerical intensive/scientific and national labs.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

Within hours of the last email (above) at the end of Jan1992, the cluster scaleup is transferred and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors. A couple weeks later it is announced for numerical intensive/scientific *ONLY*. We then decide to depart. We hear later that Oracle has managed to reverse engineer HA/CMP cluster scaleup allowing to deploy on platforms other than RS/6000.

POK channel engineers get involved with Fibre Channel Standard defining a layer for IBM mainframe channels, which becomes FICON. This is enormously heavy-weight layer that significantly degrades the throughput of the underlying FCS. z196 maximum I/O throughput does 2.2M IOPS with 104 FICON (layered on top 104 FCS). This is compared to recent Fibre Channel Standard announced for e5-2600 that claims over 1M IOPS for single FCS (i.e. two such FCS would have throughput comparable to z196 maximum I/O throughput with 104 FICON).

recent posts mentioning FICON &/or e5-2600:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#10 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#16 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#17 Still think the mainframe is going away soon: Think again. IBM mainframe computer sales are 4% of IBM's revenue; with software, services, and storage it's 25%
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#40 Searching for storage (DASD) alternatives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#77 OT: but hopefully interesting - Million core supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#5 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#6 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#7 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#8 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#10 FW: mainframe "selling" points -- Start up Costs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#15 A Private life?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#59 Why Intel can't retire X86
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#60 Why Intel can't retire X86
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#63 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#67 relative speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#68 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#77 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#5 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#12 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#16 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#45 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Lessons Learned from the Iraq War

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
Date: 30 Mar 2013
Blog: Facebook
Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/311648-3

there is this about vietnam

The Lyndon Johnson tapes: Richard Nixon's 'treason'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21768668

lots of 10th anniversary iraq invasion stories has lots of fabrication making it sound similarly political.

this makes it sound like military had mind wipe of everything they learned in vietnam
http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Armies-History-Guerrilla-ebook/dp/B007P9M034/

my son-in-law did two tours in iraq, 2004-2005 in Fallujah at the height of fighting and 2007-2008 in Baqubah ... this has Baqubah worse than Fallujah
http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-Killing-Our-ebook/dp/B007VBBS9I/

A lot of this is discussed in detail at the Boyd&Beyond meetings at Marine Corps univ. (commandant had leverage Boyd in 1990 for make-over of the corp). Recently there have been mini-B&B meetings in the DC area ... there was one at Harvard last month and there will be another the end of April. disclaimer: long ago and far way, i had sponsored Boyd's briefings at IBM

Spinney, one of Boyd's oldest acolytes: The Patraeus Myth & the Pentagon's Big Lie
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2012/12/chuck-spinney-the-patraeus-myth-the-pentagons-big-lie/

companion excuse for the military-industrial-complex was funding really massive budget projects ... there was gross exaggerations of soviet military as part of funding justifications; special forces and infantry tended to have much lower funding requirements (compared to massive tanks, artillery, etc). MIC was dismayed by reports that 95% of insurgent, new wars, etc activity are in areas with 35ton load limits, totally negating any purpose for Abrams (at 70tons). There is something analogous going on with JSF/F-35. Industry wants strategy that requires massive/enormous funding requirements. Feet on the ground doesn't meet the requirement. It shows up as main theme of Eisenhower's goodby speech. It is also here in Spinney's "The Domestic Roots of Perpetual War " (not just conflict all the time, but conflict that requires spending enormous amounts on industrial) projects).
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html

and for something different ... The Real Reason for the Iraq War
http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/the-iraqi-war-wasnt-waged-for-oil-greg-palast
and
http://www.gregpalast.com/how-george-bush-won-the-war-in-iraq-really/
and his BBC/TV documentary
http://www.gregpalast.com/bffdownload/

This is by relative of white house chief of staff
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

they were dealing with Iraq UN delegation and had all the information that there wasn't WMD, they were then confined to military mental hospital and kept doped on drugs (contrary to what Powell, Rumsfeld, Rice, etc were saying).

Spinney's Iraq Invasion Anniversary: Inside The Decider's Head (at time.com)
http://nation.time.com/2013/03/22/iraq-invasion-anniversary-inside-the-deciders-head/

also at his bloq
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-madness-of-king-george-revisited.html

and then followup Inside the Decider's Head II
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/2013/03/inside-deciders-head-ii.html

other reference
http://www.businessinsider.com/cia-and-m16-spy-agencies-knew-iraq-didnt-have-wmds-before-2003-invasion-2013-3

a slightly different version by Chuck: "The Madness of King George Revisited" here
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/21/the-madness-of-king-george-revisited/

which also has this about "The Myth of the Surge"
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/13/the-myth-of-the-surge/

The Neocons Won
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/29/the-neocons-won/

from above:
Who is this architect of a disastrous war bared on lies? Wolfowitz, an academic and student of the philosopher Leo Strauss (1899-1973), served in the Team B established by the CIA in the 1970s to present an assessment of Soviet military strength independent from the agency's. As it turns out, the team, headed by neocon Richard Pipes and firmly supported by then-Secretary of Defense and firm Wolfowitz buddy Rumsfeld, consistently exaggerated the Soviet "threat." By the fall of the USSR in 1991, it became clear that Team B had been widely off the mark. As Time Magazine editor Strobe Talbott put it, [the 41st president] Bush allowed a panel of outsiders, deliberately stacked with hard-liners, to second-guess the agency's findings.

... snip ...

MIC fabrication predates Team B (references are found in number of articles) ... "Ike's Bluff" talks about claim that there was "bomber gap" that Soviets had thousands of long range bombers and there was need to increase DOD budget by 25% to build thousands more B52s; Ike knew it was total fabrication based on U2 reconnaissance and opposed the request. Contributed to Ike's "goodby address" theme being warnings about MIC.

The Myth of the Surge
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/13/the-myth-of-the-surge/

from above:

"It was in El Salvador that Steele first came in to close contact with the man who would eventually command US operations in Iraq: David Petraeus. Then a young major, Petraeus visited El Salvador in 1986 and reportedly even stayed with Steele at his house." and talks about Petraeus taking Steele with him to Iraq ... "It was a role made for Steele. The veteran had made his name in El Salvador almost 20 years earlier as head of a US group of special forces advisers who were training and funding the Salvadoran military to fight the FNLM guerrilla insurgency. These government units developed a fearsome international reputation for their death squad activities. Steele's own biography describes his work there as the 'training of the best counterinsurgency force' in El Salvador."

... snip ...

This is different Steele (was also in El Salvador)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_David_Steele

his blog tends to quote chuck spinney periodically
http://www.phibetaiota.net/

... I use to do so many Boyd quotes in his presentations that he started referring to me as that "Boyd person" (although I was not a Boyd acolyte like Chuck Spinney and some others). Recently was the 30th anniv. of Spinney's time cover article on MIC funding fabrication
http://nation.time.com/2013/02/28/it-was-30-years-ago-today/

... article was what led to me sponsoring Boyd's briefings at IBM.

"National Insecurity" pg247, head of CIA Colby was resisting Team B fabrications, Ford removed Colby and appointed Bush1 as head of CIA who would embrace Team B fabrications. Later, pg248:
Casey and Gates combined to 'cook the books' on a variety of issues, including the Soviet Union, Central America, and Southwest Asia, tailoring intelligence estimates to support the military policies of the Reagan administration. After he left the CIA in 1993, Gates admitted that he had become accustomed to Casey 'fixing' intelligence to support policy on many issues. He did not describe his own role in support of Casey.

... snip ...

"Merchants of Doubt" ... begins with tobacco industry hiring firms to fabricate fraudulent information in the 50s ... later some of the people associated with the tobacco industry fabrication show up associated with Team B ... pg47:
Team B's Claims turned out to be more than a little exaggerated.

... snip ...

and mention of ibm pg55:
The resulting report was largely written by two well-known physicists: Richard Garwin of IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center, and Hans Bethe.

... snip ...

... one of Boyd's stories was crossing swords with Garwin at president's science advisory committee.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet >>>and more

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet >>>and more
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2013 19:59:52 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
That's what they're trying to do. They're putting towers disguised as giant pine trees (well, somewhat, anyway) on tops of mountains in the "forever wild" Adirondack Park. I don't know if they're aiming for full coverage, but they're shooting for a big percentage. I guess in Arizona they'd have to make them look like 200' saguaros,

some number of pictures:

Cellphone Towers Disguised as Trees Are a Puzzling Attempt at Aesthetics
http://www.wired.com/rawfile/2013/03/dillon-marsh-invasive-species/

there is one off the maryland intercounty connector
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland_Route_200

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
Date: 31 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Don't forget the crash of 29, the Pecora hearings, and Glass-Steagall; the repeal of Glass-Steagall as part of the bank modernization act was what enabled too-big-to-fail and significant factor in the current mess.

this reference:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html
and
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

before that there was the enormous monopolies leading up to the passage of the anti-trust act. some amount of wallstreet plundering the US during that earlier period is discussed here: "Triumphant plutocracy; the story of American public life from 1870 to 1920" was written & published in 1920 by former US congressman
http://archive.org/details/triumphantpluto00pettrich

I remember reading Robber Barons in high school when it first came out
http://www.amazon.com/The-Robber-Barons-Matthew-Josephson/dp/0156767902/

Economic Hit Man is autobiography by somebody involved in plundering other countries in the 60s-80s on behalf of US interests, sometimes with the aid of US gov. agencies.
http://www.amazon.com/Confessions-Economic-Hit-none-ebook/dp/B001AFF266/

National Insecurity talks about some of the specific success and failures of when US gov. agencies were involved.
http://www.amazon.com/National-Insecurity-American-Militarism-ebook/dp/B00ATLNI04/

Note that the Marine's Small Wars Manual written in the 30s, is based on their experience in dealing with native population in countries where they've invaded.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Wars_Manual

however, also written about the same time by a decorated Marine general about the same events being in support of wallstreet plundering the countries "War Is a Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#65 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#74 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#3 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#5 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#42 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#55 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#78 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#1 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
Date: 31 Mar 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#7 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

Pecora Commission
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pecora_Commission

from above:
In 1939 Ferdinand Pecora published a memoir that recounted details of the investigations, Wall Street Under Oath. Pecora wrote: "Bitterly hostile was Wall Street to the enactment of the regulatory legislation." As to disclosure rules, he stated that "Had there been full disclosure of what was being done in furtherance of these schemes, they could not long have survived the fierce light of publicity and criticism. Legal chicanery and pitch darkness were the banker's stoutest allies."

... snip ...

little has changed.

Pecora hearings
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/publication/?pid=87

also at the wayback machine
http://archive.org/search.php?query=stock%20exchange%20practices%20AND%20collection%3Aamericana

past Pecora references:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#58 OCR scans of old documents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#59 As bonuses...why breed greed, when others are in dire need?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#8 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#23 Should FDIC or the Federal Reserve Bank have the authority to shut down and take over non-bank financial institutions like AIG?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#56 What's your personal confidence level concerning financial market recovery?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#65 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#5 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#33 Treating the Web As an Archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#22 China's yuan 'set to usurp US dollar' as world's reserve currency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#25 The Paradox of Economic Recovery
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#29 Analysing risk, especially credit risk in Banks, which was a major reason for the current crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#40 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#57 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#35 what is mortgage-backed securities?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#23 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#2 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#20 U.K. lags in information security management practices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#25 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#73 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#54 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#28 Our Pecora Moment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#52 Our Pecora Moment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#67 The Python and the Mongoose: it helps if you know the rules of engagement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#68 Our Pecora Moment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#69 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#73 Our Pecora Moment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#74 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#4 Goldman Sachs -- Post SEC complaint. What's next?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#16 Fake debate: The Senate will not vote on big banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#77 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#7 Seeking *Specific* Implementation of Star Trek Game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#17 History--automated payroll processing by other than a computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#38 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#8 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#67 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#36 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#59 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#7 What banking is. (Essential for predicting the end of finance as we know it.)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#16 Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#54 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#59 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#16 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#29 Ernst & Young sued for fraud over Lehman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#53 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#49 What do you think about fraud prevention in the governments?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#84 The Imaginot Line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#42 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#43 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#45 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#53 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#19 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#27 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#36 On Protectionism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#6 Home prices may drop another 25%, Shiller predicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#24 US Housing Crisis Is Now Worse Than Great Depression
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#25 US Housing Crisis Is Now Worse Than Great Depression
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#29 Obama: "We don't have enough engineers"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#55 CISO's Guide to Breach Notification
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#8 'Megalomania, Insanity' Fueled Bubble: Munger
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#18 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#42 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#45 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#2 House panel approves data breach notification bill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#41 Advice from Richard P. Feynman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#20 Study shows powerful corporations really do control the world's finances
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#74 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#2 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#14 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#68 Bernanke Hearings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#71 Don't Dump the Volcker Rule Just Because It's Not Perfect
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#41 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#48 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#52 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#79 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#82 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#4 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#26 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#36 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#68 Building a Better America-One Wealth Quintile at a Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#80 How Pursuit of Profits Kills Innovation and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#72 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#88 Fed Report Finds Speculators Played Big Role in Housing Collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#93 World faces 1930-type Depression
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#146 IBM Manuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#5 The round wheels industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#56 What's the most interesting thing you do in your non-work life?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#95 Bank of America Fined $1 Billion for Mortgage Fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#31 US real-estate has lost $7T in value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#37 US real-estate has lost $7T in value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#39 Greek knife to Wall Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#52 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#32 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#69 Memory versus processor speed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#7 Adult Supervision
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#28 REPEAL OF GLASS-STEAGALL DID NOT CAUSE THE FINANCIAL CRISIS - WHAT DO YOU THINK?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#56 Why Hasn't The Government Prosecuted Anyone For The 2008 Financial recession?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#67 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#36 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#53 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#75 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#63 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#81 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#9 Sandy Weill's About-Face on Big Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#12 The Secret Consensus Among Economists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#13 Is there a connection between your strategic and tactical assertions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#75 What's the bigger risk, retiring too soon, or too late?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#48 The Payoff: Why Wall Street Always Wins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#53 CALCULATORS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#60 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#62 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#59 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#71 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#18 U.S. Treasury, AIG are poised to sever ties
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#64 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#28 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2013 16:10:59 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
note that this goes back to the start of the bubble, no. 2 on list of those responsible for the financial mess last decade (at least repeal of Glass-Steagall and blocking derivatives from being regulated)
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Gramm responsible for Glass-Steagall repeal in GLBA and gets provision that prevents commodities from being regulated ... earns him #2 responsible for the current mess (along with help from his wife who did stint as head of the CFTC) ... see referenced previous post. Repeal of Glass-Steagall enabled too-big-to-fail (too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-to-jail) and carrying toxic assets "off-book" with just the four largest TBTF carrying $5.2T at the end of 2008. Then blocking regulation of derivatives enabled the huge amount of CDS gamblings bets.

for whatever reason derivatives fall under the jurisdiction of the Commodities Futures Trading Commission
http://www.cftc.gov/

which is under control of the Agriculture Committee

Why is the Agriculture Committee Deregulating Financial Derivatives?
http://maplight.org/content/73209

from above:
According to the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the top four commercial banks -- Bank of America, Goldman Sachs Bank, Citibank, and JPMorgan Chase Bank -- account for 93.2% of the derivative contracts held for trading. That amounts to $208 trillion in notional value* outstanding in derivatives at these institutions.

The PACs of Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, and Citigroup contributed $313,000 to members of the House Agriculture Committee since 2009.

From July 1, 2010--June 30, 2012, the financial sector contributed $6,622,563 to members of the Agriculture Committee, more than any other sector.


... snip ...

not only are they trying to make sure that they aren't regulated ... but also the gov & the citizens are on the hook if things go terribly wrong.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#28 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#29 Bank Holiday In Cyprus

other recent posts mentioning derivatives:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#36 JPMorgan Chase slammed by regulators for control failings after botched derivatives bet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#77 OT: but hopefully interesting - Million core supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#30 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#81 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#82 What Makes Economic History Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
Date: 31 Mar 2013
Blog: Boyd Disciples
re:
http://lnkd.in/pD5AKG

The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-29/guest-post-knowledge-economys-two-classes-workers

from above:
In other words, creative destruction is the necessary result of constant, purposeful innovation. Any organization which fails to do so will become obsolete. The same can be said of those providing the knowledge capital to the organizations, the knowledge workers.

....
Even organizations based on rigid command hierarchies such as the U.S. military are finding that decentralized command decisions based on proximity to information flow, field intelligence and detailed knowledge of local assets trump sclerotic centralized command structures in getting demonstrable results.

... snip ...

and from the same blog: Big Government: An Unnecessary Evil That Should Be Abolished
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-29/guest-post-big-government-unnecessary-evil-should-be-abolished

In Boyd briefings, he would talk about US entry into WW2 needing to deploy huge numbers of inexperienced soldiers and adopts rigid, top-down, command&control infrastructure to leverage the few experienced resources available. Strategy was to prevail with massive overwhelming resources and associated logistic management of those resources. In the briefings, Boyd would say US corporate culture was becoming contaminated by those former WW2 officers indoctrinated in how to run large organizations ... creating rigid, top-down, command&control infrastructure and treating those below them like they had no skills or experience. This has been used to explain both upswing in outsourcing as well as explosion in ratio of avg executive to avg worker compensation to 400:1 (after being 20:1 for a long time and 10:1 in much of the rest of the world).

Boyd would contrast US rigid, top-down, command&control with Guderian's verbal orders only during the blitzkrieg (wanting to motivate local commanders to make independent decisions, minimizing having to worry about paper trail for after action blame). Boyd would characterize global strategy while pushing tactical decisions to the local person on the spot.

"The Wars for Asia, 1911-1949" highlights that in WW2, Japan had over 2/3rds of its resources deployed on mainland China (not against the US; and also that Germany had 3/4ths of its resources deployed against the Soviets) ... which would have made it easier for the US to deploy overwhelming resources against the enemy.

"Ike's Bluff" talks about the theme of his "goodby speech" being warning about the MIC ... numerous examples; airforce tried to get 25% increase in DOD budget to build thousands of extra B52s to close the "bomber gap" with Soviets (which were purported to have enormous numbers of heavy bombers). Eisenhower knew it was all fabrication based on U2 reconnaissance flights.

MIC justifying enormous funding ... from the annals of the fun of it; Fareed Zakaria just now was talking about the enormous expansion of the federal government since 9/11 and just the size of Homeland Security is quarter of million formed to fight Al-Qaeda (DHS website says 230,000)

this has Al-Qaeda between 500-1000 from 1988 to present:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al-Qaeda

which would be 250-500 people in Homeland Security for every member of Al-Qaeda

Some number of recent articles &books claim that the original purpose of the patent office was to protect individual inventors and promote innovation ... but now the patent process is almost totally taken over by large corporations that are increasingly using it to protect status quo and block innovation.

Fareed Zakaria today had several comments about the dismal case of public education in the US (exhibited by US students scoring near the bottom of industrial nations) ... but US still has more patents filed per capita than any other country ... implying the country is still the main source of innovation in the world. This is ignoring the thesis that patents are increasingly being used to preserve status quo and block innovation.

Through the large corporations use of the patent process ... they try to own the product of the knowledge workers.

The major difference between the original intent to protect individuals and foster innovation .... is that it was assumed that seldom did the individuals have a status quo to protect (motivating them to suppress innovation) ... while it frequently is just the opposite with large corporations (regardless of being considered a person), they almost always have status quo to protect (along with motivation to suppress innovation that threatens that status quo).

We have a couple dozen patents that are all assigned to large financial processing institution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadssummary.htm

in the area of authentication and security ... that aren't being used.

A scenario is that the large too-big-to-fail and the big card issuers make a significant portion off interchange fees. In the past, there have been numerous observations that these institutions "profit" from fraud; interchange fees are uplifted by approximate order of magnitude justified because of associated transaction fraud. If strong authentication and security were to eliminate most of that fraud, the interchange fee (charged merchants) drops by an order of magnitude which represented 1/3rd hit to their bottom line of many large institutions. As a result, large institutions have had little incentive for eliminating transaction fraud (any losses from actual fraud is more than offset by the transaction fee charged merchants, justified because of the associated fraud rates).

For instance a little over a decade ago, there was several "safe" e-commerce payment transaction products pitched to major e-commerce institutions (accounted for approx. 70-80% of e-commerce transactions). They agreed to support deployment ... in large part anticipating order of magnitude reduction in the associated interchange fees (having been indoctrinated for decades that the fees were strongly proportional to fraud rates). Then the "cognitive dissonance" set in, instead of lowering interchange fees, the financial institutions informed the merchants that effectively there would be surcharge applied to the largest fee rate (that they were already paying) for using the "safe" e-commerce payment transaction products.

Outside of the US, they've had some success in getting merchants to accept further increase in transaction fees by getting governments to reverse the burden of proof in disputes (rather than the merchant having to prove an individual is at fault, the individual has to prove they weren't at fault) ... aka merchant increased fees are offset by significantly reduced cases where individuals prevail against the merchant in disputes. This goes against "REG-E" here in the states (REG-E assumes large institutions have the advantage over individuals in disputes and therefor to help level the playing field, the burden of proof is on the institution, not on the individual ... regardless of whether or not institutions are considered people)

I was contacted by legal representative of somebody that was involved in dispute with bank over fraudulent transactions at an ATM cash machine. With "REG-E" in the US, the bank produces the surveillance camera video tape to prove it was the individual. This was in another country with the burden of proof reversed and it was up to the individual to produce the surveillance camera video tape to prove it wasn't them ... aka getting the gov. to reverse the burden of proof, placing it on the individual, not only benefits the merchants but also the financial institutions in any disputes they have. In this particular case, the bank was claiming it couldn't find the tape

"REG-E" assumes that institutions are in the dominant position (even if they are considered to be people) and places the burden of proof on the institution as partially leveling the playing field.

"Invisible Armies"
http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Armies-History-Guerrilla-ebook/dp/B007P9M034/

talks about success coming from winning the hearts & minds ... and force being used as part of providing the populace with feeling of safety. the times when extreme force being primary tool is situations were it can be done ruthlessly w/o having to worry about any public opinion ... and the insurgents have no outside support. it claims "winning the hearts & minds" was originally coined during the revolutionary war ... with regard to colonies winning public sentiment in england ... and the revolutionary war was aided by having outside support.

from Amdahl wanting to significantly advance IBM 360 computer technology in the 60s ... and management killing the project because it would advance the technology too fast (innovate) and threaten their control of the market
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

quote from Amdahl interview ... part of above:
IBM management decided not to do it, for it would advance the computing capability too fast for the company to control the growth of the computer marketplace, thus reducing their profit potential. I then recommended that the ACS lab be closed, and it was.

... snip ...

Amdahl leaves and starts his own 360 clone processor company. Big Blue had tight control of all their commercial accounts ... so Amdahl's initial market penetration was at large educational institutions. Then the local branch manager offended one of IBM's largest commercial customers (had large football fields of IBM computers) and they told IBM that were going to install an Amdahl computer. I was asked to go onsite at the customer to try and convince them to not to install the Amdahl computer and I refused. I periodically visited the customer, knew the people well and knew they were going install the Amdahl machine regardless of anything I did (they were really mad at the branch manager). I was told that the branch manager was good sailing buddy of the CEO and this would ruin his career; my being onsite would make it appear as if I failed to win a technical issue (distracting from the issue with the branch manager). I was told if I didn't do this, I could forget about ever having any career at the company (To Be or To Do). This commercial install for Amdahl breaks the barrier with commercial customers.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Relative price of S/370 AP and MP systems

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Relative price of S/370 AP and MP systems
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 31 Mar 2013 19:54:10 -0700
shmuel+gen@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asymmetric_multiprocessing and

360/65MP (&370MP) had (symmetric) shared memory but had dedicated channels on both processors. fully symmetric was simulated by having twin-tail controllers configured on channels on the different processors at the same addresses.

os/360 (360/65MP) multiprocessor support had global spin lock ... using test&set instruction (only one processor serialized executing in large sections of code).

360/67 multiprocessor was designed for up to 4-processors ... mostly 2-processors and i only know of one 3-processor built (no 4-processors that i know of). it had "channel controller" where all processors could access all channels (but still could be configured partition as indepedent single processors with dedicated channels). 370/67 also had a different "multi-ported" memory bus ... a single-processor "half-duplex" had degraded memory bus cycle time compared to 360/67UP and 360/65UP&MP, but under heavy i/o load, it would have higher throughput because of reduced memory contention between processors and i/o).

tss/360 multiprocessor had finer-grain lock serialization (than os/360) with multiple processors could execute in multiple parts of the kernel simultaneously.

When charlie was working on cp67 really fine-grain kernel locking at the science center, he invented compare&swap instruction (chosen because CAS are charlie's initials). Initital attempts to get compare&swap included in 370 was rebuffed because the os/360 folks said that test&set was more than adequate. The 370 architecture owners said that in order to get compare&swap included in 370, it would be necessary to come up with non-multiprocessor uses for the instruction. Thus was born the examples in principles of operation (still there) of how to use compare&swap by application code (can be used regardless of running on single processor or multiprocessor). past posts mentioning SMP and/or compare&swap instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

370 multiprocessor (2-processor) continued the 360/65mp design with dedicated channels on both processors (simulating symmetric).

370 "attached processor" (AP) was less expensive multiprocessor with channels only available on one of the processors. The 370/168 "attached processor" cost reduced by only having 168 external dedicated hardware channels on one of the processors.

The 370/158 "attached processor" was something of fiction ... since the 158 had integrated channels ... the same 158 hardware engine was shared between executing 370 microcode and executing the channel microcode. The only thing saved in the "attached processor" was not having connected channel cables.

During the 370 period in the first half of the 70s, there was the future system effort which was going to completely replace 370; during this period 370 efforts were being suspended/killed ... which is credited with giving clone processor vendors market foothold. When FS was killed, there was mad rush to get products back into the 370 pipeline ... kicking off 303x in parallel with 3081. past posts mentioning Future system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

a 370/158 engine was taken w/o the 370 microcode and just the integrated channel microcode and turned into the 303x "channel director" (supported six channels just like 370/158 integrated channels).

the 3031 then became the 370/158 engine with just 370 microcode and a second 370/158 engine with just the channel microcode. A 3031MP then became four 370/158 engines (two 370/158 engines with 370 microcode and two 370/158 engines with integrated microcode). A 3031AP was three 370/158 engines (two engines with 370 microcode and one engine with channel microcode).

a 3032 was a 370/168 reconfigured to use one or more 303x channel directors (in place of the 168 external hardware channel boxes). a 3032MP was two 370/168s, each having one or more 303x channel directors. A 3032AP was then two 370/168s, only one having 303x channel directors (aka 370/158 engines with integrated channel microcode).

a 3033 started out as 168-3 logic mapped to 20% faster chips. Some redesign got 3033 up to 50% faster than 168-3 (aka 4.5mips compared to 3mips). A 3033MP was both processors with connected 303x channel directors. A 3033AP was two processor with only one having connected channel directors.

370 has very strong memory consistency ... and to support multiprocessor cache strong memory consistency ... two processor configuration slowed the the processor machine cycle down by 10% (giving cache processing extra cycles to handle cross-cache invalidation signals) ... a base 2-processor 370 starts out as 1.8 times a single processor (any actual cross-cache invalidation signals would slow things down even further).

370 two-processor throughput was even further slowed down by operating system multiprocessor overhead and lock spinning contention ... so recommendations typically was 2-processor had 1.4-1.5 times the throughput of single processor.

However, if you had very fine grain locking and super lightweight multiprocessor pathlengths ... it could get throughput close to the hardware limit of 1.8times single processor. HONE system (internal, world-wide vm370-based online sales & marketing support system) got an early 370/158 multiprocessor ... and i played some tricks with implicit cache-affinity ... so i got twice throughput of single processor 370/158 (1.8factor because of 10% reduction in machine cycle time was offset by increase in cache hit rate with the slight-of-hand with caches in two-processor operation).

Conversely, 3081 was designed to be multiprocessor only ... so the implicit machine cycle slowdown was baseline. However, TPF (renamed airline control program) didn't have multiprocessor support. As a result there was danger of the TPF customers migrating to clone vendors offering faster single processor. Initially, there was some very unnatural things to vm370 multiprocessor support that attempted to get the two 3081 processors doing work concurrently for the virtual machine single processor running TPF. This slightly improved TPF throughput under vm370 ... while significantly degrading throughput for all the other vm370 mutliprocessor customers.

Eventually a 3083 single processor was announced. One of the big issues was the simplest solution was remove processor two from 3081 ... but that was in the middle of the box ... leaving 3083 dangerously top-heavy. Some actual re-engineering had to be done to move processor one from the top of the box to the middle. 3083 processor was announced at almost 15% faster than 3081 processor (the elimination of the 10% cache consistency multiprocessor cycle slow-down).

for something completely different in symmetric multiprocessor.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#46
with this email about VAX VMS adding symmetric multiprocessor in VMS release 5
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email880324
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email880329

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2013 10:39:47 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#98 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War

note in "Ike's Bluff" ... he also didn't care much for Nixon because he was aligned with McCarthy ... but Ike did leverage Nixon as go-between with McCarthy faction in congress ... examples include a couple cases where Ike wanted appointments confirmed and McCarthy was expected to make usual communism accusations.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2013 10:48:55 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Where does that money go?

to be FDIC insured institution ... pay premiums that go into pool currently has $25B

US Deposits In Perspective: $25 Billion In Insurance, $9,283 Billion In Deposits; $297,514 Billion In Derivatives
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-19/us-deposits-perspective-25-billion-insurance-9283-billion-deposits-297514-billion-de

problem is that too-big-to-fail having been using deposits to play derivative gambling ... currently $297,514B exposure ... in the past there were complaints that FDIC was raising insurance premium on everybody because the fund was being depleted by actions of the too-big-to-fail. The current insurance pool is $25B, the current amount of deposits is $9,283B ... but the potential exposure because of derivative gambling is $297,514B (by the too-big-to-fail).

recent posts mentioning derivatives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#36 JPMorgan Chase slammed by regulators for control failings after botched derivatives bet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#60 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#77 OT: but hopefully interesting - Million core supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#42 COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#64 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#65 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#30 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#4 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#28 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#29 Bank Holiday In Cyprus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#81 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#82 What Makes Economic History Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#9 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Relative price of S/370 AP and MP systems

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Relative price of S/370 AP and MP systems
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2013 10:52:33 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Does anybody have an IBM sales manual or other document that shows the price difference between AP and MP for S/370 and 303x systems? I need a citation for the wiki article on asymmetric multiprocessors. Thanks.

i don't ... but I have recent long-winded post over in ibm-main about the difference between AP/attached-processor and MP/multi-processor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#11 Relative price of S/370 AP and MP systems

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2013 10:54:49 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Or by large corporations gaming the system.

reference
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html
with some graphics
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2013 20:55:44 -0400
Stephen Sprunk <stephen@sprunk.org> writes:
The French had been fighting that war for decades before we showed up, so he should have known the guerrillas wouldn't be a pushover.

I sometimes wonder if the Vietnam War was a misguided attempt to improve the image of our military after the stalemate in Korea. If so, it was a spectacularly poor choice of venue; we would have been much better off with somewhere in Central/South America or in Africa.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

"invisible armies" has US helping/aiding france when it returned to vietnam after ww2. there was american advisor who worked closely with person that was going to become head of S. Vietnam gov (and supposedly Greene based some of the character in "quiet american" on this person). CIA helped take him out apparently because he wasn't under their control.

pg411/loc7024-31
Now, when he heard that Lightning Joe was trying to strike down Diem, whom he considered "a great patriot" and "probably the best of all the nationalists," Lansdale furiously typed a lengthy cable to Allen Dulles warning that "any successor government to Diem's acceptable to the French would be unable to carry out the reforms essential to deny Vietnam to the Communists." A few years later he predicted that Diem's successors would be "highly selfish and mediocre people [who] would be squabbling for power among themselves as the Communists took over." It was a prescient prediction in light of the "political and security vacuum" that was to envelop South Vietnam after Diem was overthrown and killed in 1963 with American connivance. Diem's overthrow was later to be seen by CIA Director William Colby, among others, as "America's primary (and perhaps worst) error in Vietnam."

... snip ...

that opened things to the MIC faction that want every excuse to produce more weapons.

Boyd had story about reviewing the air force air-to-air missile (before vietnam) ... they claimed it would hit every time ... Boyd investigated and said it would hit 10% or less. Come vietnam, air force was loosing lots of air-to-air battles. air force commander/general in vietnam grounds all fighters until they are switched over to navy swindwinder air-to-air missles (had about twice the hit rate of the air force missile). he lasted three months before being removed from command and brought back to pentagon. He is called on the carpet for reducing air force budget share (loosing less fighters and pilots that require replacements) ... and even worse ... he was increasing navy budget share (by using navy air-to-air missiles).

other recent references to MIC, requirement for continuous conflict and perpetual war:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#26 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War

posts and/or web URLs mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

from today some pontification I'm doing in another venue about counter-insurgency (reference to vietnam battle at Khe Sanh where 100,000 tons of explosives were dropped, ten times the amount expended in all of Afghanistan):

sort of implies trying for "hearts & minds" in Afghanistan ...
http://warnewsupdates.blogspot.com/2013/04/are-we-repeating-vietnam-in-afghanistan.html

from above:
In Afghanistan, we severely restricted our firepower in order to win popular support. That support was not achieved. Americans were viewed as infidel outsiders; they could not substitute for the absence of responsible indigenous officials. Although the Taliban were intensely disliked, the population did not rally behind a Karzai-led government that offered neither justice nor concern.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
Date: 2 Apr 2013
Blog: IBMers
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#3 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM

There has been other recent posts about items from IBM history.

Note that in the late 80s, senior IBM disk engineer got a talk scheduled at an internal, world-wide, annual communication group conference and opened the talk with comment that the communication group would be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication had a strangle-hold on datacenters with its strategic "ownership" of everything that crossed the datacenter walls; the communication group was in battle with distributed computing and client/server trying to preserve its terminal emulation paradigm and install base. The disk division was seeing data fleeing the data center to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of products to address the situation, but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group. Since then the demise of the disk division has come to pass.

past posts mentioning terminal emulation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#emulation

past posts mentioning getting to play disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

The efforts of the communication group was significant factor in the down turn of the company and its slide into the red in the early 90s ... a period where the company was being restructured into what this time magazine reference called the 13 "baby blues" ... in preparation for splitting up the company ... "fall of ibm" article from 28Dec1992 "How IBM Was Left Behind"
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

This included positioning of the disk division as "AdStar" in preparation for the split-up of the company (The board then brought in Gerstner for a house cleaning and the resurrection of the company).

Despite all the efforts and advances in support of disk technology ... it still wasn't enough to save the disk division from the stranglehold that the communication group had on datacenters.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
Date: 2 Apr 2013
Blog: IBMers
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#0 What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?

Maybe it is more like the control of creativity and commitment. This is quote from Amdahl interview about killing the advanced computing 360 project:
IBM management decided not to do it, for it would advance the computing capability too fast for the company to control the growth of the computer marketplace, thus reducing their profit potential. I then recommended that the ACS lab be closed, and it was.

... snip ...

detailed discussion of ACS here:
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

Amdahl then leaves and starts his own 360 clone processor company. Shortly afterwards, IBM starts the future system project to completely replace 360/370 ... during which time 370 efforts are being killed-off/suspended. The lack of 370 products during this period is then credited with giving clone processors a market foothold. The death of future system is then described as having a disastrous effect on the corporate culture ... (from "Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World", Time Books Ferguson & Morris) ... the culture morphed from encouraging vigorous debate to sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers. misc. references to future system effort here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

Note that IBM still had fairly tight control of the "big blue" commercial accounts ... so Amdahl early market penetration was at research and educational institutions. Then one of the largest "big blue" commercial accounts announced that it was going to install an Amdahl machine. I was asked to go on-site to try and turn the situation around. I knew the people and account well, periodically dropping by their location ... the decision for installing Amdahl had nothing to do with technical reasons (and they were going to do it regardless of my efforts, it had to do with some internal IBM issues and my being on-site was purely to obfuscate and misdirect the internal politics) . I was then told if I didn't do it, I could forget any career in the IBM company. After that first initial "big blue" commercial account, things got a lot easier for Amdahl.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 02 Apr 2013 19:46:17 -0400
"Mike" <mike@mike.net> writes:
Yes, the rich and powerful are over represented in high government posts. This is not necessarily bad. We want educated and successful people to apply their wisdom and expertise to political decisions. However, we also need to limit government actions designed to disporportinatly benefit the "rich & powerful" e.g. open competitive bidding, "sunshine" requirements, etc.

for the fun of it ... here is several long winded references about the too-big-to-fail and the OCC (office comptroller currency) hiring an outside company to wallpaper over lots of claims related to mortgage foreclosure settlement (suppose to find lots of mortgages were being fraudulently foreclosed).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#41 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#36 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#64 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#6 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#58 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#77 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence

part of the issue is that Promontory hired to perform the investigation and resolution ... had enormous gov. and too-big-to-fail connections (and the profit it turned on the deal is significant percentage of total money in the settlement for fraudulent foreclosure activity) ... even though it otherwise apparently had no expertise in dealing with mortgage foreclosures.

more on Promontory from today

SEC Ex-Chief Lands at Consultant; Schapiro Is Latest Former U.S. Regulator to Join Promontory Financial; 'No Revolving Door'
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324883604578396973470835516.html

Promontory Decides to Reinvest Part of its $1 Billion of Ill Gotten Gains from Botched Foreclosure Reviews By Buying Hiring Former SEC Chief Shapiro
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/04/promontory-decides-to-reinvest-part-of-its-1-billion-of-ill-gotten-gains-from-botched-foreclosure-reviews-by-buying-hiring-former-sec-chief-shapiro.html

Former SEC Chief Finds Consulting Firm Through Revolving Door
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/04/former-sec-chief-finds-consulting-firm-through-revolving-door.html

the following two items has graphics of the enormous number of former members of regulatory agencies:

Meet Mary Schapiro's New "Revolving Door" Employer
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-04-02/meet-mary-schapiros-new-revolving-door-employer

How Promontory Financial Became Banking's Shadow Regulator
http://www.arraydev.com/commerce/JIBC/2006-04/Grigg.asp

from above:
Sandy Weill is another fan. The former Citigroup CEO, who founded an education nonprofit where Ludwig is a board member, was Citi's nonexecutive chairman when the bank hired Promontory to overhaul its Japanese business

... snip ...

Related to Weill (head of citi) lobbying Washington to repeal Glass-Steagall (GLBA)

Judge questions fairness of Citigroup $590 million settlement
http://www.newsdaily.com/stories/bre9300mh-us-citigroup-settlement/

... and Rubin was co-chairman of Goldman-Sachs before becoming Sec. Treasury, GLBA passes Senate 6May1999, Rubin then resigns 1July1999 to join CITI
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramm%E2%80%93Leach%E2%80%93Bliley_Act

Runaway Exploitation; Plutocracy in America
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/01/plutocracy-in-america/

from above:
Then there is Robert Rubin. Rubin is the distilled essence of financial malpractice, and the embodiment of the government-Wall Street nexus that brought the country to wrack and ruin. Author of Clinton's deregulation program while Secretary of the Treasury: later super lobbyist and Chairman of CITI bank in the years before it was pulled from the brink of bankruptcy by Ben Bernanke, Paulson and Tim Geithner; and adviser to Barack Obama who stocked the new administration with Rubin proteges.

... snip ...

Relax! They've Got It Covered; Why Jamie Dimon's $2 Billion Gambling Loss Will NOT Speed Financial Reform
http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/05/15/why-jamie-dimons-2-billion-gambling-loss-will-not-speed-financial-reform/

the above includes this reference:
Back in 1986, Dimon was the bright young protege of "Sandy" Weill, when he was forced out of American Express in a coup de requin. Master and servant made their way to Baltimore, Maryland, where Weill acquired a storefront moneylending firm called Commercial Credit.

... snip ...

above also refers to Commercial Credit as loan sharking operation. Sandy was in competition with Gerstner to be next CEO of AMEX, Sandy looses and leaves.

Sandy (& Dimon) are making acquisitions, eventually taking over Citi in violation of Glass-Steagall, Greenspan gives him an exemption while he lobbies congress for the repeal of Glass-Steagall. Dimon leaves and eventually becomes CEO of JPMorgan.

Sandy Weill on the Times list of those responsible for the economic mess:
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877329,00.html
partial account of Glass-Steagall repeal
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/wallstreet/weill/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 02 Apr 2013 19:28:21 -0400
"Mike" <mike@mike.net> writes:
Yes, history reports many crimes. Much of the theft is by government, especially when its powers are not adequately limited. However, there are also examples of governments paying fair market value for property taken under eminent domain. So, we have three choices, live in anarchy in fear of everyone, live in tyranny in fear of an oppressively powerful government, or, for a brief time, live in a society with a limited government with restricted powers. Unfortunately, the third option is not stable because, over time, the populous will forget the reasons for restrictions on their government and will demand new services. This will grow government power to dangerous levels and tyranny will follow.

lot of government tyranny recently is on behalf of special interests ...

former comptroller general pointing out that medicare part-d would come to be a long term $40T unfunded mandate totally swamping all other budget items. cbs 60mins then did expose on the 18 people in congress involved in snaking the bill through passage and the (enormous) special gifts to the pharmaceutical industry ... and then after it passes, all 18 have resigned and are on drug industry payroll.

MI(C)C warnings in Eisenhower's goodby speech ... similarly all the stuff going with regulatory "capture" by wallstreet (i.e. wallstreet influencing regulatory agencies to ignore lots of criminal activity) ... analogy with MICC is FRCC (financial regulatory congressional complex) and PRCC (pharmaceutical regulatory congressional complex).

I'm currently reading "Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex" ... it has section on push to get enormously inflated enemy projections as part of justifying huge increase in military spending; the head of CIA wouldn't go along so President Ford replaces him with Bush (as head of CIA) who will gladly support the enormously inflated estimates ... aka various Team B references from recent post:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War

however it is tough slogging to get through all of the C-5A scandal ... plane that nobody really wanted (except the people getting the money), it was unable to fillful any of the states requirements supposedly justifying the project ... and the enormous cost overruns lining the builders pockets.

pg91/loc1573-76:
Proxmire responded that the C-5A "has little if anything to do with the real defense of this nation," further noting that the alleged "rapid deployment" capability of the plane had not even been adopted as official policy yet. He also noted that the $2 billion overrun on the C-5A was no small matter, equaling as it did over twice what the federal government was then spending on low- and moderate-income housing and almost as much as Washington spent annually on elementary and secondary education.

... snip ...

lots of stuff about lot of the things that justified doing C-5A ... that it turned out C-5A is unable to do ... possibly one of the biggest financial give-aways until the recent episode with the too-big-to-fail financial institutions (corporate welfare that dwarfs all other kinds). Part of it talks about company taking real bath on several weapons products as well as the L-1011 and it was facing bankruptcy if it couldn't get the federal government to bail it out (not just on C-5A overruns ... in fact part of L-1011 cost was apparently being hidden in C-5A costs).

various people are starting to liken the C-5A scandal with what is now going on with JSF/F-35.

recent posts about Eisenhower's warning and the MIC/MICC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#28 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#95 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Apr 2013 11:50:12 -0400
"James O. Brown" <job654@ax.com> writes:
These aren't tyranny, just bad government.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

tell it to the guy in the pentagon precurement office that blew the whistle on the c-5a scandle with loads of the nefarious dealings and enormous cost overruns. reference in "prophets of war" has a reference to one of the people from the company involved ... not only did they get him fired but the guy was blackballed and would be lucky to get a job cleaning toilets.

some of the recent whistle-blower references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#19 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

whistleblowers subject to lots of punitive action ... congress then sets up official government office to "protect" whistleblowers ... but it is acting much more like a decoy ... getting whistleblowers to waste enormous resources with the office rather than going some place else that could be significantly more productive (fox in charge of the hen house).

this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War

references:
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

relative of the chief of staff in the prior administration ... was dealing with the Iraq delegation to the UN ... and had loads of documentation that the justification for the invasion was pure fabrication. they get commited to military prison hospital where they are kept drugged.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Apr 2013 14:46:48 -0400
John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:
The FDIC doesn't buy or sell "exotics" other than selling off junk assets (known in the bank biz as REO or OREO) they inherited from dead banks.

Look at their very boring web site if you want to find out what they actually do.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#28 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing

The issue is FDIC insurance formulae is based on having some value left at an institution when it is backing deposits ... not expecting to have to use the FDIC insurance pool ($25B) to cover all insured deposits ($9T). In the current too-big-to-fail ... the derivative exposure ($300T) will totally loot the institution (since it is now senior to other financial obligations), leaving zero value left in the institution ... putting the FDIC insurance pool ($25B) at risk for the full amount of the insured deposits (possibly something less than the $9T but easily one to two orders of magnitude more than what is currently in the insurance pool).

And as the whistleblower and others have documented ... the FDIC so far has done little or nothing to correct that enormous risk exposure at the too-big-to-fail. Even just a single too-big-to-fail being looted by its derivative exposure ... has insured deposits way in excess of whats in the FDIC insurance pool. FDIC is suppose to be constantly monitoring the risk exposure at insured institutions and taking corrective action before there is nothing left. The current too-big-to-fail derivative exposure can easily totally wipe out a too-big-to-fail ... putting the FDIC on the hook for the full amount of the insured deposits ... enormously larger than the existing FDIC insurance pool.

some comments about plight of whistleblowers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#19 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#21 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

this guy was head of large bank examination ... and when he started finding stuff going wrong middle of last decade and insisted on documenting and reporting ... he was marginalized and eventually removed from the job. since his book has come out
http://www.amazon.com/American-Betrayal-ebook/dp/B00BKZ02UM/

he has recently gotten quite active about what he found and how he was treated in a number of linkedin discussion groups. part of the discussion are complaints about FDIC insurance premiums being increased for all banks to replenish the fund passed on subsidy for the too-big-to-fail (and not being liquidated and the executives going to jail).

US Deposits In Perspective: $25 Billion In Insurance, $9,283 Billion In Deposits; $297,514 Billion In Derivatives
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-19/us-deposits-perspective-25-billion-insurance-9283-billion-deposits-297514-billion-de

from above:
The $25 billion in touted deposit insurance is supposed to preserve and protect (granted not in their entirety) some $9,283 billion in total US deposits. A far bigger problem, however, is when one considers the "asset" side of the US banks' ledger: remember deposits are unsecured liabilities. And for US banks, sadly, over the counter derivatives represent the vast majority of "off the books" assets. According to the latest OCC quarterly report, the total derivative notional outstanding of the Top 25 holding companies is $297,514 billion, or nearly $300 trillion. In other words there are 32 times more notional derivatives than there are total deposits, while the ratio of gross derivatives to deposit insurance is a concerning 11,900-to-1.

... snip ...

And because the resolution to the most recent crisis was to prop up the too-big-to-fail institutions ... but not take any corrective actions, the scene is set for repeat on a larger scale

The Confiscation Scheme Planned for US and UK Depositors
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/28/the-confiscation-scheme-planned-for-us-and-uk-depositors/

referencing a joint FDIC/Bank-of-England document:
The 15-page FDIC-BOE document is called "Resolving Globally Active, Systemically Important, Financial Institutions." It begins by explaining that the 2008 banking crisis has made it clear that some other way besides taxpayer bailouts is needed to maintain "financial stability." Evidently anticipating that the next financial collapse will be on a grander scale than either the taxpayers or Congress is willing to underwrite

... snip ...

In the AIG scenario, a unit of the institution was taking CDS gambling bets (under the guise of insurance premiums) and booking it all as profit and distributing it. When they lost the gambling bets ... the institutions was on the hook to pay-out. They were negotiating a payout 50-60cents on the dollar for the CDS gamblings bets (ersatz insurance) when the secretary of treasury steps in and says 1) that it is illegal for AIG to pay less than 100cents on the dollar (just so happens to have been former CEO that AIG owned the most money to), 2) AIG has to take government bailout to pay full 100cents on the dollar and 3) AIG has to sign a document that it can't sue any of these players that made the CDS gambling bets.

When You Weren't Looking, Democrat Bank Stooges Launch Bills to Permit Bailouts, Deregulate Derivatives
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/when-you-werent-looking-democrat-bank-stooges-launch-bills-to-permit-bailouts-deregulate-derivatives.html

from above:
In the US, depositors have actually been put in a worse position than Cyprus deposit-holders, at least if they are at the big banks that play in the derivatives casino. The regulators have turned a blind eye as banks use their depositaries to fund derivatives exposures. And as bad as that is, the depositors, unlike their Cypriot confreres, aren't even senior creditors. Remember Lehman? When the investment bank failed, unsecured creditors (and remember, depositors are unsecured creditors) got eight cents on the dollar. One big reason was that derivatives counterparties require collateral for any exposures, meaning they are secured creditors. The 2005 bankruptcy reforms made derivatives counterparties senior to unsecured lenders. Lehman had only two itty bitty banking subsidiaries, and to my knowledge, was not gathering retail deposits. But as readers may recall, Bank of America moved most of its derivatives from its Merrill Lynch operation its depositary in late 2011.

... snip ...

other recent posts on the subject:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#29 Bank Holiday In Cyprus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#81 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#1 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Apr 2013 15:59:55 -0400
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
If every single US bank failed at the same time, FDIC is screwed. However, it's not funded for that, it's funded to handle less frequent failures of smaller banks (less than a couple of hundred each year recently, less than a dozen per year prior to 2008).

If the entire system failed, we'd have much larger problems than finding enough premium money in the FDIC to pay all claims.

Here's the list of failed banks since 2000 whose depositors have been made whole (up to the per-account limit):

http://www.fdic.gov/bank/individual/failed/banklist.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Not saying that the whole system has to fail ... say something like a $3T hit to a single too-big-to-fail depository institution derivative gambling ... the money that the depository institution has on hand from deposits is in common pool of the institution assets ... and the derivatives bets inside the depository institution have prior claim to using all assets of the institution for payoff (ahead of deposits)

Here is graphic of the 9 biggest bank derivative exposure
http://demonocracy.info/infographics/usa/derivatives/bank_exposure.html

a year ago, Chase was in the news with billion dollar hit in derivatives ... there were congressional hearings with their CEO and other executives who said it was all under control and that was the only problem. Recent hearings have turned up that what they said in the earlier hearings wasn't correct and it was several times that ... but still within their earnings for the year. above has total Chase exposure at $70T. conceivably they could have a $3T hit ... which would wipe out their depository institution. FDIC would then be on the hook for the total insured amount of those deposits (derivative exposure having totally wiped the institution out).

large bank division of FDIC is suppose to monitor the health & vitality of FDIC insured large banks ... and stop things well before total failure. what happened last decade were the too-big-to-fail ... in fact failed ... but with some slight of hand kept operating.

TARP appropriated $700B to buy the toxic assets held by the too-big-to-fail ... at close to face-value ... so the losses didn't take the institutions down.

however, just the four largest too-big-to-fail were carrying $5.2T in toxic assets off-book ... at the time, those toxic assets were going for 22cents on the dollar.
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home

if the toxic assets had to be brought back on book, the institutions would be insolvent and had to be liquidated (and the $700B wasn't sufficient to handle even the four largest too-big-to-fail) *AND* the FDIC insurance pool wasn't even enough to cover a single too-big-to-fail institution. There is an enormous amount of fabrication going on to maintain the fiction that these institutions didn't fail.

the problem being pointed out that besides the fiction covering up the enormous amount of off-book triple-A rated toxic CDOs ... if accounted for, would have the institutions failed, is the derivative gambling inside the depository institution.

The earlier issue is that while the off-book toxic assets fails the institution ... it doesn't totally wipe out all the deposits (the off-book toxic assets aren't actually in the depository institution) ... but the FDIC exposure for even these failed too-big-to-fail institutions would still be several times larger than the FDIC insurance pool.

the four largest too-big-to-fail with $5.2T in off-book toxic assets were failed institutions being propped up (these weren't directly in the depository institution unit insured by the FDIC) ... and FDIC now has an even bigger risk ... derivative gambling inside the depository institution units of the too-big-to-fail ... basically exposes all assets of these depository institutions being wiped out ... which then puts the FDIC insurance pool on the hook for the full value of those insured deposits.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Apr 2013 18:00:27 -0400
"James O. Brown" <job654@ax.com> writes:
Because there is no need to do that. And that's not a whistle blower, that's just someone who does not understand the basics.

re;
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#23 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

whistle-blower ... former head of large bank examination at FDIC
http://www.amazon.com/American-Betrayal-ebook/dp/B00BKZ02UM/

from above:
To protect the confidentiality of the innocent parties and to avoid further litigation by the wrongdoers, all names used in the book are fictitious, as is the name of the government regulatory agency. This book is the account of John Doe, MBA, CPA, whistleblower, certified examiner at the Financial Regulatory Agency. Mr. Doe has risen through the ranks in a long established professional career at the Financial Regulatory Agency spanning nearly 25 years. He headed up the Large Insured Depository Institutions program for nearly a decade leading up to the banking crisis. Agency officials removed him from the role once he made repeated disclosures to the Chairman at the agency, Ombudsman, Inspector General, and others about the deficiencies discovered in the agency's bank monitoring system. Mr. Doe currently has two formal legal complaints pending with the Office of Special Counsel and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Mr. Doe reluctantly became a whistleblower at the agency once he realized the government was a partner in enabling patterns of defective loans which sparked the recession. Like other government whistleblowers, Mr. Doe was ignored and silenced at the agency until stripped of all relevant duties without explanation after warning repeatedly that a "crisis of our own design" would lead to the bank failures that subsequently occurred. For example, he blew the whistle on a secrecy loophole that created a knowledge gap for risks by non-bank affiliates of consolidated bank holding companies -- the only Financial Regulatory Agency oversight of overall risks at institutions like Citigroup, Bank of America, Wachovia and Washington Mutual.


... snip ...

for whatever reason, between the time he wrote the book (published 13Feb2013) and now, he starts posting in linkedin financial & regulatory groups under his real name with additional details.

on times list of those responsible for economic mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

repeal of Glass-Steagall, and precluding derivatives from being regulated (including CDS gambling bets involving AIG), with some help from his wife, some recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

somewhere along the way, derivatives become subject to some regulation recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#9 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

for whatever reason derivatives fall under the jurisdiction of the Commodities Futures Trading Commission
http://www.cftc.gov/

which is under control of the Agriculture Committee

Why is the Agriculture Committee Deregulating Financial Derivatives?
http://maplight.org/content/73209

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Apr 2013 19:27:37 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#9 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#23 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#24 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

from fall 2011: "FDIC To Cover Losses On $75 Trillion Bank of America Derivative Bets"
http://problembanklist.com/fdic-to-cover-losses-on-trillion-bank-of-america-derivative-bets-0419/

from above:
Potential losses on Bank of America's massive $75 trillion book of risky derivative contracts has just been dumped onto the FDIC by the Federal Reserve.

Derivatives, once described by Warren Buffett as "financial weapons of mass destruction" are complex contracts entered into for speculation or to hedge risks linked to a wide variety of other (derivative) financial instruments such as currencies, commodities, interest rates, bonds, etc. In testimony to the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission in March 2011, Buffett warned that the trillions in derivatives held by major banking institutions could be "disruptive to the whole financial system" and that the risks were "virtually unmanageable."


... snip ...

above references:

BofA Said to Split Regulators Over Moving Merrill Derivatives to Bank Unit
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-10-18/bofa-said-to-split-regulators-over-moving-merrill-derivatives-to-bank-unit.html

and from last year:

Financial time bomb: Five megabanks monopolize $700 trillion derivatives market
http://www.examiner.com/article/financial-time-bomb-five-megabanks-monopolize-700-trillion-derivatives-market

also from last year (there where congressional hearings into the matter last year)

70 Trillion Reasons JP Morgan Is Too Big
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ron-galloway/70-trillion-reasons-jp-mo_b_1527013.html

from above:
If J.P Morgan can't get their arms around a $100 billion trade, how are they in a position to manage a derivatives portfolio 700 times that size? Their assets total $1.8 trillion, their derivatives total $70 trillion, so they, in effect, are leveraged 35 to 1. A 2% loss of value in this portfolio would be $3.5 trillion, the same size as the economy of Germany.

... snip ...

after the most recent congressional hearings into the same subject:

Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
http://compliancex.com/ex-bailout-watchdog-jpmorgans-actions-entirely-consistent-with-fraud/
Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions 'Entirely Consistent With Fraud'
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/15/neil-barofsky-jpmorgan_n_2884506.html
Neil Barofsky: $JPM's Accounting Process Appears Entirely Consistent With Fraud
http://ibankcoin.com/news/2013/03/16/neil-barofsky-jpms-accounting-process-appears-entirely-consistent-with-fraud/

and recent different kind of derivative issue:

How Wall Street Gets Development Agencies to Push Emerging Economies into Derivatives
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/04/how-wall-street-gets-development-agencies-to-push-emerging-economies-into-derivatives.html

from above:
Given what we now know about derivative instruments and markets -- they are complex, volatile, poorly regulated, crisis-prone, and dominated by very large financial firms -- the alliance between prominent global development agencies like the World Bank and UNCTAD and the derivatives industry gives real reason for concern. In fact, this appears to be yet another instance in which the interests of the development establishment seem grossly misaligned relative to the goals of the constituencies they purport serve.

... snip ...

Derivatives and Development
http://www.palgraveconnect.com/pc/doifinder/10.1057/9781137062659

and
http://demonocracy.info/infographics/usa/derivatives/bank_exposure.html

also from fall2011 "Derivatives and free trade":
http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Global_Economy/ML14Dj02.html

however the general theme sounds straight out of "Economic Hit Man"
http://www.amazon.com/Confessions-Economic-Hit-none-ebook/dp/B001AFF266/
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessions_of_an_Economic_Hit_Man

from above:
Economic hit men (EHMs) are highly-paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. They funnel money from the World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), and other foreign "aid" organizations into the coffers of huge corporations and the pockets of a few wealthy families who control the planet's natural resources.

... snip ...

and this theme about wallstreet doing over $27T in securitized loans

Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

past posts mentioning derivatives:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#82 Break the rules of governance and lose 4.9 billion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#51 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#53 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#60 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#19 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#34 The human plague
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#35 The human plague
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#82 Greenspan testimony and securization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#24 Why not build a shared services infrastructure to support the banking sector?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#60 Did sub-prime cause the financial mess we are in?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#67 What is securitization and why are people wary of it ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#51 Will the Draft Bill floated in Congress yesterday to restrict trading of naked Credit Default Swaps help or aggravate?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#38 People to Blame for the Financial Crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#53 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#55 Who will give Citigroup the KNOCKOUT blow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#65 is it possible that ALL banks will be nationalized?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#10 Who will Survive AIG or Derivative Counterparty Risk?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#13 Typewrite repair?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#14 Legacy clearing threat to OTC derivatives warns State Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#16 The Formula That Killed Wall Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#18 HSBC is expected to announce a profit, which is good, what did they do differently?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#28 I need insight on the Stock Market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#42 Bernard Madoff Is Jailed After Pleading Guilty -- are there more "Madoff's" out there?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#61 Quiz: Evaluate your level of Spreadsheet risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#63 Do bonuses foster unethical conduct?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#0 What is swap in the financial market?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#8 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#13 Should we fear and hate derivatives?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#23 Should FDIC or the Federal Reserve Bank have the authority to shut down and take over non-bank financial institutions like AIG?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#35 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#2 CEO pay sinks - Wall Street Journal/Hay Group survey results just released
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#29 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#38 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#51 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#5 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#7 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#8 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#33 Treating the Web As an Archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#76 Undoing 2000 Commodity Futures Modernization Act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#17 REGULATOR ROLE IN THE LIGHT OF RECENT FINANCIAL SCANDALS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#54 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#74 Administration calls for financial system overhaul
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#77 Financial Regulatory Reform - elimination of loophole allowing special purpose institutions outside Bank Holding Company (BHC) oversigh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#35 what is mortgage-backed securities?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#48 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#56 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#84 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#51 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#77 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#61 70 Years of ATM Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#54 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#28 Our Pecora Moment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#67 The Python and the Mongoose: it helps if you know the rules of engagement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#38 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#68 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#36 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#61 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#29 Ernst & Young sued for fraud over Lehman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#85 Two terrific writers .. are going to write a book
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#38 On Protectionism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#52 Are Americans serious about dealing with money laundering and the drug cartels?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#41 Advice from Richard P. Feynman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#30 Regulators seek to plug derivatives data gaps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#46 Sand in Machine Makes a Stable Market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#54 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#56 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#74 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#41 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#62 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#28 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#70 No One Telling Who Took $586B in Fed Swaps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#74 Derivatives and free trade
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#80 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#83 Heading For World War III | Gerald Celente Trends Blog
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#87 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#31 US real-estate has lost $7T in value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#5 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#11 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#69 Memory versus processor speed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#57 speculation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#59 Why Hasn't The Government Prosecuted Anyone For The 2008 Financial recession?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#77 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#5 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#26 US economic update. Everything that follows is a result of what you see here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#45 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#58 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#64 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#29 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#76 Naked emperors, holy cows and Libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#77 'Inexperienced' RBS tech operative's blunder led to banking meltdown
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#85 Naked emperors, holy cows and Libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#94 Naked emperors, holy cows and Libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#15 Naked emperors, holy cows and Libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#25 This Is The Wall Street Scandal Of All Scandals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#36 UH-OH: $220 Million May Be Missing From Brokerage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#38 Four Signs Your Awesome Investment May Actually Be A Ponzi Scheme
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#39 History--punched card transmission over telegraph lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#58 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#36 JPMorgan Chase slammed by regulators for control failings after botched derivatives bet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#77 OT: but hopefully interesting - Million core supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#30 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#28 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#29 Bank Holiday In Cyprus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#81 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#82 What Makes Economic History Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#88 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
Date: 2 Apr 2013
Blog: IBMers
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#3 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#17 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM

... repost, a little x-over from the "defining product" discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#18 What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?

... disclaimer: during the Future System period I would continue to work on 360/370 stuff and periodically ridicule the FS efforts ... in part claiming what I already had running was better than lots of stuff they were just dreaming about:

Maybe it is more like the control of creativity and commitment. This is quote from Amdahl interview about killing the advanced computing 360 project:
IBM management decided not to do it, for it would advance the computing capability too fast for the company to control the growth of the computer marketplace, thus reducing their profit potential. I then recommended that the ACS lab be closed, and it was.

... snip ...

detailed discussion of ACS here:
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

Amdahl then leaves and starts his own 360 clone processor company. Shortly afterwards, IBM starts the future system project to completely replace 360/370 ... during which time 370 efforts are being killed-off/suspended. The lack of 370 products during this period is then credited with giving clone processors a market foothold. The death of future system is then described as having a disastrous effect on the corporate culture ... (from "Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World", Time Book,s Ferguson & Morris) ... the culture morphed from encouraging vigorous debate to sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers. misc. references to future system effort here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

Note that IBM still had fairly tight control of the "big blue" commercial accounts ... so Amdahl early market penetration was at research and educational institutions. Then one of the largest "big blue" commercial accounts announced that it was going to install an Amdahl machine. I was asked to go on-site to try and turn the situation around. I knew the people and account well, periodically dropping by their location ... the decision for installing Amdahl had nothing to do with technical reasons (and they were going to do it regardless of my efforts, it had to do with some internal IBM issues and my being on-site was purely to obfuscate and misdirect the internal politics) . I was then told if I didn't do it, I could forget any career in the IBM company. After that first initial "big blue" commercial account, things got a lot easier for Amdahl.

Note that at the end of the ACS reference, it discusses features of ACS 360 that finally show up in ES/9000, 20yrs later ... aka from the annals of shipping no hardware before its time.

current news: Seagate Ships World's First 4TB HD With Four 1TB Platters
http://techcrunch.com/2013/04/03/seagate-ships-worlds-first-4tb-hd-with-four-1tb-platters-2/

note that some time go ibm san jose disk plant site sold to hitachi ... and then last year it was sold to western digital
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HGST
and
http://www.hgst.com/

lots of the buildings on the plant site are gone:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=5600+Cottle+Road,+San+Jose,+CA&hl=en&sll=38.814031,-77.23938&sspn=4.429472,3.059692&oq=5600+cottle+r&hnear=5600+Cottle+Rd,+San+Jose,+Santa+Clara,+California+95123&t=h&z=16

bldg 28 was the old san jose research bldg (before almaden was built), it is where the original relational/sql implementation was done on a vm370 370/145 system. it was in the corner formed by cottle rd & 85 (when 85 was built, it took part of the back 28 parking lot) ... misc past posts mentioning system/r
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

in the satellite photo it still shows bldg 14 & bldg 15 .... disk engineering and disk product test.

long ago and far away, bldg. 14 disk engineering development was doing 7x24, pre-scheduled, stand-alone testing on a variety of mainframes. They had tried running MVS to allow concurrent testings, but MVS in that environment had 15min MTBF (hang/fail, requiring re-boot) with just a single testcell. I offered to rewrite the I/O supervisor to make it bullet-proof and never fail so they could do on-demand, concurrent testing with any number of testcells (significantly increasing productivity). They would then try and suck me into playing disk engineer any time there was a problem. misc. past posts getting to play disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

Later I wrote up the effort in an internal-only publication and happen to mention the MVS 15min MTBF ... which resulted in bringing down the wrath of the MVS organization on my head (they would have fired me if they could figure out how ... but from then on they would try and make my career unpleasant).

In the wake of the failure of Future System and the major culture change to make no waves and sycophancy, there was also major change with much greater emphasis on internal corporate image management and managing the flow of information up the corporate structure.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
Date: 3 Apr 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Likely Largest Journalism Collaboration In History
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/likely-largest-journalism-collaboration-history

Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.icij.org/offshore
How ICIJ's Project Team Analyzed the Offshore Files
http://www.icij.org/offshore/how-icijs-project-team-analyzed-offshore-files
Secret Files Expose Offshore's Global Impact
http://www.icij.org/offshore/secret-files-expose-offshores-global-impact
Taxmen Have Little Clue of Offshore Companies Owned by Greeks
http://www.icij.org/offshore/greek-tax-authorities-have-little-clue-about-offshore-companies-owned-citizens
Ferdinand Marcos' Daughter Tied to Offshore Trust in Caribbean
http://www.icij.org/offshore/ferdinand-marcos-daughter-tied-offshore-trust-caribbean
Disclosure of secret offshore documents may force top Mongolian lawmaker to resign
http://www.icij.org/offshore/disclosure-secret-offshore-documents-may-force-top-mongolian-lawmaker-resign
Canadian Senator's Husband Shifted Money Into Offshore Tax Havens
http://www.icij.org/offshore/canadian-senators-husband-shifted-money-offshore-tax-havens
Offshore companies provide link between corporate mogul and Azerbaijan's president
http://www.icij.org/offshore/offshore-companies-provide-link-between-corporate-mogul-and-azerbaijans-president
'Crony' of African Strongman Among Thai Names in Secret Offshore Files
http://www.icij.org/offshore/mugabe-crony-among-thai-names-secret-offshore-files
Mega-Rich Use Tax Havens to Buy and Sell Masterpieces
http://www.icij.org/offshore/mega-rich-use-tax-havens-buy-and-sell-masterpieces

older ...

in 2009 irs going after 52,000 (off-shore)
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2009/04/03/first-american-client-charged-in-ubs-tax-shelter-probe/
U.S. starts new amnesty for offshore tax cheats
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/08/us-usa-taxes-amnesty-idUSTRE7174K920110208
and IRS Watchdog Critiques Offshore Tax Amnesty
http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertwood/2011/12/04/irs-watchdog-critiques-offshore-tax-amnesty/
two yrs later congress cutting enforcement funding:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/28/irs-budget-cuts-deficit_n_850243.html
item on $330B in uncollected taxes (but funds cut for collecting)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/11/irs-funding-cuts-congress_n_847741.html
and by 2011 listed as $400B
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2015503714_taxgap04.html
then seems to mostly evaporate
http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertwood/2011/12/03/no-jail-in-ubs-tax-evasion-case/

Tax Justice Network: Wealth Held in Tax Havens Skyrockets
http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2012/07/22/tax-justice-network-wealth-held-in-tax-havens-skyrockets/
Wealthy hiding $21 trillion in tax havens, report says
http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/07/22/tax-havens.html
$US21 trillion 'hidden in tax havens'
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-07-23/31-trillion-dollars-hidden-in-tax-haven/4147114
Tax Justice Network: Wealth Held in Tax Havens Skyrockets
http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2012/07/22/tax-justice-network-wealth-held-in-tax-havens-skyrockets/
Wealthy hiding $21 trillion in tax havens, report says
http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/07/22/tax-havens.html
$US21 trillion 'hidden in tax havens'
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-07-23/31-trillion-dollars-hidden-in-tax-haven/4147114
This has estimate between $21T and $32T:
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2012/08/pirate-banking-21-to-32-trillion-in-estimated-tax-haven-money-managed-by-big-global-banks.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 03 Apr 2013 21:54:38 -0400
latest news with some promise:

The Growing Sentiment on the Hill For Ending 'Too Big To Fail'
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/the-growing-sentiment-on-the-hill-for-ending-too-big-to-fail-20130403

part of the article:
Back on February 20th, Bloomberg published a piece called "Why Should Taxpayers Give Big Banks $83 Billion a Year?" The piece cited new research (which backed up a previous study by Dean Baker and Travis McArthur a the Center for Economic and Policy Research) showing that the Too-Big-to-Fail status of certain big banks provides a massive silent subsidy.

... snip ...

also refernces:

Gangster Bankers: Too Big to Jail; How HSBC hooked up with drug traffickers and terrorists. And got away with it
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/gangster-bankers-too-big-to-jail-20130214

other financial fraud from today:

Likely Largest Journalism Collaboration In History
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/likely-largest-journalism-collaboration-history
How ICIJ's Project Team Analyzed the Offshore Files
http://www.icij.org/offshore/how-icijs-project-team-analyzed-offshore-files
Secret Files Expose Offshore's Global Impact
http://www.icij.org/offshore/secret-files-expose-offshores-global-impact

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 04 Apr 2013 13:38:47 -0400
kenney writes:
If this is like the European systems depositors are protected not bank creditors. In other words bond holders etc. have no recourse to the protection. In the UK there is only protection up to 85,000 sterling and other countries have a limit of 100,000 euros. What is more the UK only protects one deposit per banking group so if you have an account with RBS accounts with subsidiaries of RBS will not be protected. In Cyprus it is only account holders with more than 100,000 euros in accounts that are affected by the money grab.

the FDIC insurance pool is based on having lots of bank examiners constantly monitoring financial institutions and supposedly interrupting extremely risky behavior ... i.e. like criminal and fraudulent behavior is stopped before the depository institution is completely looted ... so the FDIC insurance pool just has to make up the short fall in institutional assets to the insured amount (not planned that the insurance pool is there to completely satisfy the total amount of insured deposits at large institution).

the issue with allowing derivatives in the depository institution is 1) all assets of the depository institution are held in common ... not reserved solely for deposits and 2) using institution assets to pay off derivatives are senior/priority to using assets for deposits. the total insured deposits in even one of the too-big-to-fail is orders of magnitude larger than the current FDIC insurance deposits ... and current derivative liability could trivially wipe out all assets of large depository institution ... queuing up the FDIC insurance pool needing to provide the funds for the total amount of the insured deposits (enormously larger than the amount of funds currently in the FDIC insurance pool).

The whistleblower account is that during the bubble of the last decade ... the extremely risky behavior of the too-big-to-fail didn't actually go unnoticed ... but was actually spotted and reported before it got so bad that it was enough to wipe out the institution (and created liability that was enormously larger than the amount of money in the FDIC insurance pool; even w/o the enormously larger financial risk exposure of allowing derivatives into the depository institution). The whistleblower explanation is more reasonable than saying that all the FDIC examination and monitoring efforts are so inadequate that nobody noticed a thing ... aka the 3-monkeys scenario of the competence of all gov. regulatory agencies (billions has pumped into their budgets that serves no useful purpose):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_wise_monkeys

Somewhat supporting the whistleblower account (of gov. regulatory agencies turning a blind eye), one of the cbs 60mins exposes was that at least Federal Reserve and SEC had people sitting on-site at Lehman for six months before Lehman imploded. On one hand there is an implication that they thought the problems were serious enough to put people on-site, but afterwards they effectively claim that nobody saw any indication of problems (which seems to be logical inconsistency, aka you know things are so bad that you need people living onsite, but then there are no indiciations of problems).

The label too-big-to-fail isn't because those institutions hadn't crossed the threashold necessary to take down the instituion ... too-big-to-fail label came into existance because under normal circumstances those institutions would have failed if it hadn't been for extrodinary efforts behind the scenes with the Federal Reserve propping them up (and ignoring various accounting and audit standards).

The whole TARP appropriations for buying toxic assets being some sort of facade, misdirection and obfuscation ... since just the toxic assets held off-book by the four largest too-big-to-fail the end of 2008 was nearly ten times the amount of the TARP appropriations (making the actual total amount of toxic assets needing to be dealt with over ten times the amount appropriated for TARP).

recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#23 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#24 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#28 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

the is reference to jointly authored paper by FDIC and Bank of England, that since the risky activities that led up to the most recent financial crisis haven't been corrected ... it is building up to happening again (when, not if) ... and the various organizations that were able to prop up the too-big-to-fail last time won't be doing it again.

The Confiscation Scheme Planned for US and UK Depositors
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/28/the-confiscation-scheme-planned-for-us-and-uk-depositors/

from above:
The 15-page FDIC-BOE document is called "Resolving Globally Active, Systemically Important, Financial Institutions." It begins by explaining that the 2008 banking crisis has made it clear that some other way besides taxpayer bailouts is needed to maintain "financial stability." Evidently anticipating that the next financial collapse will be on a grander scale than either the taxpayers or Congress is willing to underwrite

... snip ...

a few past posts using the 3-monkeys reference regarding gov. regulatory agencies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#87 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#91 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#20 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#55 U.S. Needs a National Safety Board for Financial Crashes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#56 Why Hasn't The Government Prosecuted Anyone For The 2008 Financial recession?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#67 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#42 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#45 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#10 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#37 Naked emperors, holy cows and Libor

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

April 1st RFCs

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: April 1st RFCs
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 04 Apr 2013 13:51:49 -0400
Internet has had long tradition of April 1st RFCs ... my RFC index
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm

clicking on Term (term->RFC#) in the RFCs listed by brings up RFC numbers by term. Searching on "April1" gets you:

April1
6921 6919 6593 6592 6217 6214 5984 5841 5514 5513 5242 5241 4824 4042 4041 3751 3514 3252 3251 3093 3092 3091 2795 2551 2550 2549 2325 2324 2323 2322 2321 2100 1927 1926 1925 1924 1776 1607 1606 1605 1437 1313 1217 1149 1097 852 748


clicking on the RFC number, brings up that RFC summary in the lower frame. The two newest for this year arer 6921 and 6919

6921 I
Design Considerations for Faster-Than-Light (FTL) Communication, Hinden R., 2013/04/01 (7pp) (.txt=15100) (Refs 2598, 2679, 4838) (was draft-hinden-FTL-design-considerations-00.txt)

6919 E
Further Key Words for Use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement Levels, Barnes R., Kent S., Rescorla E., 2013/04/01 (6pp) (.txt=11076) (Refs 493, 2616, 3207, 3501, 5888, 5988, 6120, 6376, 6733) (was draft-barnes-2119bis-00.txt)


clicking on the ".txt=" field in the RFC summary fetches that RFC.

going back to 748
748
Telnet randomly-lose option, Crispin M., 1978/04/01 (2pp) (.txt=2741)


--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 Apr 2013 11:56:01 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
On 4/4/2013 1:38 PM, Anne & Lynn Wheeler wrote:
This is just wrong. Who the heck came up with this? Of course, doesn't the FDIC reverse this? It pays off the depositors and has first claim (I believe) on any of the bank's assets remaining.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#29 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

aka ... issue with FDIC apparently objecting to Federal Researve having $75 trillion in risky derivative contracts moved from Bank America's holding company into the depository institution (part insured by FDIC).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#29 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

"FDIC To Cover Losses On $75 Trillion Bank of America Derivative Bets"
http://problembanklist.com/fdic-to-cover-losses-on-trillion-bank-of-america-derivative-bets-0419/
BofA Said to Split Regulators Over Moving Merrill Derivatives to Bank Unit
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-10-18/bofa-said-to-split-regulators-over-moving-merrill-derivatives-to-bank-unit.html

other stories from the period was that Federal Reserve was strong-arming BofA to take-over Merrill ... when BofA found that lots of the Merrill financials had been fudged (possibly with the the knowledge of Federal Reserve), BofA tried to back out; Federal Reserve then used all sorts of threats and inducements to get BofA to go through with the deal.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 Apr 2013 12:22:39 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Boyd had story about reviewing the air force air-to-air missile (before vietnam) ... they claimed it would hit every time ... Boyd investigated and said it would hit 10% or less. Come vietnam, air force was loosing lots of air-to-air battles. air force commander/general in vietnam grounds all fighters until they are switched over to navy swindwinder air-to-air missles (had about twice the hit rate of the air force missile). he lasted three months before being removed from command and brought back to pentagon. He is called on the carpet for reducing air force budget share (loosing less fighters and pilots that require replacements) ... and even worse ... he was increasing navy budget share (by using navy air-to-air missiles).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#16 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

use of more efficient sidewinders reduced amount of money going to weapons merchants, reduced number of lost fighters, etc

Lots of the news about disastrous effect of sequestering on Pentagon budget ... however, except for elimination of war spending, DOD budget is still near all time high (and Iraq war is heading to 100 times the $50B number used in the original justification, much of it going to contractors and weapons merchants). The issue is the enormous influence of the beltway bandits, gov. contractors and weapons merchants; as the theme in Eisenhower's goodby speech warnings about MICC ... i.e. their objective isn't the integrity and safety of the country, but quarterly profits. The end of spending on the wars represents a big hit to the those that have quarterly profits as their holy grail ... and sequestering makes it more difficult to come up with fabrication to replace that war-based revenue stream with something else.

For example, Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex has number of stories about weapon sales to potential enemies, as well as lobbying for continued spending on failed/faulty weapons, all in the pursuit of quarterly profits. Eisenhower's warnings about MICC (and sacrificing everything in the pursuit of quarterly profits) continues to be echoed in Spinney's Perpetual War
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html
and
http://www.challengemagazine.com/extra/054_069.pdf

some of the actual military belt-tightening is part of attempt to maintain the flow of money to the industry part of MICC (and especially their executives).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 Apr 2013 12:59:12 -0400
hancock4 writes:
In my area's last congressional election, the Democratic incumbent candidate was a combat veteran while the Republican challenger was not. The Republican won. Interestly, a challenger for 2014 who just announced in a multiple-tour combat veteran.

part of the issue is conservatives seemed to more and more aligned with the large special interests (with significant part of increase in government spending going to line the pockets of those special interests) ... and a lot of soldiers were sacrificed in wars where the justification was largely fabricated ...

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#46 The China Threat: The MICC Pivots Obama Back to the Future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#30 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#37 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#44 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#49 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#59 The Madness of King George Revisited
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#95 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#98 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#16 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#21 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#32 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 Apr 2013 13:15:15 -0400
"Charlie Gibbs" <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
Greenbar at 8 lpi was actually pretty readable. And 8 1/2-inch paper also was much less likely to overflow your desk onto the floor when you had multiple listings open.

An added advantage was that this paper fit into standard legal-size file folders and cabinets - bulky and expensive filing systems were not required.


I'm not sure I ever got use to the squeezed 8lpi greenbar (i.e. same number lines/page ... 60/6 = 10in, 60/8 = 7.5in) ... but it was smaller. Not long after we started using 8lpi ... the plant site got microfiche printer ... and we could start doing output there ... I could have a complete set of all source listings and documentation at home on several hundred microfiche (typically single module source listing per microfiche, lots of the microfiche only had dozen or so pages ... i.e. mostly blank).

home desk with 300baud cdi miniterm, compact microfiche viewer and corporate "tieline" phone (still rotary) ... late 70s.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/miniterm.jpg

home miniterm

past posts mentioning above:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#12 Now early Arpanet security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#15 The Genealogy of the IBM PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#79 Book: "Everyone Else Must Fail" --Larry Ellison and Oracle ???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#37 Baudot code direct to computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#38 Baudot code direct to computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#51 Baudot code direct to computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#13 Typewrite repair?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#30 Timeline: 40 years of OS milestones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#45 Netbooks: A terminal by any other name
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#31 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#32 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#34 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#40 My "Green Screen" IBMLink is still working
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#53 Memories Of CompuServe, Prodigy And Other Dinosaurs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#66 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#27 August 7, 1944: today is the 65th Anniversary of the Birth of the Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#63 tty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#27 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#69 someone smarter than Dave Cutler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#14 Program Work Method Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#19 Program Work Method Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#75 What is the protocal for GMT offset in SMTP (e-mail) header
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#66 Win 3.11 on Broadband
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#75 IBM and the Computer Revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#15 I actually miss working at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#17 Hey all you Old Geeks (and younger ones too), with gas heading towards $6.00/gal, remote support, satellite offices and home office will become more cost effective
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#28 program coding pads
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#21 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#45 CRLF in Unix being translated on Mainframe to x'25'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#25 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#52 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

New HD

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: New HD
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 Apr 2013 15:29:26 -0400
Gerard Schildberger <gerard46@rrt.net> writes:
How about (VM/CP) PER?

We used VM for testing/developing/initializing/installing new MVS systems (mostly newer releases, features, subsystems ...), and many times, MVS' SLIP couldn't be used as MVS didn't get out (past) NIP.

VM (CP) was a godsend as it could trace each instruction (if that's what was wanted) up to the fail point (most often a wait state).

PER wasn't part of the original VM/370 of course, but came later. I don't remember which MVS had SLIP introduced.


I've mentioned before redoing VM370s IPCS to demonstrate the power of rexx ... dumprx
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

I had thot it would be shipped in place of the standard IPCS ... but never did ... although it came to be used by nearly every internal datacenters and nearly all of the internal customer support PSRs. I did finally get permission to do presentations on it at user group meetings ... after which there were similar implementations done within a couple months (my starting statement about demo'ing power of rexx that I would do a IPCS replacement in less than 3 months elapsed time, working on it no more than half time ... and it would have ten times the function and ten times the performance).

I remember something about person at Univ. of Maine doing a lot of enhancements and IBM hiring him ... old vmshare entry mentioning Univ. of Maine "PER" being incorporated into vm/sp 3.
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/browse?fn=WHATSPER&ft=MEMO

with quite sophisticated boolean logic regarding conditions ... current implementation
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/zvm/v5r4/topic/com.ibm.zvm.v54.hcpb2/hcse8b11.htm

down in section "Tracing Programs in Your Virtual Machine "

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 Apr 2013 15:45:19 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
original Winslow article appears here:

Error Report; Is there a government conspiracy to save the F-35?
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/03/22/error_report


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

followup today in response to GAO trying to counter Winslow critique

Why GAO's Defense of Its F-35 Investigation Worries Me Even More; Whatever Happened to the GAO?
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/05/whatever-happened-to-the-gao/

from above:
All is not well in the GAO. The agency's retort to my criticisms is flawed; it seems to validate my concerns, and actually, it increases them.

... snip ...

GAO Stands by Its F-35 Report
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/03/29/gao_stands_by_its_f35_report

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 Apr 2013 19:21:16 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#23 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#24 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#28 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#29 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#31 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

with only $25B in FDIC insurance pool ... and too-big-to-fail depository institutions with couple trillion in deposits, being allowed to take on liabilities in the large tens of trillions ... which could completely wipe out the institution. current FDIC insurance pool somewhat assumes that the FDIC bank examinars will catch and stop risky behavior well before assets of large institution are totally depleted.

Think Your Bank Deposits Will Always Be 100 Percent Guaranteed by the FDIC? Think Again.
http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/15500-think-your-bank-deposits-will-always-be-100-percent-guaranteed-by-the-fdic-think-again

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 05 Apr 2013 20:12:40 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Those are the major wars. There are plenty of minor or ongoing conflicts to fill in the gaps.

part of perpetual wars.

Marine's "Small Wars Manual" ... written in the mid-30s to detail what they had learned in various encounters (lots of later discussion that it could have been better used in vietnam)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Wars_Manual

however, "War Is a Racket" written about the same time by decorated Marine General about the same events ... efforts were in support of wallstreet plundering countries
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

"Invisible Armies" is look at the above and a lot more over the years
http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Armies-History-Guerrilla-ebook/dp/B007P9M034/

recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#26 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#30 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#44 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#98 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#16 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
Date: 6 Apr 2013
Blog: IBMers
I use to sponsor John Boyd's briefings at IBM. He was top instructor at Air Force weapons school and then went on to significantly improve the F15&F18 designs and also responsible for the F16. However, by the time he died, the Air Force had pretty much disowned him (they tried hard to have him thrown in Leavenworth for designing the F16 ... on the excuse that he wasn't authorized to do it and was using millions of dollars of "stolen" supercomputer time for the design effort) ... it was the Marines that were in Arlington Cemetery for his ceremony.

The commandant of the Marine Corps
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_M._Gray,_Jr.
(in the gray url, linkedin truncates the trailing period) leveraged Boyd in the late 80s and early 90s for a make-over of the corp and Boyd's effects went to the Marine Corps library (archives) at Quantico. Marine Corps also sponsors annual Boyd conference at the Marine Corps University.
"There are two career paths in front of you, and you have to choose which path you will follow. One path leads to promotions, titles, and positions of distinction.... The other path leads to doing things that are truly significant for the Air Force, but the rewards will quite often be a kick in the stomach because you may have to cross swords with the party line on occasion. You can't go down both paths, you have to choose. Do you want to be a man of distinction or do you want to do things that really influence the shape of the Air Force? To be or to do, that is the question." Colonel John R. Boyd, USAF 1927-1997

From the dedication of Boyd Hall, United States Air Force Weapons School, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. 17 September 1999


The Boyd display in the Quantico library lobby is the only non-Marine.

for other trivia, Gray's picture is also here:
http://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic_heritage/hall_of_honor/
for 2008
http://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic_heritage/hall_of_honor/2008/index.shtml

As I've commented before the Future System effort in the early 70s was to completely replace 360/370. "Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World", Time Books, Ferguson & Morris, discuss the period ... top executives invested quite a bit of their career in it ... it took a long time to kill ... even after it was evident it wasn't going to work, because of the executive career investment. One of their observations was that the failure cast dark shadow over IBM for decades; the culture of vigorous debate under the Watsons changed to sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers (after the failure). misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

even some IBM content ... this Boyd biography
http://www.booknotes.org/Watch/158365-1/Robert+Coram.aspx

mentions Boyd doing tour in command of "spook base" ... Boyd would comment that the datacenter was largest air conditioned bldg in that part of the world. The biography also mentions "spook base" being a $2.5B "wind fall" for IBM (around $17.5B in today's dollars). old reference to "spook base" gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine (has some references to IBM gear):
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

One of the attendees that has been at the past couple Quantico Boyd conferences ... who may or may not have been associated with these ... about Marine Corps backsliding after Gray's makeover
http://www.mca-marines.org/gazette/attritionist-letters-archives

Testimonial to Boyd in the Navy institute proceedings
http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/1997-07/genghis-john
also here
http://web.archive.org/web/20011224132049/http://www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt

Besides To Be or To Do ... Boyd also created OODA-loop

recent reference by one of Boyd's acolytes: Any OODA is better than no OODA
http://slightlyeastofnew.com/2013/04/07/any-OODA-is-better-than-no-ooda/

regarding this recent OODA-loop article at Forbes:

What a Fighter Pilot Knows About Business: The OODA-Loop
http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidkwilliams/2013/02/19/what-a-fighter-pilot-knows-about-business-the-OODA-loop/

posts & URLs referencing Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
Date: 6 Apr 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#1 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#7 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#8 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

re: pecora commission, legal chicanery and pitch darkness

Stock Trading Heading to Dark Pools to Avoid Regulation
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/04/stock-trading-heading-to-dark-pools-to-avoid-regulation.html

As Market Heats Up, Trading Slips Into Shadows
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/01/business/as-market-heats-up-trading-slips-into-shadows.html

Wall Street is embracing its dark side.

Think Your Bank Deposits Will Always Be 100 Percent Guaranteed by the FDIC? Think Again.
http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/15500-think-your-bank-deposits-will-always-be-100-percent-guaranteed-by-the-fdic-think-again

US Deposits In Perspective: $25 Billion In Insurance, $9,283 Billion In Deposits; $297,514 Billion In Derivatives
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-03-19/us-deposits-perspective-25-billion-insurance-9283-billion-deposits-297514-billion-de

$25B in the insurance pool and over $9T in deposits, some assumption that FDIC bank examiners will stop fraudulent and risky behavior before all assets are depleted in the depository institution ... however, even assuming the bank examiners are effective ... putting derivatives in the depository could let hundreds of billions (or more) go in a too-big-to-fail w/o much to stop it.

"FDIC To Cover Losses On $75 Trillion Bank of America Derivative Bets"
http://problembanklist.com/fdic-to-cover-losses-on-trillion-bank-of-america-derivative-bets-0419/
BofA Said to Split Regulators Over Moving Merrill Derivatives to Bank Unit
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-10-18/bofa-said-to-split-regulators-over-moving-merrill-derivatives-to-bank-unit.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

It's a Banker's World

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: It's a Banker's World
Date: 6 Apr 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
It's a Banker's World
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/04/its-a-bankers-world/

from above:
Sixteen banks at the core of the global financial system -- including JP Morgan, Bank of America, and Citigroup -- scored a major victory last Friday when a federal judge dismissed nearly all the charges brought against them by a group of plaintiffs that includes municipal governments, pension funds, bondholders, and other investors who lost billions of dollars as a result of LIBOR rigging.

...

Strangely, the judge's order (available here) acknowledged the massive global fraud that caused financial damages to the public in favor a few wealthy institutions. However, Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald relied on technical legal arguments to throw out the core claims of the lawsuit. In other words, the ruling doesn't deny that the crime occurred and that the Plaintiffs sustained serious damages, but still dismisses the claims.


... snip ..

How the Financial Plutocracy Tugs the Leash on the Two-Party Duopoly
http://truth-out.org/progressivepicks/item/15491-how-the-financial-plutocracy-tugs-the-leash-on-the-two-party-duopoly

A Rare Look at Why the Government Won't Fight Wall Street
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/a-rare-look-at-why-the-government-wont-fight-wall-street-20120918
The Payoff: Why Wall Street Always Wins
http://www.amazon.com/Payoff-Wall-Street-Always-ebook/dp/B008Y4TY92/

recent posts mentioning LIBOR
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#35 Does the UK Government Really Want us to Report Fraud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#1 Libor Lies Revealed in Rigging of $300 Trillion Benchmark
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#4 Libor Lies Revealed in Rigging of $300 Trillion Benchmark
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#28 Neil Barofsky: Geithner Doctrine Lives on in Libor Scandal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#7 LIBOR: Viewing the Biggest Financial Crime in History

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
Date: 6 Apr 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Wells Fargo's "Reprehensible" Foreclosure Abuses Prove Incompetence and Collusion of OCC
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/04/wells-fargos-reprehensible-foreclosure-abuses-prove-incompetence-and-collusion-of-occ.html

from above:
This story is back in the news thanks to an appeals court smackdown of Wells, which has engaged in a long-standing war of attrition with one of the plaintiffs, a Michael Jones. The reason for the appeal was that the bank was fighting the judge's imposition of punitive damages of $3.1 million for Wells' "reprehensible" conduct.

... snip ...

more on Promontory

SEC Ex-Chief Lands at Consultant; Schapiro Is Latest Former U.S. Regulator to Join Promontory Financial; 'No Revolving Door'
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324883604578396973470835516.html

Promontory Decides to Reinvest Part of its $1 Billion of Ill Gotten Gains from Botched Foreclosure Reviews By Buying Hiring Former SEC Chief Shapiro
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/04/promontory-decides-to-reinvest-part-of-its-1-billion-of-ill-gotten-gains-from-botched-foreclosure-reviews-by-buying-hiring-former-sec-chief-shapiro.html

Meet Mary Schapiro's New "Revolving Door" Employer
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-04-02/meet-mary-schapiros-new-revolving-door-employer

above has graph/diagram of former gov. officials

Former SEC Chief Finds Consulting Firm Through Revolving Door
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/04/former-sec-chief-finds-consulting-firm-through-revolving-door.html
How Promontory Financial Became Banking's Shadow Regulator
http://www.arraydev.com/commerce/JIBC/2006-04/Grigg.asp

from above:
Sandy Weill is another fan. The former Citigroup CEO, who founded an education nonprofit where Ludwig is a board member, was Citi's nonexecutive chairman when the bank hired Promontory to overhaul its Japanese business

... snip ...

Related to Weill (head of citi) lobbying Washington to repeal Glass-Steagall (GLBA)

Judge questions fairness of Citigroup $590 million settlement
http://www.newsdaily.com/stories/bre9300mh-us-citigroup-settlement/

... and Rubin was co-chairman of Goldman-Sachs before becoming Sec. Treasury, GLBA passes Senate 6May1999, Rubin then resigns 1July1999 to join CITI
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramm%E2%80%93Leach%E2%80%93Bliley_Act

Runaway Exploitation; Plutocracy in America
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/01/plutocracy-in-america/

from above:
Then there is Robert Rubin. Rubin is the distilled essence of financial malpractice, and the embodiment of the government-Wall Street nexus that brought the country to wrack and ruin. Author of Clinton's deregulation program while Secretary of the Treasury: later super lobbyist and Chairman of CITI bank in the years before it was pulled from the brink of bankruptcy by Ben Bernanke, Paulson and Tim Geithner; and adviser to Barack Obama who stocked the new administration with Rubin proteges.

... snip ...

Relax! They've Got It Covered; Why Jamie Dimon's $2 Billion Gambling Loss Will NOT Speed Financial Reform
http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/05/15/why-jamie-dimons-2-billion-gambling-loss-will-not-speed-financial-reform/

the above includes this reference:
Back in 1986, Dimon was the bright young protege of "Sandy" Weill, when he was forced out of American Express in a coup de requin. Master and servant made their way to Baltimore, Maryland, where Weill acquired a storefront moneylending firm called Commercial Credit.

... snip ...

above also refers to Commercial Credit as loan sharking operation. Sandy was in competition with Gerstner to be next CEO of AMEX, Sandy looses and leaves.

Sandy (& Dimon) are making acquisitions, eventually taking over Citi in violation of Glass-Steagall, Greenspan gives him an exemption while he lobbies congress for the repeal of Glass-Steagall. Dimon leaves and eventually becomes CEO of JPMorgan.

Sandy Weill on the Times list of those responsible for the economic mess:
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877329,00.html
partial account of Glass-Steagall repeal
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/wallstreet/weill/

GAO Report on Independent Foreclosure Reviews Exposes OCC, Fed's Plan to Deliberately Minimize Evidence of Borrower Harm
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/04/david-dayen-gao-report-on-independent-foreclosure-reviews-expose-occ-feds-plan-to-deliberately-minimize-evidence-of-borrower-harm.html

Foreclosure Review Scrapped On Eve Of Critical Watchdog Report, Congressman Says
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/31/foreclosure-review_n_2389431.html

FORECLOSURE REVIEW Lessons Learned Could Enhance Continuing Reviews and Activities under Amended ConsentOrders
http://www.scribd.com/doc/133984607/GAO-Report-on-the-Independent-Foreclosure-Review

Lessons Learned Could Enhance Continuing Reviews and Activities under Amended Consent Orders
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-13-277

Launching Our First (Free) Ebook on the OCC/Fed Foreclosure Review Fiasco
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/04/launching-our-first-free-ebook-on-the-foreclosure-review-fiasco.html

from above:
The GAO released its report on them yesterday, and even though it was narrow in focus, it confirmed, as Dave Dayen reported, that the IFR was poorly designed, inconsistently implemented, and subjected to changing guidelines. Elizabeth Warren and Elijah Cummings will be meeting with the OCC and the Fed on Tuesday April 9 to grill them on their sorry performance in the IFR. On Thursday the 11th, Sherrod Brown will be holding hearings in the financial institutions and consumer protection subcommittee. Maxine Waters has also said she will be introducing legislation next week to curb regulators' use of third party consultants.

We are distributing copies to Elizabeth Warren and Elijah Cummings and to Sherrod Brown and the members of his subcommittee.


... snip ...

past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#41 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#16 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#27 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#36 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#47 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#64 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#6 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#58 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#77 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 Apr 2013 11:09:20 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
You need to find out how the bean counters got hired and/or who they are.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#36 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

it wasn't how they got hired ... it is if they speak up, they get removed.

this previous post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#21 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

mentions the person (bean counter) that blew the whislte on (lockheeds) C-5A scandal ... got fired, blackballed and would be lucky to get a job cleaning toilets.

This goes into lot more detail: "Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex"
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

somewhat makes the point that in the C-5A scandle period ... there was at least some appetite in major institutions (congress, national press, etc) to take up such matters ... which appears to be sadly lacking these days.

this is reference to Boyd biography
http://www.booknotes.org/Watch/158365-1/Robert+Coram.aspx

after this article, the SECDEF tried to have Spinney thrown in jail for releasing classified information
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953733-1,00.html
sometimes behind paywall so also
http://web.archive.org/web/20070320170523/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953733,00.html

It was 30 Years Ago Today...
http://nation.time.com/2013/02/28/it-was-30-years-ago-today/

Boyd would say that they spent 18months getting written permission for everything in Spinney's congressional testimony (the time article was based on the testimony) about financial analysis of various pentagon projects. When the SECDEF couldn't get Spinney jailed, he directed that Boyd be banned from the Pentagon for life. However, Boyd had some congressional backing and the SECDEF had to back down. There seems to be little of that integrity these days.

There was a recent reference to petition to award Manning the Nobel Peace prize. A reference to contents of some of the leaked cables at wikileaks was that the company that had the big oil drill blow-out in the gulf, had a similar blow-out in the Caspian Sea a few years ago ... both caused by the same defect. there was big coverup of the Caspian Sea incident and some question about whether knowledge of the previous accident might have resulted in significantly larger liability in the most recent incident.

Spinney's "The Domestic Roots of Perpetual War "
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html
and some of the ins and outs of the Pentagon, "The Pentagon Labyrinth" by Chuck and some other Boyd associates
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/pentagon-labyrinth.html

misc. past posts & URL references mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

PGP and Navy SEALs take on privacy

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: PGP and Navy SEALs take on privacy
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 Apr 2013 14:12:34 -0400
Silent Circle aims for email that's as secure as it gets; PGP and Navy SEALs take on privacy
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/04/06/silent_circle_private_email_expansion/

from the above
It's been 22 years since Phil Zimmerman, Jon Callas and the rest of the PGP crew brought encryption to the masses for free, and now the same team -- augmented by backing from a couple of former Navy SEALs -- has expanded into a new privacy concern that will launch an email service in a couple of weeks.

... snip ...

for the fun of it, some old crypto related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#crypto

including this old discussion about PGP-like email implementation (32yrs ago)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email810506
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email810515

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 Apr 2013 15:00:32 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
with only $25B in FDIC insurance pool ... and too-big-to-fail depository institutions with couple trillion in deposits, being allowed to take on liabilities in the large tens of trillions ... which could completely wipe out the institution. current FDIC insurance pool somewhat assumes that the FDIC bank examinars will catch and stop risky behavior well before assets of large institution are totally depleted.

Think Your Bank Deposits Will Always Be 100 Percent Guaranteed by the FDIC? Think Again.
http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/15500-think-your-bank-deposits-will-always-be-100-percent-guaranteed-by-the-fdic-think-again


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#37 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

so this discussion:

US Bank Depositors Unlikely to Take Losses
http://my.firedoglake.com/masaccio/2013/04/04/us-bank-depositors-unlikely-to-take-losses/

then goes on how a too-big-to-fail depository institution and its parent holding company could be totally wiped out ... putting FDIC on the hook for the full amount of the insured deposits.

looking at some numbers for a too-big-to-fail, total deposits: $1.2T, other debt $950B, total net worth of enterprise $204B. Trading liabilities $132B of which $71B is derivatives payable (total amount of derivatives held is $70T, 1000 times as much). It mentions:
That is because derivatives are given special protections by Dodd-Frank.

... snip ...

with only $25B in the FDIC insurance pool ... FDIC potentially needs to raise a trillion someplace in case of such a failure

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
Date: 6 Apr 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#27 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze

International Consortium Of Investigative Journalists Lifts Veil On Offshore World
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/international-consortium-of-investigative-journalists-lifts-veil-on-offshore-world-2013-04-03
Leaks reveal secrets of the rich who hide cash offshore; Exclusive: Offshore financial industry leak exposes identities of 1,000s of holders of anonymous wealth from around the world
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/apr/03/offshore-secrets-offshore-tax-haven
ICIJ's Offshore Data Raid on the Global Elite's Financial Secrets
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/453611/20130404/offshore-icij-bvi-british-virgin-global-banks.htm
Offshore secrets: unravelling a complex package of data
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/apr/04/offshore-secrets-data-emails-icij
ICIJ Journalists Expose Mass Web of Global Tax Evasion
http://www.spiegel.de/international/business/icij-journalists-expose-mass-web-of-global-tax-evasion-a-892505.html
ICIJ's Offshore Data Raid on the Global Elite's Financial Secrets Global Elite
http://theglobalelite.org/icijs-offshore-data-raid-on-the-global-elites-financial-secrets/

Mapping The Witch-Hunt Of The World's Offshore Bank Account Holders
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-04-04/mapping-witch-hunt-worlds-offshore-bank-account-holders
Inside the global offshore money maze
http://www.publicintegrity.org/2013/04/03/12421/inside-global-offshore-money-maze
Offshore tax havens rocked by bank account leaks
http://www.euractiv.com/euro-finance/offshore-financial-industry-suff-news-518882
Massive offshore tax haven account leak includes names of 450 wealthy Canadians
http://business.financialpost.com/2013/04/03/massive-offshore-tax-haven-account-leak-includes-names-of-450-wealthy-canadians/

Hundreds did jail time in S&L: crisis ... but nobody this time ... seems like the crooks have gotten much better at corrupting the infrastructure.

Big national press and special interests ... its not just financial industry ... there was recent item from wikileaks that the process responsible for the gulf oil well failure/blowout ... had a similar failure in the caspian sea a few years earlier and there was big coverup (involving the same company). part of the issue with that coverup was whether knowledge of it would have drastically increased the liability following the gulf "accident".

Highlights of Offshore Leaks So Far
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/highlights-offshore-leaks-so-far

Offshore Expose: Bigger Than Wikileaks' "Cablegate"
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/offshore-expose-bigger-wikileaks-cablegate

Who Uses the Offshore World
http://www.icij.org/offshore/who-uses-offshore-world

others getting into the act:

Caribbean go-between provided shelter for far-away frauds
http://www.publicintegrity.org/2013/04/04/12447/caribbean-go-between-provided-shelter-far-away-frauds

from above:
This is the story of behind-the-scenes players in the Magnitsky affair -- and the tale of how an offshore go-between provided shelter to fraudsters, money launderers and other shady characters from Russia, Eastern Europe and the United States.

... snip ...

ongoing ...

Release of Offshore Records Draws Worldwide Response
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/release-offshore-records-draws-worldwide-response
Why We Are Not Turning Over the Offshore Files to Government Agencies
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/why-we-will-not-turn-over-offshore-files-government-agencies
Lawyers and Accountants Help Rich Manage Their Money
http://www.icij.org/offshore/trusted-service-provider-blends-invisible-offshore-world

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 Apr 2013 15:31:53 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#23 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#24 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#28 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#29 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#31 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#37 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#45 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

for the fun of it:

The Problem of Ignorance; The Decline of Critical Thinking
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/05/the-decline-of-critical-thinking/

from above:
In 2008 Rick Shenkman, the Editor-in-Chief of the History News Network, published a book entitled Just How Stupid Are We? Facing the Truth about the American Voter (Basic Books). In it he demonstrated, among other things, that most Americans were: (1) ignorant about major international events, (2) knew little about how their own government runs and who runs it, (3) were nonetheless willing to accept government positions and policies even though a moderate amount of critical thought suggested they were bad for the country, and (4) were readily swayed by stereotyping, simplistic solutions, irrational fears, and public relations babble.

... snip ...

Just How Stupid Are We?: Facing the Truth About the American Voter
http://www.amazon.com/Just-How-Stupid-Are-ebook/dp/B003ULOBVA/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 Apr 2013 16:10:25 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
You need to find out how the bean counters got hired and/or who they are.

I've posted this before (from Oct1998) ... preface to Spinney's testimonial to Boyd
http://web.archive.org/web/20011224132049/http://www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt

from above:
It should now be clear to most readers of this list the Defense Department is not adapting to the changing conditions brought about by the end of the Cold War: We have a modernization plan that can not modernize the force structure, a readiness nose dive, and a corrupt accounting system that makes it impossible to figure out how to solve the modernization and readiness problems. Moreover, while threats are changing, the Pentagon remains mired in a defense program inspired by the tired thinking of the cold war--a condition that is exacerbated and sustained by the pork barrelling pressures of the military-industrial-congressional complex. The crisis inspires the most basic question of all -- Ready for What? -- a question that seems forgotten by the courtiers inhabiting the five-sided halls of Versailles on the Potomac

... snip ...

that he wrote that appeared in the US Naval Institute proceedings:
http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/1997-07/genghis-john

things have gotten any better over the past 15yrs.

past posts &/or URLs referencing Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#44 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#49 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#95 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#16 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#32 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#43 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 Apr 2013 18:47:57 -0400
Ibmekon writes:
With so much "monopoly money" slopping around - it is no surprise to find people exchanging cash for solid investments -

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3007893


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#45 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

you might like this:

The Fed's Manipulation of the Bullion Market; The Assault on Gold
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/05/the-assault-on-gold/

from above:
Intelligent people could see that the US government could not afford the long and numerous wars that the neoconservatives were engineering or the loss of tax base and consumer income from offshoring millions of US middle class jobs for the sake of executive bonuses and shareholder capital gains. They could see what was in the cards, and began exiting the dollar for gold and silver.

... snip ...

it goes on to say that Federal Reserve started spreading rumors and naked shorting ... to influence the market ... saying that when the Federal Reserve does it, it isn't illegal (it is like when members of congress partake of insider trading, it isn't illegal)

... however, sounds a lot like
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

mentions that while everybody on wallstreet does it and its illegal, there is nothing to fear from the SEC.

re: executive bonuses (and corporate profits) there is also offshoring theme of hiding money in tax havens. In the past couple years there were estimates of between $21T and $32T hidden in offshore tax havens as well as IRS chasing at least $400B in (known) uncollected taxes. The recent news is that there has been a couple hundred gigabyte dump from companies specializing in offshore tax havens. recent references (over on linkedin ... but archived here):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#27 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshoare Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#46 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshoare Money Maze

they are estimating that there is enough data for investigative reporters and articles through the rest of 2013 and possibly into 2014.

misc past threads in afc mentioning (job) offshoring
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#28 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#31 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#45 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#55 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#67 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#71 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#81 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#85 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#28 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#57 OT: The dynamics of the Indian IT industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#29 Offshore IT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#34 Thoughts on Utility Computing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#37 Thoughts on Utility Computing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#56 Offshore IT ... again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#48 Thoughts on Utility Computing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#2 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#18 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#7 U.S. Cedes Top Spot in Global IT Competitiveness
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#46 India is outsourcing jobs as well
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#36 Students mostly not ready for math, science college courses
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#44 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#57 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#73 Computer Science Education: Where Are the Software Engineers of Tomorrow?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#90 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#91 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 06 Apr 2013 21:25:27 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Lots of the news about disastrous effect of sequestering on Pentagon budget ... however, except for elimination of war spending, DOD budget is still near all time high (and Iraq war is heading to 100 times the $50B number used in the original justification, much of it going to contractors and weapons merchants). The issue is the enormous influence of the beltway bandits, gov. contractors and weapons merchants; as the theme in Eisenhower's goodby speech warnings about MICC ... i.e. their objective isn't the integrity and safety of the country, but quarterly profits. The end of spending on the wars represents a big hit to the those that have quarterly profits at their holy grail ... and sequestering makes it more difficult to come up with fabrication to replace that war-based revenue stream with something else.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#32 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

government contractors appear doing well even thru sequestering (... so any axes falling someplace else)

Why Defense Stocks Soared Through The Sequester
http://www.businessinsider.com/boeing-lockheed-bae-why-defense-company-stocks-are-soaring-through-the-sequester-2013-4

from above:
"There was a great deal of fear about sequestration, and some of that is proving a bit overdone," Richard Aboulafia, a defense analyst at the Teal Group, told The Hill. "While it's a softer budget outlook, it's still a very big market. It's not as though we're experiencing the same kind of drawdown we saw after the Cold War."

... snip ...

this talks about the industry (as in MICC industry) surviving lots of other budget cuts

Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

MICC found a theme with larger quarterly profits with long drawn out failing projects ... always requiring more and more funding

Success of Failure
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

recent posts mentioning growing Success of Failure culture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 10:49:00 -0400
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
The sequestration does not actually exist. It is just the politicians running around making noises. A 5% reduction in government spending will require at least 5% of the civil servants to be fired. I have not seen any join the dole queue.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#75 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#16 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#32 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#33 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

there is lots of discussions about the ratio of flag-officers (requires congressional approval) to non-officers keeps growing over the years (navy has many more admirals than ships) the percent of budget going to industry and contractors is way up. there is enormous pressure and congressional lobbying to grow that part of budget ... at the same time decreasing overall budget ... so who gets the squeeze?

How bad is our bloat of generals? How does it compare to other armies
http://fabiusmaximus.com/2012/09/10/american-military-force-changed-43153/
Pentagon cuts general and flag positions to reduce top-heavy force
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2011/sep/27/star-creep-pentagon-cuts-general-and-flag-position/

above was 2011, i recently saw something that while they announced cuts in flag-officers, it never actually happened, they actually slightly increased ... all smoke and mirrors.

part of Boyd's briefings was at result of deploying large number of unskilled/inexperienced solders for ww2 was rigid, top-down, command&control structure to leverage the few experienced. part of that required large "middle management" ... aka officers ... at 11% growing to 20%. He contrasted that with ww2 german army with 3% officers.

Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

so one of the gimmicks to keep MICC funds and quarterly profits after fall of soviet union ... was to lobby congress to make all the former soviet satellites members of NATO with requirement that they have interoperable equipment. this required enormous purchases of weapons from US MICC (claim that Lockheed is the world's largest weapons merchant) ... which in turn required large amounts of US foreign aid that could only be used for buying specific US weapons (none of this shows up in DOD budget). All of this required large amount of MICC congressional lobbying.

One of the rounds of NATO increase was group of candidate members were told that if they voted in the UN for US invasion of Iraq ... their application for NATO membership would be viewed much more favorably. This enormously increases MICC quarterly profits 1) military action in Iraq(&Afghanistan) increases weapons needed by military 2) further expansion of NATO members and new customers for US military equipment, and 3) the wars last decade saw enormous increase in the roles played by military/civilian contractors (recent GAO report that $60B in iraq improvement projects by US contractors have little or nothing to show; shades of "Economic Hit Man" ... part of original justification for Iraq invasion was that it would *ONLY* be $50B ... it is now heading for 100 times that).

part of the issue ... is ordinary deployments by military personnel doesn't significantly contribute to MICC quarterly profits. MICC lobbying of congress would be to have cutbacks fall disproportionally on numbers and activities of military/gov personnel ... as part of preserving the part of budget going to MICC quarterly profits.

echos of the primary focus of Eisenhower's goodby speech.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

32760?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: 32760?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 7 Apr 2013 08:11:10 -0700
PaulGBoulder@AIM.COM (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
The PARMDD rules, like much of JCL, (will) fall squarely in category (2). Circa 1964, there was an excuse: IBM was in a desperate rush to get OS/360 out the door and into revenue. Things _should_ be different in the 21st Century. z/OS is vastly more complex than OS/360 and proportionally more consideration should have been given to usability.

shades of SHARE LSRAD report (Dec1979) ... I scanned my copy and finally got SHARE permission to put up on bitsavers
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/share/

on the other hand ... there is this on canceling ACS-360
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

from Amdahl interview:
IBM management decided not to do it, for it would advance the computing capability too fast for the company to control the growth of the computer marketplace, thus reducing their profit potential. I then recommended that the ACS lab be closed, and it was.

.... snip ...

goes on to describe how features from ACS-360 eventually show up in ES/9000 twenty years later (from annals of release no hardware/software before its time).

other recent posts mentioning ACS-360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#73 One reason for monocase was Re: Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#46 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#47 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#65 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#67 relative speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#19 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#22 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#18 What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#26 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 11:36:59 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
they have? Iraq shows that changing mindsets didn't work. Part of the mess is not realizing when the war changed from one kind to another (analyses taken from that book I told you about-- Three Circles of War). Obama and his administration have serious problems which can be described as denial; the mess in Lybia was inundated with this denial.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

there have been accounts of planning for invasion of Iraq started as soon as Bush took office ... well before 9/11.

however, "Prophets of War" has members of the team that Bush brought on had been working on invasion of Iraq before Bush was elected. Some of this was when Bush was governor and pushing for "privatizing" of all texas social services ... and give it all to Lockheed. Some of the account of how it all fell apart was Lockheed documents showing that part of the way they were going to guarantee large profit was new requirements for eligibility (amount of the money from state to Lockheed didn't decrease ... but Lockheed had lot of new schemes of why not to pass it on to recipients; expose helped torpedo the whole project). Others date back to when some were advisors during the previous Bush's term in office.

Incorrect assumption was there was any starting mindset which then needed to change ... there was always objective of skimming off hundreds of billions ... as MICC has done in lots of other projects ... it was "low-ball" the initial numbers ... aka part of the justification for invasion of Iraq was that it would only cost $50B ... if they had given the actual estimate, it would have never been approved ... as it is, it is on the way to being 100 times the original estimate ... how many projects do you know of where the cost-overrun was factor of 100 times (not 100%, but 10,000%)? Part of the blow-up in costs was huge expansion in contractors, private armies, etc. ... all part of increasing quarterly profits for the MICC.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#59 The Madness of King George Revisited
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#32 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#51 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 11:59:18 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

note that "Prophets of War" ... mentions that some members of the most recent Bush2's term in office had also been members of Team B ... Team B having long history of inflated threats in support of huge amount of appropriations for MICC industries and their quarterly profits.

References to Team B show up in a number of books and accounts about MICC activities ... it dates back to when CIA wouldn't inflate Soviet Union threats and Ford replaced the head of CAI with Bush1 ... who would embrace the inflated projections.

recent posts mentioning Team B:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

besides "Prophets of War" ... other recent books/articles I've read that mention Team B

The Neocons Won
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/29/the-neocons-won/
Ike's Bluff
http://www.amazon.com/Ikes-Bluff-President-Eisenhowers-ebook/dp/B0076DCPI4/
National Security
http://www.amazon.com/National-Insecurity-American-Militarism-ebook/dp/B00ATLNI04/
Merchants of Doubt
http://www.amazon.com/Merchants-of-Doubt-ebook/dp/B003RRXXO8/

Team B wiki page
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_B

although other accounts mention that Colby was specifically replaced with Bush1 to get somebody that would embrace Team B

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 12:28:50 -0400
greymaus <maus@mail.com> writes:
As someone quoted in one of the groups "It took a brave man to be a coward in the Red Army". I think that about 25% of those captured got home to Russia, and that was because at onepoint the Germans discovered that they needed the POWs to work the farms. About 5% of the troops captured in Stalingrad got home, about 50% of those captured in Operation Bagration. Germans were getting home well into the late 50's. Lesson: "Don't get involved in Wars"

there was episode of "Foyle's War" involving prisoners of war being sent back to russia ... a prisoner in england being transproted to sea port to ship to take them back to russia ... tried to escape and was shot and killed. investigation eventually revealed that churchill had cut a secret deal with stalin to return all prisoners of war ... but they were being put to death on return.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 14:25:36 -0400
Stephen Sprunk <stephen@sprunk.org> writes:
Cheap? So far we've spent $1.44 _trillion_ on wars since 2001. Think of all the other things we could have done with that kind of money.

and that is just part that was funneled thru the pentagon.

"Ike's Bluff" has him with lifetime of military service so he had some experience with MICC fabrication. He was able to recognize the "bomber gap" for pure fabrication (needing large thousands of new heavy bombers because the soviets had large thousands) ... in part based on knowing how pentagon/MICC operated and in part having U2 reconnaissance from the CIA showing it was all fabrication. It was part of the motivation for Eisenhower turning his goodby speech into warnings about the MICC.

There was also some about CIA being somewhat independent source of information as countermeasure to fabrications coming out of pentagon and MICC ... the explanation of replacing Colby with Bush1 as head of CIA was Bush1 embracing the fabrications of Team B ... and quieting some of the counter arguments against the MICC fabrications (enormous forces behind making continuous quarterly profits).

original justification for the invasion of Iraq was it would only cost $50B ... estimates are that it is going to be closer to 100 times that (when long-term costs are factored in, like VA medical and other benefits). There has been lots written about how MICC low-balls estimates in order to get approval and then goes on to have enormous cost overruns ... however 100 times cost overrun has got to be an all time high.

recent Team B posts/references:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 14:40:14 -0400
for even more topic drift:

Owl: US Department of Justice Now in Business of Shutting Down Web Sites Telling the Plain Truth
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2013/04/owl-us-department-of-justice-now-in-business-of-shutting-down-web-sites-telling-the-plain-truth/

points to this:

The U.S. Government Is Suing Barrett Brown's Intelligence Research Site
http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/the-doj-is-suing-barrett-browns-intelligence-research-site

which has this to say about "level 3" (artificial) web personalities
It states that the "most detailed character[s]" also known as a "Level 3" are "required to conduct human-to-human direct contact likely in-person to satisfy some more advanced exercise requirements."

... snip ...

I didn't know what to call them, but I've periodically wondered if we didn't have some here.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#23 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#24 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#28 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#29 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#31 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#37 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#45 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#47 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#49 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
Date: 7 Apr 2013
Blog: IBMers
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#39 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,

as Jim was leaving for Tandem ...he was palming various things on me, DBMS consulting with the IMS group, interacting with customers that had installed the original relational/SQL implementation, etc. ... as well as authoring "MIP Envy" ... from ibmjargon:

MIP envy - n. The term, coined by Jim Gray in 1980, that began the Tandem Memos (q.v.). MIP envy is the coveting of other's facilities - not just the CPU power available to them, but also the languages, editors, debuggers, mail systems and networks. MIP envy is a term every programmer will understand, being another expression of the proverb The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

... snip ...

The internal network was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until late '85 or early '86 ... and I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s; folklore is that when the executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.

"MIP Envy" ... a version here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email800920
also copy here:
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/gray/papers/MIPEnvy.pdf

wasn't what kicked off "Tandem Memos" ... it was kicked off with a trip report I authored and distributed after visiting Jim at Tandem; comparing Tandem with IBM. One of the explanations given for why I wasn't fired was that there was an estimated 27,000 employees reading "Tandem Memos" (for the most part the executive committee hadn't known that the internal network &/or online computer conferencing existed). from ibmjargon:

Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

Before Jim left, one of the things we tried to concoct was some killer application that would get IBM middle management and upper executives to use computers ... for the most part they were totally computer illiterate. That would make a big distinction with the Marines ... where the claim was an attempt to make every Marine a rifleman first.
http://www.futurejarheads.org/everymarinearifleman.htm

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 16:31:44 -0400
Ibmekon writes:
The English ones are described here -

http://www.prospects.ac.uk/intelligence_analyst_officer_job_description.htm

To any spymasters lurking, I am looking for work...


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#57 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

and now back to your regularly scheduled programming ...

Wall Street power player: We're incentivized to cheat; Jim Chanos, an early detector of Enron's fraudulent practices, explains our dysfunctional banking system
http://www.salon.com/2013/04/03/wall_street_power_player_were_incentivized_to_cheat_partner/

Fiduciary Duty to Cheat? Stock Market Super-Star Jim Chanos Reveals the Perverse New Mindset of Financial Fraudsters; American business has always had cheaters and crooks, but today they are escaping prosecution and are incentivized to cheat more.
http://www.alternet.org/economy/fiduciary-duty-cheat-stock-market-super-star-jim-chanos-reveals-perverse-new-mindset

above claims to be the first in new series on wallstreet fraud ... it would make a companion to what ijij is claiming will be long series of articles through the rest of 2013 and possibly into 2014 into offshore tax havens and tax dodgers.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#57 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

in any case, the topic came up in the congressional hearings into the rating agencies and their selling "Triple-A" ratings for toxic CDOs (and that both the sellers and the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-a rating). The testimony was that the rating agencies business process was mis-aligned and they were incented to do the wrong thing. The availability of triple-A ratings was a major factor in over $27T being done.

How the Financial Plutocracy Tugs the Leash on the Two-Party Duopoly
http://truth-out.org/progressivepicks/item/15491-how-the-financial-plutocracy-tugs-the-leash-on-the-two-party-duopoly

A Rare Look at Why the Government Won't Fight Wall Street
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/a-rare-look-at-why-the-government-wont-fight-wall-street-20120918
The Payoff: Why Wall Street Always Wins
http://www.amazon.com/Payoff-Wall-Street-Always-ebook/dp/B008Y4TY92/

LIBOR Litigation to Recoup Damages After the Biggest Financial Fraud in World History has been Thrown Out It's a Banker's World
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/04/its-a-bankers-world/

from above:
Strangely, the judge's order (available here#1) acknowledged the massive global fraud that caused financial damages to the public in favor a few wealthy institutions. However, Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald relied on technical legal arguments to throw out the core claims of the lawsuit. In other words, the ruling doesn't deny that the crime occurred and that the Plaintiffs sustained serious damages, but still dismisses the claims.

#1
http://www.scribd.com/doc/133125164/Order-on-Motion-to-Dismiss-in-Re-LIBOR-Based-Financial-Instruments-Anti-Trust-Litigation


... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 18:40:43 -0400
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
You are covering the reasons why Uncle Joe was a hero in 1944 but Stalin was the Cold War enemy in 1947.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#55 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

"The Wars for Asia, 1911-1949"
http://www.amazon.com/Wars-Asia-1911-1949-ebook/dp/B0096R1NZ4/

highlights that in WW2, Japan had over 2/3rds of its resources deployed on mainland China and Germany had 3/4ths of its resources deployed against the Soviets ... made it lot easier on the US in the conflicts it was fighting.

recently discussed in this boyd discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers

my wife's dad was command of 1154th engineering combat group in ETO ... towards the end frequently out in front of other units where he was ranking officer in some number of surrenders and/or liberations. I found his status reports at national archives and made copies. old afc post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#82

picture of "dagger" board ... some of the german officer daggers given to him as part of surrenders.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#39

after ETO end of hostilities, he was sent to Nanking as advisor to the Generalissimo. old afc post (scanned the cover of his MAGIC id card):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#38

he took his family with him and this references the family airlifted out of Nanking in army cargo plane when the city was ringed (landing at Tsing Tao airfield after dark ... lit by headlights of cars&trucks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#36

they lived on USS Repose in Tsing Tao harbor for 3months.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

32760?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: 32760?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 7 Apr 2013 16:27:31 -0700
charlesm@MCN.ORG (Charles Mills) writes:
Culture is a key here.

IBM's background was in punched cards. IBM's strength in punched card tabulating is what transferred over to their success in computer data processing. They never forgot that.

Many other computer systems' analog of the punched card was punched paper tape.

We see that legacy today. z/OS's model of a file is one of discrete records with "hard" boundaries. UNIX's model of a file is a continuous undifferentiated stream of characters.

BASIC and FORTRAN both used sequence numbers as "labels" but they were on the left, not the right, correct?

Speaking of not portable program formats, didn't Symbolic Optimal Assembly Program (SOAP) optimize code speed by scattering instructions around a drum such that the next instruction to be executed was just coming under the read head?


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#52 32760?

this chronicals that 360 was suppose to be an ASCII machine ... but because of some scheduling constraints and being able to leverage old BCD card machines ... it was supposedly temporarily done as EBCDIC ... "one of the biggest computer goofs ever":
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM

CP67/CMS was distributed from science center to customers in full source form ... and maintenance was distributed as CMS "UDPATE" files ... that relied on sequence numbers (and process was heavily used by customers for their changes/fixes).

At the university, I was making so many source changes ... that I did a preprocessor to the CMS UPDATE program that figured out the sequence numbers to put into cols. 73-80 ... that were then inserted into the working source file ... so that sequence numbers proceeded in sequential increasing order (so I didn't have to manually type in the sequence numbers on every insert).

Later, the cp67/cms multi-level source update process was added, a wrapper cms exec file that iteratively applied a series of source updates in sequential order to source working file before assembly.

I had archived all of it ... and when Melinda was looking for the early history of multi-level source process ... I was able to pull off the original files. This turned out to be fortunate timing ... since even tho I had multiple copies archived on multiple tape files ... all the tapes were in the Almaden datacenter tape library ... and a couple months later they went through a period where operations were pulling random tapes from the tape library for scratch tapes (and destroyed lots of my files from 60s up through the late 70s).

some old email with Melinda
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email850906
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email850906b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email850908

later support was added to CMS editor ... so that edit changes to base source file were stored as source update file ... as opposed to storing replacement for the original file.

melinda's history tomes here:
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/

a UNIX convention (rather than "updates") ... was to do "downdates" ... the most recent file is taken as current and to get earlier versions, "downdates" are applied to regress to earlier version(s).

the CMS convention was to have stable base ... and then to apply some number of update changes.

in the SOAP case, the drum continued to rotate while the fetched instruction was executed (before the processor was ready to fetch the next instruction) ... the objective was to not have to do another full rotation to get to the next sequential instruction to execute.

vm370 paging did something similar, but different on DASD starting with 3330s. 3330 paging & spool areas were formated three 4k records per track with 19 tracks per cylinder. vm370 tried to maximize all queued record i/o transfers (for same cylinder) per revolution with single channel program. the idea was if you had queued request for the 1st record from one track and another for the 2nd record on a different track ... insert a seek head between the channel command for the 1st record and the channel command for the 2nd record.

The problem is that the fetch and execution of a seek head has latency while the disk continues to rotate (and 360, 370, etc channel architecture precluded channel command word prefetch). The solution was to format tracks with short "dummy" records between the 4k data records ... increasing rotational time between the end of previous data record transfer and the start of the following data record (allowing time for the seek head channel command to be fetched and executed).

turns out 370 channel timing architecture requires 110 byte short dummy record to provide the latency for execution of 3330 seek head fetch & execute ... but the 3330 tracks only had space for three 4k data records plus 101 byte short dummy records. Turns out 145, 148, 165, 168 with 3830 controller actually could do the switch head in the 101 byte latency (and many oem disk controllers could do the head switch operation in the latency of a 50byte short dummy record) ... only the 158 integrated channels were so slow that they required the latency of full 110 byte short dummy record to perform the switch head operation.

and what was used for all 303x machines?

channels for all 3031, 3032, and 3033 machines were the channel director. the channel director was 370/158 engine with only the integrated channel microcode and w/o the 370 instruction microcode.

a 3031 was two 370/158 engines ... one dedicated as channel director with only the integrated channel microcode and one with only the 370 instruction microcode

a 3032 was 370/168 configured to work with 303x channel director

a 3033 was 168 logic remapped to faster chips.

all 303x i/o suffered from using the slowest of all the 370 channels

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 20:46:37 -0400
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
Defense workers lose their jobs, people who make stuff the defense companies use lose their jobs, retail and medical and all sorts of people near the affected plant lose their jobs.

note that "Prophets of War" has looked at several cases where the company used the argument and it was mostly fabrication.

there was older article where the company was complaining that possible defense austerity program would cut them back to 2007 levels. the article pointed out that since 2007, the company had significantly cut the number of workers while earning more money, bigger profits and bigger executive saleries. they suggested lots of people would be happy to return to the 2007 levels ... the company would rehire all the workers let go ... and lower the executive salary to 2007 levels.

MICC industries have one of the lowest levels of number of employees per gov. dollar spent.

They will play the "jobs" card when they are really looking at quarterly profits on an ever upward trajectory. However, the enormous amounts of welfare for defense industry companies doesn't translate into that many jobs ... similar to the corporate welfare for the financial industry.

for instance:

Study: Federal Spending on Defense Doesn't Create As Many Jobs As Education Spending
http://nation.time.com/2011/09/21/study-federal-spending-on-defense-doesnt-create-as-many-jobs-as-education-spending/

from above:
For example, only 1.5% of the price of each F-35 Joint Strike Fighter pays for the labor costs involved in "manufacturing, fabrication, and assembly" work at the plane's main production facility in Fort Worth, Texas.

... snip ...

so f-35 is tending towards $200+M
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/2013/04/a-look-at-f-35-fms-deals.html

... 1.5% is $3m for jobs ... imagine the number of jobs you could do with the other 98.5%.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 21:47:10 -0400
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
It is well known that the original Atlas computer had as one of its features what was called a "single-level store", the feature that later became known as virtual memory when IBM included it in the 370 series of computers.

Despite it actually being mentioned in a thread here of which I was a participant, I hadn't noted it at the time... but recently, in looking for information to contrast the claim of the RCA SPECTRA 70/46 computer to being the smallest computer to provide time-sharing - it was smaller than a 360/67, of course - with TSS/8 and OS/8, I found a mention in Wikipedia of time-sharing being present on the Titan or Atlas 2. Despite the fact that it didn't have virtual memory - the feature of the 360/67 (well, it had paging, at least) that was copied by the 70/46 to enable timesharing - it had an early time-sharing system.


note some of the ctss people went to the science center on 4th flr and did virtual machines, first cp40 which morphs into cp67. past posts mentioning the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

others went to the 5th flr and did multics.

the atlas assumed all pages were the same address space ... so to change address space you had to swap all pages ... primarily used to support virtual address space larger than real memory ... as opposed to multiple concurrent virtual memories.

science center originally did virtual machine cp/40 on specially modified 360/40 with virtual memory ... it was more like risc/801 inverted tables ... since each real page was tagged with its address space identifier and virtual page number (supporting multiple different virtual address spaces concurrently).

when standard 360/67 became available ... cp/40 morphed into cp/67 360/67 had hardware single level 8-entry associative array. a pointer to a virtual segment/page table (mapped virtual addresses to some set of real pages) was loaded into cr0 ... which would reset/clear all entries in associative array. virtual address translation would look for the virtual address in any associative array entry (gave the translation from virtual page to real page address), if not found, the hardware would lookup the corresponding virtual page table entry for a real address to load in one of the 8-entries (entries managed via LRU). If the corresponding virtual page table entry was invalid, it would generate a page fault interrupt to the software.

tss/360 was the official operating system for the 360/67 ... but (virtual machine) cp67 (from the science center) came to dominate in terms of the number of installations. However, with the failure of tss/360 to mature, there were also other virtual memory alternatives developed for the 360/67, Michigan doing the (virtual memory) MTS operating system and Stanford doing the (virtual memory) Orvyl operating system (it is better known for the Wylbur editor which was later ported to os/360 and then MVS) ... aka lots of universities had been convinced to order & install 360/67s on the grandiose descriptions of the tss/360 system.

Boeing Huntsville also did a modified os/360 MVT release 13 with virtual memory on a pair of 360/67. It didn't actually do paging ... but Boeing Huntsville had long running 2250 graphic design jobs ... and MVT had horrible problem with storage fragmentation with long running jobs. Boeing just used the 360/67 virtual address hardware to provide contiguous address areas as work-around to the MVT storage fragmentation problem (single virtual address space, more like Atlas ... but with virtual memory size limited to real machine size and no paging).

tss/360 supported virtual memory per task, segment sharing and one-level store in sense that file i/o was done via memory mapped operations. one of the reason that cp67/cms came to dominate was that the tss/360 memory mapped i/o operations were horribly inefficient. Later when I would do memory mapped filesystem for cp67/cms, I worked hard to avoid lots of the performance shortcomings that plagued tss/360. later there would be a small business machine, the s/38 with "single-level store" ... but only a single virtual address space (more like atlas) ... but didn't do anything to improve on the horribly inefficient memory mapped filesystem.

370 was followon to 360 ... initially announced and shipped w/o virtual memory ... and then later virtual memory announced for all 370 models.

The 370s would have indexed hardware TLBs for virtual address translation (rather than the associative array from 360/67). The 370/165 & 370/168 had 4-way associative, 128-entry TLB with 7-entry "STO stack" ... aka each TLB entry had 3-bit STO (aka virtual address space) identifier ... aka TLB entry was invalid or associated with one of seven possible virtual address spaces. When a new virtual address space pointer was loaded into CR1, it was checked to see if it was already in the STO-stack ... if so, nothing more was done; if not, an entry in the STO-stack was selected to place the address space pointer and any hardware TLB-entries associated with that STO-stack entry were invalidated.

360/67 had option for 24-bit or 32-bit virtual addressing ... it had 1mbyte virtual "segments" (16 or 128 entry segment table) and each segment table entry pointed to page table with 256 page table entries (each one representing a 4kbyte page).

370s only supported 24-bit virtual addressing ... but had both 64kbyte and 1mbyte virtual segment options and 2kbyte and 4kbyte virtual page options ... aka 64kbyte virtual segment table entry pointed to page table with either 16 or 32 entries (depending on whether 4k or 2k pages was selected). 1mbyte virtual segment table entry pointed to page table with either 256 or 512 entries (depending on whether 4k or 2k pages was selected). the 360/67 segment table pointer moved from cr0 to cr1 in 370 and 370 cr0 held flag bits indicating segment and page size).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 22:11:44 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#62

current f-35 projections are that it is heading for lifetime cost of over $1T ... and being called the most expensive weapons system in the history of the country ... originally justifed as being cheaper than f-16 ... but now (almost come to be standard practice) enormous cost overruns (alhtough not yet like iraq invasion that is stacking up to be two orders of magnitude, aka 100 times, cost overrun) ... but then looking like it could turn out to be another weapons system that is so flawed it will never really be used.

and only 1.5% goes for jobs building f-35.

there is whole lot more comments on F-35 here:
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/p/f-35-reading-list.html

now how many more jobs could you get for 98.5% of $1+T ($985+B)

total aside ... if you are expecting a 5% across the board cut in budget ... you over-inflate by several hundred percent ... so even after the cuts ... you still come out ahead.

recent posts mentioning f-35
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#62 America Is Basically Helpless Against The Chinese Hackers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#68 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#54 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#64 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#87 Not the Navy's Favorite Artist Rendering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#36 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 08 Apr 2013 00:28:37 -0400
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
11 years * 33 billion = $363 billion

fiscal year is oct1 to oct1 ... so is he talking about remainder of fiscal year june, july, august, sept (4months) or possibly (since it was already june) just july, august, sept (3months)

so three times that is trillion+ ... four times is almost $1.5T ... assuming constant run rate. august2010 was past surge and start of withdrawal.

withdrawal Iraq
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Withdrawal_of_U.S._troops_from_Iraq

final cost of iraq war
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_cost_of_the_Iraq_War

above also includes supplemental appropriations by year fy2007 was $70B plus emergency supplemental $100B

the above references

Iraq Relief and Reconstruction Fund
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_Relief_and_Reconstruction_Fund

talks about $18.4B ... but recent GAO was that it examined $60B in Iraq relief and reconstruction with little or nothing to show for it (there were reports about something like $8B in pallets of shrink wrapped $100 bills disappearing)

$1.49T by 2013ye ... detailed by year
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0933935.html

recent: $4T-$6T ... various press outlets quote this
http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2013/4/5/report_cost_of_war/

for instance:

Cost of Iraq, Afghanistan wars will keep mounting
http://articles.latimes.com/2013/mar/29/nation/la-na-0329-war-costs-20130329

from above:
The government has already spent $134B billion on medical care and disability benefits for veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Bilmes estimated that in coming decades these benefits would cost an additional $836 billion.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 8 Apr 2013 06:30:55 -0700
phil@VOLTAGE.COM (Phil Smith) writes:
I did an internal Brown Bag a year or so ago, in which I outlined the VM CNTRL/AUX/update theology, to a room full of bewildered-looking distributed folks. I did preface it with "Obviously the following isn't going to change how we do anything, but it might spark some ideas down the road..."

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#52 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#61 32760?

part of the issue was that a lot of the internal folks did all their work on vm370 regardless of the platform they were programming for.

I've periodically mentioned the IMS group being moved out of STL (because if was overflowing) to offsite bldg. and wouldn't tolerate remote 3270 since they were use to response of local channel attach vm370/cms 3270.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#62

there is also stories about JES2 doing all their programming in vm370/cms ... and having various problems importing to *clear* (?clear/caster?) for product release.

old post of (much earlier) results of the introduction of channel attach 3274/3278 and comparing it to channel attach 3272/3277 (along with mvs/tso versus vm370/cms) ... aka mvs/tso system response was so large that the slow-down of going from 3272/3277 to 3274/3278 wasn't noticed (while 3274/3278 hardware latency processing was larger than vm370/cms system response plus 3272/3277 hardware latency combined).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#19

from the days when mvs/tso response was measured in second plus ... with all the reports about increase in human productivity with small sub-second response.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 08 Apr 2013 09:48:19 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#65

note also that in 2010 CBO did report that baseline budget for the decade had all federal debt retired by 2010. However, there actually was a $6T increase in spending and $6T decrease in tax revenues for the decade (compared to baseline) for a $12T budget gap ... much of it occuring after congress allowed the fiscal responsibility act (required spending and tax revenue match) to expire in 2002.

a separate report was that DOD appropriation increase during the decade (over baseline budget) was approx. $2.2T, $1.1T for the wars and couldn't determine what the other $1.1T went to ... that non-war DOD status in 2010 was approx. what the baseline budget had laid out ... and the extra $1.1T apparently just evaporated into MICC with nothing to show for it.

some of this can be accounted for by the significant number of failed weapon projects described in "Prophets of War".

however, some amount of the other $3.8T increase in budget during the decade went to DHS.

from the annals of spreading Success of Failure culture ... "Prophets of War" has some number of enormously expensive failed DHS efforts. One was hundreds of billions that went into modernization of the coast guard fleet of ships, all apparent failures. The reset of coast guard fleet modernization now seems to be to buy ships from Denmark.

misc. recent posts mentioning $12T budget gap, fiscal responsibility act allowed to expire, extra $2.2T spending for DOD ($1.1T apparently evaporating into MICC; note for some time, there is federal law mandating all agencies have to pass financial audit ... every year DOD gets an exemption and the projected year when DOD might actual meet the mandate keeps being pushed into the future)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#97 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 08 Apr 2013 13:17:22 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
The Big Dig.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

I remember big dig was something like $2B to $20B ... 10times, 90% graft and corruption. this is $50B to $5T, 100times, 99% graft and corruption ... a ten fold increase in overrun ... and the absolute number is from $18B to $4,950B ... 275 times increase in the absolute dollars of graft and corruption.

as the CBO references that is just the direct war cost overrun (graft & corruption) ... however, other cbo reports has possibly another $2T disappearing into MICC corporations during the last decade (if not more) ... $1.1T in additional appropriations for DOD (over baseline) during the last decade that has nothing to show for it ... and possibly another $1T (or more) out of the other $3.8T increase in spending last decade (over baseline)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

other recent posts mentioning the 100 times (99%) cost overrun for Iraq invasion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#59 The Madness of King George Revisited
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#32 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#51 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 08 Apr 2013 13:29:40 -0400
greymausg <maus@mail.com> writes:
Not all, The Cossacks, that changed sides well after it was obvious that Germany was going to lose, Croatian militias, a pretty nasty lot were mostly executed by the victorious Serbs, (which could be pretty nasty in turn). Most of the Russians that were POWs were given prison sentences. One Englishman who was a POW in Eastern Germany told me that a lot of the crimes committed against German Women at the end were committed by POWs that had been released by the REd Army and reformed into new units. That sssort of behaaviour spread to the main aarmy. (He said that he was almost tempted to join the German Army to stop what he saw happening). At that time, the true horror of the Nazis rule was not generally known.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#55 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

there are some indications that my wife's father refused to take command of german district after end of hostilities ... having "liberated" some camps ... and not wanting to stay in germany ... one of the reasons he then was posted to Nanking as advisor to Generalissimo.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#60 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

"The Wars for Asia, 1911-1949" has lots of factions with various strategies during the japanese occupation to prevail over the other factions after japanese were defeated. communists supposedly spent most of their time in Manchuria and let the Nationalists do most of the fighting (and take casualties) ... so afterwards they could emerge "fresh" with lots of military equipment provided by the soviets.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2013 09:58:19 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
That would be the place to start - don't raise taxes, close the loopholes. In fact I read recently that closing the loopholes would raise enough money that we could actually cut tax rates and the government would still take in a lot more money.

while all the loopholes may not be sufficient to cover the current debt ... it may generate enough revenue to cover the current spending, but it will take more to also pay down the debt. as periodically mentioned, the baseline budget last decade would have had all federal debt cleared by 2010 ... however congress let the fiscal responsibility act expire in 2002 and started radically cutting taxes, decrease of $6T in revenue by 2010 *AND* increasing spending, increase of $6T by 2010 ... for a $12T budget gap (continuance of that tax revenue cut and spending increase now up to around $16T debt ... instead of now debt).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

comptroller general (& head of GAO) in the middle of the last decade would include references in speeches to nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmatic (based on what congress was doing to the budget).

there is estimate of $31T worldwide held in offshore tax havens ... 2009 there was IRS estimate that 52,000 wealthy americans were illegally hiding revenue offshore ... however, in 2011, congress was cutting IRS tax recovery budget ... significantly curtailing IRS ability to prosecute those individuals and recover the money (taxes and penalties would several times over pay the cost of investigation and prosecution). recent reference to illegal & legal offshore money
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#59 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

however, proponents of "flat tax" had an additional explanation for closing the loopholes 1) selling of loopholes is one of the major contributors to congressional graft & corruption ... helping earn congress the label of most corrupt institution on earth 2) dealing with 65,000pg tax code (a couple years ago, now grown to over 72,000pg) is horrible drain on the economy; estimate that "flat tax" would be 500pg tax code and would represent 6% improvement in GDP (3% in lost productivity dealing with the tax code, and 3% in lost productivity because of non-optimal business decisions based on tax code provisions). The 6% improvement in GDP more than offsets the loss of any benefit that well-deserving institutions gain from tax-hole provisions. This is separate from the increase in tax collections because of the elimination of the tax loop holes (although 6% improvement in GDP would help spur economic growth resulting in tax collection increase).

the tax collected (heavily influenced by tax loopholes ... primarily for corporations and wealthy) has other issues ... from a discussion here in afc last dec
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#35 Search Google, 1960:s-style

The tax&spend radically changed in 2002 when congress let the fiscal responsibility act expire ... rather than having cleared all federal debt by 2010 ... a $12T budget gap had been created growing to $16T debt now.

this (2012) lists loopholes cost $1.1T/yr (presumably doesn't include money illegally hidden offshore, one of the reports was IRS was trying to go after $400B in unpaid taxes)
http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/the-best-life/2012/05/02/3-inconvenient-truths-about-taxes

but has a list of major loopholes that would be politically difficult to eliminate. Ignoring the amount needed to balance current budgets ... the $1.1T/yr increase in tax revenue could be dedicated to just paying off the debt created last decade

The $12T budget gap created last decade after the fiscal responsibility act expired works out to $1.5T/yr (2003-2010) or approx $750B/yr cut in tax revenue and $750B/yr increase in spending. Resetting the budget to 2002 ... requires a separate $750B/yr increase in tax revenues (plus $750B/yr cut in spending). The tax collections then comes out to approx. $1.85T/yr to balance the budget plus being able to pay off the debt in 20+yr period (taking into account that all of the $1.1T from loopholes doesn't just go to reduce the $16T debt, there would also be interest payments over the lifetime of the debt)

Realistically eliminate all loopholes for a $1.1T/yr increase in tax collections ... plus a separate increase in tax rate for $750B/yr increase tax collections (along with $750B/yr cut in spending) ... for a $1.85T/yr increase in tax revenue to both balance the budget and pay off the current federal debt (that should have otherwise have been gone in 2010).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2013 10:04:36 -0400
nmm1 writes:
What I do know was that we made VERY rude remarks about IBM's claims to have invented virtual memory, and we were an IBM shop. So did most of the other IBM shops with considerable experience of other systems.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#63 The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store

after all the work that the science center did on virtual machines and virtual memory ... there was a IBM system journal article published about some other location inventing both virtual machines and virtual memory ... a letter was written to the editor of the system journal pointing out both 1) ATLAS predated their virtual memory work and 2) science center did lot of work on both virtual memory and virtual machines before this other location. the response back from the system journal editor was that it wouldn't be in the best interests of the company to print a retraction.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2013 10:30:08 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
this (2012) lists loopholes cost $1.1T/yr (presumably doesn't include money illegally hidden offshore, one of the reports was IRS was trying to go after $400B in unpaid taxes)
http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/the-best-life/2012/05/02/3-inconvenient-truths-about-taxes

but has a list of major loopholes that would be politically difficult to eliminate. Ignoring the amount needed to balance current budgets ... the $1.1T/yr increase in tax revenue could be dedicated to just paying off the debt created last decade

The $12T budget gap created last decade after the fiscal responsibility act expired works out to $1.5T/yr (2003-2010) or approx $750B/yr cut in tax revenue and $750B/yr increase in spending. Resetting the budget to 2002 ... requires a separate $750B/yr increase in tax revenues (plus $750B/yr cut in spending). The tax collections then comes out to approx. $1.85T/yr to balance the budget plus being able to pay off the debt in 20+yr period (taking into account that all of the $1.1T from loopholes doesn't just go to reduce the $16T debt, there would also be interest payments over the lifetime of the debt)

Realistically eliminate all loopholes for a $1.1T/yr increase in tax collections ... plus a separate increase in tax rate for $750B/yr increase tax collections (along with $750B/yr cut in spending) ... for a $1.85T/yr increase in tax revenue to both balance the budget and pay off the current federal debt (that should have otherwise have been gone in 2010).


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

separate from using elimination of all loopholes for additional $1.1T/yr tax revenue going to pay off debt+interest over 20+yr period (created by allowing the fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002) ... and returning to the 2002 level balanced budget ... $750B/yr increase in tax revenue plus $750B/yr decrease in spending ... there is the ongoing obligations created by the two wars last decade which will be something like $50B/yr for the next several yrs/decade ... which means rather than needing $1.85T/yr increase in tax revenue ... it is probably closer to needing $1.9T/yr increase in tax revenue (plus the $750B/yr decrease in spending).

Based on returning to something like fiscal responsibility act and balanced budget ... any separate spending level adjustments for MICC industries for DOD & DHS (in excess of the 2002 levels) ... would require further increases in tax revenue ... likely another $100B (or more) bringing tax revenue collection increase up to a round $2T/yr.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2013 10:36:31 -0400
nmm1 writes:
I like it! That fails to surprise me. As you gather, my remarks (and our rude remarks then) were aimed at the culprits: marketing.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#63 The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#71 The Atlas 2 and its Slave Store

we also placed quite a bit of blame on the authors of the article from this other location (names & location redacted to protect the guilty).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2013 19:28:40 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Based on returning to something like fiscal responsibility act and balanced budget ... any separate spending level adjustments for MICC industries for DOD & DHS (in excess of the 2002 levels) ... would require further increases in tax revenue ... likely another $100B (or more) bringing tax revenue collection increase up to a round $2T/yr.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

even tho we cross paths periodically and both have some Boyd association, we aren't related:

Smoke & Mirrors Alert: Pentagon's 2014 Budget Proposal Drops Wednesday nation.time.com/2013/04/08/smoke-mirrors-alert-pentagons-2014-budget-proposal-drops-wednesday/

winslow wiki page
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winslow_T._Wheeler

other recent posts mentioning winslow:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#54 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#31 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#36 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 09 Apr 2013 20:04:04 -0400
Stephen Sprunk <stephen@sprunk.org> writes:
Aside from Floria, which can't competently run an election in the first place, the large states aren't up for grabs. Nor are the very small states, really. There were, what, five "battleground" states in 2012? The rest of the country got ignored by both campaigns, and that certainly isn't an "advantage" in my book.

also mentions florida

The Five Most Outrageous Facts About Our Broken Voting System; New study reveals voting rights are in even worse trouble than you thought
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-five-most-outrageous-facts-about-our-broken-voting-system-20130409

references this paper from MIT (even with date of 1Apr2013)
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2243630

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 10 Apr 2013 10:36:35 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I'm currently reading _Baghdad at Sunrise_. One of the author's criticisms is that no one apparently realized the extent to which Saddam's policies had completely destroyed the Iraqi economy. Parts of the country were filled with abandoned factories and warehouses - abandoned even before the war.

the other explanation is the US blockade/sanctions on the country ... although one could claim that the US was destroying Iraq's economy with blockade/sanctions because of Saddam's policy of not cooperating (and therefor it was Saddam's policy of not cooperating that was destroying the Iraq's economy).

it wasn't just no-fly zone ... but blockage/sanctiions ... simple example from 1999:

Children pay price for Iraq blockade
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/children-pay-price-for-iraq-blockade-1112385.html

there are stories that the new administration had started plans for invasion as soon as it came into office well before 9/11 ... with members of Team B were notorious for fabrication in pursuit of their military policies (Team B dates back to head of CIA Colby not agreeing with fabrication and Colby was replaced with Bush1 who would embrace the fabrication by what would come to be called "Team B"). "not realized" could be another euphemism for fabrication and carefully choice of facts that would support their objectives.

recent posts mentioning Team B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 10 Apr 2013 13:39:04 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
I'm not defending them!!!! I'm simply getting tired of the "screw the rich" rhetoric here from people who believe that those tax hikes the Dems want are really taxing the rich. They aren't. those rich people can hire accountants and tax lawyers to find the new loopholes. The ones who can't afford them are the middle class and they end up with their income tax rates higher. Go read the forms.

somebody's post on facebook

Income Growth For Bottom 90 Percent Of Americans Averaged Just $59 Over 4 Decades: Analysis
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/25/income-growth-americans_n_2949309.html

... and avg $116,071 for the top 10%

similar to this from 2011
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html
and
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

however there is still requirement for approx. $2T/annum increase in tax revenue and $750B/annum reduction in spending to undo what congress did last decade after it allowed the fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002 ... recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#97 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#74 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

the large special interest are pushing hard to require spending cuts and tax revenue increases to be equal ... $1.375T in tax increases and $1.375T in spending custs ... since that still puts them $625B/annum ahead of where they were in 2002.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 10 Apr 2013 13:58:20 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Children pay price for Iraq blockade
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/children-pay-price-for-iraq-blockade-1112385.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#76 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

iraq economy ... iraq was in protected war (with some help from US) with iran ... which had significant downside effect on its economy.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_War

above has picture of Rumsfeld meeting with Saddam to discuss military aid ... lot more here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war

from above:
The full extent of these covert transfers is not yet known. Teicher's files on the subject are held securely at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and many other Reagan Era documents that could help shine new light on the subject remain classified. Teicher declined to discuss details of the affidavit with the Washington Post shortly before the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

... snip ...

later, this has somebody identifying iraq massing forces for invasion of kuwait in satellite imagery. white house tells people to ignore it because they *know* saddam won't invade kuwait, "Long Strange Journey: An Intelligence Memoir"
http://www.amazon.com/Long-Strange-Journey-Intelligence-ebook/dp/B004NNV5H2/

later same person (from satellite imagery) says that iraq is massing forces for invasion of saudia arabia ... this kicks white house into action (implication white house didn't care if iraq invaded kuwait ... but really cared if iraq invaded saudia arabia).

Boyd than does alternative battle plan that was used for desert storm ... rather than army's tank slugfest until last tank standing.

iraq is then under sanctions/blockade until the 2003 invasion.

all of which has detrimental downside effects on its economy.

misc. past posts & URLs mentioning Boyd:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
Date: 10 Apr 2013
Blog: IBMers
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#39 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#58 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,

there was an article in the early 80s calling for 100% unearned profit tax on the US auto industry; supposedly the auto import quotas were to reduce competition allowing the US auto industry enormous profits used to remake themselves ... but they just pocketed the money and continued business as normal. In the early 90s, they had the C4 task force to look at completely remake themselves (finally?); technology was going to play a critical role and invited representatives from technology vendors. They could describe all the problems and all the solutions ... but as seen, they still weren't able to make the changes. I would chide offline, the people from POK mainframe land that nearly everything described wrong with the US auto industry also applied to them.

As mentioned upthread, This was in the period that Gray was leveraging Boyd to do a make-over of the Marine Corp. It was also during the period that the IBM was going into the red and top management was restructuring the company into what time called the 13 baby blues in preparation for breaking up the company. time magazine ref from the period about IBM preparing for breakup ... "How IBM Was Left Behind"
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

In the middle 80s, top executives were predicting that worldwide revenue was going to double from $60B to $120B mostly based on mainframe offerings and initiated massive internal building program to double mainframe related manufacturing capacity. There was also massive influx of "fast track MBAs" ... apparently part of program that was going to double the size of the company.

Simple spreadsheet analysis at the time showing they were wrong wasn't exactly a career enhancing activity ... this was in period that mainframe was already starting its downward slope ... primary factor with the company going into the red just a few years later. While company was slipping into the red (and top management spending all their time preparing to break up the company), people in POK mainframe land were sending email referencing would the last person to leave POK, please turn out the lights.

The board then brought in Gerstner to clean house, reverse the breakup, and "resurrect" the company ... a little analogous to Gray's make-over of the Marine Corps that went on just a couple yrs earlier.

Note ... I have different summary about how Gerstner was also closely positioned to wallstreet and the events leading up to economic mess and the too-big-to-fail.

have a few comments here as part of somebody's review of Gerstner's book
http://www.tdaxp.com/archive/2012/02/10/review-of-who-says-elephants-cant-dance-by-louis-gerstner.html

Sandy is in competition with Gerstner to be next CEO of AMEX, Sandy looses:
http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/05/15/why-jamie-dimons-2-billion-gambling-loss-will-not-speed-financial-reform/

from above:
Back in 1986, Dimon was the bright young protege of "Sandy" Weill, when he was forced out of American Express in a coup de requin. Master and servant made their way to Baltimore, Maryland, where Weill acquired a storefront moneylending firm called Commercial Credit.

... snip ...

the above also references Commercial Credit being loan sharking operation. Sandy (& Dimon) then go on to make other acquisitions ... eventually taking over Citi in violation of Glass-Steagall; Greenspan gives an exemption while Sandy lobbies congress for repeal of Glass-Steagall ... resulting in creation of too-big-to-fail (lots of recent news in press, because of their size they have immunity for lots of criminal behavior resulting in references like too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-to-jail). Sandy is on times (short) list of those responsible for the financial mess (behind Greespan and the person in congress Sandy was lobbying for repeal of Glass-Steagall)
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877329,00.html

Dimon departs and goes on to be CEO of Chase ... another too-big-to-fail ... also recently in the news for various financial manipulations.

Back to the 80s, KKR and AMEX are in competition for take-over of RJR and KKR wins ... KKR runs into trouble with RJR and hires Gerstner away from AMEX to turn-around RJR ... later IBM board hires Gerstner away from KKR to "resurrect" IBM. After leaving IBM, Gerstner goes on to be head of another large KKR-like institution

About the same time as IBM is going into the red, AMEX does IPO/spin-off of a lot of its dataprocessing business as "First Data" in what was described as the largest IPO ever.

This has short writeup ... some of the information slightly garbled (like joining CSC is actually joining IBM, since CSC was part of IBM) ... later I do a stint as chief scientist at First Data
http://www.ibmsystemsmag.com/mainframe/stoprun/Stop-Run/Making-History/

First Data then does spin-off of WU (at the time, WU half of revenue/profits) and then KKR takes the remaining part of First Data private (15 years after First Data is the largest IPO, First Data has distinction of becoming the largest reverse-IPO)

early 90s ... commandant of Marine Corps (Gray) leveraged John Boyd for make-over of the marine corp; us auto industry is having c4 task force to study remaking themselves (and inviting reps from technology vendors to participate) after not remaking themselves a decade earlier (and still couldn't do a make-over, its not clear that recent make-over more than another decade later was substantial); and IBM was slipping into the red and being restructured into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for being broken up. There was also Desert Storm, where Boyd was brought in to do the battle plan (that was used, although efforts were aborted in the final follow through) as alternative to the Army's plan of tank slugfest until last tank standing. There were comments that a major problem with the wars of the last decade was that Boyd had died in 1997.

IBM eventually had its own make-over when Gerstner was brought in to clean house, reverse the break-up activity and resurrect the company.

ot marine .. but recently had (army) grandson come back from tour in afghanistan

I also had (army) son-in-law do two tours in Iraq ... first tour was 2004-2005 in Fellujah during the height of the hostilities (foot patrols with frequent fire fights), 2nd tour was 2007-2008 in Baqubah ... this describes Baqubah as worse than Fallujah
http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-Killing-Our-ebook/dp/B007VBBS9I/
there is also reference to Baqubah here (Yon spends quite a bit of time embedded)
http://www.michaelyon-online.com/hunting-al-qaeda-part-i-of-iii.htm

misc posts mentioning review of Gerstner book:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#104 Time to Think ... and to Listen
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#105 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#84 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#4 Hard drives: A bit of progress
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#82 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#87 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#4 Think You Know The Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#21 The Age of Unsatisfying Wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#31 History--punched card transmission over telegraph lines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#61 What is holding back cloud adoption?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 10 Apr 2013 18:39:16 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
the large special interest are pushing hard to require spending cuts and tax revenue increases to be equal ... $1.375T in tax increases and $1.375T in spending custs ... since that still puts them $625B/annum ahead of where they were in 2002.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#74 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#77 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

*drastic* tax decreases after congress allowed fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002

The US Collects Less In Taxes Than All But Two Industrialized Countries
http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2013/04/08/1834981/the-us-collects-less-in-taxes-than-all-but-two-industrialized-countries/

US collects 24.8% of GDP in taxes; references slightly older OECD comparison

US Has Second Lowest Corporate Taxes In The Developed World
http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2011/07/05/260535/graph-corporate-tax-second-lowest/

and

Analysis: Dow 30 companies show what a joke calling corporate tax burden 'heavy' has become
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/03/27/1197405/-Analysis-Dow-30-companies-show-what-a-joke-calling-corporate-tax-burden-heavy-has-become

on the radio yesterday there was news item on the six largest too-big-to-fail are having record profits and at the same time are dropping 21,000 employees.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How Criticizing in Private Undermines Your Team - Harvard Business Review

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How Criticizing in Private Undermines Your Team - Harvard Business Review
Date: 11 Apr, 2013
Blog: Global IBM
How Criticizing in Private Undermines Your Team - Harvard Business Review
http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/03/how_criticizing_in_private_und.html

I use to sponsor John Boyd's briefings at IBM. One of his examples was in the discussion about the US entry into WW2, explaining that in order to deploy huge numbers of low skilled/experienced soldiers they created a rigid, top-down, command&control infrastructure to leverage the few experienced resources available. He would contrast this with Guderian's use of verbal orders only during the blitzkrieg. This was wanting flexible decision making at the lowest level possible by the person on the spot ... but also reducing their worrying about any blame in after action reviews.

As a total aside, I'll be at a Boyd&Beyond conference the end of the month at Harvard.

the issue of criticizing in private was also applied to organizational criticism. "Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World" Ferguson & Morris:

... and perhaps most damaging, the old culture under Watson Snr and Jr of free and vigorous debate was replaced with sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers. It's claimed that thereafter, IBM lived in the shadow of defeat

... and:

But because of the heavy investment of face by the top management, F/S took years to kill, although its wrongheadedness was obvious from the very outset. "For the first time, during F/S, outspoken criticism became politically dangerous," recalls a former top executive.

... snip ...

During the FS period I would continue to work on 360/370 stuff (FS was planned to completely replace 360/370 and was killing off 370 development activity) and periodically ridicule FS stuff (which probably wasn't exactly career enhancing activity). Later, I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s ... folklore is that when the executive committee was told about computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. from ibmjargon:

Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

there were lots of attempts to deflect constructive criticism with numerous FUD-tactics

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 Apr 2013 11:10:17 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#74 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#77 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

some more on tax collection analysis

Debunking the Idea that Americans are Overtaxed
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/04/debunking-the-idea-that-americans-are-overtaxed.html

from above:
In 1979, the total level of taxation in the US was 26% of GDP versus 24.8% now. That means the vaunted Reagan Revolution served mainly to shift taxation from progressive income taxes (hitting the rich harder) and corporate taxes to regressive sales taxes, rather than lower the level. But our tax level has fallen while they've grown in other advanced economies. Tax burdens in OECD countries excluding the US were 31.7% of GDP in 1979 and have risen to 33.4% in 2010. So the US ranking has fallen from 16 out of 24 to 32 out of 34. Any wonder why our infrastructure is crumbling and our educational attainment is falling?

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 Apr 2013 20:46:37 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#76 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#78 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

2003 invasion of Iraq
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003_invasion_of_Iraq

from above:
The Republican Party's campaign platform in the 2000 election called for "full implementation" of the Iraq Liberation Act as "a starting point" in a plan to "remove" Hussein.[41] After leaving the George W. Bush administration, Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill said that an attack on Iraq had been planned since Bush's inauguration, and that the first United States National Security Council meeting involved discussion of an invasion.

... snip ...

and as per previous references ... documentation about the dealings with Hussein in the 80s is locked up in the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

for a little topic drift, from today "Avoiding Corporate Crime, The Unmentionable Topic"
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/11/the-unmentionable-topic/

aka (US) "Corporate Crime" is topic to be avoided in (US) press (its all right to do stories about corporate crime in other countries). Does mention A NYTimes story "Top Prosecutor of Corporate Crime to Resign".

However, other recent stories have had the person testifying in congress that effectively the too-big-to-fail are also too-big-to-prosecute for their (corporate) criminal activity and too-big-to-jail (aka effectively reasons for not prosecuting corporate crime) other recent posts mentioning the person:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#60 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA

and past posts mentioning part of justification for Iraq Invasion was that it would only cost $50B ... it will be more like 100 times that with large amount going to corporate graft and corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#59 The Madness of King George Revisited
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#32 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#51 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2013 09:45:41 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
Wow. I had to google RCI. Lynn has stories about (lack of) FBA support in MVS (IIRC). Apparently since unbundling changes have to be cost-justified on their own merits, no matter how good and usefil they moght be.

i think MVS just didn't want to have FBA support for one reason or another ... the issue of what could or couldn't be used as part of financial justification appeared to somewhat arbitrary ... they were also quite creative in fiddling the books when it was something that they really wanted to do. misc. pasts mentioning CKD, FBA, multi-track search, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

they told me that even if I delivered them fully integrated & tested MVS FBA support ... it still required justification of something like $200M-$300M in incremental new disk sales (i.e. customers would buy that much additional FBA disks compared to what they would were otherwise purchasing in CKD DASD). lifecycle costs were explicitly excluded. note that real CKD DASD haven't been manufactured for decades ... it is all simulated on industry standard (fixed-block) disks.

two old folklore story examples ... one about JES2 and one about ISPF.

in switch to unbundling ... 23Jun69 announce, including charging for software ... although they did manage to make the case that kernel software was still free. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

internal network was mostly (vm370/cms) VNET/RSCS ... internal network was larger than arpanet from just about the beginning until late '85 or early '86. misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

mid-70s the efforts to get VNET/RSCS announced was constantly thwarted (in part because POK/MVS land was working on corporate to get vm370/cms killed off, the development group shutdown and all the people moved to POK to work on MVS). JES2 networking support had grown up from body of source code changes that had identifier "TUCC" (from HASP days) in cols 68-71 and was somewhat used on the internal network (VNET/RSCS had layered support and did gateway to JES2) but had lots of limitations.

The other issue was even though JES2 networking code was picked up ... the "mainstream" mainframe software development tends to still be very high overhead. Standard process was to forecast number of customers at three different price points ... high, medium and low. The issue was number of customers times the price had to cover the (frequently very high) upfront costs ... plus the per copy costs ("low" was barely above per copy costs ... but had to have very large customer forecast in order to cover the high upfront costs; "high" tended to have lower customer forecast; aka customer purchasing was sometimes cost sensitive). misc. past posts mentioning HASP, JES2, JES2 networking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#hasp

the problem was that no matter how they fiddled the numbers, they couldn't come up with JES2 networking customer forecast the covered the upfront development costs. The solution for announcing JES2 networking ... was to make it a combined JES2/VNET product announce ... the VNET upfront development costs were essentially non-existant by POK/MVS-land standards. A "medium" forecast for the combined product, times (number of JES2 networking plus number of VNET) customers was more than enough to cover the JES2 costs (since corresponding VNET costs were non-existant).

JES2 networking and VNET were at least both mainframe network, the other folklore example was ISPF and vm370/cms performance tools. They moved the vm370/cms performance tools into the same development group with ISPF. They both had approx. the total gross sales ... however, ISPF had a group of a couple hundred people and the vm370/cms performance tools only had three. If they stopped any new work on vm370/cms performance tools ... they could then book all the revenue from vm370/cms performance has coming to the whole development group and devote it for ISPF development. misc past posts mentioning ISPF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#17 Where's all the VMers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#33 XEDIT on MVS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#52 Microsoft's innovations [was:the rtf format]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#0 VSPC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#42 misc. dmksnt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#26 Moribund TSO/E
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004g.html#43 Sequence Numbbers in Location 73-80
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#7 TSO replacement?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#8 TSO replacement?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#15 HASP/ASP JES/JES2/JES3
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#40 FULIST
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#50 TSO and more was: PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#21 Source maintenance was Re: SEQUENCE NUMBERS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#13 What part of z/OS is the OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#3 THE on USS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#4 ISPF Limitations (was: Need for small machines ... )
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#5 Call for XEDIT freaks, submit ISPF requirements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#14 ISPF not productive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#50 IBM to the PCM market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#8 whiny question: Why won't z/OS support the HMC 3270 emulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#69 ServerPac Installs and dataset allocations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#40 Why isn't OMVS command integrated with ISPF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#43 handling the SPAM on this group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#62 CHROME and WEB apps on Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#59 ISPF Counter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#60 ISPF Counter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#46 DEC-10 SOS Editor Intra-Line Editing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#6 Call for XEDIT freaks, submit ISPF requirements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#7 Call for XEDIT freaks, submit ISPF requirements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#50 Call for XEDIT freaks, submit ISPF requirements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#51 Call for XEDIT freaks, submit ISPF requirements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#54 Unix systems and Serialization mechanism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#84 Set numbers off permanently
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#33 Why are TSO IDs limited to 7 characters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#85 REXX "address" environments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#30 Philosophy: curiousity question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#32 CMS Sort Descending?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#19 When is performance really an issue? Was: Running an ISPF applicction from one pds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#20 When is performance really an issue? Was: Running an ISPF applicction from one pds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#42 CMS load module format
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#21 The "IBM Displays" Memory Lane (Was: TSO SCREENSIZE)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#84 Is there an SPF setting to turn CAPS ON like keyboard key?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#106 SPF in 1978
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#53 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#85 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#19 Writing article on telework/telecommuting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#20 Writing article on telework/telecommuting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#63 Typeface (font) and city identity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#53 Image if someone built a general-menu-system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#33 Using NOTE and POINT simulation macros on CMS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#64 Should you support or abandon the 3270 as a User Interface?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Apr 2013 07:09:43 -0700
shmuel+gen@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
A normal reading of "diff3 allows a 3 way merge" would be that there are options to diff3 that cause it to perform the merge. Did you read it as "diff3 creates output that you are allowed to feed into an external program in order to do the merge"? If so, pretty much any program "allows" you to do pretty much anything.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#52 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#61 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#66 Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?

trivia ... when we were doing the original multi-level updating at the science center for cp67/cms (would eventually morph into what is found in vm370/cms and the various editors) ... the person that later would go on to "invent" DNS (domain name system) was at MIT and had job working at science center. he did a bit of software that would merge multiple two or more independent update streams for the same source ... attempting to do as much as possible automagically and flagging all possible areas of conflicts. this routine was never carried forward into standard support.

the issue was if two (or more) groups/individuals were indenpendently generating changes/updates for the same source module ... how to merge/combine the independent operations.

the problem (at least) would be common when vm370 would ship a new release. standard PLC (monthly enhancements & fixes) were shipped as accumulated source updates. New monthly PLC tape is was much more straight-forward to identify changes since last PLC tape and do the integration of any local source code changes with standard product enhancements/fixes.

However, for new release, the product group would apply all accumulated PLC fixes/enhancements updates to the base source plus all new changes specifically for the new release and resequence the new base source module. customers then had a much harder time migrating local source code changes from prior release to the new release (with all IBM updates applied to base source routine and resequenced).

not diff3 ... but later, I did do trivial program that helped in the process. given two similar sources with old & new sequence numbers ... would generate an update for the old sequence numbers that represented the difference between the two sources (effectively created what was in new resequenced source release that applied to the previous release updated old sequenced source, would generate the same code). This made integration of local source changes against new release much simpler (since it localized just the actual source code changes w/o the impact of the resequencing). when the local installation was done resolving conflicts (except for sequence numbers) ... run the program in reverse; two nearly identical source routines (except different sequence numbers) ... old release using old sequence numbers with both update applied to turn it into new release (with old sequence numbers) and local updates ... against new release with new sequence numbers ... would generate local updates converted to new release sequence numbers.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2013 10:52:56 -0400
hancock4 writes:
The economy was over-excited in 1929, and this contributed to the severity of the crash and aftermath. Indeed, there were strong parallels between the problems that led up to the 1929 crash and the crash of today--irresponsible and fraudulent use of investments and credit that could not be supported. Fortunately, this time around we had the stimulous and bailouts which created a 'soft fall'. Otherwise it would've been a nasty ripple downward effect.

lots of discussion that fundamentlal structural problems that allowed most recent problems aren't being corrected in parallel with the stimulous ... so the accounting may just being postponed not averted.

part of the issue was that congress really savaged the budget last decade in conjunction with wallstreet savaging the economy; the gov. steps in to prop up wallstreet w/o actually correcting problems. there is downward slope on available resources that are available for propping up institutions.

as I mentioned before, jan2009 I was asked to html'ize the pecora hearings (30s hearings into '29 crash; had been scanned fall2008 at boston public library) with lots of internal cross-links and URLs with correspondance between what happened then and what happened this time (some anticipation that the new congress had appetite to do something). I worked on it for awhile but then got a phone call that it wouldn't be needed after all (references to enormous piles of wallstreet cash on capital hill).

there have been references to wallstreet "capture" of regulatory and law enforcement agencies ... even S&L crisis had hundreds going to jail ... this time it is highlighted that nobody has gone to jail. one of the new mantras is referring to the too-big-to-fail as too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-to-jail.

this also shows up in stories about illegal tax havens. in 2009 the story was that IRS was looking for 52,000 wealthy people (real/corporate) that were illegally using offshore tax havens (separate from special loop-holes that congress had created legalizing a lot of the illegal activity). A year or so later there was reference that congress was cutting IRS enforcement budget for going after illegal offshore tax havens and whether or not IRS would prosecute anybody (although UBS a major financial player in illegal offshore tax avoidence was fined; there are jokes that regulatory fines of the too-big-to-fail are so small compared to actual amounts involved that it is being considered cost of doing business)

recent reference that US news seems to be downplaying major US corporate crime
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#83 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

recent posts mentioning Pecora hearings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#28 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#7 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#8 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

recent posts mentioning too-big-to-fail/too-big-to-jail involved in money laundering for drug cartels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#1 Libor Lies Revealed in Rigging of $300 Trillion Benchmark
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#28 Neil Barofsky: Geithner Doctrine Lives on in Libor Scandal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#49 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#6 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2013 11:06:34 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
If you want to learn more, get a set of instructions and forms, make up some income data and just do the taxees for that. I haven't done that for the child tax credit mess yet. There is going to be another worksheet for those qualifieds. You'll get an idea of what it might look like (Congress has until Dec 31sst to fuck it all up) by reading the 2013-ES form and the instructions to go with it. Estimating taxes used to be filling in a dozen or so blanks. Now it's a page plus some with the tax law changes passed on Dec 31st, 2012.

couple of stories recently that turbotax has been lobbying congress against making tax process simpler.

this goes along with the estimates that going to flat-tax gains the country 6% of GDP (3% lost productivity dealing with complexity and 3% lost because businesses making non-optimal decisions motivated by loop-holes). recent post mentioning flat-tax:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

the issue isn't argued about the merits of flat-tax ... the issue is argued that flat-tax eliminates loop-holes; selling loop-holes is major contributor to congress being considered most corrupt institution on earth ... and that growing number of loop-holes is major contributor to the complexity of the tax code (72,000 pages and constantly growing).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Apr 2013 08:29:24 -0700
PaulGBoulder@AIM.COM (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
Was your "trivial program" made available to end customers, or were they compelled to reinvent it?

I've done most of these operations using SuperC with the UPDCMS8 option in place of your program; the UPDMVS8 option is practically worthless for this purpose.

And once one recognizes that it's possible to rehabilitate damaged or missing sequence numbers, it's only a short logical step tp realize that one didn't need the sequence numbers in the first place.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#66 Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#85 Sequence Numbrs (was 32760?

it was like my replacement done for IPCS ... I wasn't allowed to distribute it (even tho nearly all internal datacenters and customer support PSRs used it) ... but was allowed to describe it at user group meetings ... I managed to describe it in sufficient detail that coding become a straight forward exercise and those results were made to customers.

people that had a bunch of other tools that were sequence number based ... would have required all the other tools to have been changed. this was small incremental tweak.

one of my hobbies was highly enhanced production operating system for internal datacenters ... originally on cp67/cms and then on vm370/cms ... periodically some of the changes might leak out to customers. old email regarding migration of cp67/cms to vm370/cms and making the new csc/vm available to internal datacenters (aka internal datacenters had been in process migrating from cp67/cms to vm370/cms):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

later after i transferred to sjr ... the distribution became sjr/vm ... other old email (I also included reseq with sjr/vm distribution)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#email800501
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#email830705
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#email830709
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#email830711

part of the issue was that since the internal distribution was purely a hobby ... having to track standard product PLC & release distributions with large set of my own updates could get time-consuming.

also contributing was the standard product groups would periodically be changed affecting code quality. when the mvs group did succeed in getting vm370 killed and all the people transferred to pok to work on mvs ... endicott finally did manage to save the vm370 product mission ... but had to reconstitute a development group from scratch ... vmshare archives have some amount of comments about code quality during that period.
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

original virtual machine was highly efficient microkernel ... which had a totally different development culture from the traditional enormously bloated IBM operating system development methodology. It took hard work to maintain efficient microkernel paradigm ... people coming over from traditional operating system development background found it extremely easy to go wild with enhancements to the kernel ... since it was so small and compact ... but that eventually resulted in just another overly bloated piece of kernel-ware.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2013 13:02:58 -0400
Stephen Sprunk <stephen@sprunk.org> writes:
They want (other) welfare programs cut, of course, so that their taxes go down and/or there is more money for Social Security and/or Medicare benefits.

some estimates put medicaid skimming (padding the bill) and outright fraud at 30%. Feds provide matching funds (50%) to states medicaid programs. The FEDS have a number of recommended anti-fraud procedures that if state legislature would pass conforming legislature, FEDS would increase their funding to 60% (20% reduction in cost of medicaid to the state). Some states have such strong medicaid lobbies that the legislatures haven't been able to pass conforming legislation ... aka medicaid industry taking possibly 30% hit has lots of motivation to lobby legislatures ... members of legislatures don't receive anything similar amount of money from passing FED conforming legislation. what they personally get in their pocket (from medicaid lobby) appears to more than offset any consideration about significant increase in federal funding ... and corresponding reduction in state funding (and/or the elimination of billions in fraud ... which would be a win-win for both federal & state, but not for individual member of the legislature). For a time, was that states were using FED stimulus to offset state budget, like funding for medicaid (in round-about way ... fed stimulus was going to support medicaid fraud). In at least one state, the head of the state medicaid fraud unit quit over legislature not passing the bill with provisions to conform to federal guidelines.

somewhat corresponding skimming for pharmaceutical industry was medicare part-d ... first major legislation after congress allowed fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002; comptroller general would claim that it comes to be a long-term $40T unfunded mandate totally swamping all other budget items (and apparently major motivation for including in speeches that nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmatic).

cbs 60mins did expose on the legislative process for part-d ... that a sentence was slipped into the bill just before final vote that preclude competitive bidding; identical drugs were shown side-by-side that part-d drugs (w/o competitive bidding) were three times the cost of the same drug from VA (with competitive bidding). they also noted that the 18 people primarily responsible for the process had then resigned and were on drug industry payrolls.

If you aren't going to cut into the enormous amount being skimmed off by various large industries and/or large companies taking advantage of enormous loop-holes for tax avoidance (either legally or illegally) ... then at some point it will be necessary to cut basic services ... especially for constituates that otherwise have little leverage with members of congress.

misc. past posts mentioning medicaid &/or medicare part-d:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#61 Health Care
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#14 Health Care
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#19 Another "migration" from the mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#7 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#34 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#35 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#98 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#17 Michigan industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#71 "Rat Your Boss" or "Rats to Riches," the New SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#0 Oldest Instruction Set still in daily use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#3 Oldest Instruction Set still in daily use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#9 Oldest Instruction Set still in daily use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#34 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#35 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#46 not even sort of about The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#37 WHAT, WHY AND HOW - FRAUD, IMPACT OF AUDIT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#75 origin of 'fields'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#78 origin of 'fields'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#72 77,000 federal workers paid more than governors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#12 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#14 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#20 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#28 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#29 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#31 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#33 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#37 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#40 Advice from Richard P. Feynman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#59 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#57 The Mortgage Crisis---Some Inside Views
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#42 Speed: Re: Soups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#73 How Pursuit of Profits Kills Innovation and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#136 Gingrich urged yes vote on controversial Medicare bill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#137 The High Cost of Failing Artificial Hips
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#6 We are on the brink of a historic decision [referring to defence cuts]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#36 McCain calls for U.S.-led airstrikes in Syria
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#40 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#61 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#68 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#69 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#0 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#41 Lawmakers reworked financial portfolios after talks with Fed, Treasury officials
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#51 Is this Boyd's fundamental postulate, 'to improve our capacity for independent action'? thoughts please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#63 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#81 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#86 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#37 If all of the American earned dollars hidden in off shore accounts were uncovered and taxed do you think we would be able to close the deficit gap?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#74 Unthinkable, Predictable Disasters
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#79 Romney and Ryan's Phony Deficit-Reduction Plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#85 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#33 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#38 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#66 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#71 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#0 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#36 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#40 Stealth Target of Defense Spending Cuts: America's Highly Effective Socialized Medicine Provider, the VA System, and Military Benefits Generally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#41 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#43 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#56 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#97 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: comp.arch, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2013 19:11:58 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
then I should have added the phrase "...to make manure taste like caviar." Quarterpound has gone up 150%; Social Security for retirees has not. Both numbers are determined by this year's inflation costs.

latest on social security
http://www.alternet.org/10-facts-obama-doesnt-want-you-know-about-his-social-security-slashing-budget-plan

note that decade ago, there was push to "privatize" social security ... wallstreet wanted to get their hands on trillions in the social security fund.

this is similar to their lobbying for 401Ks ... wallstreet fees on individual 401Ks are higher that what they can charge big retirement funds. then there is this

Dan Loeb Simultaneously Solicits, Betrays Pension Funds
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/dan-loeb-simultaneously-solicits-betrays-pension-funds-20130411

some of this was behind lots of wallstreet going along with rating agencies giving triple-A ratings on toxic CDOs (even when *most* everybody knew that they weren't worth triple-A ratings) ... because then they could be sold to institutions restricted to only dealing in safe investments (like the big retirement funds) ... significantly contributing to over $27T being done during the bubble.

recent posts mentioning over $27T was done during the bubble
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#0 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#62 Taleb On "Skin In The Game" And His Disdain For Public Intellectuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#44 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#59 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2013 19:42:23 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
US Has Second Lowest Corporate Taxes In The Developed World
http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2011/07/05/260535/graph-corporate-tax-second-lowest/

and

Analysis: Dow 30 companies show what a joke calling corporate tax burden 'heavy' has become
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/03/27/1197405/-Analysis-Dow-30-companies-show-what-a-joke-calling-corporate-tax-burden-heavy-has-become


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Bait and Switch, CEO-Style; CEOs blame the poor for the nation's financial woes, then laugh all the way to the Caymans
http://inthesetimes.com/article/14828/bait_and_switch_ceo_style/

from above:
Also late last month, a Washington Post investigation showed that the 30 companies that make up the Dow Jones industrial average pay a dramatically smaller portion of their profits in taxes than they did a half century ago. Instead of discussing how that impacts government services, all of Washington is talking about slashing Social Security and Medicare.

... snip ...

referenced article (in above)

Post analysis of Dow 30 firms shows declining tax burden as a share of profits
http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-03-26/business/38042311_1_tax-code-corporate-tax-tax-burden

recent reference to social security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#90 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

recent reference to medicare:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#20 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

recent reference to tax-code:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#87 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

recent references to off-shore tax havens:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#36 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#27 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#46 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#49 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#59 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#86 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Continuing cloud computing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Continuing cloud computing
Date: 12 Apr 2013
Blog: IBMers
Amazon CEO Bezos: AWS an example of 'internally driven motivation'
http://www.zdnet.com/amazon-ceo-bezos-aws-an-example-of-internally-driven-motivation-7000013951/

from above:
In 2012, AWS announced 159 new features and services. We've reduced AWS prices 27 times since launching 7 years ago, added enterprise service support enhancements, and created innovative tools to help customers be more efficient.

... snip ...

... in large cloud datacenters ... as cost of basic computing hardware plummets, energy/cooling costs represents increasing percentage

New data center survey shows mediocre results for energy efficiency
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2034139/new-data-center-survey-shows-mediocre-results-for-energy-efficiency.html

from above:
Big online firms such as Google and Microsoft have boasted of PUEs of close to 1.0, but they're special cases. Many of the data centers they operate are new, and they invest heavily in IT efficiency, since it affects so much of their overall operating costs.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 Apr 2013 10:02:09 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#80 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#91 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

How much tax do big tech companies pay?
http://www.techhive.com/article/2034137/how-much-tax-do-big-tech-companies-pay-.html

from above:
Large U.S. tech companies should pay income taxes of about 35 percent on the profits they make (above $18.3 million) from business done in the United States. So says the tax code.

It rarely works out that way. Instead, many U.S. companies routinely park large chunks of their income overseas to avoid paying federal income taxes on it. And the SEC apparently looks the other way when companies obscure the true mix of their domestic-versus-overseas profit in their regulatory filings


... snip ...

apple, at&t, dell, facebook, google, hp, m'soft, total worldwide pre-tax $112.1B, worldwide tax: $15.4B, effective 14%

Congressional Research Service Finds Evidence of Massive Tax Avoidance by U.S. Corporations Using Tax Havens
http://ctj.org/ctjreports/2013/01/congressional_research_service_finds_evidence_of_massive_tax_avoidance_by_us_corporations_using_tax.php

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

KPMG quits as Skechers and Herbalife auditor amid insider trading allegations

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: KPMG quits as Skechers and Herbalife auditor amid insider trading allegations
Date: 13 Apr 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
KPMG quits as Skechers and Herbalife auditor amid insider trading allegations Accountancy giant rocked by damaging allegations that one of its senior US partners had leaked confidential information
http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2013/apr/09/kpmg-quits-auditors-herbalife-skechers

from above:
KPMG said it had fired a partner in its Los Angeles office after the employee had passed on information about the firm's clients to an individual who profited from the disclosures.

... snip ...

However, Sarbanes-Oxley was enormous gift to the audit industry ... rhetoric at the time would the new audit requirements would eliminate ENRON/WORLDCOM scenarios, there would be no more public company fraudulent financial filings ... and if there were incorrect information on filings, both senior executives and auditors would do jail time.

GAO reports of public company fraudulent financial filings show increase in number ...even after Sarbanes-Oxley. Implication is that not only is SEC "captured" and won't prosecute fraud ... but the audit industry is participating.

As I've periodically commented, in the Madoff congressional hearings they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff. Part of his testimony was that whistle-blowers/tips turn up 13 times more fraud than audits (imply that Sarbanes-Oxley audits aren't a particularly cost effective way of eliminating fraud).

Secret Recordings, Cash in Insider Sting
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/secret-recordings-cash-insider-sting-223300486.html
Secret Recordings, Cash in Insider Sting
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324240804578416741001984184.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
Date: 13 Apr 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#27 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#46 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze

almost think somebody was reading this discussion: Chase Down Mega-Rich Tax Cheats and Recover the Offshore Trillions; Audit the Rich!
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/08/audit-the-rich/

and latest from today

Highlights of Offshore Leaks So Far
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/highlights-offshore-leaks-so-far

summary says that there is enough material for articles through the rest of 2013 possibly extending into 2014

The Swiss Lawyers Who Help Europe's Richest Families Park Their Wealth Offshore
http://www.icij.org/offshore/swiss-lawyers-who-help-europes-richest-families-park-their-wealth-offshore

from above:
The documents show how Peter Hafter helped arrange the financial affairs of some of Europe's wealthiest individuals -- for example the banker Elie de Rothschild and industrialist Hans Heinrich Thyssen -- by setting up business entities in tax havens such as Panama, the British Virgin Islands, Luxembourg and Liechtenstein. This is known as "asset protection" in commercial legalese, but some experts say it's tax avoidance and evasion.

... snip ...

also key findings:
Ponzi schemers and other large-scale fraudsters routinely use offshore havens to pull off their shell games and move their ill-gotten gain

... snip ...

Release of Offshore Records Draws Worldwide Response
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/release-offshore-records-draws-worldwide-response
Highlights of Offshore Leaks So Far
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/highlights-offshore-leaks-so-far

also

How much tax do big tech companies pay?
http://www.techhive.com/article/2034137/how-much-tax-do-big-tech-companies-pay-.html

from above:
Large U.S. tech companies should pay income taxes of about 35 percent on the profits they make (above $18.3 million) from business done in the United States. So says the tax code.

It rarely works out that way. Instead, many U.S. companies routinely park large chunks of their income overseas to avoid paying federal income taxes on it. And the SEC apparently looks the other way when companies obscure the true mix of their domestic-versus-overseas profit in their regulatory filings


... snip ...

apple, at&t, dell, facebook, google, hp, m'soft, total worldwide pre-tax $112.1B, worldwide tax: $15.4B, effective 14%

Congressional Research Service Finds Evidence of Massive Tax Avoidance by U.S. Corporations Using Tax Havens
http://ctj.org/ctjreports/2013/01/congressional_research_service_finds_evidence_of_massive_tax_avoidance_by_us_corporations_using_tax.php

The comment about SEC looking the other way ... is similar to GAO reports of public company fraudulent financial filings ... even showing uptic after Sarbanes-Oxley (even tho rhetoric around leading up to passage of Sarbanes-Oxley was that all executives and auditors would do jail time).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970





previous, next, index - home