List of Archived Posts

2016 Newsgroup Postings (11/22 - 12/31)

Snowden
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Smedley Butler
Smedley Butler
OODA in IT Security
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Make companies pay full cost of breaches to restore trust in the internet, says ISOC
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Nasdaq asks SEC for speed bump to protect retail traders
Smedley Butler
The FBI Is Wrongly Telling People To Change Passwords 'Frequently'
Jeff Sessions set to show his steel on white-collar crime
The FBI Is Wrongly Telling People To Change Passwords 'Frequently'
BREAKING: Trump Announces Big Gift To Banks Despite His Campaign Rhetoric Against Wall Street
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Destination z article: Lessons Learned
The Winds of Reform
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Jeff Sessions set to show his steel on white-collar crime
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Nixon and the war
Nixon and the war
Nixon and the war
Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Are We Nearing a Cyber Sarbanes-Oxley?
China's spies gain valuable US defense technology: report
Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
IBM project discussions
Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)
Are We Nearing a Cyber Sarbanes-Oxley?
TARP Bailout
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
CFTC Reproposes Position Limits Rule
Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Every US taxpayer has effectively paid Apple at least $6 in recent years
Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
just what is micro-code anyway?
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Note on dis-orientation
Arpanet May 1973
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
The F-35 Stealth Fighter Is Politically Unstoppable----Even Under President Trump
Test Pilot Admits the F-35 Can't Dogfight
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Economic Mess
Gov. Privatization
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
US vs German Armies
Computer/IBM Career
[CM] 40 years of man page history
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING
Your Social Security cuts are already on the way
Elections Fair?
F35 Program
Your Social Security cuts are already on the way
Retrieving data from old hard drives?
This Is How The US Government Destroys The Lives Of Patriotic Whistleblowers
In American Towns, Private Profits From Public Works
A Christmassy PL/I tale
PC Compromise and Internet Transactions
Attack SS Entitlements
Multitasking question
Multitasking question
Minimum Wage
PC Compromise and Internet Transactions
Multitasking question
Minimum Wage
Minimum Wage
Minimum Security Required
Minimum Wage
The top 50 hospitals that gouge patients the most
Definition of "dense code"

Snowden

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Snowden
Date: 22 Nov 2016
Blog: Facebook
Edward Snowden Is a F**king Idiot
http://gizmodo.com/edward-snowden-is-a-fucking-idiot-1789039598

In the early 80s, we were working with the director of NSF and was suppose to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget, some other things happen and finally NSF releases an RFP (in part based on what we already had running). Internal politics prevent us from responding to the RFP. The NSF director tries to help, writing the company a letter (with support from other agencies), but that just makes the internal politics worse (as did comments that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers, it grows into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to modern internet. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internet

One difference bertween the internet and the internal network, was that all internal network links had to be encrypted (created lots of problems with gov. entities, especially when links crossed national boundaries). I got tired of what I had to pay for T1 encryptors and faster encryptors were almost impossible to find. I got involved with new kind of link encryptor, objective was cost less than $100 and easily handle T3. The corporate crypto product group complained that what was done significantly compromised crypto strength. It took me 3months to figure out how to explain to them what was happening (so they would understand), aka rather than weaker than crypto standard, it was significantly stronger than crypto standard. It was hollow victory, I got told I could make as many as I wanted, but they all had to be sent to address in Maryland. It was when I realized that there was three kinds of crypto: 1) the kind they don't care about, 2) the kind you can't do, and 3) the kind you can only do for them.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

Note by the early 90s, two-party operations was standard in finance and gov. as countermeasure to insider threats. In the wake of Snowden there was some press that the agency was going to (re?-)implement two-party operations. One scenario is that last decade there was an enormous uptic in outsourcing to private-equity beltway bandit subsidiaries ... that are under enormous pressure to cut costs in the search of profits (Snowden and the latest case in the news, were both employed by the same company)
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
and
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/06/us/nsa-leak-booz-allen-hamilton.html

further aggravated by realization that series of failures is more profitable than immediate success
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

in the success of failure paradigm, with gov. contractors doing everything possible in the pursuit of profit, not only does a series of failures represent more profit ... but collecting everything (as opposed to just what is needed) represents significant uptic in revenue

Director shelves working $3M ThinThread for multi-billion dollar Trailblazer that doesn't work
https://www.whistleblower.org/bio-william-binney-and-j-kirk-wiebe

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

the narrative can change significantly if you play follow the money

I was industry rep to Key Escrow meetings ... where gov "gave" into strong crypto ... but wanted all crypto keys escrowed and available. I made the case that escrowing keys used for (crypto-based) strong authentication was fundamental security violation. Gov. reps complained that people would then cheat, using authentication keys for encryption; which was one of the last key escrow meetings, 20yrs ago. Current narrative is very similar to the mid-90s.

Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb; Got to get educated before we can defeat Internet threats
https://medium.com/war-is-boring/30a00a8d29ad

We are cyberdumb. Opponents have danced through our networks (years before it was even discovered), several times extracting detailed designs for advanced weapon systems (including radar & stealth) .... going on all last decade.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/confidential-report-lists-us-weapons-system-designs-compromised-by-chinese-cyberspies/2013/05/27/a42c3e1c-c2dd-11e2-8c3b-0b5e9247e8ca_story.html

... more

OPM hack was avoidable, says congressional report
http://www.pcworld.com/article/3117352/opm-hack-was-avoidable-says-congressional-report.html
Congressional Report Slams OPM on Data Breach (actually outsourced to private equity subsidiary)
http://krebsonsecurity.com/2016/09/congressional-report-slams-opm-on-data-breach/
OPM Contractor's Parent Firm Has a Troubled History
https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas/
How Private Contractors Have Created a Shadow NSA; A new cybersecurity elite moves between government and private practice, taking state secrets with them (also references oil rig company that was transformed into one of the largest defense contractors after former SECDEF and future VP becomes CEO, including no-bid contracts in Iraq)
http://www.thenation.com/article/how-private-contractors-have-created-shadow-nsa/

I was tangentially involved in the Cal. data breach notification law (had been brought in to help with some word smith'ing) ... the problem was little or nothing was being done; the issue is normally entities take security measures in self-protection. The issue with most of the breaches is that the entities weren't at risk, it was their customers and/or the public. It was hoped that the publicity from the notifications would motivate institutions to take corrective action. It can be seen in the private-equity beltway bandit subsidiaries. There was enormous uptic in gov. outsourcing last decade and a major platform of the 2008 presidential campaign was to reverse that enormous increase in gov. outsourcing ... however, it didn't happen.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2016 08:15:03 -0800
"Kerr Mudd-John" <admin@127.0.0.1> writes:
I played it (after work hours naturally) in 1980, again IBM mainframe, but MVS. I never saw the source, just the tables; which were probably in ASCII.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#66 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

I started out only distributing executable internally inside IBM ... but would send source to people that proved that they had gotten all points. From that came versions with more points, FORTRAN converted to PLI, also ports to MVS/TSO.

This is old post reference to PLI port of ADVENTURE to MVS/TSO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#41 Colossal Cave Adventure in PL/I

from version sent to me ... when I complained that I didn't have any in my archives. It had been ported back to CMS ... using assembler emulation of WYLBUR TSO I/O Interface used by mvs pli version.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Smedley Butler

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Smedley Butler
Date: 23 Nov 2016
Blog: Google+
Smedley Butler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smedley_Butler
wrote "War is Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

and then: If you haven't heard anything yet about the "Panama Papers" ... "Dirty little secrets" ... setting up Panama as one of the worlds money laundering capitals ...
http://interactive.fusion.net/dirty-little-secrets/
Of course, the U.S. had a big hand in shaping Panama's destiny, stretching back to days when the canal was still a pipe dream, and even laid the groundwork for its financial system today. A circle of American financiers, chief among them J.P. Morgan, made $40 million off the canal deal, following a stealthy lobbying effort to get lawmakers to choose Panama over Nicaragua, according to author Ovidio Diaz-Espino's critical history "How Wall Street Created a Nation." At the time, the canal arrangement was the most expensive land deal of all time. Afterwards, Morgan and William Nelson Cromwell, the chief lobbyist for the financiers, managed Panama's finances up until the 1930s. Cromwell, who co-founded the prominent law firm Sullivan & Cromwell, also became Panama's de facto attorney General.

How Wall Street Created a Nation
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MDW60IY/
How Wall Street Created a Nation
https://www.globalpolicy.org/component/content/article/221/46782.html
And the U.S. was already on its way to building the canal in Nicaragua. The House of Representatives unanimously passed a Nicaragua canal bill, a treaty was signed with Nicaragua, President McKinley had already signed the bill, and the excavation had already began in Nicaragua. It was a done deal -- until Cromwell arrived on Capitol Hill and began throwing money around.

... snip ...

then there is "perpetual war" from this
http://archive.org/details/triumphantpluto00pettrich

loc6265-74:
XXX. THE LEAGUE TO PERPETUATE WAR The war has just begun. I said that when the Armistice terms were published and when I read the Treaty and the League Covenant I felt more than ever convinced of the justice of my conclusion. The Treaty of Versailles is merely an armistice -- a suspension of hostilities, while the combatants get their wind. There is a war in every chapter of the Treaty and in every section of the League Covenant; war all over the world; war without end so long as the conditions endure which produce these documents.

... snip ...

one of Boyd acolytes, tome on "pepetual war" (I wasn't ever really an acolyte, although I sponsored Boyd's briefings at IBM)
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html

perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

and in 20s&30s, John Foster Dulles (also) at Sullivan&Cromwell played major role in rebuilding Germany's economy and military
http://www.amazon.com/Brothers-Foster-Dulles-Allen-Secret-ebook/dp/B00BY5QX1K/

loc865-68:
In mid-1931 a consortium of American banks, eager to safeguard their investments in Germany, persuaded the German government to accept a loan of nearly $500 million to prevent default. Foster was their agent. His ties to the German government tightened after Hitler took power at the beginning of 1933 and appointed Foster's old friend Hjalmar Schacht as minister of economics.

loc873-79:
Sullivan & Cromwell floated the first American bonds issued by the giant German steelmaker and arms manufacturer Krupp A.G., extended I.G. Farben's global reach, and fought successfully to block Canada's effort to restrict the export of steel to German arms makers.

loc905-7:
Foster was stunned by his brother's suggestion that Sullivan & Cromwell quit Germany. Many of his clients with interests there, including not just banks but corporations like Standard Oil and General Electric, wished Sullivan & Cromwell to remain active regardless of political conditions.

loc938-40:
At least one other senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Eustace Seligman, was equally disturbed. In October 1939, six weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, he took the extraordinary step of sending Foster a formal memorandum disavowing what his old friend was saying about Nazism

... snip ...

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
Boyd refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Smedley Butler

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Smedley Butler
Date: 23 Nov 2016
Blog: Google+
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#2 Smedley Butler

more than 100yrs later: Experts urge Panama to reform financial services industry
https://www.icij.org/blog/2016/11/experts-urge-panama-reform-financial-services-industry

and very similar to Smedley's account

"The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World"
https://www.amazon.com/Profiteers-Bechtel-Men-Built-World-ebook/dp/B010MHAHV2/
"Economic Hit Man"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessions_of_an_Economic_Hit_Man

and "Is Havard responsible for the rise of Putin" (needed as countermeasure to US capitalists looting the country); John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html
If you are unfamiliar with this fiasco, which was also the true proximate cause of Larry Summers' ouster from Harvard, you must read an extraordinary expose, How Harvard Lost Russia, from Institutional Investor. I am told copies of this article were stuffed in every Harvard faculty member's inbox the day Summers got a vote of no confidence and resigned shortly thereafter.

... snip ...

How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html
Mostly, they hurt Russia and its hopes of establishing a lasting framework for a stable Western-style capitalism, as Summers himself acknowledged when he testified under oath in the U.S. lawsuit in Cambridge in 2002. "The project was of enormous value," said Summers, who by then had been installed as the president of Harvard. "Its cessation was damaging to Russian economic reform and to the U.S.-Russian relationship."

... snip ...

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OODA in IT Security

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: OODA in IT Security
Date: 23 Nov 2016
Blog: LinkedIn
OODA in IT Security
http://www.securityweek.com/breaking-OODA-loop

almost OODA-loop:

The Business of America is Lobbying: How Corporations Became Politicized and Politics Became More Corporate, loc2732-34:
Daft and Weick model the process in a three-stage cycle: first organizations scan their environment for information; then they interpret it; and finally they learn as part of a "process of putting cognitive theories into action."

... snip ...

and older reference:

Elements of Military Art and Science Or, Course Of Instruction In Strategy, Fortification, Tactics Of Battles, &C.; Embracing The Duties Of Staff, Infantry, ... Notes On The Mexican And Crimean Wars. (1846, Henry Wager Halleck), loc5019-20:
A rapid coup d'oeil prompt decision, active movements, are as indispensable as sound judgment; for the general must see, and decide, and act, all in the same instant.

... snip ...

other trivia ... gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

there are lots of things that could have been done for the internet that would have radically reduced many of the attack surfaces ... needing to only strengthen a radically smaller number of points. The current paradigm is vulnerabilities are so large that it guarantees constant reactive (rather than proactive to prevent).

more folklore

long ago and far away we were brought in as consultants to small client/server startup that wanted to do payments on their server; they had also invented this technology they called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now sometimes called "electronic commerce". I had complete authority over server to payment gateway (which haven't been known to have exploits) ... but could only make recommendations on the client/server part ... which were almost immediately violated ... continue to account for some number of exploits that continue to this day.

we were tangentially involved in the (Cal, original) data breach notification act, having been brought in to help wordsmith the cal. state electronic signature act. Some were heavily involved in privacy issues and had done extensive public surveys. The #1 issue was identity theft, notably fraudulent financial transactions as the result of breaches. The issue is normally entities take security measures in self protection ... in the case of breaches, it wasn't the institutions at risk, it was the public. It was hoped that the publicity from the breaches would motivate security measures

data breach notification posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

somewhat having done "electronic commerce" we were asked to participate in x9a10 financial standard working group that had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments. We did detailed end-to-end exploit and vulnerability studies of all kinds of retail payments. We didn't do anything directly about breaches or evesdropping, we write a standard that slightly tweaked the current infrastructure and eliminated the ability of the crooks to use information from previous transactions for fraudulent transactions (eliminated the primary motivation for breaches and need for "SSL", a variation on "replay" attack, enormously reducing the attack surface). The agency was quite ambivalent, the transactions no longer needed encryption to hide details as countermeasure to fraud, but they were also anonymous.

some refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959

"dual use" threat, in the current paradigm, the information necessary for the crook to make a fraudulent transaction ... is also required in the standard transaction business processes at millions of location around the world; as a result the information is simultaneously both a) needed to be readily available and b) kept confidential and never divulged.

also security proportional to risk to describe the current paradigm, the value of transaction information to the merchant is the profit ... which can be a few dollars, while the value of the information to the criminal is the credit limit &/or account balance. As a result the crooks may be able to outspend attacking by orders of magnitude (compared to what merchants can spend defending).

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proportional.to.risk

other folklore, in the early 80s (about the same time I was started sponsoring Boyd's briefings at IBM), we were working with the director of NSF to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. We were suppose to get $20M, then congress cuts the budget, some number of other things happen and finally an RFP was released. Internal politics prevent us from bidding, the NSF director tries to help by writting the company a letter (with support from other agencies) copying the CEO, but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments that what we already have running is at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As the regional networks tie into the centers, it becomes the NSFNET backbone ... precursor to the modern internet.

some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

even more folklore, I worked on CP67/CMS as undergraduate in the 60s, IBM picked up a lot of my stuff and shipped it in the product ... including to many gov. agencies ... which I didn't learn about until much later. Besides, the 3-letter gov. agencies reference in the URL upthread ... there was also (at least) NPG school in Monterey. In fact windows lore, before MS/DOS there was Seattle Computing, and before that CP/M and before that, Kildall worked on CP67 at NPG

the transaction information value to the merchant is the profit on the transaction ... possibly only a couple dollars, the transaction information can be used by the crook for fraudulent transactions to drain the account and/or upto the credit limit. Therefor the value to the crook can be several orders of magnitude times the value to the merchant. The work in X9A10 financial standard work basically eliminated crooks being able to use information from previous transactions to perform fraudulent transaction ... basically a variation on replay attack. It didn't do anything to prevent breaches by crooks to obtain the information ... but it eliminated the risk if crooks had the information and also their motivation for the breaches.

My observation about almost OODA-loop was see/decide/act was it was published in 1846 not bad for over 150yrs ago

in briefings, Boyd would stress observing from every possible facet as countermeasure to orientation bias ... isn't possible to deal with such issues w/o including orientation.

some boyd posts & refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

as referenced upthread ... a lot of data breaches were where the institution wasn't at risk .... it was there customers &/or public ... so the institutions had little at stake to motivate them to take security precautions. Along with that many involve the "dual-use" scenario ... where critical information was needed in dozens of business processors at millions of locations around the world ... at the same time the information had to be kept confidential and never divulged (dual-use paradigm making the information readily available for exploits) .... along with the security proportional to risk. Part of the work in the X9A10 financial standard working group was slightly tweaking the current paradigm and eliminating both the "dual-use" problem as well as the security proportional to risk problem. That enormously reduces the (at risk) attack surface ... there still could be intrusions in those places ... but there was nothing at risk ... and therefor no motivation for the intrusions.

trivia: Postel (long-time internet IETF RFC editor) before he passed, use to let me help with doing STD1 (internet standards) and also had me give a long talk at ISI on what was needed for business critical internet (the graduate network security people from USC also came over ... which totally filled the room to overflowing).

my IETF RFC index
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular  Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2016 16:36:23 -0800
Mike Spencer <mds@bogus.nodomain.nowhere> writes:
December 1972, reprinted in _II Cybernetic Frontiers_, Random House/Bookworks, 1974 as "Fanatic Life and Symbolic Death Among the Computer Bums."

Just to locate it in mental time, his December 1973 "Epilog" observes that Pong has just appeared in airports and bars and CAD/CAM has appeared as a nascent idea at SAIL in the intervening year.


some recent adventure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#77 PDP-8 advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#24 Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#103 August 12, 1981, IBM Introduces Personal Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#66 Is the IBM Official Alumni Group becoming a ghost town? Why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#96 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#1 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

co-worker at science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

had "ported" spacewar to 1130/2250 ("2250-m4", a 2250 graphics display with 1130 computer) for two users, split 2250 in left/right half for controls. my kids would come in and play it on weekends. He and I both transferred from science center to San Jose Research later in the 70s. He was also responsible for technology in the internal network some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
The Story of Edson C. Hendricks, the Genius Who Invented the Design for the Internet (there is also ipad version)
http://www.amazon.com/Its-Cool-Be-Clever-Hendricks/dp/1897435630
wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edson_Hendricks

other ...

atari, chuck e. cheese, etc
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nolan_Bushnell

1st chuck e. cheese opened in old grocery store bldg in south sanjose behind almaden mall
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_E._Cheese's
(a few miles from san jose plant site) a couple old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002p.html#24 I'll see your deep-fried mars-bar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#34 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
other history
http://www.computerhistory.org/revolution/computer-games/16/185
other history
http://www.shortlist.com/tech/gaming/the-power-of-pong

we would run into various of above around silicon valley.

the author of rexx (originally on vm370, later mvs, amiga, etc) ... did multi-user space-war game ... clients running on 3270s communicating with (vm370) SPM to "server" (and internal network supported SPM, so users didn't have to be on the same mainframe).

controls were straight-forward ... so almost immediately a number of users wrote bot players .... which would beat human players. somewhat in response, server was updated to increase energy use non-linearly as interval between commands dropped below what could be expected from human players. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#26 Help needed on conversion from VM to OS390
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#20 Whatever happened to IBM's VM PC software?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#12 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#4 Fast action games on System/360+?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#22 Was CMS multi-tasking?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#5 real-time messages
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#74 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#33 Was VM ever used as an exokernel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#5 Is email dead? What do you think?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#49 My first mainframe experience
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#24 Inventor of e-mail honored by Smithsonian
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#27 Inventor of e-mail honored by Smithsonian
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#38 Invention of Email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#64 Typeface (font) and city identity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#7 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#27 RBS Mainframe Meltdown: A year on, the fallout is still coming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#38 1969 networked word processor "Astrotype"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#1 Application development paradigms [was: RE: Learning Rexx]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#48 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#9 PROFS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#17 IBM Destination z - What the Heck Is JCL and Why Does It Look So Funny?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#1 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

various old posts mentioning SPM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#32 z900 and Virtual Machine Theory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#51 other cp/cms history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#8 Why these original FORTRAN quirks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#16 intersection between autolog command and cmsback (more history)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#11 vm/sp1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#14 more shared segment archeology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#25 IBM 360 Model 20 Questions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#22 Was CMS multi-tasking?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#33 Was VM ever used as an exokernel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#28 CSC History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#66 Wasn't instant messaging on IBM's VM/CMS in the early 1980s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#24 Inventor of e-mail honored by Smithsonian
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#38 Invention of Email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#1 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World
Date: 24 Nov 2016
Blog: Google+
The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World
https://www.amazon.com/Profiteers-Bechtel-Men-Built-World-ebook/dp/B010MHAHV2/

Bechtel and the big dig, log3034-36:
The Big Dig would take twenty years and become the most expensive urban highway redevelopment in US history. "If total expenditures are adjusted for inflation, it cost more than the Panama Canal," according to author Judith Nies. Originally budgeted at $2.8 billion when the congressional bill passed, its final cost in 2009 would be $16 billion.

and outsourcing nuclear to Bechtel, log4288-91:
A congressional commission, led by former undersecretary of the army Norman Augustine and retired admiral Richard Mies, concluded in 2014 that the privatization of the nuclear weapons laboratories had resulted in a "dysfunctional management and operations relationship," and "uneven collaboration with customers"—the "customers" being the DOE.

log4296-98:
In 2000 Bechtel received the $4.3 billion deal for the cleanup, which the company estimated would cost $14 billion to complete. But eleven years later, with the job still uncompleted, Bechtel predicted that the final cost would be more than $120 billion.

... snip ...

like outsourcing intelligence that also went on last decade
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
... 70% of the budget and over half the people,
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
Director shelves working $3M ThinThread for multi-billion dollar Trailblazer that doesn't work
https://www.whistleblower.org/bio-william-binney-and-j-kirk-wiebe

posts referencing success of failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

posts mentioning "big dig"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#25 TGV in the USA?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#73 Cormpany sponsored insurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#41 fraying infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#56 IBM drops Power7 drain in 'Blue Waters'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#0 Urban transportation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#55 TV Big Bang 10/12/09
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#11 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#14 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#15 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#18 other days around me
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#48 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamationmade30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#4 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#105 only sometimes From looms to computers to looms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#42 Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#27 Federal Subsidies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#72 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 12:09:53 -0800
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
Actually, that's not been true for a decade. Multithreading is even available in Java and has been used on Posix systems for a quarter century via pthreads and even earlier with ADA.

in early 70s, i got roped into project to do hyperthreading on 370/195 ... 195 didn't have branch prediction and conditional branches stalled the pipeline ... most codes ran at half rated speed (very few programmers/code was optimized for running at full speed) ... so it was thot if ran two instruction streams ... would doing a better job of utilizing available resources. it was never announced or shipped, in part because it was deamed too hard (impossible) to retrofit virtual memory to 370/195 (virtual memory had been announced for all 370s).

hyperthread originally shows up in acs; next to last section "sidebar: multithreading" (just before section on ACS features showing up 20yrs later in es/9000)
https://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

however, very few programmers are adept at multithreading/multiprocessor.

I've mentioned before charlie inventing compare&swap (name chosen because CAS are charlie's initials) at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

working on fine-grain multiprocessor locking for cp67. The initial attempt to get it included it 370 was rebuffed ... because the architecture owners claimed that the POK favorite son operating system people said that test&set (from 360/65MP) was more than adequate. The 370 architecture owners said that to get compare&swap included in 370, justification other than kernel multiprocessor locking was needed. Thus was born the application multithreading examples that still are included in mainframe principles of operation. It was picked up by large thoughput applications, like DBMS ... and then the same and/or similar semantics started showing up on other hardware platforms. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

as more and more microporcessors started moving to multiple core (somewhat in lieu of faster clock speeds), the holy grail became a multi threaded/programming/processor (parallel) programming language which would simplify concurrent programming for the majority of programmers that don't quite "get it".

old posts referencing news article from middle of last decade, where head of microsoft was demanding that intel stop this multicore stuff and return to faster & faster single processors because concurrent/parallel programming was just too hard. Intel then had to explain to the head of microsoft that it wasn't going to happen.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#78 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#42 Panic in Multicore Land
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#15 Why do people say "the soda loop is often depicted as a simple loop"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#44 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#90 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#28 I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#48 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#85 Parallel programming may not be so daunting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#118 By the time we get to 'O' in OODA

other posts mentioning parallel/concurrent programming "holy grail"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#15 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#44 Are multicore processors driving application developers to explore multithreaded programming options?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#63 Intel: an expensive many-core future is ahead of us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#26 What is the biggest IT myth of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#9 Age
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#8 No command, and control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#21 Eurofighter v F16
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#15 Why do people say "the soda loop is often depicted as a simple loop"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#36 Time to competency for new software language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#48 Difference between fingerspitzengefuhl and Coup d'oeil?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#44 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#77 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#91 Difference between fingerspitzengefuhl and Coup d'oeil?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#118 By the time we get to 'O' in OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#119 Holy Grail for parallel programming language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#123 Holy Grail for parallel programming language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#175 Holy Grail for parallel programming language
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#56 Which Books Can You Recommend For Learning Computer Programming?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#10 Boyd OODA-loop Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#14 New words, language, metaphor

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Make companies pay full cost of breaches to restore trust in the internet, says ISOC

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Make companies pay full cost of breaches to restore trust in the internet, says ISOC
Date: 24 Nov 2016
Blog: LinkedIn
Make companies pay full cost of breaches to restore trust in the internet, says ISOC
http://www.pcworld.com/article/3144136/security/make-companies-pay-full-cost-of-breaches-to-restore-trust-in-the-internet-says-isoc.html

We were tangentially involved in the Cal. data breach notification act, having been brought in to help wordsmith the electronic signature act. Several of the participants were heavily involved in privacy issues and had done detailed public surveys. At the top was fraudulent financial transactions as a result of breaches. The problem was little or nothing was being done about the breaches. An issue is institution normally takes security measures in self protection, in these cases the institutions weren't at risk, it was their customers &/or public. It was hoped that the publicity from the notification might prompt institutions to take corrective action.

data breach notification posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

aside: I used the above explanation in the intro to the financial industry privacy standard. I've also used metaphors "dual-use" and security proportional to risk in reference to majority of the breaches that have occurred (criminal harvesting account information for the purpose of fraudulent financial transactions).

In the "dual-use" scenario ... account information is needed in dozens of business processors at millions of locations around the world ... at the same time the information has to be kept confidential and never divulged (dual-use making the information readily available for exploits)

In the security proportional to risk. the value of electronic payment transaction information to the merchant is the profit ... which can be a few dollars, while the value of the information to the criminal is the credit limit &/or account balance (several hundred to tens of thousands). As a result the crooks can afford to outspend attacking by orders of magnitude (compared to what merchants can spend defending).

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proportional.to.risk

Long ago and far away we were brought in as consultants to small client/server startup that wanted to do payments on their server; they had also invented this technology they called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now sometimes called "electronic commerce". I had complete authority over server to payment gateway (which haven't been known to have exploits) ... but could only make recommendations on the client/server part ... which were almost immediately violated ... accounts for some number of exploits that continue to this day.

Somewhat for earlier having done "electronic commerce" at a small client/server startup, in the mid-90s we were asked to participate in the X9A10 financial standard working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments (POS, attended, unattended, internet, debit, credit, ACH, etc). Detailed end-to-end threat and vulnerability studies were done for most kinds of payments. One of the objectives of the resulting standard was to slightly tweak the existing paradigm and eliminate the dual-use characteristic. It did nothing to eliminate the breaches at millions of locations around the world, but it did eliminate the risk, since the crooks were no longer able to use the information to perform fraudulent financial transactions (enormously reducing the attack surface that needed to be protected).

some refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#x959

trivia: Before he passed, long-time internet IETF RFC standards editor Postel, use to let me help with doing STD1 (internet standards) and also had me give a long talk at ISI on what was needed for business critical internet (the graduate network security people from USC also came over ... which totally filled the room to overflowing).

my IETF RFC index
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm

More long ago and far away, in the early 80s we were working with the director of NSF and were suppose to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then Congress cuts the budget, some other things happen and finally NSF releases an RFP but internal politics prevent us from bidding. The director of NSF tries to help, writing a letter to the company (with support from other agencies), but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers, it becomes the NSFNET "backbone" (precursor to modern internet).

some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 15:13:31 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
It's been true a lot longer than that. PL/I(F) supported multi-tasking back in the 60s.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#7 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

posix async i/o for unix ... was used by unix platforms for mutli-threading transactions.

it was predated by "read/write" & "wait" system services from original os/360 from mid-60s ... and higher level languages with library functions interfacing to the os/360 system services.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Access_method

just straight-forward read, write, wait, etc ... left it to the application to do the multithreading services ... the application appeared as single "large" executable to the system. This is basically what CICS did ... doing its own multithreading scheduling/dispatching ... and one reason why CICS didn't support multiprocessing multithreading until this century. ... recent CICS post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#51 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

OS/360 had "ATTACH" which would create multiprogramming (multithreading) tasks managed by OS/360 dispatching. However, OS/360 system services tended to be really heavyweight ... and so early multithreaded "subsystem" applications (like CICS) would do their own internal "lightweight" multithreading. However, it appeared as single large dispatching unit ... and OS/360 then only dispatches on single task on single processor.

Large DBMS on unix would use posix asynch I/O (similar to os/360 read, write, wait) and do their own multithreading ... for running on single processor. There was also forking with shared memory ... which would allow different forks to run on different processors concurrently ... before Posix lightweight threads.

posix asynch i/o
http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=607373
posix threads
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_POSIX_Thread_Library

DBMS just doing its own threads and dispatching worked single processor (like CICS). For UNIX to get concurrent execution on multiple processors started with forking and shared memory.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Nasdaq asks SEC for speed bump to protect retail traders

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Nasdaq asks SEC for speed bump to protect retail traders
Date: 25 Nov 2016
Blog: LinkedIn
Nasdaq asks SEC for speed bump to protect retail traders
https://www.finextra.com/newsarticle/29822/nasdaq-asks-sec-for-speed-bump-to-protect-retail-traders
US equity markets have become skewed in favour of aggressive, short-term, high frequency traders (HFTs) and against long-term and retail investors unable to keep up with the expensive technology employed by HFTs.

... snip ...

HFT makes something appear ... proposal is that HFT can't make it disappear for at least one second (big divide between short-term traders and long-term investors)

recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#75 American Gripen: The Solution To The F-35 Nightmare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#68 Eric Hunsader Explains To CNBC That "Markets Are Always Rigged"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#11 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#95 Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#40 Misc. Success of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#65 old Western Union Telegraph Company advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#18 Bundesbank Confirms HFTs Reduce Liquidity, Contribute To Flash Crashes, Withdraw At Times Of "Market Stress"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Smedley Butler

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Smedley Butler
Date: 25 Nov 2016
Blog: Google+
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#2 Smedley Butler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#3 Smedley Butler
and somewhat related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#6 The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World

John Boyd's Art of War; Why our greatest military theorist only made colonel.
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/john-boyds-art-of-war/
Here too Boyd had a favorite line. He often said, 'It is not true the Pentagon has no strategy. It has a strategy, and once you understand what that strategy is, everything the Pentagon does makes sense. The strategy is, don't interrupt the money flow, add to it.'

... snip ...

... part of the for-profit "perpetual war"
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html
and success of failure
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
paradigms, are never finish/complete something ... because that would interrupt the flow of money

posts referencing success of failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war
John Boyd posts and refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The FBI Is Wrongly Telling People To Change Passwords 'Frequently'

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The FBI Is Wrongly Telling People To Change Passwords 'Frequently'
Date: 25 Nov 2016
Blog: Facebook
The FBI Is Wrongly Telling People To Change Passwords 'Frequently'
http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-fbi-is-wrongly-telling-people-to-change-passwords-frequently

passwords & pins are something you know, shared-secret authentication, things weren't too bad nearly 50yrs ago when I got cp67/cms online password ... when it was my only password. However, institutions security guidelines are that passwords have to be hard-to-guess, impossible-to-remember that have to be changed every 30 days and can never be written down. Also since they are shared-secrets, every unique security domain has to have unique passwords (as countermeasure to cross-domain attacks). Now institutions still act like their "hard to guess", "impossible to remember" unique password that has to be changed every 30 days, is the only password that a person has. The paradigm started to break down by the time a person had to deal with a dozen shared-secrets ... and now many people have a hundred or more to deal with.

posts mentioning three factor authentication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#3factor
posts mentioning shared-secrets authentication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#secrets

disclaimer: we have more than a couple dozen patents on the subject. We were dealing with the patent attorneys and the claims were packaged as 50 some patents and the attorneys said that there would be well over 100 patents. When the executives reviewed it (cost of filing all the patents in the US and international as well as the $6k/patent/inventor) they directed all claims to be packaged in nine patents. Somewhat later the patent office came back and said they were getting tired of getting the humongous patents where the fee doesn't even carry the cost of reading all the claims ... and the claims had to be repackages as at least 30 patents (there was something in the fine print about only $6K/patent/inventor for just original patents). reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadssummary.htm

more references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads
--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Jeff Sessions set to show his steel on white-collar crime

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Jeff Sessions set to show his steel on white-collar crime
Date: 25 Nov 2016
Blog: Facebook
Jeff Sessions set to show his steel on white-collar crime
https://www.ft.com/content/c870f24c-b1c5-11e6-a37c-f4a01f1b0fa1
The Obama administration's failure to jail any bank executives after the financial crisis undoubtedly fuelled the populist wave that has lifted Donald Trump from the world of reality television to the White House. Mr Sessions, who once bragged that bankers he prosecuted in Alabama "lost everything they had", will be mindful of public sentiment.

... snip ...

VP (and former CIA director) ... claims no knowledge of such activities
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

and another presides over the financial mess, 70 times larger than S&L crisis. The S&L crisis had 1000 criminal convictions with jailtime, proportionally the economic mess should have 70,000; so far there have been none.

S&L crisis posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#s&l.crisis

Jan2009, I was asked to HTML'ize the (recently scanned) Pecora Hearings (30s senate hearings into the '29 crash, resulted in criminal convictions and Glass-Steagall) with lots of internal HREFs and URLs between what happened this time and what happened then (comment that the new congress might have appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call saying that it won't be needed after all (reference to enormous mountains of wallstreet cash totally burying capital hill).

Pecora Hearing and/or Glass-Steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The FBI Is Wrongly Telling People To Change Passwords 'Frequently'

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The FBI Is Wrongly Telling People To Change Passwords 'Frequently'
Date: 25 Nov 2016
Blog: Facebook
note shared-secret passwords are vulnerable to various kinds of skimming and breach attacks (as opposed to brute force guessing).

late thursday/early friday, somebody in POK sent me the following. On friday I distributed it to several people. over the weekend somebody printed it on official corporate letterhead paper and stuffed all the bulletin boards in the bldg. Monday was 2April1984 and several people believed it was a real directive (see last paragraph). Some got very angry when they learned it was a Sundary, 1April directive. There was an effort to find out who was responsible ... and then all corporate letterhead paper was moved to lock cabinet.
CORPORATE DIRECTIVE NUMBER 84-570471 April 1, 1984

In order to increase the security of all IBM computing facilities, and to avoid the possibility of unauthorized use of these facilities, new rules are being put into effect concerning the selection of passwords. All users of IBM computing facilities are instructed to change their passwords to conform to these rules immediately.

RULES FOR THE SELECTION OF PASSWORDS:

1. A password must be at least six characters long, and must not contain two occurrences of a character in a row, or a sequence of two or more characters from the alphabet in forward or reverse order.

Example: HGQQXP is an invalid password. GFEDCB is an invalid password.

2. A password may not contain two or more letters in the same position as any previous password.

Example: If a previous password was GKPWTZ, then NRPWHS would be invalid because PW occurs in the same position in both passwords.

3. A password may not contain the name of a month or an abbreviation for a month.

Example: MARCHBC is an invalid password. VWMARBC is an invalid password.

4. A password may not contain the numeric representation of a month. Therefore, a password containing any number except zero is invalid.

Example: WKBH3LG is invalid because it contains the numeric representation for the month of March.

5. A password may not contain any words from any language. Thus, a password may not contain the letters A, or I, or sequences such as AT, ME, or TO because these are all words.

6. A password may not contain sequences of two or more characters which are adjacent to each other on a keyboard in a horizontal, vertical or diagonal direction.

Example: QWERTY is an invalid password. GHNLWT is an invalid password because G and H are horizontally adjacent to each other. HUKWVM is an invalid password because H and U are diagonally adjacent to each other.

7. A password may not contain the name of a person, place or thing.

Example: JOHNBOY is an invalid password.

Because of the complexity of the password selection rules, there is actually only one password which passes all the tests. To make the selection of this password simpler for the user, it will be distributed to all managers. All users are instructed to obtain this password from his or her manager and begin using it immediately.


some past posts mentionng 84-570471
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#52 OT Re: A beautiful morning in AFM.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#53 April Fools Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#42 Password Rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#2 Passwords: silly or serious?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#97 Just for a laugh ... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#34 Special characters for Passwords

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

BREAKING: Trump Announces Big Gift To Banks Despite His Campaign Rhetoric Against Wall Street

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: BREAKING: Trump Announces Big Gift To Banks Despite His Campaign Rhetoric Against Wall Street
Date: 26 Nov 2016
Blog: Facebook
BREAKING: Trump Announces Big Gift To Banks Despite His Campaign Rhetoric Against Wall Street
http://news.groopspeak.com/breaking-trump-announces-big-gift-to-banks-despite-his-campaign-rhetoric-against-wall-street/

well

Wall Street Preparing Dodd-Frank Rule Workaround
http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/38033-wall-street-preparing-dodd-frank-rule-workaround

There was lots of obfuscation/misdirection with Dodd/Frank. Congress had to appear to be doing something
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodd%E2%80%93Frank_Wall_Street_Reform_and_Consumer_Protection_Act

Dodd was high on "Friends of Mozilo" list
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelo_Mozilo#Friends_of_Angelo_.28FOA.29_VIP_program
who is #1 on time's list of those responsible for the economic mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877339,00.html

so one of the tactics was to make it extremely complex and take forever to figure out how to specify regulations ... which would move it out of public eye and any resulting regulations have good chance of actually not doing anything (and/or bill would be repealed before regulations could be enacted). Another tactic, wallstreet lobbyists would supply (extremely onerous) text to be inserted in the bill, then when draft bill provision leak, wallstreet would come out publicly lambasting the text (discrediting the process)

various articles about the shenanigans
http://www.thenation.com/article/174113/how-wall-street-defanged-dodd-frank
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/05/23/banks-lobbyists-help-in-drafting-financial-bills/
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/05/bank-lobbyists-writing-the-rules-for-wall-street.html
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/how-wall-street-killed-financial-reform-20120510
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/05/josh-rosner-on-how-dodd-frank-institutionalizes-too-big-to-fail.html

http://www.nationaljournal.com/politics/are-treasury-and-the-fed-at-odds-over-big-banks-20130524
http://billmoyers.com/segment/gretchen-morgenson-on-why-banks-are-still-too-big-to-fail/

also from "Confidence Men" regarding Volcker rule (in Dodd-Frank), pg430:
But they were fighting on too many fronts. Carl Levin of Michigan and Jeff Merkley of Oregon had discovered that Dodd had discreetly gutted the Volcker Rule

... snip ...

recent Trump &/or Dodd-Frank posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#51 OT: DuPont seeks to screw workers of their pensions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#65 old Western Union Telegraph Company advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#69 IBM Buying Promontory Clinches It: Regtech Is Real
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#73 IBM Buying Promontory Clinches It: Regtech Is Real
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#8 Wall Street Preparing Dodd-Frank Rule Workaround
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#9 Wall Street Preparing Dodd-Frank Rule Workaround
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#10 Wall Street Preparing Dodd-Frank Rule Workaround
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#58 Drafting of Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#65 In the Trump Era, Leaking and Whistleblowing Are More Urgent, and More Noble, Than Ever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#78 More Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#93 The annual Budget Games begin: Trump vs. Congress to control spending
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#13 Jeff Sessions set to show his steel on white-collar crime

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 12:22:15 -0800
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
You know, it's the sort of attitude expressed in that article that cost Hillary the election. Democrats need to quit acting like they have a monopoly on education and intelligence.

from
http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/national.php

clinton 64,433,399, trump 62,337,643, johnson 4,418,013, stien 1,395,182

articles right after the election was that obama had won 70M to 60M and clinton had lost with nearly even 60M to 60M (lost 10M voters compared to Obama). Now, she may be down only 5M compared to Obama when they are done. Since she has won the popular vote by comfortable margin, it then only becomes distribution of votes by states. The polls are that Bernie would have won popular vote by significantly larger margin.

note that every once and awhile local DC news will refer to congress as Kabuki Theater ... that what you see has very little to do with what is really going on ... apparent conflict between the two parties is just Roman Circus for the public. ... posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#kabuki.theater

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Destination z article: Lessons Learned

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Destination z article: Lessons Learned
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 26 Nov 2016 12:45:19 -0800
gabe@GABEGOLD.COM (Gabe Goldberg) writes:
Though even z Systems can't provide actual temporal relocation, it's interesting to consider what advice mainframe professionals would give their younger selves if the opportunity existed. And veterans' wisdom applies to Generation Z. Best to receive it now, rather than in 30 years when someone else asks what advice they'd give to their younger selves

we were out making customer executive presentation on 3-tier architecture, involving ethernet, routers, mainframes, etc. ... when we were taking sharp barbs in the back from the token-ring and SAA forces (communication group strongly fighting off distributed computing and client/server, trying to preserve their dumb terminal paradigm and install base). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

Part of the T/R forces critism involved comparing 16mbit t/r with what it claimed was ethernet ... but they only way they could make those numbers come out was if they used pre-product 3mbit ethernet before listen-before-transmit. I would make facetious references that obviously somewhere in the bowels of Armonk (or Raleigh) that they have time-machine to justify comparing 1990 token-ring technology with 1980 ethernet.

as an aside, my wife had also included 3-tier architecture in response to large, very secure, gov network campus request ... and took a lot of heat & FUD.

as I've periodically mentioned, in the late 80s a senior disk engineer got a talked scheduled at the world-wide, internal, annual communication group conference supposedly on 3174 performance ... but opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. As referenced the communication group was fightting off distributed computing and client/server and the disk division was seeing data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions but were constantly vetoed by the communication group (with its corporate strategic ownership of everything that crossed the datacenter walls).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

In the early 80s, we were working with the director of NSF and suppose to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget, some other things happened and finally an RFP was release (in part based on what we already had running). Internal politics prevent us from bidding and the NSF director tries to help by writing the company a letter (with support of other agencies), but that just makes the internal politics worse (as did comments that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers, it evolves into the NSFNET backbone, precursor to the modern internet. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

somebody collected the email going around the communication group with lots of misinformation and FUD ... and forwarded it to us ... heavily snipped and REDACTED to protect the guilty:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109
and other SNA/VTAM misinformation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#email870302
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#email870306

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Winds of Reform

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Winds of Reform
Date: 26 Nov 2016
Blog: Facebook
Boyd had story about SECDEF Weinburger associated with 18pg cover article ... gone behind paywall, but much of it still lives free at wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20070320170523/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953733,00.html

He said that he knew SECDEF would attempt to take revenge (something like the Pollard case) ... so Boyd started 18months earlier making sure that there was written approval for public release of every piece of information, and then it was orchistrated that every piece was made public in congressional hearings. When SECDEF ordered retribution, it turned out that every piece of information made public in the hearings was covered. Attempt was made to move one of the smallest congressional rooms (on Friday afternoon) ... to minimize the chances of press coverage. Supposedly there was review in Pentagon on Sat. morning and no mention of the hearing was found. The pentagon then was taken by surprise when 18 page front page article shows up in the Pentagon on Monday ... and all sorts of anger breaks out. Then when Weinburger realizes he can't get Spinney, he goes after Boyd, who is assumed to be behind the whole thing. Boyd contract is moved to Alaska and he is forbidden to ever enter the Pentagon bldg. again. Congressional cover at the time got that reversed and Boyd got even better Pentagon office. He joked that afterwards Pentagon established a new classification "NO-SPIN" (unclassified but not to be given to Spinney).

This account "The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World" has both Shultz and Weinburger being hired by Bectel after the Nixon administration, even though there was intense rivalry between the two. When Weinburger is brought in as SECDEF by Reagon, Weinburger tells Reagon that Shultz is not interested in SECSTATE because he wants to stay at Bechtel (which wasn't true). Later when Haig is removed as SECSTATE, Reagon does bring Shultz in as SECSTATE. Account has both Shultz and Weinburger working on behalf of Bectel all during their gov. service.

Boyd posts & references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 11:33:44 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
The thing is, by the end of the war I don't think any army had much oomph left. I'm not sure the Germans were defeated on the battlefield.

many of the original ww1 combatants were pretty much exhausted ... they were playing attrition and body count.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I_casualties

A major factor was US entering to conflict.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_entry_into_World_War_I

from
http://www.ushistory.org/us/45.asp
The contributions of the United States military to the Allied effort were decisive. Since the Russians decided to quit the war, the Germans were able to move many of their troops from the eastern front to the stalemate in the West. The seemingly infinite supply of fresh American soldiers countered this potential advantage and was demoralizing to the Germans. American soldiers entered the bloody trenches and by November 1918, the war was over.

... snip ...

and
https://www.enotes.com/homework-help/why-did-us-ender-ww1-what-affect-did-its-entry-162415
The Russian Revolution in 1917 had given the Germans victory on the Eastern Front with the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, allowing the Kaiser to concentrate his entire army on the Western Front, which had stalemated into bloody trench warfare with both side bled white. A final offensive by a reinforced German army might capture Paris and end the war for good. This was a real possibility when the US came in on the Allied side. In fact, one of the major effects of our entry into the war not yet discussed here was the American Army's role in breaking up that much of that last offensive at Chateau Thierry and Belleau Wood.

... snip ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Belleau_Wood and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ch%C3%A2teau-Thierry_(1918)
Despite the revolution in Russia, fortune seemed to favor the Allies with the arrival of the Americans to France. However, these troops needed time to train before they could be combat effective. Recognizing the window of opportunity, Ludendorff consolidated the manpower freed up from the Eastern Front to conduct Operation Michael in order to split the Allies' lines. The successes of the German Stormtroopers infiltration tactics earned Germany approximately 40 miles of territory. But the offensive lost momentum when it surpassed its supply lines. Up to this point, American General Pershing refused to hand over American divisions to either the British or French armies, insisting on keeping them together as one army. But in the face of the German onslaught, Pershing relented and sent a portion of his army to assist the French in blocking the German advance.

Spring Offensive
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_Offensive
The Germans had realised that their only remaining chance of victory was to defeat the Allies before the overwhelming human and materiel resources of the United States could be fully deployed. They also had the temporary advantage in numbers afforded by the nearly 50 divisions freed by the Russian surrender (the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk).

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Jeff Sessions set to show his steel on white-collar crime

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Jeff Sessions set to show his steel on white-collar crime
Date: 27 Nov 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#13 Jeff Sessions set to show his steel on white-collar crime

Reagan's Iran-Contra affair 30 years later has lessons for Trump
http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB567-Iran-Contra-Reagan-Oliver-North-and-Post-Truth-30-years-later/
Vice President George H. W. Bush was substantially aware of, and even participated in aspects of, the illicit operations even though he denied it vociferously at the time. Confirmation eventually came in the form of dictated notes which he had refused for years to turn over to the independent counsel (Document 06), as well as in the form of other documents about proscribed quid pro quo deals with the Honduran government.

... and
The final act of post-truthism came with then-President George H.W. Bush's decision to pardon several key participants in Iran-Contra. Among them were defendants who had not even had their day in court, thus taking Bush further than other presidents have been willing to go with the pardon power. The not-so-subtle implication of the act was to make it impossible to pursue already-developed plans to investigate Bush himself in greater detail

... snip ...

aka, he was full-time administrative point person deregulating the financial industry creating the S&L crisis (along with other family members) ... posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#s&l.crisis

posts referencing November 1, 2001 executive order blocking release of Reagan era papers, violating Presidential Records Act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#92 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#42 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#24 1976 vs. 2016?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#38 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#71 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#27 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#93 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#83 IBM's Gerstner to Join Carlyle As Investment Firm's Chairman

President who Eviscerated Presidential Records Act Relying on His Presidential Library to Boost Legacy.
http://nsarchive.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/president-who-eviscerated-presidential-records-act-relying-on-his-presidential-library-to-boost-his-legacy/
HISTORIANS, PUBLIC INTEREST GROUPS SUE TO STOP BUSH ORDER; Say New Restrictions on White House Files Violate Presidential Records Act; "Bush Order Attempts to Overturn the Law, Take the Power Back"
http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/news/20011128/
Court Rules Delay in Release of Presidential Papers is Illegal; Fails to Address Authority of Former Vice Presidents to Hold Up Disclosure of Papers
http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/news/20071001/

another recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#39 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
referencing gwu.edu archive ... CIA Confirms Role in 1953 Iran Coup
http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB435/

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 15:58:05 -0800
JimP. <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:
The Pentagon had no plans on how to win. Stupid.

John Boyd's Art of War; Why our greatest military theorist only made colonel.
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/john-boyds-art-of-war/
Here too Boyd had a favorite line. He often said, 'It is not true the Pentagon has no strategy. It has a strategy, and once you understand what that strategy is, everything the Pentagon does makes sense. The strategy is, don't interrupt the money flow, add to it.'

... snip ...

Boyd had another story about being asked to review the new USAF air-to-air missile (prior to vietnam) that claimed that it hit every time ... and he projected that it would hit 10% or less. Roll forward to vietnam and he was prooved correct. At one point the USAF 1star on the ground in vietnam ground all USAF fighters until they could be rearmed with (NAVY) sidewinder (which had better than twice hit rate of USAF missile). The 1star lasted 3months until he was called back to Pentagon. He was reducing USAF budget by loosing less planes and pilots and not using the USAF missile ... but every worse he was increasing the Navy's budget share (by using sidewinders) ... aka perspective of the war from the Pentagon was purely focused on the money.

actually winning or finishing ... can interrupt the flow of money ... also shows up in the rapidly spreading success of failure
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
and Perpetual War
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

McNamara had been LeMay's staff planning fire bombing of German and Japanese cities (even with norden sites, it was difficult for strategic bombing to hit targest from 5-6miles up, aka precision bombing was myth), but hard to miss a whole city with fire bombs. After WW2, McNamara leaves for auto industry, but returns as SECDEF for Vietnam where Laos becomes the most bombed country in the world (more tonnarge than Germany and Japan combined).
http://legaciesofwar.org/about-laos/secret-war-laos/

other recent posts mentioning McNamara and Lemay
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#60 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#73 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#8 What Does School Really Teach Children
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#30 AM radio Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#88 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#90 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#64 Strategic Bombing

Boyd would tell story about spending 18months getting sign-off for public release of every piece of information ... and then still had it done in congressional hearing ... anticipating that SECDEF Weinberger would attempt to throw them in brig for life (something like he did in the Pollard case). Manipulation was to have hearing late friday afternoon in small room ... minimizing press coverage. Supposedly there was Pentagon analysis Sat. that find no coverage. Supposedly SECDEF & staff were shocked when article hit the desks Monday morning. gone behind paywall ... but mostly free at wayback machine (may have to select pg. number to skip over pages that didn't make it to wayback machine).
http://web.archive.org/web/20070320170523/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953733,00.html

When SECDEF Weinberger couldn't make anything stick on Spinney, he turned attention to Boyd, transfering contract to Alaska, and forbidding Boyd from entering the Pentagon. At the time, Boyd had congressional coverage and actually ending getting better office in the Pentagon. Boyd claimed that DOD then invented "NO-SPIN" security classification (unclassified but not to be provided to Spinney).

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
Boyd posts and references:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Nixon and the war

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Nixon and the war
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 16:14:40 -0800
hancock4 writes:
_At the time_ it seemed important to actually have some sort of face-saving "peace with honor", even if it was really a defeat. Nixon was concerned that simply pulling out as a defeat would hurt U.S. interests worldwide and make people think the U.S. was untrustworthy and undependable. I can't say whether that would've been true, but I think in his day it was certainly worth deep consideration.

Nixon also faced political pressure. The head of Vietnam gave him a very hard time, and there were plenty of hardliners in U.S. politics who hated the communists would've been furious with Nixon with a defeat.

By the time the defeat occurred years later under Ford, enough time had passed that far more people recognized the futility of Vietnam and were ok with letting it go. That certainly wasn't the attitude in 1969.

IMHO, the real villain in Vietnam was Johnson and McNamera. They lied to the American people, lied to Congress, and lied to themselves about the progress and plan of the war. They knew all along they were creating a terrible mess.

Johnson never should've escalated the war.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#21 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Boyd had another story incisting that the electronic sensors across the trail wouldn't work ... so apparently in punishment, he was put in charge of "spook base" ... reference here gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

Boyd posts & refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

There are several accounts that Nixon committed treason, convincing South Vietnam to undermine the Paris peace talks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#98 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#21 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#22 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#23 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#61 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#75 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#87 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#34 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#39 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#68 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#73 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#76 Qbasic

Declassified LBJ Tapes Accuse Richard Nixon of Treason
http://news.slashdot.org/story/13/03/21/0331256/declassified-lbj-tapes-accuse-richard-nixon-of-treason
The Lyndon Johnson tapes: Richard Nixon's 'treason'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21768668
It begins in the summer of 1968. Nixon feared a breakthrough at the Paris Peace talks designed to find a negotiated settlement to the Vietnam war that he knew would derail his campaign.

Nixon therefore set up a clandestine back-channel to the South Vietnamese involving Anna Chennault, a senior campaign adviser. In late October 1968 there were major concessions from Hanoi which promised to allow meaningful talks to get underway in Paris. This was exactly what Nixon feared. Chennault was dispatched to the South Vietnamese embassy with a clear message: the South Vietnamese government should withdraw from the talks, refuse to deal with Johnson, and if Nixon was elected, they would get a much better deal. Meanwhile the FBI had bugged the ambassador's phone and transcripts of Chennault's calls were sent to the White House

In the end Nixon won by less than 1% of the popular vote, escalated the war into Laos and Cambodia with the loss of an additional 22,000 American lives, and finally settled for a peace agreement in 1973 that was within grasp in 1968.


... snip ...

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Nixon and the war

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Nixon and the war
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 16:36:41 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
There are several accounts that Nixon committed treason, convincing North Vietnam to undermine the Paris peace talks

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#21 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#22 Nixon and the war

mistype ... "South Vietnam"

This account "The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World" has both Shultz and Weinburger being hired by Bectel after the Nixon administration, even though there was intense rivalry between the two. When Weinburger is brought in as SECDEF by Reagon, Weinburger tells Reagon that Shultz is not interested in SECSTATE because he wants to stay at Bechtel (which wasn't true). Later when Haig is removed as SECSTATE, Reagon does bring Shultz in as SECSTATE. Account has both Shultz and Weinburger working on behalf of Bectel all during their gov. service.

recent refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#3 Smedley Butler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#6 The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World</a>
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#11 Smedley Butler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#18 The Winds of Reform

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Nixon and the war

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Nixon and the war
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 18:43:15 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#21 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#22 Nixon and the war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#23 Nixon and the war

some more articles:

How Richard Nixon Sabotaged 1968 Vietnam Peace Talks to Get Elected President
http://www.truth-out.org/progressivepicks/item/13994-how-richard-nixon-sabotaged-1968-vietnam-peace-talks-to-get-elected-president
Newly Released Secret Tapes Reveal LBJ Knew but Never Spoke Out About Nixon's 'Treason'
http://www.thewire.com/national/2013/03/newly-released-secret-tapes-reveal-lbj-knew-never-spoke-out-about-nixons-treason/63188/
Did Nixon Commit Treason in 1968? What The New LBJ Tapes Reveal.
http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/60446
Richard Nixon at 100: not just criminal, but treasonous too
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jan/10/richard-nixon-100-criminal-traitor
Yes, Nixon Scuttled the Vietnam Peace Talks - John Aloysius Farrell
http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/06/yes-nixon-scuttled-the-vietnam-peace-talks-107623.html
Richard Nixon's long shadow
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/george-f-will-nixons-long-shadow/2014/08/06/fad8c00c-1ccb-11e4-ae54-0cfe1f974f8a_story.html
Nixon's Treason Now Acknowledged
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/08/nixons-treason-now-acknowledged.html
Fleshing Out Nixon's Vietnam 'Treason'
https://consortiumnews.com/2014/09/08/fleshing-out-nixons-vietnam-treason/
Nixon betrayal far worse than GOP Iran letter: Column
http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2015/03/10/senators-letter-doesnt-rise-to-nixons-level/24695093/
George Will Confirms Nixon's Vietnam Treason
http://www.commondreams.org/views/2014/08/12/george-will-confirms-nixons-vietnam-treason
In the four years between the sabotage and what Kissinger termed "peace at hand" just prior to the 1972 election, more than 20,000 US troops died in Vietnam. More than 100,000 were wounded. More than a million Vietnamese were killed.

But in 1973, Kissinger was given the Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating the same settlement he helped sabotage in 1968.

According to Parry, LBJ wanted to go public with Nixon's treason. But Clark Clifford, an architect of the CIA and a pillar of the Washington establishment, talked Johnson out of it. LBJ's close confidant warned that the revelation would shake the foundations of the nation.

In particular, Clifford told Johnson (in a taped conversation) that "some elements of the story are so shocking in their nature that I'm wondering whether it would be good for the country to disclose the story and then possibly have [Nixon] elected. It could cast his whole administration under such doubt that I think it would be inimical to our country's best interests."


...
Fittingly, Clark Clifford's upper-crust career ended in the disgrace of his entanglement with the crooked Bank of Credit and Commerce (BCCI), which financed the terrorist group Al Qaeda and whose scandalous downfall tainted the Agency he helped found.

Johnson lived four years after he left office, tormented by the disastrous war that destroyed his presidency and his retirement. Nixon won re-election in 1972, again with a host of dirty dealings, then became the first American president to resign in disgrace.


... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 20:04:28 -0800
Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/erich-bloch-ibm-pioneer-who-later-led-national-science-foundation-dies-at-91/2016/11/28/4c0b9b84-b4af-11e6-b8df-600bd9d38a02_story.html

Just before he left for NSF, he had some title in Armonk responsible for employee innovation or some such thing. I had written some tome and he asked if he could come out to talk to me ... which I thought was fine to discuss the subjects. Turns out it was setup, he came out with it all marked up in red ... and was going to take me to task for each point ... turns out I had significant amount of backup detail for each point. I think he eventually got exasperated and said something about the IBM company and I were at loggerheads. Got on a lot better when he was at NSF ... even would drop in on him after he left NSF when he was at one of those K-street places.

recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#25 Globalization Worker Negotiation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#30 Globalization Worker Negotiation

some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 08:55:05 -0800
pechter@T61.(none) (Bill Pechter) writes:
Concurrent Computer (formerly Interdata, Perkin-Elmer Data Systems) had a couple of PDP8 machines running component insertion equipment.

They wanted to do something similar, and finally hid the PDP8 stuff behind a false front panel, if I remember correctly.

I was a DEC Field guy in the area before signing on with Concurrent in the training department and later becoming their Unix guy in the MIS Department.


as undergraduate, I added TTY terminal support to cp67 ... in consistent way with the existing 1052 & 2741 terminal support that did automatic terminal identification (which turned out would only work consistently with hard-wired lines). I then wanted to have single dial number for single pool of ports ("hunt group") ... but didn't quite work because the while the IBM terminal controller allowed to change the terminal type port scanner associted with each port ... they had taken short-cut and hard wired the line speed oscillator. This helped motivated univ. clone controller project ... started with Interdata/3 programmed to emulate the terminal controller, reverse engineered channel interface to build channel interface board ... four of us get written up as responsible for (some part of) clone controller business ... Interdata was selling the box commercially. It then evolves into an Interdata/4 handling the channel interface and cluster of Interdata/3s handling the ports ... later sold under PE logo after they buy Interdata.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

Later I had "HSDT" effort at IBM doing T1 and faster speed links and was suppose to have some IBM content ... the standard product that supported T1 was 2701 controller that was a couple decades old. FSD had done special bid ZIRPEL card for Series/1 that supported T1 for the gov. market that I was suppose to get and use.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

Along the way IBM buys ROLM which used data general. "ROLM" then oders a couple hundred Series/1 (as replacement) creating a years lead time for (other) Series/1 orders. I do some horse trading with person running "ROLM" datacenter to get a couple of their Series/1. They wanted some help with ROLM switch development which ran on the Data General ... but it was taking enormous long time to load a new system over 56kbit link ... for internal development, they wanted to be able to use T1 link ... getting load elapsed time down to under an hour.

as I've mentioned before, we were also working with NSF director
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#25 Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91

and were suppose to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers; then congress cuts the budget, some other things happen and finally NSF releases RFP (in part based on what we had already had running). Internal politics prevent us from bidding, NSF director tries to help by writing the company a letter (with support from other agencies), but that just makes the internal politics worse (as did comments that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers, it evolves into the NSFNET backbone (precursor to modern internet).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Are We Nearing a Cyber Sarbanes-Oxley?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Are We Nearing a Cyber Sarbanes-Oxley?
Date: 30 Nov 2016
Blog: Facebook
Are We Nearing a Cyber Sarbanes-Oxley?
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/we-nearing-cyber-sarbanes-oxley-bob-barker?trk=hp-feed-article-title-comment

Rhetoric in congress was that Sarbanes-Oxley would prevent future ENRONs and guarantee that executives (and auditors) would do jail time, but it requires SEC to do something. Possibly because GAO didn't believe SEC is doing anything, it starts doing reports of fraudulent public company financial filings, even showing increase after SOX goes into effect (and nobody doing jail time). Turns out that Sarbanes-Oxley also calls for SEC to do something about rating agencies, but SEC did about as much about rating agencies as they did about the public company fraudulent financial filings.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

In the congressional Madoff hearings, they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff (SEC's hands were forced when Madoff turned himself in, speculation he was looking for gov. protection from some bad people he had defrauded). Part of the testimony was that tips/whistleblowers turn up 13 times more fraud than audits and SEC didn't have tip hotline, but did have 1-800 line for companies to complain about audits.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff
regulatory capture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#regulatory.capture

In 1999, we were asked if we would help try and prevent the coming economic mess by improving the integrity of securitized mortgage supporting documents (securitized mortgages had been used during S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages, posterchild were office bldgs around Dallas that turned out to be empty lots). They then found they could pay for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A from Oct2008 congressional testimony), triple-A trumps supporting documents, they can start doing no-document liar loans and no longer have to care about borrowers' qualifications and loan quality ... being able to sell everything as fast as they could be made. Triple-A also enables being able to sell to institutions restricted to safe investments like large public & private pension funds (claims that it accounts for 30% loss in their value). Triple-A rating major factor in being able to do over $27T 2001-2008 (and outside the traditional mortgage market).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

triva: spring of 2008, some investors began to suspect that rating agencies were selling ratings ... and none of their ratings could be trusted ... which totally froze the muni-bond market. Finally, Warren Buffett steps in and starts offering muni-bond insurance to unfreeze the market.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

China's spies gain valuable US defense technology: report

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: China's spies gain valuable US defense technology: report
Date: 30 Nov 2016
Blog: Facebook
China's spies gain valuable US defense technology: report
http://www.atimes.com/article/chinas-spies-gain-valuable-us-defense-technology-report/

Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb; Got to get educated before we can defeat Internet threats
https://medium.com/war-is-boring/30a00a8d29ad

We are cyberdumb. Opponents have danced through our networks (years before it was even discovered), several times extracting detailed designs for advanced weapon systems (including radar & stealth).
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/confidential-report-lists-us-weapons-system-designs-compromised-by-chinese-cyberspies/2013/05/27/a42c3e1c-c2dd-11e2-8c3b-0b5e9247e8ca_story.html

recent posts mentioning cyberdumb:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#8 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#19 Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#20 DEC and The Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#95 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#104 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#104 How to Win the Cyberwar Against Russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#0 Snowden

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
Date: 01 Dec 2016
Blog: LinkedIn
Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/erich-bloch-ibm-pioneer-who-later-led-national-science-foundation-dies-at-91/2016/11/28/4c0b9b84-b4af-11e6-b8df-600bd9d38a02_story.html

Just before he left for NSF, he had some title in Armonk responsible for employee innovation or some such thing. I had written some tome and he asked if he could come out to talk to me ... which I thought was fine to discuss the subjects. Turns out it was setup, he came out with it all marked up in red ... and was going to take me to task for each point ... turns out I had significant amount of backup detail for each point. I think he eventually got exasperated and said something about the IBM company and I were at loggerheads. Got on a lot better when he was at NSF ... even would drop in on him after he left NSF when he was at one of those K-street places.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

We were working with NSF director and was suppose to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers; then congress cuts the budget, some other things happen and finally NSF releases RFP (in part based on what we had already had running). Internal politics prevent us from bidding, NSF director tries to help by writing the company a letter (with support from other agencies), but that just makes the internal politics worse (as did comments that what we already had running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks connect into the centers, it evolves into the NSFNET backbone (precursor to modern internet).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

The last product we did before leaving IBM was HA/CMP ... and was working on cluster scaleup for both commercial and scientific ... old post with reference to Jan1992 meeting in Ellison's conference room on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
and some old cluster scaleup email from the period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

within a few weeks of the Ellison meeting, cluster scaleup was transferred to kingston, announced as supercomputer and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors. Old 17Feb1992 press item, announced for scientific and technical *ONLY*
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
and more from 11May1992 (caught by surprise by national lab interest)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

conjecture was that possibly part of being blind-sided was complaints by mainframe DB2 if we were allowed to go ahead it would be at least five years ahead of them.

Trivia: In 1980 I had done some work on channel technology, but when it was tried to be released, some people in POK working on their serial stuff managed to block it getting released. In 1988, I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they had, which quickly becomes fibre channel standard (& working with LLNL regarding HA/CMP and supercomputer cluster scaleup). The POK stuff was finally released in 1990 as ESCON with ES/9000, when it was already obsolete.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

Other trivia: In 1979, I was con'ed into doing some benchmarking on (pre-FCS) 4341 for LLNL, which was looking at getting 70 4341s for compute farm. Later big corporations were ordering hundreds of 4341s at a time for placing out in departmental areas (i.e. 4341 was precursor to both the coming cluster supercomputing and the distributed computing tsunami).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM project discussions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM project discussions
Date: 01 Dec 2016
Blog: LinkedIn
Note mid-80s they were predicting revenue would double mostly based on mainframe business ... and there was massive manufacturing building program to double mainframe manufacturing (at a time when the business was starting to go the other way). There was also big uptic in "fast track" MBAs being rotated around different business units (to the detriment of some of those businesses) ... apparently part of preparing those business. It wasn't exactly career enhancing to point out problems with those businesses.

In the late 80s, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at the annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference supposedly on 3174 performance ... but opened the talk with statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that communication group had corporate strategic ownership of everything that cross the datacenter walls and was fighting off distributed computing and client/server trying to preserve its dumb terminal paradigm and install base. The disk division was seeing data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions that were constantly being vetoed by the communication group (a few short years later the company goes into the red and was being reorganized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company ... before the board brings in former AMEX president to reverse the breakup and resurrect the company).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

and FS
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
and another FCS page
https://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/fs.html
as well as end of ACS
https://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs.html
end of ACS
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html
where executives decided that it would advance the state of the art too fast and they could loose control of the market (lists some features of ACS that show up more than 20yrs later in ES/9000)

oh and this has some discussion of FS (appears to have gone 404 sometime after this snapshot, but lives on at wayback machine)
https://web.archive.org/web/20160410090830/http://www.ecole.org/en/seances/CM07

FS posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 01 Dec 2016 11:08:44 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#25 Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
related discussion in linkedin group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#29 Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91

from long ago and far away:

Date: 10/21/82 19:02:12
From: wheeler

it was something of a set-up ... but I don't think it proceeded quite the way he figured. "the company & I are on collision course unless I stop distributing things like TRIP0782 SCRIPT".

I think that since he wasn't making any points anywhere else, he had to pull out the file and go over it. I had rebuttal for his specific objections ... and then he would finish up with I've got to decide what I want to do ... because the company and I are currently on a collision course.

I guess he was suppose to ease into it gently but I had too large a body of facts of things wrong. He thot he had me with Vulcan ... because apparently he was involved in some way. He kept saying that Vulcan was killed and these other projects made it out. He stopped when I gave him the reason that Vulcan was killed and that the Vulcan fill-ins are post-Vulcan done on crash project (and not done very well).

First hour was not too bad. Second hour he tried to make points and since I had rebuttals ... he would resort to the collision course line.

He wants to have more meetings, next time he is out here &/or next time I'm on the east coast.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

past posts discussing Vulcan:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#8 IBM S/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#104 Fixed Head Drive (Was: Re:Power distribution (Was: Re: A primeval C compiler)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#53 IBM 650 (was: Re: IBM--old computer manuals)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#73 DASD Architecture of the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#3 Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#38 Is VIO mandatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#45 Why magnetic drums was/are worse than disks ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#59 Why magnetic drums was/are worse than disks ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#61 Z/VM support for FBA devices was Re: z/OS support of HMC's 3270 emulation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#74 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#63 Mac at 30: A love/hate relationship from the support front

I've mentioned before getting blamed for online computer conferencing (a precursor to modern social media) on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s) in the late 70s and early 80s. Folklore is that when the executive committee (in armonk) was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.

some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

from IBM Jargon:
Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 01 Dec 2016 13:30:33 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
McNamara had been LeMay's staff planning fire bombing of German and Japanese cities (even with norden sites, it was difficult for strategic bombing to hit targest from 5-6miles up, aka precision bombing was myth), but hard to miss a whole city with fire bombs. After WW2, McNamara leaves for auto industry, but returns as SECDEF for Vietnam where Laos becomes the most bombed country in the world (more tonnarge than Germany and Japan combined).
http://legaciesofwar.org/about-laos/secret-war-laos/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#21 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

from today on WW2 strategic bombing program: "Arrogant U.S. Generals Made the P-51 Mustang a Necessity"
https://warisboring.com/arrogant-u-s-generals-made-the-p-51-mustang-a-necessity-fd6063ff4893
Throughout World War II, the Army Air Forces bombarded the American public with press releases about the accuracy of the Norden bombsight and how it and the four-engine bomber would bring Germany to its knees. Both the gullible public and the politicians, believing in the integrity of high ranking officers, swallowed the propaganda about American bombers flying so high and so fast that enemy fighters and surface-to-air guns couldn't possibly prevent them from destroying the Hun's means and will to wage war.

... snip ...

other recent posts about WW2 strategic bombing program (possibly even winning the war w/o need to send troops to europe).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#31 I Feel Old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#57 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#60 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#10 What Will the Next A-10 Warthog Look Like?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#49 Corporate malfeasance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#64 Isolationism and War Profiteering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#75 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#91 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#49 Fateful Choices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#88 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#90 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#113 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#117 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#27 British socialism / anti-trust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#56 "One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#64 Strategic Bombing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#68 Strategic Bombing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#94 The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#17 Why Large Companies Can't Innovate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#24 US Air Power
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#63 America's Over-Hyped Strategic Bombing Experiment

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 01 Dec 2016 16:29:14 -0800
hancock4 writes:
A look at LIFE magazine from WW II finds tons of propaganda ads from various military contractors promising how their military products will quickly defeat the enemy. Bell Telephone advertised its fire control. Several companies advertised radar by the end of the war. The automakers touted their tanks.

So, while there was indeed false propaganda about the Norden bombsight, it went along with tons of other false propaganda issued during the war.

Look at a wartime movie--patriotism and sacrifice and constantly glorified, and slacking is criticized. Everybody does their duty.

Labor strife, black market for rationed goods, draft dodging, etc., were kept discrete. A major strike in Philadelphia was not covered in LIFE nor the New York Times, despite the need for Federal troops to be sent to maintain order to the city.

On the other hand, the news media did cover political conflict and problems in the Administration. Even military strategy was second-guessed. Both TIME and NEWSWEEK had coverage of stuff.

Bill Mauldin's cartoons exposed a lot of B/S within the military. Patton was furious about it, but Eisenhower felt it was good to have the cartoons published.

Truman's Senate committee uncovered massive amounts of incompetence and corruption during the war. At first, the Army wanted it all covered-up, but then they realized it was in their interest to expose it and get better results.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#21 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#32 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

however, the air issue was significantly more egregious, 2/3rds of TOTAL US WW2 spending went to air program ... half that (1/3rd of TOTAL) went just to strategic heavy bombers & strategic bombing (and norden bomb sights). Given that such a huge amount of total WW2 spending went to strategic bombing with so little to show for it ... possible prompted the switch to fire bombing cities (since it was harder to miss a whole city).

The fire bombing cities cost enormous number of civilian lives ... but also the representations about strategic bombing claimed a significant number of US lives ... D-Day just a simple example, "The European Campaign: Its Origins and Conduct" (no precision strategic bombing),
https://ssi.armywarcollege.edu/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1075

loc2582-85:
The bomber preparation of Omaha Beach was a total failure, and German defenses on Omaha Beach were intact as American troops came ashore. At Utah Beach, the bombers were a little more effective because the IXth Bomber Command was using B-26 medium bombers. Wisely, in preparation for supporting the invasion, maintenance crews removed Norden bomb sights from the bombers and installed the more effective low-level altitude sights.

... snip ...

Claims are that the British warned US Stratetic Bombing command about need for long-range fighters (the german's having learned the lesson in the battle for britain) ... but they wanted all the money to go into heavy bombers.
https://warisboring.com/arrogant-u-s-generals-made-the-p-51-mustang-a-necessity-fd6063ff4893

And one of the important things to remember about U2 flights, it debunked the USAF "bomber gap" claims (justifying enormous increase in USAF budget for new bombers in the 50s) ... and likely also contributed to Eisenhower's warnings about the military-industrial complex in his goodby speech.

military-industrial complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

some recent posts mentioning "Omaha Beach" &/or "Bomber Gap"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#79 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#80 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#91 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#88 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#99 Trust in Government Is Collapsing Around the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#117 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#122 U.S. Defense Contractors Tell Investors Russian Threat Is Great for Business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#47 British socialism / anti-trust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#56 "One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#64 Strategic Bombing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#24 US Air Power
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#63 America's Over-Hyped Strategic Bombing Experiment

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 01 Dec 2016 17:18:02 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
The fire bombing cities cost enormous number of civilian lives ... but also the representations about strategic bombing claimed a significant number of US lives ... D-Day just a simple example, "The European Campaign: Its Origins and Conduct" (no precision strategic bombing),
https://ssi.armywarcollege.edu/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1075


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#21 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#32 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#33 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

also could assert that this was result of claims that WW2 could be won just with air power (over estimated need for air crews and underestimated need for infantry).

"The European Campaign: Its Origins and Conduct" loc4585-88:
For example, the AAF trained more pilots and aircrew members than were needed for the demands of the war. The War Department staff began to recognize that they had underestimated the number of combat arms Soldiers necessary to win the war. In 1944, the AAF transferred about 24,000 air cadets to Army ground forces to be retrained as infantrymen.7

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 02 Dec 2016 07:57:46 -0800
hancock4 writes:
Major contributor to S/360.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#25 Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#26 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#29 Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#31 Erich Bloch, IBM pioneer who later led National Science Foundation, dies at 91

Erich Bloch, IBM mainframe pioneer, dies at 91; Mainframe computers he helped to develop ushered in the modern computing era.
https://www.cnet.com/news/erich-bloch-ibm-mainframe-pioneer-dies-stretch-s360/
IBM's then-CEO, Thomas Watson Jr., is said to have "bet the company" on development of the S/360, the ancestor to today's mainframes. IBM invested $5 billion in the project at a time when the company's annual revenue came to $3.2 billion.

... snip ...

I use to sponsor John Boyd's briefings at IBM. He would say this would never work ... so possibly as punishment he was put in charge of "spook base" ... gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

from "Kill Chain" pg21/loc393-95:
To process the data Garwin, the IBM scientist, recommended the IBM-360 computer to analyze the signals, he explained, and "try to characterize the sounds so you wouldn't be bombing birds or peasants but convoys, trucks, or whatever." Once birds and peasants had been eliminated, promised Garwin, the computer would order "response, immediate response" from attack aircraft.

... snip ...

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#82 Computing Luminaries Honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

One of Boyd's biographies claims it was a $2.5B (60s $$) windfall for IBM ... which would have helped with cost of 360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 02 Dec 2016 17:49:12 -0800
hancock4 writes:
IMHO, the Soviet Union owes the U.S. a huge debt of gratitude for Lend Lease, because without it, the Soviets would've been overrun. Lend Lease provided food and materiel that allowed the Soviets to fight on.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#21 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#32 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#33 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#34 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

possible the significance of soviet lend lease ($11.3B) was inflated similar to how the effectiveness of strategic bombing was inflated
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lend-Lease
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soviet_Union_in_World_War_II
By the end of 1943, the Soviets occupied half of the territory taken by the Germans from 1941-42.[203] Soviet military industrial output also had increased substantially from late 1941 to early 1943 after Stalin had moved factories well to the East of the front, safe from German invasion and air attack.[204] The strategy paid off, as such industrial increases were able to occur even while the Germans in late 1942 occupied more than half of European Russia, including 40 percent (80 million) of its population, and approximately 2,500,000 square kilometres (970,000 sq mi) of Soviet territory.[204] The Soviets had also prepared for war for more than a decade, including preparing 14 million civilians with some military training.[204] Accordingly, while almost all of the original 5 million men of the Soviet army had been wiped out by the end of 1941, the Soviet military had swelled to 8 million members by the end of that year.[204] Despite substantial losses in 1942 far in excess of German losses, Red Army size grew even further, to 11 million

,, snip ...

strategic heavy bombing did manage to destroy some german military/industrical capacity but significantly less than claimed and far out of proportion to resources (1/3rd of total US WW2 spending) put into strategic bombing (fire bombing cities shows much more dramatic damage than what it had been doing against military & industrial targets).

I've seen claims that strategic bombing helped the war effort ... not so much the damage from the bombing ... but it diverted german resources attacking the bombers ... that would have otherwise been used directly against allied forces .... sort of decoy ... but a decoy (strategic bombers) that cost 1/3rd of total US military spending ... however that money could have been much more effectively spent in direct support. An example was the previously mentioned difference between effectiveness of strategic bombing at Omaha beach versus tactical bombing at Utah beach

soviet union fielded 500 divisions and 3/4s of german military effort were fielded agasinst the soviets ... 1/4 of german military forces against the rest of the allies ... us had 90 divisions
http://www.history.army.mil/books/70-7_15.htm

there were complaints Churchill kept obstructing launching european invasion ... supposedly Churchill wanted Germany & Russia to continue slugging it out until both were exhausted ... and also wanted to campaigns to help preserve British position in the middle east ... and its oil resources.

Many of the accounts comparing effectiveness of French blitzkrieg versus soviet attack ... was that French had paved roads ... soviets kept pulling back and germany ran into enormous difficulty supplying and tactical air support becomes very limited.

At the time Germany attack soviets, soviets had better tanks and significantly larger tank manufacturing capacity ... and the plants were far in the east, outside range of german bombers (distances and lack of transportion infrastructure, created significant advantage for the defenders). Guderian claims that Hitler expected to take Moscow and the russians would sue for peace/truce ... and it would be quickly over (Germany didn't have enough resources to carry on extended 2-front war). Russians just withdraw a lot of arms, industry, and plants to the east. In the 30s, Guderian had estimated that Russia had 17,000 tanks (and better than the German's). Later Guderian quotes Hitler as saying if he had believed Guderian estimates, he wouldn't have started the eastern front war (at the time, germany had total annual tank production of 1,000; soviets had multiple tank plants, each capable of several thousand tanks/annum). past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#13 Keydriven bit permutations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#69 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#55 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)

Churchill had written in the 20s about how the country had been led into the mess with the middle east and oil (and then dragged the US along) with the switch from 13.5 to 15 naval guns (before ww1), which required larger battleships, which required switch from coal to oil (Britain had lots of coal resources but almost no oil resources) past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#78 The World Crisis, Vol. 1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#102 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#84 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#21 US and UK have staged coups before
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#23 Frieden calculator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#102 Chain of Title: How Three Ordinary Americans Uncovered Wall Street's Great Foreclosure Fraud

past references to failure of strategic bombing at omaha beach:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#53 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#79 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#62 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#13 Fully Restored WWII Fighter Plane Up for Auction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#120 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#91 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#88 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#117 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#56 "One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#64 Strategic Bombing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#24 US Air Power
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#63 America's Over-Hyped Strategic Bombing Experiment

past posts referencing 3/4s of German military was against Soviets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#60 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#77 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#70 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#38 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#70 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#34 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#12 1950: Northrop's Digital Differential Analyzer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#63 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#49 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#51 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#28 channel islands, definitely not the location of LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#52 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#74 Qbasic

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING
Date: 02 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING
http://bipartisanreport.com/2016/11/28/breaking-gop-announces-privatization-of-medicare-and-the-details-are-terrifying/

One indication is when some members of congress started referring to the size of the federal debt as the amount w/o what is owed the SS Trust Fund ... when not too long ago, the same members were referring to the total federal debt including the amount owed the SS Trust Fund.

2002 congress lets the fiscal responsibility act expire (spending can't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt). 2010 CBO report was in the interval, tax revenue was cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap compared to the fiscal responsibility budget (first time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars). Since then tax revenue hasn't been restored and only little cut in spending so debt continues to increase.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

Lots of members of congress were highlighting the total federal debt (including amount owned SS Trust Fund) ... attributing it to the current administration ... but more recently, some of those same members have started to refer to amount of the total federal debt w/o what is owed the SS Trust Fund.

Some analysis claims debt was confluence of interests, Greenspan & wallstreet wanting huge debt (so the ZIRP/treasury scam works), special interests wanting huge tax cuts, and military-industrial complex and other gov contractors wanting huge spending increase (along with huge uptic in gov. outsourcing last decade).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

In 1999, we were asked if we would help try and prevent the coming economic mess by improving the integrity of securitized mortgage supporting documents (securitized mortgages had been used during S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages, posterchild were office bldgs around Dallas that turned out to be empty lots). They then found they could pay for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A from Oct2008 congressional testimony), triple-A trumps supporting documents, they can start doing no-document liar loans and no longer have to care about borrowers' qualifications and loan quality ... being able to sell everything as fast as they could be made. Triple-A also enables being able to sell to institutions restricted to safe investments like large public & private pension funds (claims that it accounts for 30% loss in their value). Triple-A rating major factor in being able to do over $27T 2001-2008 (and outside the traditional mortgage market).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

Supposedly TARP funds were appropriated to bail out the TBTF, buying offbook toxic assets. But with only $700B appropriated it would hardly make a dent in the problem (with just the four largest TBTF holding $5.2T in offbook toxic assets). TARP was then used for other purposes and the Federal Reserve was left to do the real bailout. FEDRES fought hard, long legal battle to prevent public release of what it was doing (buying offbook toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar and providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds). When they lost the legal battle the chairman held press conference to say that he thought the TBTF would use the ZIRP funds to help mainstreet, but when they didn't that didn't stop the ZIRP funds (used to buy treasuries and making $300+B/annum on the spread). Supposedly the chairman in part selected for depression scholar ... where the FEDRES had tried something similar with the same results (so the chairman shouldn't have any expectation of different result this time). As an aside, FEDRES could use ZIRP to buy treasuries directly and the federal dept wouldn't cost anything ... but then the TBTF would be out their $300+B/annum.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

The Triple-A ratings eliminated any reason to care about borrower's qualifications or loan quality since they could sell-off as fast as loans could be made. Then they discovered they could design securitized mortgages designed to fail (creating enormous demand for bad mortgages), pay for triple-A, sell to their victims, and take out CDS gambling bets that they would fail. The largest holder of the CDS gambling bets was AIG and was negotiating to pay-off at 50cents on the dollars when the SECTREAS steps in and have them sign a document that they can't sue those making the bets and take TARP funds to pay-off at face value. The largest recipient of TARP funds was AIG and the largest recipient of face-value payoffs was was firm formally headed by SECTREAS.

Note that all the money in the SS Trust Fund has been "loaned" to federal gov. to help cover the federal dept. Recently some members of congress have been quoting the total federal debt as a number w/o what is owed the SS Trust Fund.

Stockman claims credit for increasing SS taxes under Reagan so the money would be available for DOD ... and for starting to tax SS benefits (tax on the money paid into SS and taxed again when it is paid out).

Many in congress were treating the amount paid into the SS Trust fund each year in excess of what was paid out each year as slush fund for other activities (wouldn't have to be paid back until long after they were gone). A few years ago as the leading edge of baby boomers started to retire there was explanation that the baby boomer generation was four times as large as the previous generation and twice as large as the following generation (baby boomer birth bubble). With baby boomers in the prime working years there was significantly more being paid into the SS Trust Fund each year than had to be paid out. However as the baby boomers move into retirement, the situation will invert. The following (smaller) generation will have to not only pay back what is owed the SS Trust Fund, but also be asked to pay taxes for what use to be covered by the slush money taken from the SS Trust Fund (as well as make their own SS contributions) past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#13 Michigan industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#72 I would like to understand the professional job market in US. Is it shrinking?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#37 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#38 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#24 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#46 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#45 not even sort of about The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#2 taking down the machine - z9 series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#66 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#69 They always think we don't understand
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#75 origin of 'fields'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#44 Ratio of workers to retirees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#57 The Mortgage Crisis---Some Inside Views
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#67 The debt fallout: How Social Security went "cash negative" earlier than expected
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#73 These Two Charts Show How The Priorities Of US Companies Have Gotten Screwed Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#67 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#4 Mandated Spending
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#68 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#48 Protecting Social Security from the Thieves in the Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#54 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#25 SS Trust Fund
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#23 How Generation Y is paying the price for baby boomer pensions

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 03 Dec 2016 08:11:56 -0800
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
Geez, I'm getting sick of all this saber rattling. Nobody in his right mind wants a war with Russia. That has NEVER gone well. Napoleon got slaughtered. Hitler got slaughtered. The only reason the Kaiser didn't get slaughtered is that the Russians had their revolution going at the time (admittedly he helped it along).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#21 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#32 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#33 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#34 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#36 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

The meme about Harvard is responsible for Putin ... after the fall of the wall, US sent a lot of a lot of people over supposedly to teach democratic capitalism ... but they were there to loot the country ... Russia reacts with a strong man that would stand up to their country being looted.

"Is Havard responsible for the rise of Putin" (needed as countermeasure</b> to US capitalists looting the country); John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html
If you are unfamiliar with this fiasco, which was also the true proximate cause of Larry Summers' ouster from Harvard, you must read an extraordinary expose, How Harvard Lost Russia, from Institutional Investor. I am told copies of this article were stuffed in every Harvard faculty member's inbox the day Summers got a vote of no confidence and resigned shortly thereafter.

... snip ...

How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html
Mostly, they hurt Russia and its hopes of establishing a lasting framework for a stable Western-style capitalism, as Summers himself acknowledged when he testified under oath in the U.S. lawsuit in Cambridge in 2002. "The project was of enormous value," said Summers, who by then had been installed as the president of Harvard. "Its cessation was damaging to Russian economic reform and to the U.S.-Russian relationship."

... snip ...

The looting of russia sounds right out of Butler's "War is a Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smedley_Butler
"Economic Hit Man"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessions_of_an_Economic_Hit_Man
and "The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World"
https://www.amazon.com/Profiteers-Bechtel-Men-Built-World-ebook/dp/B010MHAHV2/

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

not everybody involved was looking to just loot the country ... I got tangentially involved in figuring out how to fund building 5000 bank branches around the country (as part of a capitalist economy).

also before all this looting strained the relationships between the two countries there was program involving a US west coast univ. that had a fair number of former russians ... they were given access to a lot of soviet military and political archives to study. At some of the Boyd conferences there were presentations by professor on some of what they were finding
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

recent posts mentioning above:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#73 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#5 The Deep State
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#31 Putin holds phone call with Obama, urges better defense cooperation in fight against ISIS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#39 Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#42 Nobody saw the economic mess coming last decade
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#7 Why was no one prosecuted for contributing to the financial crisis? New documents reveal why
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#69 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#59 How Putin Weaponized Wikileaks to Influence the Election of an American President
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#22 US and UK have staged coups before
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#105 How to Win the Cyberwar Against Russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#92 The Lessons of Henry Kissinger
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#3 Smedley Butler

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 03 Dec 2016 14:47:38 -0800
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
To "defend" them by killing them, if necessary (remember "we had to destroy the village to save it"?). Don't kid yourself, aside from propaganda purposes, the US didn't give much of a crap about the people of Vietnam, they were pawns in the global East vs. West game. If the US cared about tyrannical regimes, we would have overthrown Franco, Pinochet, the apartheid regime in South Africa, and the House of Saud.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#21 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#32 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#33 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#34 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#36 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#37 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

as referenced in Churchill writing in the 20s about the mess in the middle east started before Ww1 with switching from 13.5inch naval guns to 15inch which required larger battleships, which required switching from coal to oil ... britain had lots of coal but very little oil. loc2012-14:
From the beginning there appeared a ship carrying ten 15-inch guns, and therefore at least 600 feet long with room inside her for engines which would drive her 21 knots and capacity to carry armour which on the armoured belt, the turrets and the conning tower would reach the thickness unprecedented in the British Service of 13 inches.

loc2080-83:
For instance, nearly a hundred men were continually occupied in the Lion shovelling coal from one steel chamber to another without ever seeing the light either of day or of the furnace fires. The use of oil made it possible in every type of vessel to have more gun-power and more speed for less size or less cost. It alone made it possible to realize the high speeds in certain types which were vital to their tactical purpose. All these advantages were obtained simply by burning oil instead of coal under the boilers.

loc2087-89:
To build any large additional number of oil-burning ships meant basing our naval supremacy upon oil. But oil was not found in appreciable quantities in our islands. If we required it, we must carry it by sea in peace or war from distant countries.

loc2123-24:
An unbroken series of consequences conducted us to the Anglo-Persian Oil Convention.

... snip ...

In the early 50s, Iran had democratically elected president who said he was going to audit the Anglo-Persian oil contract ... when Kermit Roosevelt help managed to overthrow the government and put the Shah in power (in part to maintain the British oil status quo).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_Iranian_coup_d%27%C3%A9tat
Schwarzkopf senior is brought in to train the Shah's secret police, helping keep the Shah in power
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAVAK

which help set the stage for the 1979 revolution and the current mess in the middle east.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iranian_Revolution

US was then supporting Sadam in the Iran-Iraq war,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_War
including supplying WMDs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war

Last decade, cousin of white house chief of staff Card was dealing with Iraq in the UN and given proof that the WMDs had been decommissioned ... the information is provided to Card, Powell and others ... and then cousin gets locked up in military hospital ... eventually gets out and publishes this in 2010
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/

turns out that the decommissioned WMDs tracing back to the US were eventually found in the invasion, but kept classified for a decade ... eventually declassified in fall of 2014, at least partially corroborating the cousin's account
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html

there appeared to be a number cooperating commercial interests pushing for iraq invasion ... here corporate military-industrial complex reps were telling former soviet block countries that if they voted for IRAQ2 invasion in the UN, they would get membership in NATO and (directed appropriation) USAID ... that can be used (only) for purchase of modern US arms.
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

note: directed appropriation USAID (that can only be used for US arms purchases) is just one way congress has for supporting military-industrial complex that doesn't show up in the pentagon budget.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

but there were also the no-bid, tens-of-billion dollar contracts in Iraq

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)
Date: 02 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)
http://nationalinterest.org/feature/the-f-22-raptor-the-worlds-best-fighter-it-has-secret-weapon-18549

In briefings, Boyd would talk about really needing something that cost 1/3rd the F16 and needed 1/3rd the maintenance hours per flying hours and maintenance required much lower skill level ... what was being claimed for the F20/Tigershark (between more planes and more flying hrs, possibly at least ten times the flying hours per dollar). At the time they stopped the F22, there were references to enormous maintenance (including jokes about not being able to take out in the weather) ... from the period referring to F22 not just "hangar queen" but a hangar empress
http://nypost.com/2009/07/17/cant-fly-wont-die/
this is recent article, makes reference to bottleneck with hrs needed in maintenance bays
http://www.tyndall.af.mil/News/Features/Display/tabid/6651/Article/669883/lo-how-the-f-22-gets-its-stealth.aspx

Last couple years, major game changer is latest generation of computer chips ... much faster and powerful requiring less power. They are major driving factor behind drones ... as well as multi-band radar for tracking and targeting (as countermeasure to stealth). The increased power to do real-time multi-band radar analysis extends over to claim that the number of transmit/receive pairs in the F22 AESA could be reduced by nearly two orders of magnitude w/o loss of capability.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN/APG-77

part of technology background, Boyd would claim that he told them it would never work ... but possibly as punishment they put him in charge of "spook base" ... he said it had largest air conditioning bldg in that part of the world. Some detail here ... gone 404, but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

One of Boyd's biographies claims it was a $2.5B (1970 $$) windfall for IBM. and from "Kill Chain" pg21/loc393-95:
To process the data Garwin, the IBM scientist, recommended the IBM-360 computer to analyze the signals, he explained, and "try to characterize the sounds so you wouldn't be bombing birds or peasants but convoys, trucks, or whatever." Once birds and peasants had been eliminated, promised Garwin, the computer would order "response, immediate response" from attack aircraft.

... snip ...

Garwin also involved in the Soviet nuclear arms treaty ... but the computer power to process the verification sensor information ... required ten times more computer power, Garwin was instrumental in FFTs that could do the processing with existing computer power.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_Fourier_transform#History
and
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/white-house-honors-5-technology-innovators-with-the-presidential-medal-of-freedom/
radar FFT
http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1278838

Boyd also would tell story about evaluating USAF air-to-air missile and rather than "hitting" every time, hit rate would lucky to be 10%. Role forward to Vietnam and Boyd is correct. Major problem is pentagon USAF were all wrapped up in "budget share" (as opposed to effectiveness) ... using Navy sidewinder (that was better than twice as effective) would mean loosing budget share to the Navy.

Another story was original F16 HUD ... which had scrolling digital numbers ... which degraded pilot effectiveness with brain power needed to turn digital numbers into meaning.

Lots of Boyd's references to technology were the exaggerated claims ... along the lines of
https://warisboring.com/arrogant-u-s-generals-made-the-p-51-mustang-a-necessity-fd6063ff4893

Another computer related issue is that F22 was 1.7M lines of software ... F35 project is claimed to be pushing 25M lines ... with complexity/difficulty increasing non-linearly with size. At USNI conference a couple years ago, somebody pointed out that F35 would be pushing a couple decade generation ... at a time when drones were evolving at the rate of nearly a new generation every month.

as an aside ... this article was from 2011
http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1278838

spring of 2015, DOD put latest generation of multi-core chips on export control. At fall 2015 supercomputer conference, China announced it had started production of its own chips for supercomputer (and military radar) systems. This fall supercomputer conference has china with the top two on the list and the power of its #1 has as much power as the aggregate of the other eight in the top 10.
In Part 4 of this Radar Basics series, Space Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) radar processing will be examined. This class of algorithms provides capabilities beyond that of Doppler radar processing, but has extremely high processing requirements and also requires the dynamic range of floating point.

Until recently, only the most advanced computer types have been able to implement this type of algorithm, due to these extreme processing requirements. However, now FPGAs can provide complex floating point processing at the performance levels required. As will be shown, STAP requires the processing capability to invert matrices containing of 100,000 or more elements in well under a millisecond



http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1278878

STAP graph shows processing requirement starting at 83GFLOPs ... latest generations are showing processing rates of ten times that or better. ... from part 4:
In fact, this is a very conservative scenario. The PRF is rather low and the number of antenna array inputs is very small. Should the number of antenna array inputs increase by 12 to 48, the processing load of the matrix processing, in particular QR Decomposition, goes up by the third power or 64 times. This would require over 3 TeraFLOPs of realtime floating point processing power. Because of this, the limitations on STAP are clearly the processing capabilities of the radar system.

....

a couple current multi-core chips and/or multi-core chips with some custom digital signal processing chips.

e5-2600v3 (2015) when DOD export list put into effect, 1.3Tflop single precision and 589gflop double precision
https://www.hpcwire.com/2015/06/02/cpu-benchmarking-haswell-versus-power8/

Here is 20TFLOPS
http://wccftech.com/nvidia-pascal-gpu-gtc-2016/
This brings up the issue of how the suspected targets are identified for subequent STAP processing. This can come from weak detections found in Doppler processing, from other IR or visual sensors, from intelligence data, or from many other sources. This issue is beyond the scope of these discussions on how STAP processing works. But as will be shown, STAP has the capability to pull targets that are below the clutter into a range that can be reliably detected

VHF/L-band for tracking ... STAP for targeting

Boyd posts &/or references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html
military-industrial complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

recent F22 &/or F35 posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#57 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#75 American Gripen: The Solution To The F-35 Nightmare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#8 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#10 What Will the Next A-10 Warthog Look Like?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#20 DEC and The Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#21 DEC and The Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#55 How to Kill the F-35 Stealth Fighter; It all comes down to radar ... and a big enough missile
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#89 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#90 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#92 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#95 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#96 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#97 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#105 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#13 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#89 China builds world's most powerful computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#22 Iran Can Now Detect U.S. Stealth Jets at Long Range
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#61 5th generation stealth, thermal, radar signature
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#62 5th generation stealth, thermal, radar signature
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#104 E.R. Burroughs

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Are We Nearing a Cyber Sarbanes-Oxley?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Are We Nearing a Cyber Sarbanes-Oxley?
Date: 03 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#27 Are We Nearing a Cyber Sarbanes-Oxley?

posts mentioning Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes-oxley

Wall Street Preparing Dodd-Frank Rule Workaround
http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/38033-wall-street-preparing-dodd-frank-rule-workaround

Dodd was high on "Friends of Mozilo" list
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelo_Mozilo#Friends_of_Angelo_.28FOA.29_VIP_program
who is #1 on time's list of those responsible for the economic mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877339,00.html

so one of the tactics was to make it extemely complex and take forever to figure out how to specify regulations ... which would move it out of public eye and any resulting regulations have good chance of actually not doing anything (and/or bill would be repealed before regulations could be enacted). Another tactic, wallstreet lobbiests would supply (extremely onerous) text to be inserted in the bill, then when draft bill provision leaked, wallstreet would come out publicly lambasting the text (descrediting the process)

various articles about the shenanigans
http://www.thenation.com/article/174113/how-wall-street-defanged-dodd-frank
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/05/23/banks-lobbyists-help-in-drafting-financial-bills/
http://www.pogo.org/blog/2013/05/bank-lobbyists-writing-the-rules-for-wall-street.html
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/how-wall-street-killed-financial-reform-20120510
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/05/josh-rosner-on-how-dodd-frank-institutionalizes-too-big-to-fail.html

http://www.nationaljournal.com/politics/are-treasury-and-the-fed-at-odds-over-big-banks-20130524
http://billmoyers.com/segment/gretchen-morgenson-on-why-banks-are-still-too-big-to-fail/

also from "Confidence Men" regarding Volcker rule (in Dodd-Frank), pg430:
But they were fighting on too many fronts. Carl Levin of Michigan and Jeff Merkley of Oregon had discovered that Dodd had discreetly gutted the Volcker Rule

... snip ...

We were tangentially involved in the Cal. data breach notification act, having been brought in to help wordsmith the electronic signature act. Several of the participants were heavily involved in privacy issues and had done detailed public surveys. At the top was fraudulent financial transactions as a result of breaches. The problem was little or nothing was being done about the breaches. An issue is institution normally takes security measures in self protection, in these cases the institutions weren't at risk, it was their customers and/or the public. It was hoped that the publicity from the notification might prompt institutions to take corrective action.

Since the (original) cal. state act, there have been several bills introduced in congress (none yet passed) about evenly divided between those similar to the cal. state act and those that effectively eliminate notification (breach conditions that would never be met).

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

recent posts mentioning Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#102 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#69 IBM Buying Promontory Clinches It: Regtech Is Real
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#73 IBM Buying Promontory Clinches It: Regtech Is Real
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#8 Wall Street Preparing Dodd-Frank Rule Workaround
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#9 Wall Street Preparing Dodd-Frank Rule Workaround
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#10 Wall Street Preparing Dodd-Frank Rule Workaround
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#58 Drafting of Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#78 More Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#15 BREAKING: Trump Announces Big Gift To Banks Despite His Campaign Rhetoric Against Wall Street

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

TARP Bailout

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: TARP Bailout
Date: 04 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
SECTREAS convinces congress to pass TARP for purchase of TBTF offbook toxic assets (TBTF bailout). However, just the four largest TBTF were carrying $5.2T in offbook toxic assets the end of 2008 and the appropriated $700B would hardly make a dent in the problem.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

The "real" bailout was performed by Federal Reserve, buying offbook toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar and providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds (that the TBTF have been clearing $300+B/annum).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

1999, we were asked if we would help try and prevent the coming economic mess by improving the integrity of securitized mortgage supporting documents (securitized mortgages had been used during S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages, posterchild were office bldgs around Dallas that turned out to be empty lots). They then found they could pay for triple-A ratings (when both the sellers and rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A from Oct2008 congressional testimony), triple-A trumps supporting documents, they can start doing no-document liar loans and no longer have to care about borrowers' qualifications and loan quality ... being able to sell everything as fast as they could be made. Triple-A also enables being able to sell to institutions restricted to safe investments like large public & private pension funds (claims that it accounts for 30% loss in their value). Triple-A rating major factor in being able to do over $27T 2001-2008 (and outside the traditional mortgage market).

Then they found they could they could do securitized mortgages purposefully designed to fail, pay for Triple-A, sell to their victims and then take out (CDS) gambling bets they would fail (before triple-A rating met they didn't have to care about loan quality, now they created enormous demand for bad mortgages). AIG was largest holder of the CDS gambling bets and was negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar. Then SECTREAS steps in and had them sign document that they can't sue those making the bets and to take TARP funds to payoff at face value. The largest recipient of TARP funds was AIG, the largest recipient of face-value payoffs was firm formally headed by SECTREAS (which may have been the real reason for TARP all along).

Congress had passed auto import quotas to reduce competition and provide domestic industry enormous profits that they use to completely remake themselves. Early 80s, Washington Post had article calling for 100% unearned profit tax on domestic industry because they were pocketing the money and continued business as usual. In 1990, the domestic auto industry had the C4 taskforce, looking at completely remaking themselves ... and because they were planning on heavily leveraging technology, they invited major tech companies to send reps. In the meetings, they could accurately describe what competition was doing right and how the domestic industry needed to respond. As shown when TARP funds were used for the domestic industry, all the entrenched vested interests continued business as usual (for well over 30yrs).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#auto.c4.taskforce

2002, Congress allows fiscal responsibility act to expire (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt). 2010 CBO report that in the interim, tax revenue was cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsible budget (first time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars). Since then taxes haven't been restored and only modest cuts in spending so debt has continued to increase.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

Some analysis claims debt is confluence of interests, Greenspan & wallstreet wanting huge debt (so TBTF using ZIRP funds to buy US treasury $300+B/annum works), special interests wanting huge tax cuts, and military-industrial complex and other gov contractors wanting huge spending increase (along with huge uptic in gov. outsourcing last decade). Trivia, in theory Fed could use ZIRP funds to directly buy treasuries and the debt wouldn't cost anything, but then the TBTF would be out the $300+B/annum.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

VP (and former CIA director) ... claims no knowledge of such activities
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

and another presides over the financial mess, 70 times larger than S&L crisis. The S&L crisis had 1000 criminal convictions with jailtime, proportionally the economic mess should have 70,000; so far there have been none.

S&L crisis posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#s&l.crisis

Jan2009, I was asked to HTML'ize the (recently scanned) Pecora Hearings (30s senate hearings into the '29 crash, resulted in criminal convictions and Glass-Steagall) with lots of internal HREFs and URLs between what happened this time and what happened then (comment that the new congress might have appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call saying that it won't be needed after all (reference to enormous mountains of wallstreet money totally burying capital hill).

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 05 Dec 2016 11:21:20 -0800
JimP. <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:
Churchill described DeGaulle as his Cross of Lorraine he had to bear.

in the 70s I spent a lot of time of france ... started with EMEA hdqtrs moved from NY to Paris and they wanted me to go over and help with installing their online computer system ... i've mentioned before that one of my hobbies at the science center was producing enhanced production operating systems for internal datacenters (and they were one of my customers)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

one trip I went over with IBMer that had been a history major and we spent some weekends touring military memorials (to french soldiers that died in battle) in and around paris. at the end of one weekend he asked me if I had noticed anything ... and I said no. He said that there were no WW2 military memorials for dead french soldiers.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 05 Dec 2016 14:35:05 -0800
hancock4 writes:
How did a CDC 6600 compare to a 360-195?

1979, i got con'ed into doing some 4341 (before customer ship) benchmarks for LLNL that was lookiing at getting 70 for compute farm (sort of leading edge of current cluster supercomputing, later large corporates would also be ordering hundreds of 4341s at a time for placing out in departmental areas, the leading edge of the coming distributed computing tsunami).

158               3031              4341


Rain 45.64 secs 37.03 secs 36.21 secs Rain4 43.90 secs 36.61 secs 36.13 secs

also times approx; 145 168-3 91 145 secs. 9.1 secs 6.77 secs

rain/rain4 ran on cdc6600 in 35.77 secs.
370/195 for most codes would be about the same as 360/91 because conditional branches drained the pipeline ... optimized codes would get about twice 91 or about three times 168-3 ... my past posts about getting sucked into hyperthreading project for 370/195 that never announced/shipped ... reference to patent from ACS (next to last "sidebar" near the bottom).
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

past posts mentioning 4341 rain benchmark:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#0 Is a VAX a mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#67 Pentium 4 Prefetch engine?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#0 Microcode?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#75 Computers in Science Fiction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#7 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#12 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#19 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#22 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#4 misc. old benchmarks (4331 & 11/750)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#68 IBM zSeries in HPC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#25 IBM's mini computers--lack thereof
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#31 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#21 moving on
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#62 Cycles per ASM instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#54 mainframe performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#67 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#37 While watching Biography about Bill Gates on CNBC last Night
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#65 Comparing YOUR Computer with Supercomputers of the Past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#40 IBM Watson's Ancestors: A Look at Supercomputers of the Past
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#45 Under what circumstances would it be a mistake to migrate applications/workload off the mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#38 DEC/PDP minicomputers for business in 1968?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#53 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#61 I Must Have Been Dreaming (36-bit word needed for ballistics?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#37 History--computer performance comparison chart
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#71 Miniskirts and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#106 DOS descendant still lives was Re: slight reprieve on the z
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#116 How the internet was invented

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2016 09:52:37 -0800
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
It used true out-of-order execution, while the 6600 with its scoreboard only provided an incomplete implementation of that.

The CDC 6600 was made from discrete transistors, and it had reliability problems.

However, the CDC 6600 was a machine made by people for whom performance was the main goal; IBM's machine was designed within a bureaucracy, and compatibility was a big consideration.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html##44 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead

the 195 engineers said that the major difference between 370/195 & 360/195 (besides the few new instructions) was the addition of instruction retry (for recoverable hardware errors) that significantly improved reliability.

then the decision was made to move all 370s to virtual memory support ... discussed here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#47 junking CKD; was "Social Security Confronts IT Obsolescence"

more workloads were disk i/o and systems were getting faster, much faster than disks were getting faster ... so throughput was increasingly becoming disk limited. to compensate needed increasingly larger number of concurrent tasks (with their "dedicated" disks). The big problem was that MVT storage management was so bad, that multiprogramming regions had to be four times larger than typically used ... so concurrent multiprogramming on typical 1mbyte, 370/165 was only four. With virtual memory ... that could be increased by four times with little or no paging penalty.

However, retrofitting 370 virtual memory architecture proved so difficult to 370/165 ... that several 370 virtual memory features were dropped (and other hardware & software groups had to go back and remove support &/or use of the dropped features) ... and nobody had any illusions about being able to retrofit virtual memory to 370/195.

note that this discussion about ACS (previously mentioned with hyperthreading reference) ... mentions that executives felt that it would advance state of the art too fast and IBM would loose control of the market.
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

past references about repeatedly pontificating that relative disk throughput was increasingly becoming major bottleneck ... between period of 360/67 w/2314s and 3081 w/3380s ... the relative system disk throughput had declined by order of magnitude
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#31 Big I/O or Kicking the Mainframe out the Door
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#43 Bloat, elegance, simplicity and other irrelevant concepts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#55 How Do the Old Mainframes Compare to Today's Micros?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#10 Virtual Memory (A return to the past?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#46 The god old days(???)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#4 IBM S/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#66 Pentium 4 Prefetch engine?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#62 any 70's era supercomputers that ran as slow as today's supercomputers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#40 MVS History (all parts)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#61 MVS History (all parts)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#23 Smallest Storage Capacity Hard Disk?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#5 index searching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#11 Microcode? (& index searching)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#20 index searching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#8 What are some impressive page rates?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#9 What are some impressive page rates?

in early 80s, disk executives took exception to the claim and assigned the division performance group to refute the claims. After a few weeks they came back and effectively said that I slightly understated the problem. This was respun for a (IBM user group) SHARE presentations on configuring disks for improving system throughput (B874, DASD Performance Review)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#3 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#68 DASD Response Time (on antique 3390?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#70 25 reasons why hardware is still hot at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#31 Wax ON Wax OFF -- Tuning VSAM considerations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#32 OS idling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#33 History of Hard-coded Offsets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#18 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#35 CKD DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#1 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#59 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#5 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#32 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2016 13:21:10 -0800
timcaffrey420 writes:
Of course, the 4341 was from 1979 and the 6600 was from 1964. The contemporary designs to compare the 4341 against would be a CDC Cyber 176 (probably about 4-5 times faster than the 6600 and I think was really a CDC 7600 in different skins) or a Cray 1 (which was released in 1975 and had the same designer as the 6600 & 7600).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#44 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#45 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead

sorry, I didn't mean to imply that 6600 and 4341 were direct contemporaries ... but the question was 6600 benchmark compare to 360/195 ... and the only benchmark that I had done that had some 6600 numbers were rain that I had done for national lab on 4341 ... and the national lab also had number for 6600.

the 6600 benchmark number that they provided was similar to the 4341 number ... and the 195 was about ten times faster than 4341 ... and about twice as fast as the 360/91 number.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 6 Dec 2016 13:39:38 -0800
CPVITULLO@ARKBLUECROSS.COM (Vitullo, Carmen P) writes:
I found this out some time ago working for Boeing, even though we were one company, we still had to submit a budget each year for computing services, this drove Boeing Helicopters to look at alternatives, mostly the costs of CATIA and CADAM, on Big Iron, distributed was initially cheaper, but in the long run many cost overruns due to poor planning and a desire to 'just get off the mainframe at any cost', that's what drove us to look at consolidation afterwards, then migrations to / from other platforms....if it made sense :)

60s we started doing lots of stuff to leave system up 7x24 for online access. Part of the issue was that (especially initially), offshift online access was very light so there was little useage ... but in order to encourage offshit useage, the systems had to be available 7x24. Because of light useage there would be little recovery charges ... so lots of things were done to minimize offshift expenses. This was in the days when mainframes were leased and charges were based on system meter that ran whenever the processor and/or any channel was busy ... also everything had to be idle for at least 400milliseonds before it the system meter would stop (triva: long after mainframes had switched from leases to sales, MVS still had a time ever that went off every 400ms, making sure system meter would never stop). In any case, came up with special channel programs for terminal I/O ... that would let the channel "go idle" ... but would immediately startup when there was any characters. Also lots of support for "dark room" ... not requiring offshift operators.

For big cloud megadatacenters, the price of systems has so dramatically dropped that they have hundreds of thousands of "blades" (each blade with more processing power than max. configured mainframe) supported by staff of 80-120 people per megadatacenter. Also with the dramatic cut in system cost, the major expense has increasingly become power & cooling. The big cloud datacenters have been on the leading edge of systems where power&cooling drop to near zero when idle ... but are effectively instant on for ondemand computing.

while an undergraduate in the 60s, I was hired as fulltime boeing employee to help with the formation of boeing computer services ... consolidate all computing into independent business unit as part of better monetizing the investment (which would also have the freedom to sell computing services to non-boeing entities, a precursor to cloud computing). at the time, I thought renton data center was possibly the largest in the world with something like $200M-$300m (60s dollars) in ibm mainframe gear (for a period, there were 360/65s arriving faster than they could be installed, boxes were constantly being staged in the hallways outside the datacenter).

there was disaster scenario where mt rainier warms up and the resulting mudslide takes out the renton datacenter. the analysis was that the cost of being w/o the renton datacenter for a week was more than the cost of the renton datacenter ... so there was a effort underway to repicate the renton datacenter up at the new 747 plant in everett.

in any case, the politics with the different plant managers tended to dwarf any technical issues.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 6 Dec 2016 14:16:16 -0800
allan.staller@HCL.COM (Allan Staller) writes:
Big Iron is too expensive. Get Off! Migrate to VAX (many). Oops! Too many VAX's. Get Off Migrate to Amdahl! (Big Iron).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#47 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

note that IBM 4300s in single & small unit orders sold about the same as VAX .... old post with decade of VAX sales, sliced & diced by model, year, US/non-us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0

the big difference was large corporations with orders of hundreds of 4300s at a time for placing out in departmental areas (leading edge of the distributed computing tsunami). the 4361/4381 followon were expected to continue the explosion in mid-range sales ... but as can be seen by the vax numbers ... by that time, the mid-range market was moving to workstations and large PCs.

note that cluster of 4341s also had higher throughput, more processing power, more i/o, smaller space and environmental footprint than 3033 at less cost. POK felt the threat to 3033, that at one point the head of POK got the allocation of critical 4341 manufacturing componenent cut in half.

in 1979, I got con'ed into doing 4341 benchmarks (before 4341s shipped to customers) for national lab that was looking at getting 70 4341s for compute farm (leading edge of current cluster supercomputing, grid computing, and cloud megadatacenters).

other trivia ... ACS getting canceled because IBM executives were afraid that it would advance the state of art too fast and they might loose control of the market ... Amdahl leaves shortly afterwards to start his own computer company.
https://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

at the bottom of above ... it shows ACS features that show up more than 20 yrs later in ES/9000.

even more trivia ... in the early/mid 70s ... the company started the Future System effort which was completely different than 360/370 and was going to replace 360/370. During the FS period, 370 efforts were being killed off. The lack of 370 offerings during the FS period is credited with giving clone processor makers a market foothold. When FS was finally killed (long delayed because top executives stiffled any criticism), there was mad rush to get stuff back into product pipelines. 303x & 3081 Q&D efforts kicked off at the same time. 3031 was repackaged 158-3, 3032 was repackaged 168-3, 3033 started out 168-3 logic mapped to 20% faster chips. 3081 was some warmed over FS technology ... much more longer winded analysis:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm
some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

I continued to work on 360/370 all during the FS period ... periodically ridiculing FS ... including drawing comparisions with long-running cult film down in central sq. ... which wasn't exactly career enhancing activity.

late 80s, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at world-wide, annual, internal communication group conference, supposedly on 3174 performance but opened the talk with the satement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had strategic ownership of everything that crossed the datacenter walls and were fiercely fighting off distributed computing and client/server trying to preserve their (emulated) dumb terminal paradigm and install base. The disk division was seeing data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions that were constantly being veoted by the communication group.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

a few short years later, the company had gone into the red and was being reorganized in preparation for breaking up into the 13 "baby blues"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 07 Dec 2016 09:47:12 -0800
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
TOPS-10's asymmetric multiprocessing was inefficient because I/O required a context switch to the master processor. Is that why the 6500 was "slow"?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#44 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#45 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#46 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead

one of the things that I did in 370 context switch was trying to manage them because context switch blew the cache ... besides making context switch (and timeslicing) as well as short a pathlength as possible. Furthermore asynchronous I/O interrupts would also have detrimental effects on cache locality and hit rate ... so trying to "batch" I/O interrupts (in very high I/O workload environments) would show improved throughput, because of improved cache hit rates (keeping locality for i/o interrupt and redrive processing before switching to application cache locality). For multiprocessor support, I carried this over so that rather than kernel spin-locks ... do very lightweight queued interface (eliminate lost processor cycles to lock spinning as well as could serialize kernel useage for improved cache useage).

POK favorite son (MVS) operating system documentation advised that multiprocessor would have 1.3-1.5 times the throughput of single processor ... because of extremely long multiprocessor pathlengths and stuff like inefficient kernel spin-locks.

My very short multiprocessor pathlengths, attempting to maintain cache locality, no spinlocks ... could come very close to the tbroughput of the underlying multiprocessor hardware (there were lost cycles compared to two completely independent machines because of underlying hardware cross-cache consistency protocol overhead).

However, in some asymmetric multiprocessor environments (i.e. 370 offered both asymmetric and symmetric configurations, i.e. processors w/o channels were less expensive) ... got better than twice single processor throughput. If I/O load was sufficiently high enough, all I/O requests had to be placed on queue anyway (because device was busy with other I/O) plus switch to another application. As a result the non-I/O processors tended to have improved application cache hit rates (no asynchronous I/O interrupts) and I/O processor tended to have improved improved i/o processing cache hit rates (two processor asymmetric multiprocessor having better than twice the effective MIP rate of single processor ... because of the improved cache hit rate).

In environments with high multiprogramming and I/O rates, nearly all I/O requests required queuing and context switch ... so application processing and pathlength was the same whether the physical I/O was done on same processor or different processor (and cache "affinity", cache hit rates and asynchronous interrupt cache effects play large role).

posts mentioning multiprocessing support (and/or compare&swap instruction)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

old reference to VAX announcement adding symmetric multiprocessor support (and where it might help with throughput compared to its asymmetric support).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email880324
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email880329
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#46 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?

trivia drift: ibm mainframe "channel programs" can be viewed as queued independent I/O processing interface ... however 370/158 had "integrated channels" ... 158 processor engine executed both the 370 microcode and the integrated channel migrated. In the aftermath of FS failure (and 370 efforts being killed off during FS) ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

there was mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines ... including kicking off 303x and 3081 projects in parallel. For 303x they took a 158 processor engine with just the integrated channel microcode (and no 370 microcode) for the 303x "channel director".

A 3031 then was a 158 engine with the 370 microcode (and w/o the integrated channel microcode) reconfigured to work with a 2nd 158 engine with the integrated channel microcode (and w/o channel microcode) ... and a asymmetric two-processor 3031 multiprocessor was three 158 engines and a symmetric two-processor 3031 multiprocess was four 158 engines.

This can be seen in the recently posted rain/rain4 benchmarks where 158 was 45.64/43.90 and 3031 was 37.04/36.61 ... even tho the underlying 158 processor engines were identical (but the 3031 wasn't also running the integrated channel microcode, overhead was there even if i/o was idle and nothing else running during rain/rain4 benchmark).

The 3032 was 168 reconfigured to use channel director as external channels ... and 3033 started out being 168 logic mapped to 20% faster chips.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 07 Dec 2016 10:30:30 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#44 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#45 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#46 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#47 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

when I originally did multiprocessor support ... I only touched I/O supervisor around the edges ... however, when I got involved with disk development ... past posts getting to play disk engineer in bldgs 14&15 disk development was running "test cells" stand alone with mainframe time prescheduled around the clock 7x24. They had tried running with MVS to get some concurrent testing ... but MVS had 15min MTBF in that environment (requiring manual reboot). I offered to rewrite I/O supervisor to make it bullet proof and never fail ... so they could do any amount of ondemand, concurrent testing (greatly improving productivity).

bldg15 also tended to get very early engineering processor models (frequently #3 or #4) for disk i/o testing. bldg15 got something like the 3rd 3033 engineering machine. Since I/O testing only used 1-2% of the processor (even with several concurrent testing) ... we setup the 3033 to also provide online service ... two strings of 8drive 3330s and 3830 controller.

one monday morning, I got irate call from bldg 15 asking what I had done to the system ... online response had enormously degraded. I said absolutely nothing ... after lots of investigation ... eventually turned out that they had replaced the 3830 controller with 3880 controller.

3830 had very fast horizontal microcode processor. The 3880 had special data transfer hardware path ... but a very modest vertical microcode processor for all the other functions (much slower than 3830). Company had requirement that new hardware had to be within 5% of earlier. 3880 was taking longer to process channel programs so appeared like it degraded throughput. To fake it they modified 3880 controller to signal i/o complete to channel before it had actually completed all final processing ... figuring that they could get it finished overlapped with system processing of the interrupt.

I had so optimized the I/O supervisor pathlength ... that I had finished the i/o interrupt processing and was back trying to redrive with queued I/O ... before 3880 had finished previous channel program processing cleanup (after the "early" interrupt). Because it was still busy, it had to reflect controler busy (SM+BUSY) to the redrive SIO. This required system to requeue the I/O. Later when the controller had really finished, it would now have to reflect CUE (control unit end) interrupt. As a result, as soon soon as load ramped up, all I/O was requiring two SIOs (first one failed with SM+BUSY) and two I/O interrupts (the early one, and then CUE) ... with additional system processing pathlength (in aggregate appeared to be 30% degradation).

Fortunately this was 6months before 3880 first customer ship ... and they did all sorts of additional tweaks to 3880 microcode to try and mask how it had degraded performance (compared to previous 3830 controller).

other triva: afterwards I authored an internal document and happened to mention the MVS 15min MTBF .... when the MVS RAS people called I thought they wanted to work on fixing all the shortcomings. Turns out it was first step that was bringing the wrath of the MVS group on my head, that apparently included trying to get me separated from the IBM corporation (it wasn't that the information wasn't untrue, it was that it was brought to the attention of their upper management ... it reminded me of the joke about gov. security clearance levels ... the absolute highest level is "downright embarrassing").

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 07 Dec 2016 10:53:22 -0800
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
other triva: afterwards I authored an internal document and happened to mention the MVS 15min MTBF .... when the MVS RAS people called I thought they wanted to work on fixing all the shortcomings. Turns out it was first step that was bringing the wrath of the MVS group on my head, that apparently included trying to get me separated from the IBM corporation (it wasn't that the information wasn't untrue, it was that it was brought to the attention of their upper management ... it reminded me of the joke about gov. security clearance levels ... the absolute highest level is "downright embarrassing").

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#44 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#45 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#46 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#47 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#48 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead

aka the highest security classifications are frequently used for things that would affect a person's career (as opposed to something that is really national security).

... and the reason that I got sucked into doing the rain/rain4 4341 benchmarks was because bldg. 15 had early engineering 4341 ... and I had more time&access to that machine ... than the engineers in endicott had access to 4341s.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 07 Dec 2016 16:07:47 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#44 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#45 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#46 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#47 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#48 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#49 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year-old supercomputer back from the dead

in the simplification morph from cp67 to vm370 ... they dropped a lot of stuff, charlie's smp and fine-grain locking support ... lots of performance enhancements i did as undergraduate, etc.

I then eventually moved a lot of stuff back into vm370 ... for the internal "csc/vm" (one of my hobbies was production systems for internal datacenters) ... old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

then with the failure of FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

and mad rush to get stuff back into product pipeline contributed to decisions to pick up lots of my stuff for release to customers ... some of it went into the base vm370 "release 3". However, the lack of 370 products during the FS period is credit with giving the clone processors a market foothold ... and decision was made to start charging for kernel software. The 23june69 unbundling announcement (result of various legal actions) resulted in starting to charge for (application) software, se services, maintenance, etc. However, they managed to make the case that kernel software should still be free.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

the rise of clone processors then resulted in decided to (also) start charging for kernel software ... and a bunch of my performance stuff was selected for the guinea pig for starting to charge for kernel software, eventually transitioning to charge for all kernel softare. However, during the transition period ... the rule was already free kernel software stayed free and any new direct hardware & device support would still be free.

My performance stuff in charged for product, included a bunch of other stuff ... didn't actually included SMP support ... but did include a bunch of kernel reorganization that was required for multiprocessor supprt. A later decision was made to release multiprocessor support (for free), but it was dependent on the kernel reorg that was already released as part of charged for product (which violated requiring customers to pay for something in order to get hardware multiprocessing support). The eventual resolution was to move close to 90% of the lines of code in my charge for performance product into the free base ... but w/o changing the price of the performance product. Some of performance posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare
and paging performance posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock
and multiprocessor related posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 7 Dec 2016 16:54:07 -0800
cvitullo@HUGHES.NET (Carmen Vitullo) writes:
Brings back some good memories - I enjoy reading your post, I seem to have forgotten more about my life at Boeing than I remember, short time, 11 years in Philly but I do recall the 4341 trail connected to some new state of the art 3390 controllers running MVS 4.3 ? or 5 strictly for an electronic mock up system for the V-22, I had a great pleasure working with some AI engineers and Wind Tunnel engineers on some off the wall projects.

I remember the data center running microwave sender/receiver from one building to another to support CATIA workstations, not an IBM approved method to extend a channel but back them there were less options. so many other projects I can't even remember any longer :(

BCS then morphed into Boeing Shared Services group. I have some fond memories of those time and the GREAT folks I worked with. thanks again for the trip back in time. sorry to stray from the topic folks

Carmen


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#47 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#48 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

1980, I was con'ed into doing channel-extension support (over microwave) for STL (even tho the lab was only a couple years old, it was already bursting at the seams), they were moving 300 people from the IMS group to offsite bldg ... but with dataprocessing support back into the STL datacenter. They had tried "remote" 3270 support but found the human factors totally unacceptable (use to vm370/cms local channel attached 3270 controllers). It turns out that the support downloaded channel programs to a channel emulator at the remote site for execution which radically reduced the latency and channel protocol chatter overhead on the real channels. A combination of factors resulted in them not seeing any degradation and because lots of channel protocol chatter was moved off the real IBM channels, total system throughput increased 10-15% (reduced channel busy for the 3270 operations). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

Then the FE IMS support group in Boulder was being moved acrossed the road with infrared optical modem between the roofs of the two bldgs. with same support. There was concern that optical modems would be subject to weather outages. Turns out in a white-out snow storm when nobody could get into work, we recorded only a modest number of transmission bit-errors. There was a problem with poles with the modems on the roofs ... it turns out sun during the day, unevenly heated the sides of the bldgs causing them to slightly lean ... causing the modems to get out of alignment (took some careful engineering).

The vendor wanted to get IBM to let them release my support ... but there was a group in POK working on some serial stuff that got it blocked, because they felt if it was released, it would make it harder to get their stuff released. In any case, the vendor eventually managed to reimplement my support from scratch and sell it in the market. A year after 3090s had been in the field, the 3090 product administrator tracked me down. There is an industry publication that gathered customer EREP reports and generated summary reports ... able to compare different models as well as IBM processors against clone makers. 3090 had been design to have less than 3-5 total channel check errors over period of year ... and it turned out something like 15 were reported. It turns out that nearly all of them was because I had chosen to reflect "channel check" error for channel-extender unrecoverable errors ... setting up standard system error retry. After doing some research, I figured that reflecting IFCC (interface control check) would result in same system error recovery (as CC, channel check). I then got the vendor to make the change (to IFCC) in their support ... to improve the 3090 EREP statistics.

In 1988, I was asked to help LLNL (national lab) standardize some serial channel stuff they had, which quickly becomes fibre channel standard ... including the support for downloading I/O programs to minimize latency and protocol chatter overhead. In 1990, the POK people get their serial stuff released as ESCON with ES/9000, when it was already obsolete. Later, some POK channel engineers get involved with fibre channel standard and define an extremely heavyweight protocol (that drastically reduces the throughput of the native standard), that is eventually released as FICON ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

Relatively recently, IBM published peak I/O benchmark that used 104 FICON getting 2M IOPS on z196 (I haven't been able to find anything similar published since then) ... at about the same time, a native fibre channel was announced for e5-2600 blade claiming over million IOPS (two such fiber channel with higher throughput than 104 FICON running over 104 fibre channel). About the same time there was specification for enhanced FICON protocol using TCWs ... a little like what I had done originally in 1980 ... but it claimed only about 30% improvement compared to the base FICON heavyweight protocol.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

CFTC Reproposes Position Limits Rule

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: CFTC Reproposes Position Limits Rule
Date: 08 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
CFTC Reproposes Position Limits Rule
http://www.cftc.gov/PressRoom/PressReleases/pr7495-16

CFTC used to have a rule that significant position in a commodity was required in order to play, because speculators cause wild, irrational price swings. Then 19 "secret letters" go out allow speculators to play ... results include the huge spike in oil&gas summer of 2008 (speculators pump&dump on the way up and short on the way down, enormous profits on volitility they cause).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#griftopia

A senator then publishes transaction detail showing those responsible; the mainstream press lambasts the senator for violating those corporations' privacy.

Earlier, chair of CFTC had proposed regulating derivatives ... and was quickly replaced by the wife of senator that is #2 on time's list of those responsible for the economic mess, while the senator gets law passed preventing derivative regulation. The wife then resigns and joins ENRON board & audit committee. It was originally billed as gift to ENRON, but then used by those creating securitized mortgages designed to fail, paying for triple-A rating, selling to their victims, and then taking out derivative gambling bets that they would fail.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power, loc4985-88:
The final result, Jefferson believed, was "the least bad of all the turns the thing can take." 90 It was true that he hated the financial speculation that would result from the Hamiltonian vision of commerce. "It is much to be wished that every discouragement should be thrown in the way of men who undertake to trade without capital," Jefferson said.

... snip ...

Senate Democrats Push CFTC to Curb Excessive Speculation in Futures Contracts
http://www.energy.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/2016/3/senate-democrats-push-cftc-to-curb-excessive-speculation-in-futures-contracts
CFTC Nears New Rules to Curb Excessive Speculation
http://www.wsj.com/articles/cftc-nears-new-rules-to-curb-excessive-speculation-1421964452
Traders Face Curbs on Speculation With CFTC Vote on New Limits
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013-11-05/traders-face-curbs-on-speculation-with-cftc-vote-on-new-limits
Position Limits Regulation
http://www.marketsreformwiki.com/mktreformwiki/index.php/Position_Limits_Regulation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 8 Dec 2016 10:15:35 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#47 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#48 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#53 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

old news articles about AWS spinning up, on-demand supercomputer using credit card ... and no AWS human intervention, all automated processes.

$1,279/hr, (42nd largest supercomputer in world, 240TFLOP in 17,000 cores)
https://www.cnet.com/news/amazon-takes-supercomputing-to-the-cloud/
https://www.wired.com/2011/12/nonexistent-supercomputer/all/1
$4,824/hr, 51,132 cores
http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/04/4829-per-hour-supercomputer-built-on-amazon-cloud-to-fuel-cancer-research/

part of the thread from the period that a cloud megadatacenter have hundreds of thousands blades with millions of cores ... staffed with 80-120 people. large cloud operators had been claiming for decade that they built their own server blades for 1/3rd the cost of brand name vendors ... and in this period there was news that server chip vendors were shipping over half the server chips directly to cloud operators (possible motivation for IBM selling off its server business).

also from the period, IBM's mainframe price was something like million times IBM's base list price of e5-2600 server blade (in price/BIPS) ... making the cloud server blades something like 1/3,000,000 (price/BIPS, aka cloud price 1/3rd brand name servers). The cost of servers for typical 500,000 system cloud megadatacenter then would be something like the cost of a dozen or so max-configured mainframes (and easily have more processing power than all mainframes in the world today)

some old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#78 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#80 Article on IBM's z196 Mainframe Architecture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#50 Layer 8: NASA unplugs last mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#12 Can Mainframes Be Part Of Cloud Computing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#70 How many cost a cpu second?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#84 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#34 X86 server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#42 I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#47 I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#51 Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#56 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#28 I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#86 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#10 FW: mainframe "selling" points -- Start up Costs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#15 A Private life?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 8 Dec 2016 14:08:26 -0800
john.archie.mckown@GMAIL.COM (John McKown) writes:
​I think I understand why IBM does this, not that I agree with them. Look at all the press recently about Wintel (PC sales down) and even Linux. It appears that this segment of the "computing population" is a low margin segment. IBM simply doesn't want to bother with it. They prefer a small number of high margin sales to the bother of a large number of low margin sales. I don't know of anything which is high margin (profit per unit) and high sales (because most can't afford). I wonder what the margin is on z hardware itself (sans software). I also wonder what the margins are on the z operating systems: z/OS, z/VSE, z/TPF & z/VM.​

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#55 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

big cloud operators view systems, power, cooling. hardware, people, etc as costs ... and they have scale of operation that allows them to aggresively address those costs (for a decade they've been claiming they build their own systems for 1/3rd the cost of brand name servers) ... huge automation, dramtic reduction in cost of systems (with extensive investigation into optimal reliability&availability price/performance), etc. Recent claims that over half server processor chips to ship to cloud operators also give them huge leverage in the market.

a couple years ago, mainframe hardware was 4% percent of IBM revenue, but whole mainframe group (including software & services) was 25% of IBM revenue and 40% of its profit. past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#31 Still think the mainframe is going away soon: Think again. IBM mainframe computer sales are 4% of IBM's revenue; with software, services, and storage it's 25%
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#67 How do you feel about the fact that today India has more IBM employees than any of the other countries in the world including the USA.?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#13 System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#25 System/360--50 years--the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#17 Still think the mainframe is going away soon: Think again. IBM mainframe computer sales are 4% of IBM's revenue; with software, services, and storage it's 25%
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#25 Still think the mainframe is going away soon: Think again. IBM mainframe computer sales are 4% of IBM's revenue; with software, services, and storage it's 25%
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#24 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#4 Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#35 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#37 Where Does the Cloud Cover the Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#7 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#61 Bet Cloud Computing to Win
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#80 IBM Sales Fall Again, Pressuring Rometty's Profit Goal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#84 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#90 Demonstrating Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#95 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#71 Decimation of the valuation of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#155 IBM Continues To Crumble
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#170 IBM Continues To Crumble
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#30 Why on Earth Is IBM Still Making Mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#85 a bit of hope? What was old is new again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#19 Linux Foundation Launches Open Mainframe Project
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#20 the legacy of Seymour Cray
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#52 MVS Posix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#69 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 8 Dec 2016 14:21:36 -0800
charlesm@MCN.ORG (Charles Mills) writes:
I would guess because the market is for Linux on Intel. Vicious cycle: no apps, no offering, no apps, ...

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#56 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

a big issue in the cluster supercomputing, cluster grid, and cloud computing megadatacenters was that they needed to make significant changes to the system operating paradigm ... and in order to do that, they needed source ... and full freedom to change it (which effectively met linux).

for awhile, the big cloud megadatacenters were threatening to move to ARM ... which had specifically been design for effecient battery powered operation ... but as a result represented significant power/BIPS savings (as cost of their systems have so dramatically dropped, power&cooling were increasingly becaming major expense). They even installed some number of ARM-based complexes ... with same Linux systems (processor architecture becoming relatively transparent). This then prompted the i86 server processor chip makers to make significant improvement in the power efficiency of their chips (and stories about big cloud megadatacenters migrating to ARM have since dropped off). Some of the big cloud operators are even getting server processor chips with custom designed features specifically for their use.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Every US taxpayer has effectively paid Apple at least $6 in recent years

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Every US taxpayer has effectively paid Apple at least $6 in recent years
Date: 08 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
Every US taxpayer has effectively paid Apple at least $6 in recent years; If you think Apple is cheating via overseas tax trickery, you'll hate this move.
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/12/uncle-sam-pays-apple-to-legally-park-profits-abroad-via-bond-sales/

Americans Are Paying Apple Millions to Shelter Overseas Profits
https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2016-apple-profits/?cmpid=BBD120716_BIZ/

Luxembourg added 172 new tax deals in year after LuxLeaks
https://www.icij.org/blog/2016/12/luxembourg-added-172-new-tax-deals-year-after-luxleaks
Luxembourg Leaks: Global Companies' Secrets Exposed
https://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks

Some of this started with large human instensive manufacturing and services operations that would create separate subsidiaries where the profit was booked. They then got congress to pass loophole so the subsidiary is moved to offshore tax haven. Poster child is heavy equipment manufacture that makes, sells and ships in the US. It then created distributor subsidiary in tax haven, wholesale at cost to the distributor that then sells to the customers in the US ... all the profit is booked in the tax haven distributor (equipment is still made in the US and ships directly to customers in the US, but the profit is booked in tax haven).

tax evasion, tax haven, tax avoidance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 09 Dec 2016 08:44:51 -0800
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
We (DEC) tried to fix everything which didn't work well. That's why we had field tests of every monitor release including the LIRs (Limited Interim Release).

VM370 had "release" (every 9-12 months) that had all sort of regression tests . but also had "PLC" distributions every month (all accumulative) fixes & enhancements between releases. Releases and PLCs were both full executables and sources. PLCs were the base release plus the incividual source "update" files for each PLC between releases.

For my "resource manager" charged for monitor add-on ... recent ref
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#52 Resurrected! Paul Allen's tech team brings 50-year -old supercomputer back from the dead
and past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

I've mentioned before that part of the technology at the science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
for performance work was automated benchmarking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#bench

For initial release of "resource manager" ... did 2000 benchmarks that took three months elapsed time ... varied workload, configurations, stress tests, etc. They wanted me to provided an updated "resource manager" every month in-sync with PLC distributions. I countered with every three months ... because I insisted on at least 100 benchmarks that continued to validate "resource manager" operation ... and "resource manager" release was only a small part-time of what I was doing.

trivia: after having move from CP67 to VM370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

the stress test benchmarks started out crashing VM370 everytime, as a result had to do a complete rewrite of the VM370 serialization mechanism as well as a whole lot individual fixes ... which was included in the "resource manager" release (as was the kernel restructuring changes needed for multiprocessor support). I had claimed that the serialization rewrite had eliminated all serialization related failures ... as well as all cases of zombie processors. Several years later, instances of zombie processes started reappearing ... which I tracked down to specific (poorly done) "fix".

past posts on problem determination, zombies, dump readers, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

past posts mention VM13025
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#61 VM13025 ... zombie/hung users
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#81 If IBM Hadn't Bet the Company

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 9 Dec 2016 11:02:19 -0800
0000000a2a8c2020-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UA.EDU (Tom Marchant) writes:
And your z/OS license will cost how much?

and you still wouldn't have all the source that is free to change for adapting to cloud megadatacenter operating paradigm.

posts in this thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#47 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#48 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#53 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#55 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#56 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#57 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
Date: 09 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
https://www.yahoo.com/news/gop-introduces-plan-to-massively-cut-social-security-222200857.html

Note that all the money in the SS Trust Fund has been "loaned" to federal gov. to help cover the federal dept. Recently some members of congress have been quoting the total federal debt as a number w/o what is owed the SS Trust Fund.

Stockman claims credit for increasing SS taxes under Reagan so the money would be available for DOD ... and for starting to tax SS benefits (tax on the money paid into SS and taxed again when it is paid out).

Many in congress were treating the amount paid into the SS Trust fund each year in excess of what was paid out each year as slush fund for other activities (wouldn't have to be paid back until long after they were gone). A few years ago as the leading edge of baby boomers started to retire there was explanation that the baby boomer generation was four times as large as the previous generation and twice as large as the following generation (baby boomer birth bubble). With baby boomers in the prime working years there was significantly more being paid into the SS Trust Fund each year than had to be paid out. However as the baby boomers move into retirement, the situation will invert (drawing on the principal they paid in). The following (smaller) generation will have to not only pay back what is owed the SS Trust Fund, but also be asked to pay taxes for what use to be covered by the slush money taken from the SS Trust Fund (as well as make their own SS contributions)

This proposal can drastically reduce the payouts ... so there will continue to be more being paid in than would have to be paid out, the difference being diverted for other purposes .... plus effectively never having to return the amount that has already been borrowed.

fiscal responsibility act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

recent posts mentioning SS Trust Fund:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#22 I Feel Old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#44 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#25 SS Trust Fund
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#23 How Generation Y is paying the price for baby boomer pensions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#88 Goldman Slammed With $5.1 Billion Fine For "Serious Misconduct" In Mortgage Selling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#54 Social Security Trust Fund IOUs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#91 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#65 old Western Union Telegraph Company advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#101 Chain of Title: How Three Ordinary Americans Uncovered Wall Street's Great Foreclosure Fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#95 Social Security Trust Fund
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#37 GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 09 Dec 2016 18:20:22 -0800
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
There's another issue there--the Russians recognize that in the Middle East a totalitarian dictatorship works better than a democratically elected government that does not have the backbone to keep the lunatics, with which the Middle East appears to abound, under control.

wasn't just the russians ... US has constantly eliminating elected govs. for totalitarian dictatorships ... not just middle east, also other places around the world.

an exception was possibly russia ... where US went in to loot the country under the guise of teaching them how to be capitalist democracy ... the "Is Harvard responsible for Putin" meme

recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#22 US and UK have staged coups before
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#105 How to Win the Cyberwar Against Russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#92 The Lessons of Henry Kissinger
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#3 Smedley Butler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#38 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Fareed Zakaria interview with Kissinger a couple weeks ago had running ticker at the bottom somewhat paraphrasing Kissnger (because he was somewhat hard to hear?). Fareed was asking Kissinger about Putin, referring to Kissinger having 30 or so meetings with Putin. At one point Fareed said something about clarifying what Kissinger had said (about Russia) which was reflected in the ticker at the bottom) and Kissinger said not at all ... and explained what he met ... somewhat indirectly referring to US efforts to loot the country, which was not reflected in the ticker, seemed very much like Zakaria was trying to obfuscate that subject.

however, there were actually a few that were actually working for capitalist democracy. I got tangentially involved with effort to create 5000 banks around Russia (as part of supporting capitalism economy) .... needed $1M/bldg+bank ... or $5B.

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
Date: 10 Dec 2016
Blog: LinkedIn
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#37 GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#61 GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security

GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
https://www.yahoo.com/news/gop-introduces-plan-to-massively-cut-social-security-222200857.html

Note that all the money in the SS Trust Fund has been "loaned" to federal gov. to help cover the federal dept. Recently some members of congress have been quoting the total federal debt as a number w/o what is owed the SS Trust Fund.

Stockman claims credit for increasing SS taxes under Reagan so the money would be available for DOD ... and for starting to tax SS benefits (tax on the money paid into SS and taxed again when it is paid out).

Many in congress were treating the amount paid into the SS Trust fund each year in excess of what was paid out each year as slush fund for other activities (wouldn't have to be paid back until long after they were gone, used for benefits never paid for and "loans" for the federal debt). A few years ago as the leading edge of baby boomers started to retire there was explanation that the baby boomer generation was four times as large as the previous generation and twice as large as the following generation (baby boomer birth bubble). With baby boomers in the prime working years there was significantly more being paid into the SS Trust Fund each year than had to be paid out. However as the baby boomers move into retirement, the situation will invert (hopefully drawing on the principal they paid in). The following (smaller) generation will have to not only pay back what is owed the SS Trust Fund, but also be asked to pay taxes for what use to be covered by the slush money taken from the SS Trust Fund (as well as make their own SS contributions)

This proposal can drastically reduce the payouts ... so there will continue to be more being paid in than would have to be paid out, the difference being diverted for other purposes .... plus effectively never having to return the amount that has been "borrowed".

2002 congress lets the fiscal responsibility act lapse (spending can't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt). 2010 CBO report was in the interval, tax revenue was cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap compared to the fiscal responsibility budget (first time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars). Since then tax revenue hasn't been restored and only little cut in spending, so debt continues to increase.

fiscal responsibility act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

Lots of members of congress were highlighting the total federal debt (including amount owned SS Trust Fund) ... attributing it to the current administration ... but more recently, some of those same members have started to refer to amount of the total federal debt w/o what is owed the SS Trust Fund.

Some analysis claims debt was confluence of interests, Greenspan & wallstreet wanting huge debt (so the ZIRP/treasury $300+B/annum works), special interests wanting huge tax cuts, and military-industrial complex, beltway bandits and other gov contractors (with the huge uptic in outsourcing last decade) wanting huge spending increase. posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

Supposedly TARP funds were appropriated to bail out the TBTF, buying offbook toxic assets. But with only $700B appropriated it would hardly make a dent in the problem (with just the four largest TBTF holding $5.2T in offbook toxic assets end of 2008). TARP was then used for other purposes and the Federal Reserve was left to do the real bailout. FEDRES fought hard, long legal battle to prevent public release of what it was doing (buying offbook toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar and providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds). When they lost the legal battle the chairman held press conference to say that he thought the TBTF would use the ZIRP funds to help mainstreet, but when they didn't that didn't stop the ZIRP funds (used to buy treasuries and making $300+B/annum on the spread). Supposedly the chairman in part selected for depression scholar ... where the FEDRES had tried something similar with the same results (so the chairman shouldn't have any expectation of different result this time). As an aside, FEDRES could use ZIRP to buy treasuries directly and the federal dept wouldn't cost anything ... but then the TBTF would be out their $300+B/annum.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

First major bill after fiscal responsibility act is allowed to lapse, was Medicare part-D in 2003. CBS 60mins does expose on 18 republicans & staffers responsible for getting it passed. Just before final vote, they insert one line change and prevent CBO from distributing report on the effects of the change. Six months after it passes, CBS finds all 18 have resigned and on drug industry payroll. Middle of last decade, US Comptroller General starts including in speeches that part-D comes to be a long-term $40T item (totally swamping all other budget items) and nobody in congress is capable of middle school arithmetic (for how badly they are savaging the budget).

part-d posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#medicare.part-d
US Comptroller General posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

last decade private-equity companies were buying up beltway bandits and then heavily lobbying congress outsourcing to their subsidiaries (70% of intelligence budget and over half their people, two most recent well known whistleblowers/leakers were actually employed by private-equity subsidiaries) ... scenario is that private-equity owners put their subsidiaries under heavy pressure to cut corners and produce revenue any way possible. Trivia: IBM CEO last decade had previously worked for large private-equity company and then left to head up another large private-equity company that bought the beltway bandit employing some of the most well known leakers.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

This decade, there are numerous accounts of the private equity companies buying non-profit hospital and medical practices and turn them into huge profit making organizations. Privatizing medicare would be consistent with what private-equity did last decade with other government operations.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

private equity beltway bandit subsidiaries last decade also cultivated a rapidly spreading success of failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
and
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2016 12:36:53 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
Oh, you're limiting yourself to 7-bit ASCII. That's why I originally preferred EBCDIC.

BCD was supposed to go to 8-bit ASCII ... but (comedy? of) circumstances, it went to EBCDIC instead:
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM
http://www.bobbemer.com/ASCII.HTM
http://www.bobbemer.com/BACSLASH.HTM
http://www.bobbemer.com/FATHEROF.HTM
http://www.bobbemer.com/HISTORY.HTM

other recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#43 Ransomware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#47 ASCII vs. EBCDIC (was Re: On sort options ...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#0 Is it a lost cause?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2016 12:46:33 -0800
hancock4 writes:
If it were up to me, we all would be banging away at our Teletype model 33's to communicate with the newsgroup. The rich would have their 35's, and a few would have 15's or 28's and a code converter. The snooty would have 2741 and a code converter.

touch type on tty33 required lots of finger strength. 2741 required code converter regardless of what it talked to ... tranmission code bits controller the golf ball tilt & rotate ... so regardless of talking EBCDIC or ASCII ... it required translate table.

i've mentioned before writing the cp67 terminal support for TTY ... the ascii<->ebcdic translate tables were a little odd, the mainframe terminal controllers placed leading bit in low-order byte bit position ... so incoming chacters from terminal controller had bit-reversed characters (for all terminals). ebcdic->outgoing had to translate to bit-reversed characters/codes ... and then the controller would reverse the bits for each byte ... as it went on the line.

some past posts doing clone controller (with interdata) because the ibm controller didn't quite do what I wanted
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

just what is micro-code anyway?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: just what is micro-code anyway?
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2016 14:20:48 -0800
Ivan Godard <ivan@millcomputing.com> writes:
Nanocode refers to the case where a very simple CPU runs a microprogram which interprets a second-level microprogram (this time in microcode) which executes the nominal program. The CPU in the IBM 5100 is an example of a processor which had both nanocode and microcode.

following is account of 3081 was actually the 370 simulator from the Future System project (i.e. 1st half 70s, FS was completely different from 370 and was going to completely replace it). During the FS period, 370 projects were being killed off (credited with giving clone processor makers market foothold). When FS imploded (w/o even being announced), there was made rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines ... kicking off Q&D 303x and 3081 efforts in parallel:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

note that 370/158 was horizontal microcode, split between the 370 emulator microcode and "integrated channel" microcode. For 303x, an external "channel director" was created with a 370/158 engine running the "integrated channel" microcode (w/o the 370 emulation). A 3031 is then 370/158 engine (with 370 emulation) and a 2nd 370/158 engine with the integrated channel microcode (and no 370 emulation). A cpu intensive benchmark ... doing no I/O, was still about 1/4th-1/3rd faster on 3031 than 370/158 ... since the integrated channel microcode was still using cycles even when no I/O was going on.

circa 1980, there was effort to replace the large number of internal microprocessors (low-end/mid-range 370s, controllers, as/400 followon to s/38, etc) with 801/risc Iliad. For various reasons the efforts floundered/canceled ... resulting in some number of risc engineers leaving for other vendors.

The followons to the 4331&4341 were going to 801/risc Iliad with 370 emulation "microcode" implemented in 801. Contributing to killing that effort was white paper showing that for 4341 followon, the majority of 370 could be directly implemented in CISC silicon, having much better price/performance than Iliad (disclaimer: I contributed to that white paper).

As an aside, the 370 "microcode" implementation on 801/risc Iliad ... looked somewhat like Hercules
http://www.hercules-390.org/

however, there was effort to look at doing JIT 370 code snipet translation to native 801/risc Iliad. In the 90s, some of the commerical 370 emulators (running on sparc & intel platforms) did implement JIT 370 code snipet translation to native.

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2016 14:25:08 -0800
JimP. <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:
Having seen some alleged computer security, those would be hacked and turned against us.

we've had quite a bit about cyberdumb

Let's Face It--It's the Cyber Era and We're Cyber Dumb; Got to get educated before we can defeat Internet threats
https://medium.com/war-is-boring/30a00a8d29ad

We are cyberdumb. Opponents have danced through our networks (years before it was even discovered), several times extracting detailed designs for advanced weapon systems (including radar & stealth) .... going on all last decade.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/confidential-report-lists-us-weapons-system-designs-compromised-by-chinese-cyberspies/2013/05/27/a42c3e1c-c2dd-11e2-8c3b-0b5e9247e8ca_story.html

some recent posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#8 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#19 Does Cybercrime Really Cost $1 Trillion?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#20 DEC and The Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#91 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#95 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#104 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#104 How to Win the Cyberwar Against Russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#0 Snowden
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#28 China's spies gain valuable US defense technology: report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#40 The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 11 Dec 2016 11:36:33 -0800
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
But Jeannette Rankin voted twice to stay out of war, WWI and WWII. She was the only one who voted against going to war after Pearl Harbor. There were some others in WWI.

There was monthly lecture series about british military airplane development from before ww1 p through blitz & ww2 ... as a side-note they pointed out that members of congress behind the US neutrality acts were motivated by the enormous US war profiteering that they saw happening during ww1. industry then were constantly respinning it as isolationism ... especially by those doing lots of business with germany.

this theme shows up in a number of works, book on the Dulles brothers has John Foster major force behind rebuilding German's industry and military in the 20s & 30s ... up until almost US entry into the war.

"intrepid" has lots of US corporations showing up at the June1940 German victory celebration at NYC Waldorf-Astoria to learn about how to do business with Germany (and how to get around the neutrality law).

Later annual industry national conference (5,000 corporations) at NYC Waldorf-Astoria, because corporations had gotten such a bad repudiation during the depression and for supporting Germany, they launch a major propaganda campaign to equate capitalism with Christianity, part of trying to refurbish the image of US corporations (this eventually includes in the early 50s, getting "In God We Trust" put on paper money and "Under God" added to the pledge).

enormous war profiteering also major contributor to Eisenhower's warning about the militar-industrial complex in his goodby speech.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

which also shows up in the drive for "perpetual war"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

from the law of unintended consequences ... us army air corp were making claims that strategic high altitude bombing could even win WW2 w/o need for land forces ... but one of the issues was that they needed target locations. For the 1943 US Strategic Bombing program, they got the locations of industry and military targets from wallstreet. One of the later issues about it not really working ... was the switch to fire bombing cities (hard to miss whole city even from 5-6 miles up and provided more dramtic results). The other was that 24,000 air cadets were transferred to Army ground forces to be retrained as infantrymen.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 11 Dec 2016 14:56:39 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
We should never have gotten into WWI. the British suckered us into it by loading the Lusitania with arms and munitions and claiming they hadn't. If we hadn't gotten into WWI maybe there wouldn't have been a WWII.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#68 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

from member of congress a century ago: Triumphant plutocracy; the story of American public life from 1870 to 1920
http://archive.org/details/triumphantpluto00pettrich

loc6265-74:
XXX. THE LEAGUE TO PERPETUATE WAR The war has just begun. I said that when the Armistice terms were published and when I read the Treaty and the League Covenant I felt more than ever convinced of the justice of my conclusion. The Treaty of Versailles is merely an armistice -- a suspension of hostilities, while the combatants get their wind. There is a war in every chapter of the Treaty and in every section of the League Covenant; war all over the world; war without end so long as the conditions endure which produce these documents.

... snip ...

perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#pepetual.war

and "War is Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket
by Smedley Butler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smedley_Butler

wiki references "perpetual war"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_war

references one of the "boyd people" ... no relation
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winslow_T._Wheeler
and full article (many "boyd people")
http://pogoarchives.org/labyrinth/full-labyrinth-text-w-covers.pdf
including Chuck's "Perpetual War"
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/domestic-roots-of-perpetual-war.html

Boyd posts & URLs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 11 Dec 2016 16:35:45 -0800
Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
More like the NIH syndrome. Quoting from Ted Nelson's _Computer Lib_:

"ASCII and ye shall receive." -- the computer industry

"ASCII not, what your machine can do for you." -- IBM


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#64

some history by "father of ascii"
http://www.bobbemer.com/ASCII.HTM
http://www.bobbemer.com/BACSLASH.HTM
http://www.bobbemer.com/FATHEROF.HTM
http://www.bobbemer.com/HISTORY.HTM

account of why went to ebcdic (rather than ascii):

EBCDIC and the P-Bit, (The Biggest Computer Goof Ever)
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM
Who Goofed?

The culprit was T. Vincent Learson. The only thing for his defense is that he had no idea of what he had done. It was when he was an IBM Vice President, prior to tenure as Chairman of the Board, those lofty positions where you believe that, if you order it done, it actually will be done. I've mentioned this fiasco elsewhere. Here are some direct extracts:


... snip ...

other past posts mentioning above:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#26 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#27 Origins of EBCDIC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#39 Mainframe Utility for EBCDIC to ASCII conversion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#41 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#63 CAPS Fantasia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#4 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#65 They've changed the keyboard layout _again_
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#9 Typewriter vs. Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#67 Wondering if I am really eligible for this group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#6 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#45 HP getting out of computer biz
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#23 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#5 Any candidates for best acronyms?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#45 CRLF in Unix being translated on Mainframe to x'25'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#55 "Geek" t-shirts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#100 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#52 M68k add to memory is not a mistake any more
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#55 Just for a laugh... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#73 END OF FILE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#36 PDP-10 system calls, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#84 72 column cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#52 8-bit bytes and byte-addressed machines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#56 Reduced Symbol Set Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#56 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#72 One reason for monocase was Re: Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#14 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#61 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#3 Ported Tools - Unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#49 Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#33 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#19 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#21 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#22 the suckage of MS-DOS, was Re: 'Free Unix!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#37 Subject Unicode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#5 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#13 How many EBCDIC machines are still around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#63 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#52 Rather nice article on COBOL on Vulture Central
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#78 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#24 Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#29 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#99 IBM architecture, was Fifty Years of nitpicking definitions, was BASIC,theProgrammingLanguageT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#4 Migration path for IBM 650 users?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#6 Migration path for IBM 650 users?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#65 16-bit minis, was Floating point
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#6 New Line vs. Line Feed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#47 ASCII vs. EBCDIC (was Re: On sort options ...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#0 Is it a lost cause?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 12 Dec 2016 10:12:46 -0800
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
That still leaves it with no useful purpose. Could have been a bit of marketing in the purpose. They could tell the customers the machine was all set to process ASCII.

Speaking of IBM and ASCII, to this day, IBM ftp by default translates EBCDIC <> ASCII with non-characters translating to NULLs. They should have at least assigned unique values to all 256 characters. If the translate creates non-unique values, it's impossible to recover the lost data.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#44 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#89 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#1 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#64 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#65 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#70 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

more from "father of ascii", ebcdic and the p-bit
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM
I mention this because it is a classic software mistake. IBM was going to announce the 360 in 1964 April as an ASCII machine, but their printers and punches were not ready to handle ASCII, and IBM just HAD to announce. So T.V. Learson (my boss's boss) decided to do both, as IBM had a store of spendable money. They put in the P-bit. Set one way, it ran in EBCDIC. Set the other way, it ran in ASCII.

But nobody told the programmers, like a Chinese Army in numbers! They spent this huge amount of money to make software in which EBCDIC encodings were used in the logic. Reverse the P-bit, to work in ASCII, and it died. And they just could not spend that much money again to redo it.

After all, the entire 360 venture was nicknamed "You Bet Your Company", after a TV game show of that era. And IBM found the reason, or excuse, to use EBCDIC in the huge costs to their users to change their existing files to ASCII ordering. But this short-range argument fell apart when we added a lower case alphabet.


... snip ...

upthread, I mentioned that I had done the TTY terminal support for CP67 while undergraduate at univ ... and one of the "interesting" things was that it wasn't just a simple matter of choosing ebcdic characters for ascii characters ... there was also the issue of the terminal controller inverted the bit-order in bytes i.e. leading bit was put in low order bit position in byte ... so bytes arriving in computer memory were in bit-reversed order. This had less meaning for 2741 & 1052 (selectric-based terminals) ... since the terminal code wasn't actually some character ... it was tilt/rotate code for the selectric mechanism ... and needed different (bit-reversed order) translate tables for the particular (golf) typeball.

tty keyboard had left/right brace&brackets (which don't exist in ebcdic) for right little finger. on selectric it was at-sign/cent-sign. However, both cp67 & cms used at-sign/cent-sign for character/line delete edit (i.e. at-sign deleted previous character, cent-sign deleted all characters to start of line). "at" sign was there but not cent-sign, so I translated bracket to/from cent-sign
http://www.quadibloc.com/comp/kybint.htm

science center picked up my tty support (as well as lots of other changes I made as undergraduate) and shipped it in product. pg. 22, figure one has at/cent sign next to letter "P" ... which was all the 2741s I used
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cp67/GH20-0859-0_CP67_Version_3_Users_Guide_Oct70.pdf

pg.24 starts tty terminal but doesn't describe the translation for ascii characters not in ebcdic.

pg. 34 describes line-delete (cent-sign) and character-delete (at-sign) convention (and ascii left bracket for line delete). pg. 35 describes a couple other of the ascii->ebcdic

past posts about problems I had with IBM terminal controller, led to univ. starting clone controller project (using interdata) ... and emulation including having to follow bit-reverse bytes over channel interface
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

Later as part of mainframe tcp/ip support ... input/output wasn't going thru controller that bit-reversed within byte ... so it used different translate tables that went directly from bit-ordered ascii to bit-ordered ebcdic.

trivia ... I didn't do the original tcp/ip product ... which was written in vs/pascal. however, as I've commented before about senior disk engineer giving talk about how communication group was going to be responsible for demise of disk division ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

they were fiercely fighting off distributed computing and client/server ... including affecting how tcp/ip product released ... it would get 44kbytes/sec throughput using nearly whole a 3090 cpu processor. I did the changes to the tcp/ip product to support RFC1044 and in some testing at cray research, got sustained channel speed throughput using only modest amount of 4341 processor (something like 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 12 Dec 2016 11:25:17 -0800
mitchdana@GMAIL.COM (Dana Mitchell) writes:
Exactly! They are just managing the decline and extracting maximum profit out of it along the way, IBM (and more importantly Wall St.) have no interest in expanding the z business.

I wouldn't exactly consider cloud a high margin business.


there was scenario in the 90s when wallstreet probably cared.

1992 IBM had gone into the red and was being reorganized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breacking up the company.

At the time, large number of customers were moving off mainframes to other platforms (major factor in company going into the red) ... however large part of the financial industry & wallstreet was still heavily invested in mainframes (I've periodically told story about senior disk engineer doing talk in the late 80s at annual, world-wide, internal communication group ... claiming the communication group was going to be responsible for demise of disk division, they were seeing data fleeing mainframe datacenters with drop in disk sales).

The former president of AMEX .... which had been in battle with KKR for private-equity take-over of RJR ... and KKR won:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

KKR ran into problem with RJR and hired away president of AMEX to turn it around. Then the IBM board hired him away to resurrect IBM and reverse the breakup ... using some of the same techniques that were used at RJR:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

Also in 1992, AMEX spun off a lot of its dataprocessing into independent business unit which was the largest IPO up until that time. Besides doing a lot of AMEX stuff, it also does a significant amount of transaction, statementing, account management, etc outsourcing for large number of other financial institutions (including, at one point handling everything for over half of all credit card accounts in the US). It has been one of the largest mainframe customers (total trivia, 15yrs later, KKR does private-equity take-over of that business, in the largest reverse-IPO up until that time).

Starting in the middle 90s, major financial institutions spent billions of dollars to move off mainframe cobol overnight batch settlement to straight-though processing on large number of "killer micros". Over decades, batch financial had been front-ended with "real-time" transaction, but they were really just being queued for overnight batch processing window. In the 90s, globalization was cutting size of overnight batch window and singificantly increasing workload ... breaking the overnight window. Turns out the efforts were using some standard parallization libraries that had 100 times the overhead of cobol batch. The toy demos looked good ... but pointing out to them that they wouldn't scale was ignored. They had to go into deployments that went down in spectacular flames (100 times overhead totally swamping any throughput anticipated with large number of "killer micros").

Middle of last decade I was involved in project that did high-level specification of business processes that was then decomposed into large number of light-weight SQL statements. It leveraged the significant efforts by major RDBMS vendors (including IBM) in enormous throughput for parallized cluster operation. It easily demonstrated the required throughput for straight-through processing along with being able to easily add all sort of enhancements (helped by advances in "killer micros" gave them throughput compareable to mainframes). Did well accepted demonstrations for major financial associations ... and then hit brickwall. Was finally told that there were too many executives that bore the scars of the failed efforts in the 90s and it was going to have to wait for new generation of executives (which could be demise of one of the last major mainframe cash cows).

Trivia: I was involved in the original relational/SQL implementation, System/R and tech transfer to Endicott for product release. At the time this was done "under the radar" because most of the company was focused on the strategic next generation DBMS, (code-name) EAGLE. When EAGLE imploded, there was request for how fast could System/R be available on MVS ... which was eventually released as DB2 (originally for decision support only).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Note on dis-orientation

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Note on dis-orientation
Date: 12 Dec 2016
Blog: Slightly East of News
Note on dis-orientation
https://slightlyeastofnew.com/2016/12/12/note-on-dis-orientation/

There is big overlap between anticipation and orientation basis ... orientation bias directs observation to specific anticipation .... when if it is the wrong things, it is orientation bias. Boyd would talk about continually observation from every possible facet as countermeasure to orientation bias (anticipation focused on the wrong things and surprised when it comes from completely different direction).

for the fun of it, from 1846, Elements of Military Art and Science Or, Course Of Instruction In Strategy, Fortification, Tactics Of Battles, & C.; Embracing The Duties Of Staff, Infantry, ... Notes On The Mexican And Crimean Wars. loc5019-20:
A rapid coup d'oeil prompt decision, active movements, are as indispensable as sound judgment; for the general must see, and decide, and act, all in the same instant.

... snip ...

Adding orientation ... then is able to talk about orientation bias and whether focus is on the right or wrong things.

this 2011 talks about STAP being able to target even the best stealth ... if it knows where to look (aka predictable flt. path, vhf/l-band radar that can track the best stealth, etc) ... but it requires TFLOPS of real-time computing ... which is starting to appear in the latest computer chips (spring 2015, DOD put them on export control, fall 2015 at supercomputer conference, china shows it was building their own)
http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1278878
sometimes eetimes server has problems so wayback
https://web.archive.org/web/20160304052450/http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1278878

Boyd posts & web references:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Arpanet May 1973

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Arpanet May 1973
Date: 12 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
Trivia, the corporate internal network was larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime mid-80s. The corporate sponsored univ network (bitnet in us, earn in europe using technology similar to internal network) was also larger than internet for a time in the 80s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

One of the problems in the early/mid 70s was the hasp/jes support used leftover entries in the 256 entry psuedo device table and would trash all traffic not in its table (maybe 160-180 available entries) ... and the internal network had quickly passed 255 entries. If hasp/jes nodes were on the network, they had to be carefully restricted to edge nodes (to avoid constantly trashing traffic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#hasp

1jan1983 in the great change-over from IMPs to internetworking protocol ... there was approx 100 IMP nodes and 250 connected hosts .. at a moment when the internal network was about to pass 1000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/internet.htm
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internet

When JES gets around to increasing node limit to 999, internal network was well over 1000

Early 80s we were working with NSF director and were suppose to get $20M to interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers. Then congress cuts the budget, some other things happen and finally NSF releases RFP (in part based on what we already have running). Internal politics prevent us from bidding. The NSF director tries to help by writing the company a letter (with support from other agencies), but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does statements that what we already have running was at least 5yrs ahead of all RFP responses). As regional networks hook into the centers, it becomes the NSFNET backbone (precursor to modern internet)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

Part of move from IMPs to internetworking protocol was IMP protocol didn't scale ... 1980 there were claims that when there was any configuration event, the IMP administration protocol chatter would totally saturate all the ARPANET dedicated 56Kbit lines

aka the myth of robust availability in face of failures didn't continue to actually work as things scaled

for no particular reason, RFC109 (24March1971) by Joel Winett describes 360/67 CP67 support (and ascii/ebcdic translation).
https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc109

Mid-80s, I started shadowing all the IETF documents. And then put up detailed index of RFCs on the web.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm

Then (before he passes), Postel (IETF RFC document editor) starts letting me do part of STD1.

Recently in a.f.c. I've had long winded postings about when I was undergraduate in the 60s, did the TTY/ASCII terminal support for CP67 (that science center picks up and ships) ... that includes some discussion of ascii/ebcdic translation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#71

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 12 Dec 2016 19:27:14 -0800
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
I think in the S/360 era full translation wasn't really a problem. The machine already had a TR instruction. Applying it to input/output should have been pretty simple in the I/O routines. The real problems lay in the area of compatibility with existing software.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#44 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#89 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#1 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#64 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#65 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#70 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#71 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

part of story from "father of ascii" about 360 was originally suppose to be ascii machine was that the ascii unit record gear wouldn't be available in time for announcement ... so they had to adapt previous generation unit record gear. since 360 was incompatible with previous machines, there was much less issue with software compatibility.

as aside, Amdahl leaves sortly have acs was terminated (supposedly because executives thought it would advance state of the art too fast and they would loose control of the market)
https://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

and starts his own computing company (bldg clone 370s). He had talk at MIT in filled, large auditorium in the early 70s talking about starting his new company. He was asked convinced investors to fund his new company. He said that even if IBM completely walked away from 370, that there was enough customer 360/370 software that would keep him in business through the end of the century. Now this was in the Future system period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

which was completely different from 360/370 and going to completely replace it (also 370 efforts were being shutdown during this period, the lack of offerings during this period was credited with giving clone processors market foothold). Now Amdhal's reference to IBM completely walking away from 360/370 appears like he knew about FS, but he claims at the time that he had no knowledge of FS at all.

there is thread on Facebook today about early ARPANET ... one of my (many) references is (Joel Winett) lincoln labs cp67 support for arpanet, rfc109 (24march71 rfc also discusses some ascii/ebcdic translation)
https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc109

archived here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#74

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The F-35 Stealth Fighter Is Politically Unstoppable----Even Under President Trump

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The F-35 Stealth Fighter Is Politically Unstoppable----Even Under President Trump
Date: 12 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
The F-35 Stealth Fighter Is Politically Unstoppable----Even Under President Trump
https://warisboring.com/the-f-35-stealth-fighter-is-politically-unstoppable-even-under-president-trump-67196911da7a

note they said something similar about the F-22, but apparently company simply switched effort to F-35

This is F-22: Can't Fly Won't Die
http://nypost.com/2009/07/17/cant-fly-wont-die/
Pilots call high-maintenance aircraft "hangar queens." Well, the F-22's a hangar empress. After three expensive decades in development, the plane meets fewer than one-third of its specified requirements.

... snip ...

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#57 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#75 American Gripen: The Solution To The F-35 Nightmare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#4 Cyberdumb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#10 What Will the Next A-10 Warthog Look Like?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#20 DEC and The Americans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#55 How to Kill the F-35 Stealth Fighter; It all comes down to radar ... and a big enough missile
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#97 Computers anyone?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#89 China builds world's most powerful computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#22 Iran Can Now Detect U.S. Stealth Jets at Long Range
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#61 5th generation stealth, thermal, radar signature
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#104 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#40 The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Test Pilot Admits the F-35 Can't Dogfight

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Test Pilot Admits the F-35 Can't Dogfight
Date: 12 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
Test Pilot Admits the F-35 Can't Dogfight
https://warisboring.com/test-pilot-admits-the-f-35-can-t-dogfight-cdb9d11a875

F-35 stealth for different radar bands (low frequency really good for tracking, but not necessarily good enough for targeting)
http://ausairpower.net/XIMG/JSF-RCS-Qualitative-A-XLVHF.png
discussed in detail here
http://ausairpower.net/APA-2009-01.html

2011 discussion of radar technology, STAP requires TFLOPs of real-time computing power to target best of stealth (especially when provided tracking info for where to look), which is becoming available from latest generation of computer chips. Spring 2015 DOD put them on export control, fall 2015 at supercomputer conference, china demonstrated they were making their own.
http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1278878
sometimes server has problems, so article at wayback machine
https://web.archive.org/web/20160304052450/http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1278878

STAP requires Tflop computation even when tracking gives it part of sky to focus on. F22 stealth much better than F35 ... and even F22 can be tracked. Real-time Tflop computation extracts low-observable targeting information when focused in specific area.
http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/revealed-can-chinas-radars-track-americas-stealth-f-22-15261
reference on low-observable from above:
http://ndupress.ndu.edu/portals/68/Documents/jfq/jfq-55.pdf
and another
http://aviationweek.com/defense/ways-track-low-observable-aircraft
from article references US Navy approach for tracking stealth
http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/revealed-japans-secret-weapon-destroy-chinas-j-20-j-31-14016
ausairpower just provided convenient graphics (doesn't seem to be any change in F35 low-observable characteristics since article written)

The STAP reference was part 4 of 2011 article on radar technology (and where STAP can extract targeting when AESA can't), part 3 discusses AESA:
http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1278838

note that latest generation of computer chips provide the real-time tflops needed for STAP stealth targeting ... the claim is the latest generation of computer chips also could reduce the number of transmit/receive pairs in the F22&F35 AESA by nearly two orders w/o loss of capability.

recent posts referring to radar article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#40 The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#73 Note on dis-orientation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 13 Dec 2016 18:15:22 -0800
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:
I enjoy a good conspiracy theory as well as the next person, but I can't believe more than a few oddballs believe fake news they read on the internet. A much bigger problem is that traditional sources such as the New York Times, that many _do_ believe are biased, not just on the editorial page but in the way they selectively publish and slant the news.

even better conspiracy theory is about adversaries danced through defense networks for years harvesting and compromising most sensitive and important defense programs w/o (before) being detected

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/confidential-report-lists-us-weapons-system-designs-compromised-by-chinese-cyberspies/2013/05/27/a42c3e1c-c2dd-11e2-8c3b-0b5e9247e8ca_story.html
Some of the weapons form the backbone of the Pentagon's regional missile defense for Asia, Europe and the Persian Gulf. The designs included those for the advanced Patriot missile system, known as PAC-3; an Army system for shooting down ballistic missiles, known as the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD; and the Navy's Aegis ballistic-missile defense system.

..
Also on the list is the most expensive weapons system ever built -- the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which is on track to cost about $1.4 trillion. The 2007 hack of that project was reported previously.

... snip ...

are the major military-industrial complex companies
really, really incompetent?

... or
as part of "perpetual war" ... do they have to periodically aid adversaries in order to maintain them as credible threats and keep the military budget flowing?

...

incompetent or duplicit???

note in the F-35 case, the F-22 had 1.7M lines-of-code, they are projecting 25M lines-of-code for F-35.

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 13 Dec 2016 18:33:14 -0800
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Exactly what is ASCII unit record gear?

As far as the card equipment, I would not expect the cards to contain anything other than Hollerith. I see no reason that the card equipment would have to send ASCII to the host. The host software can translate whatever the card equipment sends to the host into ASCII.


EBCDIC and the P-Bit (The Biggest Computer Goof Ever)
http://www.bobbemer.com/P-BIT.HTM
The position of IBM was a most important factor for progress of a standard code, and the System 360 was crucial to IBM's position. It was designed to handle both the Extended BCD Code (for upward compatibility of much former equipment) and the eventual ASCII. However, the resistance in X3 and in ECMA to an 8-bit code, together with the fact that the ASCII printer and card reader were not ready when 360 announcement time neared, led to the decision to make EBCDIC the primary code. It was reasoned that ASCII could wait until the matter was settled, at which time the software would be modified slightly, the P-bit switched to ASCII internal mode, and everything would be fine.

... snip ...

recent posts referencing Bob Beamer pages
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#47 ASCII vs. EBCDIC (was Re: On sort options ...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#0 Is it a lost cause?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#64 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#70 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#71 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 18 Dec 2016 19:21:33 -0800
"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
The project started in 1939. What would have happened if the Japanese had not attacked Pearl Harbor is speculation--it might have proceeded apace or might now.

"The Battle of Bretton Woods: John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dexter White, and the Making of a New World Order"
http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Bretton-Woods-Relations-University-ebook/dp/B00B5ZQ72Y/

portrays White as heavily under the influence of the Soviets, who secretly provided him with a draft of demands for him to get US to issue to Japan (which he did) ... that would prompt Japan into attacking the US (which they did ... Soviets were battling Germany in the west and were worried that Japan would attack in the east ... needed to divert Japan into pacific conflict with the US).

Hull Note
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hull_note
According to Benn Steil, director of international economics at the Council on Foreign Relations, while "no single individual can be said to have triggered" the Pearl Harbor attack Harry Dexter White "was the author of the key ultimatum demands". Steil also maintains "the Japanese government made the decision to move forward with the Pearl Harbor strike after receiving the ultimatum".

... snip ...

Part of discussions is that Churchill is characterized as attempting to delay invasion of europe for as long as possible ... allowing the Germans & Soviets to completely exhaust each other ... afterwards allows Britain to easily co-op Europe as well as the mid-east (and preserve the rest of its empire). Roosevelt response to it would delay end of the war into 1947 ... and the American public wouldn't tolerate for the war to drag on that long.

THE EUROPEAN CAMPAIGN:ITS ORIGINS AND CONDUCT, loc:1311-15:
In 1942, Eisenhower and Marshall pushed hard for a ground campaign in Europe, but the British were at best reticent about the concept of SLEDGEHAMMER.

loc:1618-20:
First, the proposed American operations SLEDGEHAMMER and BOLERO-ROUNDUP were the preferred operations for the Americans who had set their sights on a cross-channel attack. George Marshall, Albert Wedemeyer, and Dwight Eisenhower had agreed that this was the logical path to victory over Nazi Germany.

loc:1636-38:
Although Marshall consistently pressed Allied leadership for an attack on northern France, it was again Churchill and his military advisors who carried the day. Consequently, once the North African campaign was over, the Allies (beginning to refer to themselves as the United Nations) would invade Sicily, firming up Allied control over the Mediterranean.

loc:1642-43:
For Marshall and Eisenhower, the failure of the British to agree to some type of military action in Europe in late 1942 to early 1943 remained a bitter pill.

... snip ...

they constantly pointed out that these side efforts didn't directly strike German military capability ... snide remarks that if Churchill had his way it would be 1947

loc5428-29:
As a result, Eisenhower dropped the capture of Berlin as a priority. On March 28, Eisenhower ordered the encirclement of the Ruhr. His plan was to first capture the Ruhr and then cut Germany in half on an east-west axis.

... snip ...

from recent on going "misson command" (auftragstaktik) discussions:
Logistics and industrial capability wins in state on state wars. On D Day (6 Jun) the US alone flew over 3,000 sorties the Germans could only manage 150. The famous debrief of a German anti-tank commander when captured at Normandy when asked how he came to be captured, his answer was he ran out of anti-tank shells before the americans ran out of tanks.

....
Massive overwhelming resources and willingness to fight a war of attrition (whether or not it is called a strategy) can offset otherwise significant strategic and tactical shortcomings. One of Roosevelt stories was reference to Churchill wanting to postpone D-Day another year or two while Germany&Russia further exhausted each other on the eastern front (3/4 of german military resources were used against Russia) ... but Roosevelt didn't believe the American public would stand for the war continuing into 1947. Current version is how the military-industrial complex manages American public opinion for a war that continues forever.

perpetual war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war
military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

From Guderian's Panzer Leader, loc2902-3:
Hitler then said: 'If I had known that the figures for Russian tank strength which you gave in your book were in fact the true ones, I would not--I believe--ever have started this war.'

... snip ...

other past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#52 An elusive command philosophy and a different command culture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#52 EBFAS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#61 Are you tired of the negative comments about IBM in this community?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#21 IBM ushers in BIGGEST EVER re-org for the cloud era, say insiders
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#22 channel islands, definitely not the location of LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#80 Here's how a retired submarine captain would save IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#70 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#84 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#85 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#45 The Battle of Bretton Woods: John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dexter White, and the Making of a New World Order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#51 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#55 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#60 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#61 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#62 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#64 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#70 God No, the U.S. Air Force Doesn't Need Another Curtis LeMay
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#39 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#55 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#74 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#49 Fateful Choices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#18 Bullying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#94 The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#13 Rogue sysadmins the target of Microsoft's new 'Shielded VM' security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#14 Rogue sysadmins the target of Microsoft's new 'Shielded VM' security

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Economic Mess

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Economic Mess
Date: 18 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
2002, Congress allows fiscal responsibility act to lapse (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt, from 90s republican congress). 2010 CBO report that in the interim, tax revenue was cut by $6T and spending increased by $6T for $12T budget gap compared to fiscal responsible budget (first time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars). 2005, US comptroller general starts including in speeches that nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmetic because of how badly they were savaging the budget. Since then taxes haven't been restored and only modest cuts in spending so debt has continued to increase.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

Some analysis claims debt is confluence of interests, FED chairman & wallstreet wanting huge debt (so TBTF using tens of trillions in ZIRP funds to buy US treasury $300+B/annum works), special interests wanting huge tax cuts, and military-industrial complex and other gov contractors wanting huge spending increase (along with huge uptic in gov. outsourcing last decade). Trivia, in theory Fed could use ZIRP funds to directly buy treasuries and the debt wouldn't cost anything, but then the TBTF would be out the $300+B/annum.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Current speculation is another round of huge tax cuts and further spending increases ... surpasses the republican congress of last decade (in contrast to the fiscal responsible republican congress of the 90s)

But claim is TBTF getting tens of trillions in ZIRP funds no longer were motivated to pay interest rates to attract deposits ... which then percolates thru rest off economy ... including adversely affecting things like pension funds

FED zero (or near zero) interest rate funds for TBTF bailout ... TARP was pure facade ... supposedly justified to buy off-book toxic assets, but only $700B appropriated ... end of 2008, just the four largest TBTF were carrying $5.2T. FED fought hard legal battle to prevent disclosure of what it was doing ... buying trillions in offbook toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar and providing tens of trillions in ZIRP funds (but it required enormous gov debt to make the scheme work. ... clearing $300+B/annum on spread)

When FED was forced to disclose what it was doing, chairman held press conference to say he thought TBTF would use ZIRP funds to help main street ... When they didn't, he had no way to force them (but that didn't stop ZIRP funds). Note that chairman was supposedly chosen in part because he was a student of the depression ... but the FED had tried something similar then with the same results. (so he .should have had NO expectation of different results)

ZIRP
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_interest-rate_policy
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

Some of this is little smoke to obfuscate what is going on behind the scenes after FED lost legal battle to prevent disclosure of what it was doing

Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages (poster child was office bldgs in dallas/ft.worth that turned out to be empty lots). 1999, I was asked to look at improving integrity of supporting documents as countermeasure and help prevent the coming economic mess. Then they found they could pay for triple-A rating (when rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A, from Oct2008 congressional testimony) ... triple-A trumps supporting documents and they can start doing no-documentation liar loans (no-documents means that there is no longer any supporting documents so no integrity issues). The securitization and triple-A rating enables selling into bond market, largely responsible for being able to do over $27T 2001-2008 (even selling to funds restricted to dealing in "safe" investments like large public & private pension funds).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

Jan2009, I'm asked to HTML'ize the Pecora hearings (30s senate hearings into the '29 crash that resulted in criminal convictions and Glass-Steagall) with lots of internal cross-HREFs and URLs between what happened this time and what happened then (comments that the new congress might have an appetite to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get a call that it won't be needed after all (comments that capital hill buried under enormous mountains of wallstreet cash).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

Being able to pay for triple-A ratings eliminated any reason for loan originators to care about borrowers' qualifications or loan quality (since they could immediately sell off nearly everything in bond market). Then they found that they could make securitized mortgages designed to fail, sell-off to their victims, and take out CDS gambling bets that they would fail (creating enormous demand for bad mortgages). AIG was the largest holder of these CDS gambling bets and was negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar. The SECTREAS then steps in and says that it is illegal for them to pay off at less than face value, forcing them to sign document that they can't sue those making the CDS gambling bets and to take TARP funds to pay off at face value. The largest recipient of TARP funds was AIG and the largest recipient of face-value payoffs is the firm formally headed by the SECTREAS (which may have been motivation for TARP funds all along)

Trivia: spring 2008, some investors realized that triple-A ratings were being sold and it might not be able to trust any ratings. As a result the muni-bond market froze. To unfreeze the muni-bond market, Warren Buffett starts offering muni-bond insurance

Other trivia: from the law of unintended consequences ... so far, the largest fines for the TBTF associated with the economic mess are for the robo-signing mills fabricating documents to foreclose on no-documentation, liar mortgages.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Gov. Privatization

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Gov. Privatization
Date: 18 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
also privatizing much of the gov., 70% of intelligence budget and over half the people went to for-profit companies (the "leakers" in the news actually were for-profit company employees), much of DoE operation become privatized, lots of military and overseas operation, etc., etc. However, one of the major presidential campaign planks in 2008 was to reverse the enormous privatization that went on ... the new administration did stop the huge increase in privatization, but actually didn't reverse what had already happened ... but a lot of that may be congress ... somebody joked that lobbyist took 10% of appropriations to for-profit companies ... which was then evenly split with congress (congress didn't get any kickback on appropriations to gov. agencies)

many of the beltway bandit outsourcing are private equity subsidiaries
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

Bechtel and Los Alamos National Laboratory: The Privatization of the Nuclear Industry
https://lajicarita.wordpress.com/2012/03/30/bechtel-and-los-alamos-national-laboratory-the-privatization-of-the-nuclear-industry/
Nuclear Workers Deserve Better from Bechtel
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joanne-doroshow/nuclear-workers-deserve-b_b_6902776.html
"The Department of Energy is the largest military and weapons racket in the U.S. Government."
https://pando.com/2016/04/06/profiteer/
The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World
https://www.amazon.com/Profiteers-Bechtel-Men-Built-World-ebook/dp/B010MHAHV2/
It's a Bumpy Ride to Private Management for Los Alamos, Livermore
https://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/201006/losalamos.cfm
Investigative reporter details Bechtel's influence
http://www.santafenewmexican.com/pasatiempo/books/readings_signings/investigative-reporter-details-bechtel-s-influence/article_7520013c-32ad-5af8-b836-5ba9c8710b5d.html

the VP (and former head of CIA) claims no knowledge of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

S&L crisis posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#s&l.crisis

another presides over the economic mess last decade, 70 times larger than the S&L crisis

trivia: the bechtel account looking at two bechtel employees serving as SECDEF and SECSTATE in the 80s ... does find that the VP was also involved in Iran/Contra

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 19 Dec 2016 09:10:17 -0800
mausg writes:
It constantly amazes me that, with all this available in the library of Congress, nobody has collected it and published it in book form. I would agree with the above, with some reservations, as.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#80 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

another side is that john foster dulles was instrumental in rebuilding german industry and military during 20s & 30s ... with lots of help with US industry .. the members of congress behind the neutrality laws are characterized trying to counteract the enormous war profiteering that they saw during the "Great War". US corporations were continuing trying to respin it as isolationism ... because they were after more enormous war profiteering. "intrepid" has lots of US corporations showing up at the June1940 German victory celebration at NYC Waldorf-Astoria to learn about how to do business with Germany (and how to get around the neutrality law).

Later at annual industry national conference (5,000 corporations) at NYC Waldorf-Astoria (because corporations had gotten such a bad repudiation during the depression and for supporting Germany), they launch a major propaganda campaign to equate capitalism with Christianity, part of trying to refurbish the image of US corporations (in the early 50s, this eventually includes getting "In God We Trust" put on paper money and "Under God" added to the pledge).

I imagine that there are lots of wallstreet and corporations don't really want too much examination of what they were doing during that period. And from the law of unintended consequences, for the 1943 US Strategic bombing program, they needed locations of military and industrial targets in Germany ... which they got from wallstreet (behind funding and building the facilities).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#68 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

with respect to being able to destroy targets from 5-6miles up (and switching to fire bombing cities ... lot harder to completely miss a whole city, but strategic "precision bombing" was a myth), I recently ran across this reference, Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman, pg236/loc4305-7
Dyson saw the scattershot bomb patterns in postmission photographs, saw the Germans' ability to keep factories operating amid the rubble of civilian neighborhoods, worked through the firestorms of Hamburg in 1943 and Dresden in 1945, and felt himself descending into a moral hell.

... snip ...

perpetual war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war
military-industrial complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

slightly related (Jefferson insisting on separation of god & country), Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power, loc6457-59:
For Federalists, Jefferson was a dangerous infidel. The Gazette of the United States told voters to choose GOD—AND A RELIGIOUS PRESIDENT or impiously declare for "JEFFERSON-AND NO GOD."

... snip ...

Jefferson was constantly battling what he felt were the Federalists striving for British form of government with Lords and eventually a Monarch. starting with things like loc6254-58
The alien laws collectively invested the president the authority to deport resident aliens he considered dangerous. The sedition bill criminalized free speech, forbidding anyone to "write, print, utter or publish … any false, scandalous, and malicious writing or writings against the government of the United States, or either House of the Congress of the United States, with intent to defame … or to bring them … into contempt or disrepute, or to excite against them, or either or any of them, the hatred of the good people of the United States."

log6266-67:
Once sedition legislation passed and was signed by Adams, the speaking of one's mind—a foundational freedom—could result in fines up to $2,000 and up to two years in prison.

... snip ...

other trivia, Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman, pg180/loc3320-24:
Having requisitioned the machines, the scientists now also requisitioned a maintenance man—an IBM employee who had been drafted into the army. They were gaining adroitness at military procurement. The crates arrived two days before the repairman; in those two days Feynman and his colleagues managed to get the machines unpacked and assembled, after a fashion, with the help of nothing but a set of wiring blueprints. So much more powerful were they that Feynman—sensitive to rhythms as always—rapidly discovered that he could program them to clatter out the cadence of well-known songs.

pg181/loc3339-42:
John von Neumann served as a traveling consultant with an eye on the postwar future. Von Neumann—mathematician, logician, game theorist (he was more and more a fixture in the extraordinary Los Alamos poker game), and one of the fathers of modern computing—talked with Feynman while they worked on the IBM machines or walked though the canyons.

... snip ...

some past posts mentiong US 1943 strategic bombing program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#52 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#69 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#13 Fully Restored WWII Fighter Plane Up for Auction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#37 End of vacuum tubes in computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#77 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#7 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#55 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#0 How Corporate America Invented Christian America; Inside one reverend's big business-backed 1940s crusade to make the country conservative again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#26 Putin's Great Crime: He Defends His Allies and Attacks His Enemies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#28 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#31 I Feel Old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#49 Corporate malfeasance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#64 Isolationism and War Profiteering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#75 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#91 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#11 Study: Cost of U.S. Regulations Larger Than Germany's Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#88 "Computer & Automation" later issues--anti-establishment thrust
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#56 "One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#64 Strategic Bombing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 19 Dec 2016 11:37:02 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#68 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#80 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#83 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

recently, retired boeing employee gave a series of talks on the "battle for britain" (had been british, propeller fighter pilot, then came to the states to work for boeing). Hitler had directed Luftwaffe to only attack military & industrial targets and was rapidly depleating British military resources & defenses. Then one raid on london docks, some bombs went astray, hitting nearby neighborhood. Churchill (got mad? and) directed a large bombing raid on Berlin (& civilians). Hitler than removed restrictions on civilian targets. From the law of intended(or unintended?) consequences, the diversion of raids to British civilian targets allowed the British to replenish the military resources and defenses.

past posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#52 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#53 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#89 Your earliest dream?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#38 End of vacuum tubes in computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#81 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

US vs German Armies

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: US vs German Armies
Date: 19 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
In briefings in the early 80s, Boyd would comment about former military officers starting to contaminate US corporate cultures with their rigid, top-down, command&control structure (& only those at the very top knew what they were doing). Scenario is that at entry to WW2, US has to deploy large numbers with little or no skills and experience ... the rigid, top-down, command&control structure was used to leverage the few skilled resources available. Boyd would compare 11% (growing to nearly 20%) US officers to maintain rigid, top-down command&control structure, compared to 3% (or less) for German army. Note it wasn't just former military officers contaminating US comporate culture ... but about the same time, news articles started to appear that MBAs were starting to destroy US corporate culture with myopic focus on quarterly results (possibly some synergy between MBAs and former military officers with simplistic, single, near-term, quarterly results objective).

German deployed 3/4s of its military resources against Russia.

Part of discussions are that Churchill is characterized as attempting to delay invasion of europe for as long as possible ... allowing the Germans & Soviets to completely exhaust each other ... afterwards allows Britain to easily co-op Europe as well as the mid-east (and preserve the rest of its empire). Roosevelt response was it would delay end of the war into 1947 ... and the American public wouldn't tolerate for the war to drag on that long (we have now entered period of perpetual war).

perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

past references to Germany & Soviets exhaust each ohter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#80 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Computer/IBM Career

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Computer/IBM Career
Date: 19 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
shortly after taking computer intro course in the 60s, university hired me fulltime to be responsible for production 360/65 os/360 systems. Along the way I also rewwrote large amounts of CP67 (science center had originally created virtual machine cp40 on modified 360/40 with hardware virtual memory support, it morphs into cp67 when 360/67 standard with virtual memory becomes available, later it morphs into vm370). still undergraduate, Boeing hires me as fulltime employee to help with the creation of boeing computer services (consolidate all dataprocessing into independent business unit to better monetize the investment). before graduation I go to job fair and take the IBM programming test ... which I don't pass ... but I already have offer from the science center (they apparently didn't tell the rest of ibm that I didn't know how to program). science center posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

in the late 70s and early 80s I'm blamed for online computer conferencing (precursor to social media) on the internal network (larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late 80s). folklore is that when the corporate executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. possibly one factor was one of my hobbies back to when I first joined IBM, was enhanced production operating systems distributions used by large number of internal datacenters ... upper management was somewhat dismayed to find so much of the company ran on the stuff ... including world-wide sales marketing and hdqtrs HONE systems (one of my 1st overseas trips was when EMEA hdqtrs moved from NY to Paris and HONE asked me to go over for the installation). HONE posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

Original CP67 provided vanilla 360 virtual machines ... somebody on assignment from France did the enhancements to support running CP67 under CP67 (360/67 virtual machines).

This was then modified to provide the 370 virtual memory architecture ... and was part of joint program with Endicott. A year before 370 with virtual memory engineering machines was operation, science center regularly ran plan cp67 ("cp67l") on real 360/67, then in a virtual 360/67 ran modified cp67 ("cp67h") that provided 370 virtual machines (in part because there were a lot of non-employees from boston area univ. using the base system, and needed to provide strong security for unannounced 370 virtual memory), and then in a virtual 370 machine ran cp67 modified to run on 370 ("cp67i") ... which then ran CMS. In fact, "CP67I" was eventually used as original regression test for first 370/145 engineer machine that had virtual memory hardware (turns out that they had incorrectly swapped some of the new opcodes, when they finally figured it out, they patched "cp67i" for the incorrect opcodes and got it running).

trivia: as part of the joint effort with endicott for cp67h & cp67i, the original CMS multi-level source update implementation was done

When I 1st joined IBM ... it was still doing lots of new hirings ... and after a couple months got asked to be a manager. I asked to read the managers manual over the weekend. I came back and said that it wouldn't be a good idea. I worked for hardware store in highschool and they would lend me out to contractors for various kinds of construction activities. Summer after freshman year I was forman on construction job and sometimes needed to do employee attitude readjustment in the parking lot after work (which wasn't covered in the manager's manual).

During the FS period in the 70s (completely different and incompatible with 370), I was told FS was the only place there was promotions and raises. I continued to work on 370 and even periodically ridicule FS (which wasn't exactly career enhancing). FS was going to completely replace 370 so 370 efforts were being shutdown and lack of 370 products during the period is credited with giving clone processor makers market foothold. After FS imploded there was mad rush to get products back into the 370 pipeline. Clone makers were still primarily universities, technical, scientific, but hadn't broken into true blue commercial market yet. I got to know a lot of customers that I could periodically drop by and talk to. One customer was one of the largest commercial financial account on the east coast. At one point the IBM branch manager did something that horribly offended the customer ... and the customer went public as first true blue commercial customer to order clone processor. I was asked to go sit onsite at the customer for six months, trying to make the order look like a technical issue (rather than for something the branch manager did). I said that was pointless, I'd had lots of talks with the customer about the situation and they weren't going to change. I was told that the IBM branch manager was a sailing buddy of the IBM CEO and if I didn't obfuscate what was going on it would put a black mark on the branch manager's career ... furthermore if I refused, it would be the end of any career at IBM and I could forget any promotions or raises. At lot of stuff I did was inspite of the company ... I would just wander around and talk with datacenter managers (inside and outside IBM). FS posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

[CM] 40 years of man page history

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: [CM] 40 years of man page history
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2016 10:05:02 -0800
Jorgen Grahn <grahn+nntp@snipabacken.se> writes:
The worst disappointment is the "modern" markup languages like Markdown. Trivial examples are simpler than troff, but if you need to do anything non-trivial (and I don't mean complex -- just non-trivial) you regret not doing it in troff.

triva: mid-60s, ctss runoff
http://web.mit.edu/saltzer/www/publications/ctss/AH.9.01.html

was redone on cp/cms at the science center as "script" command.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

then in 1969, gml (three letters chosen as 1st letter of last name of three inventors) was invented at the science center (almost 50yrs ago) ... and gml tag processing added to script. after a decade gml morphs into sgml
http://www.sgmlsource.com/history/sgmlhist.htm
posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

after another decade sgml morphs into html at cern
http://infomesh.net/html/history/early/

from above:
1992

With 1992 came (some) stability. See the HTML page.

One of the related files contains a very important idiom:-

It is required that HTML be a common language between all platforms. This implies no device-specific markup, or anything which requires control over fonts or colors, for example. This is in keeping with the SGML ideal.

However, HTML suffered greatly from the lack of standardization, and the dodgy parsing techniques allowed by Mosaic (in 1993). If HTML had been precisely defined as having to have an SGML DTD, it may not have become as popular as fast, but it would have been a lot architecturally stronger.

Standardization?

The first official standard for HTML (HTML 2.0) came out in November 1995: way too late!

HTML has been in use by the World Wide Web (WWW) global information initiative since 1990. This specification roughly corresponds to the capabilities of HTML in common use prior to June 1994. HTML is an application of ISO Standard 8879:1986 Information Processing Text and Office Systems; Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML).


... snip ...

https://www.w3.org/History/19921103-hypertext/hypertext/WWW/MarkUp/MarkUp.html
https://www.w3.org/MarkUp/html-spec/index.html
http://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/SS6RBX_11.4.2/com.ibm.sa.xml.design.doc/topics/c_history.html

I was brought in as consultant (little involved with the formating stuff) because they wanted to do payment transactions on the server (now frequently referred to as "electronic commerce") I had authority over interfacing webservers over the internet to the payment networks ... but only could make recommendations on the browser/server side (some of which were almost immediately violated, accounting for some number of exploits that continue to today).

past posts mentioning CTSS RUNOFF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#0 What good and old text formatter are there ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002b.html#46 ... the need for a Museum of Computer Software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#16 instant messaging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003o.html#32 who invented the "popup" ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#73 Specifying all biz rules in relational data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#74 Specifying all biz rules in relational data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#55 History of first use of all-computerized typesetting?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#27 What part of z/OS is the OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#86 CLIs and GUIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#90 z/OS Documentation - again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#67 Web Security hasn't moved since 1995
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#46 Lawyers & programming (x-over from a.f.c discussion)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#5 history of comments and source code annotations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#11 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#53 IBM 029 service manual
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#10 25 reasons why hardware is still hot at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#41 Unix systems and Serialization mechanism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#48 GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#53 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#55 GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#61 GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#69 GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#58 So why doesn't the mainstream IT press seem to get the IBM mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#60 Daisywheel Question: 192-character Printwheel Types
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#73 IBM and the Computer Revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#86 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#81 TSO Profile NUM and PACK
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#38 IBM Assembler manuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#49 OT The inventor of Email - Tom Van Vleck
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#37 First Website Launched 20 Years Ago Today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#68 Wondering if I am really eligible for this group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#34 Data Areas?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#89 Is there an SPF setting to turn CAPS ON like keyboard key?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#64 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#9 History of UNIX Manpages
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#50 Word Length
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#8 "execs" or "scripts"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#15 "execs" or "scripts"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#73 PDP-10 system calls, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#39 PC/mainframe browser(s) was Re: 360/20, was 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#72 IBM documentation - anybody know the current tool? (from Mislocated Doc thread)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#52 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#21 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#32 The Vindication of Barb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#40 Reader Comment on SA22-7832-08 (PoPS), should I?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#37 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#21 CTSS DITTO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#74 The Mother of All Demos: The 1968 presentation that sparked a tech revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#84 The Mother of All Demos: The 1968 presentation that sparked atech revolutio
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#88 DCF on OS/2
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#56 Computer Architecture Manuals - tools for writing and maintaining- state of the art?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#3 IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue wouldrather you f
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#48 Before the Internet: The golden age of online service
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#60 The Tragedy of Rapid Evolution?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#98 PROFS & GML
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#34 How the internet was invented

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2016 10:37:58 -0800
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#68 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#80 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#83 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#84 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

The Blitz
http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/timeline/about-blitz.htm
Britain bombs Berlin
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/events/britain_bombs_berlin
On the evening of 24 August the Luftwaffe, whilst targeting London's docks, also dropped bombs on the city's financial heart and Oxford Street in the West End. This was probably not intentional, as it was in defiance of Hitler's strict instructions that central London should not be attacked. Winston Churchill was outraged and, 24 hours later, RAF Bomber Command retaliated.

... snip ...

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 22 Dec 2016 11:38:19 -0800
hancock4 writes:
The book "Reds" by Ted Morgan says White was a Soviet spy and cites the damage he did.

The book "I Chose Freedom" by Victor Kravchenko, a Soviet defector in WW II, describes the horrible condition of the Soviet Union and how American food and resources saved them. It also supplies the Soviet attempts at espionage in the U.S.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#68 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#80 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#83 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#84 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#88 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)

Churchill's Secret War: The British Empire and the Ravaging of India during World War II, loc22-25:
By Hindustan, or Land of the Hindus, Churchill meant India, which during the war was part of the British Empire. Britain's wartime prime minister did not discuss in his six-volume account the 1943 famine in the eastern Indian province of Bengal, which killed 1.5 million people by the official estimate and 3 million by most others. One primary cause of the famine was the extent to which Churchill and his advisers chose to use the resources of India to wage war against Germany and Japan, causing scarcity and inflation within the colony.

... snip ...

discussions bengal had been one of the wealthiest and highest standard of living in the world, after becoming part of the British Empire they turned into one of the poorest. the story has Britain have substituted growing cotton (benefit english mills) for food ... but that resulted in exhausting food stocks during poor harvest. story talks about Churchill diverting shipping capacity (for providing food to starving India) to building up stockpiles for postwar England.

a few past posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#54 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#56 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#62 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#55 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

One of the issues with how much US helped USSR during WW2 was that the shipping capacity (to soviets) was far less than what was available for India.

US USSR Lend-Lease
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lend-Lease#US_deliveries_to_the_Soviet_Union
In total, the U.S. deliveries through Lend-Lease amounted to $11 billion in materials: over 400,000 jeeps and trucks; 12,000 armored vehicles (including 7,000 tanks, about 1,386[37] of which were M3 Lees and 4,102 M4 Shermans);[38] 11,400 aircraft (4,719 of which were Bell P-39 Airacobras)[39] and 1.75 million tons of food.[40]

... snip ...

comparison of US and USSR production:
https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/3ku09p/in_ww2_who_had_greater_industrial_capacity_the/

some items


Total wartime production numbers for select weapons systems (Ellis)
Item                       US        USSR
Tank/SPG                 88,410     105,251
Artillery               257,390     516,648
MGs                   2,679,840   1,477,400
Trucks                2,382,311     197,100
Planes (all types)      324,750     157,261
Fighters                 99,950      63,087
Bombers                  97,810      21,116

... snip ...

note while US out-produced USSR during WW2, for the most part, lend-lease deliveries was small percent of USSR production.

Guderian talks about Germany having tank production of couple thousand/yr and USSR tanks were frequently more effective and reliable than Germans (and US Shermans). The US massive production advantage over both Germany and USSR ... is in contrast to claims about Churchill wanted to delay Europe invasion until Germany and USSR had totally exhausted each other (Roosevelt didn't believe US public would stand for war dragging into 1947) ... and that 3/4s of German military resources was in fighting USSR.

Military deaths, USSR: 8m-11m, Germany: 4m-5m, US: 400k
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_casualties

in some recent military discussions, it was pointed out that Germany had lost so many in the USSR campaigns, that by the time US had gotten around to invading Europe, it faced 14&15 yr old boys.

other trivia (from past discussions), 2/3rds of total US WW2 military budget went to planes & air campaign ... half that, 1/3rd of total went to strategic heavy bombers & strategic bombing campaign. Roosevelt commissioned the strategic bombing survey because the cost of strategic bombing seemed all out of proportion to the benefits.

I've mentioned before that the important thing to remember about the 50s U2, was it debunks the USAF "bomber gap" claims (justifying enormous increase in DOD budget for building strategic bombers) and contributes to Eisenhower's warning about military-industrial complex in his goodby speech
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military-industrial-complex

past posts mentioning strategic bombing survey:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#10 America's Defense Meltdown
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#67 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#73 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#90 Friden Flexowriter equipment series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#91 Friden Flexowriter equipment series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#92 Off topic screeds (was Re: Friden Flexowriter equipment series)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#40 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#13 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#52 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#68 Why do we have wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#69 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#77 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#82 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#0 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#70 God No, the U.S. Air Force Doesn't Need Another Curtis LeMay
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#76 Your earliest dream?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#89 Your earliest dream?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#13 Fully Restored WWII Fighter Plane Up for Auction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#37 End of vacuum tubes in computers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#52 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#77 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#81 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#87 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#55 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING
Date: 22 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#37 GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#61 GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#63 GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security

aka they spent the baby boomer trust fund .... assuming they would be long gone by the time it was noticed ... and following generations weren't as large as the baby boomer bubble (collapses like Ponzi scheme).

Why Social Security Is Doomed: "Birthrate At Lowest Level On Record"... And the Future Is Unfunded
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-12-22/why-social-security-doomed-birthrate-lowest-level-record-and-future-unfunded

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Your Social Security cuts are already on the way

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Your Social Security cuts are already on the way
Date: 23 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
Opinion: Your Social Security cuts are already on the way
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/your-social-security-cuts-are-already-on-the-way-2016-12-15

Why Social Security Is Doomed: "Birthrate At Lowest Level On Record"... And the Future Is Unfunded
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-12-22/why-social-security-doomed-birthrate-lowest-level-record-and-future-unfunded

The excess into the trust fund has been used to cover other debts ... now they don't want to pay it back. Recent explanation is baby boomer bubble was 4times larger than previous generation and twice as large as following generation. Baby boomers during their prime working years were paying more into the trust fund each year (building up principal for their retirement) than was being paid out each year (for previous generations), and this excess was being used to pay for other debt. Now they don't want to pay it back (similar to ponzi scheme) ... only way to pay it back is take it from following generations (alternative is throw baby boomers under the bus and radically cut their payout).

Lots of stories during the 90s that wallstreet (and CEOs of large corporations) were lobbying hard for 401Ks ... for wallstreet, large pension plans negotiated very slim fees, they get higher percentage from 401Ks. Some IBM:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

Last decade they came up with another scam to attack large pension plans, the did toxic securitized mortgages designed to fail, paid for triple-A ratings, allowing them to unload on funds restricted to "safe" investments (including pension plans, some claim that it accounts for 30% loss in value). They (also) then took out CDO gambling bets they would fail. The largest holder of CDO gambling bets was AIG and netogiating to payoff at 50cents on the dollar. Then SECTREAS steps in, has them sign a document that they can't sue those making the bets, and has them take TARP funds to payoff at face value. The largest recipient of TARP funds is AIG and the largest recipient of face-value payoffs is corporation formally headed by SECTREAS.

Disclaimer: 1999 I was asked to try and help stop the coming economic mess. securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent mortgages. As countermeasure, I was asked to help improve the integrity of supporting documents. Then they find they can pay for triple-A ratings (which trumps supporting documents) and they start doing no-documentation, liar loans.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

avg life span has stayed relatively static since major adjustment to SS in the 80s ... except this year, US life span has slightly dropped/decreased

there are members of congress harping on the total size of debt ... but recently in respin, they are only talking about debt w/o what is owed the trust fund (as if they are preparing for campaign to make trust fund evaporate) ... they are also making noise about another round of huge tax cuts.

Note 2002, congress allows fiscal responsibility act to lapse (spending couldn't exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt, from the 90s republican congress). 2010 CBO report was in the interim (2003 thru 2009), tax revenue was cut $6T and spending increase $6T for $12T gap compared to fiscal responsible budget (1st time taxes were cut to not pay for two wars, courtesy of new republican congress). By 2005, the U.S. Comptroller General was including in speeches that nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmetic (for what they were doing to the budget). Since then, taxes haven't been restored and only modest cuts in spending, so debt continues to increase.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

Stockman (80s budget director) takes credit for accelerating trust fund contribution (to cover longer life span) in order to use the extra money for DOD. Stockman more recently wrote a book about "stock buybacks" where IBM has prominent role ... its easier for top executives to get huge bonuses by juicing stock price with stock buybacks.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#stock.buyback

2013 breakdown
http://static5.businessinsider.com/image/52586e38ecad048c0e57f2e9-800-/screen%20shot%202013-10-11%20at%205.20.55%20pm.png

i.e. $16T 2013, $19T 2016 (but only $16T again, if you take out what is owed trust fund) ... increased by approx. $1T/yr, down from nearly $2T/yr last decade. Part of the problem now is interest on the debt is nearing half trillion/yr.

Some analysis claims debt is confluence of interests (letting fiscal responsibility act to lapse in 2002), Greenspan & wallstreet wanting huge debt (easy investment interest), special interests wanting huge tax cuts, and military-industrial complex and other gov contractors wanting huge spending increase (along with huge uptic in gov. outsourcing last decade).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fed.chairman
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Elections Fair?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Elections Fair?
Date: 23 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
There was recent article about Sanders suing DNC for unfair. Response was that statements and process during election aren't basis for litigation ... it is equivalent of used-car salesmen puffery (buyer beware).

Example: during 2008 election, DEM presidential candidate made lots of statements about reversing the enormous outsourcing of the federal government that went on last decade ... which didn't happen, although it didn't seem to increase much. Example enormous outsourcing of intelligence to beltway bandits last decade, 70% of budget and over half the people ... accelerated by large private-equity companies buying up beltway bandits then heavily lobbying congress.
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

Some IBM, after 90s IBM CEO leaves ... he goes on to head up private-equity company that buys the beltway bandit that will employ Snowden.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

Part of the explanation is that companies can't use money from gov. contracts to lobby congress (recent news that companies involved in Hanford cleanup are fined for violating lobbying law) ... but private-equity owners of belt-way bandits can.

Note standard criticism of private-equity is that they put their subsidiaries under heavy pressure to cut corners and provide money every way possible ... example is the outsourced security clearances to (private-equity) betlway bandits were found to filling out the paper work but not actually doing background checks (and leaking examples where previously sensitive operations had required multiple parties as countermeasure to insider threats).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

F35 Program

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: F35 Program
Date: 23 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
F35 over trillion, total lifetime program costs ... way behind schedule, even "revised, updated" schedule redone in 2011, and way over budget. This talks about general process used by military-industrial complex ... problem was F-22 was going into production still having all the problems ... so the maker switches from F-22 production to F-35 development (where all the problems haven't become so apparent yet, and pretend F-22 never existed)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

This is F-22: Can't Fly Won't Die
http://nypost.com/2009/07/17/cant-fly-wont-die/
Pilots call high-maintenance aircraft "hangar queens." Well, the F-22's a hangar empress. After three expensive decades in development, the plane meets fewer than one-third of its specified requirements.

Anyway, an enemy wouldn't have to down a single F-22 to defeat it. Just strike the hi-tech maintenance sites, and it's game over. (In WWII, we didn't shoot down every Japanese Zero; we just sank their carriers.) The F-22 isn't going to operate off a dirt strip with a repair tent.

But this is all about lobbying, not about lobbing bombs. Cynically, Lockheed Martin distributed the F-22 workload to nearly every state, employing under-qualified sub-contractors to create local financial stakes in the program. Great politics -- but the result has been a quality collapse.


... snip ...

more than you possibly ever want to know about F-35 and some of the things that happened during the evolution of the F-35 program, including shows original "true" stealth in Boeing and Lockheed prototypes and then how it is compromised.
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-JSF-Analysis.html
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-2009-01.html
http://www.ausairpower.net/jsf.html

in the military-industrial complex & beltway bandits rapidly spreading success of failure culture (except its trillions now instead of simply billions)
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

can expect something new to come along to replace F-35 and start the cycle all over again.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Your Social Security cuts are already on the way

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Your Social Security cuts are already on the way
Date: 23 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#91 Your Social Security cuts are already on the way

It will be getting harder & harder with interest on the debt pushing half trillion, big push for another big round of tax cuts and another big round of spending increases.

One of the stories, is about major purchases of treasuries are from tax havens (with opaque laws about who is doing what). Congress allowed loopholes for revenue to be hidden overseas. Posterchild is large heavy equipment maker that manufactures in the US and sells&ships directly to customers in the US. They get help setting up "distributorship" in tax haven, they sell to the distributorship at cost, and then the distributorship sells to customers in the US, equipment is shipped directly from US plant to US customer, and all the profit is booked in the tax haven. Possibility is that the money never actually left the US and is being used to buy treasuries ... but wizardry of accounting, you can't see it.

Part of the reason that there are references that congress is the most corrupt institution on earth

tax evasion, tax haven, tax avoidance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

Note stockman also claims credit for starting to tax SS benefits ... double taxation ... taxes were paid on SS payments into the trust fund ... and then again when the benefits are are paid out (backdoor transfer of some of the money in the trust fund into the general fund).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Retrieving data from old hard drives?

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Retrieving data from old hard drives?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2016 11:18:48 -0800
Morten Reistad <first@last.name.invalid> writes:
You look at the connector, and somtimes at the addressing DIP/plugs.

SCSI come in a variety of packaging, with narrow/wide and open-end/balanced cables. This is normally one longish cable with lots of connectors. You must set the unit address on each unit, usually with DIPs.

(E)SMD is the same, but has one bus cable and radial cables to each device, with address plugs in the devices. The bus cable is longish and has lots of connectors.

ST506 disks (mfm or rll) have this bus+radial cable design as well. One fat, longer bus cable with several connectors, and shorter radial cables.

IDE and ATA are smaller versions of the same ideas as SMD did. Sometimes you find bus/radial, but just as often you see them in the same cable, but with a twist in the cable for ~16 or so connectors. They sometimes even set the drive select in this twist, so you just jumper each drive to unit zero.

There is a gliding migration from st506 to ide to ata, where the drivers were the same or very similar, as were the bus electronics.

The disk interfaces on (E)SMD, ST506 and IDE are in principle analog data paths for the data (but digital control). SCSI and ATA are digital in nature. It was this analog mode that made the migration from MFM (two state changes per bit) to rll (5 state changes per 4 bits) to take place, giving 80% more data on the same disk.


parallel ATA (originally for pc/at)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_ATA
there is now SATA ... serial-ATA.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA

1990, Hursely had done SCSI commands over 80mbit/sec serial copper ... I did some server i/o throughput with 4&8 drives and got three times the throughput with serial than straight SCSI with essentially identical drives.

eariler in 1988, I had been asked to help LLNL standardize some serialize some serial stuff they had been playing with that quickly becomes fibre channel standard.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibre_Channel

Initially ran IPI drives over FCS.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligent_Peripheral_Interface

In practice, the theoretical advantages of IPI over SCSI were often not realized, as they only materialized when several disks were connected to the interface, which could then easily become a bandwidth bottleneck.

... snip ...

LANL had standardized parallel 100mbyte/sec cray channel as HIPPI that was used to run IPI disk arrays. That was then adopted for FCS.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HIPPI

there was then work on "serial" HIPPI ... competing with FCS.

Having been involved with both FCS and Hursely's serial copper ... I wanted them to interoperate ... as part of cluster scaleup (for both commerical and technical/scientific). However when cluster scaleup was transferred to Kingston (for technical/scientific *ONLY*), we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors ... some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa
and posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

Then Hursely's serial copper evolves into (non-interoperable, initially 160mbyte/sec) SSA
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_Storage_Architecture

I had been con'ed into doing channel extender for STL lab in 1980, bursting at the seams, and moving 300 from the IMS group to offsite bldg with dataprocessing back in STL datacenter. They had tried remote 3270s but found human factors totally unacceptable. Part of the support was downloading channel programs to channel emulator at the remote building ... enormously reducing the latency for the heavy weight channel protocol chatter. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#channel.extender

semi-related posts, getting to play disk enginneer in bldgs 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

The vendor tried to get my support released ... but some engineers in POK objected because they were afraid that it would make it harder to get some serial stuff they were playing with, released. There stuff is finally released in 1990 as ESCON when it is aleady obsolete. Later some of the POK channel engineers become involved in fibre channel standard and define a heavy-weight protocol that drastically reduces the native throughput, eventually released as FICON. Most recent (2012) peak mainframe disk I/O I can find was z196 2M IOPS running over 104 FICON (running over 104 FCS). At the same time there was a (native) fibre channel announced for E5-2600 blade claiming over million IOPS (two such FCS having higher native throughput than 104 FICON running over 104 FCS). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

About the same time (2012), they announced zHPF/TCW enhancement for FICON (a little bit like what I had done for channel extender in 1980 and included in fibre channel standard), but only claims 30% improvment over FICON.

For whatever reason, I also got dragged into SCI standards, originated at SLAC (possibly in part because I use to attend regular monthly meetings at SLAC).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalable_Coherent_Interface
some slac refs
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/pubs/slacpubs/5000/slac-pub-5184.pdf
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/pubs/slacpubs/5500/slac-pub-5656.pdf
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/pubs/slacpubs/5500/slac-pub-5699.pdf

which was used for directory based scalable shared memory ... Sequent & Data General did 256-way intel multiprocessor, Convex did 128-way HP multiprocessor. However, there was also lots of work on using SCI for disk i/o.

mentioned in Futurebus
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurebus

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

This Is How The US Government Destroys The Lives Of Patriotic Whistleblowers

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: This Is How The US Government Destroys The Lives Of Patriotic Whistleblowers
Date: 24 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
This Is How The US Government Destroys The Lives Of Patriotic Whistleblowers
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-12-23/how-us-government-destroys-lives-patriotic-whistleblowers

some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

Boyd had story that when SECDEF couldn't get Chuck and him thrown in Leavenworth for (behind paywall, but mostly lives free at wayback machine) ... he created new security classification, NOSPIN (unclassified but not to be given to Chuck)
http://web.archive.org/web/20070320170523/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953733,00.html

there is a joke about Washington that the highest security classification is "downright embarrassing" (usually nothing to do with national security, but individual careers).

boyd posts & web URLs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

somewhat related:
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

We didn't know it at the time, but we were possibly involved on the periphery. In 2002 the agency released IC-ARDA (since renamed IARPA) unclassified BAA that basically said none of the tools that the agency had did the job. Just before closing, we got a call asking us to respond before closing. We quickly got in response and then had a number of meetings showing we could do what was needed ... and then nothing. It wasn't until this series that we had any idea of what might be going on.
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

In American Towns, Private Profits From Public Works

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: In American Towns, Private Profits From Public Works
Date: 24 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
In American Towns, Private Profits From Public Works
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/24/business/dealbook/private-equity-water.html

private-equity companies bought up lot of beltway bandits last decade ... which appeared to go along with huge congressional lobbying and uptic in gov. outsourcing ... in intelligence, 70% of budget and over half the people (private-equity pressure for profits results in things like subsidiaries doing security clearances, filling out paperwork but not actually doing background checks). Prior to Snowden incident (employed by beltway bandit, private equity subsidiary) ... common practice for sensitive operations required multi-party processes (as countermeasure to insider threats)
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
and contributed to the rapidly spreading success of failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

they've also gotten into buying up medical practices and non-profit hospitals (another big potential for profits with the rapidly graying baby boomers).

During the S&L crisis, they got such a bad reputation, they changed the industry name to "private equity" and "junk bond" becomes "high-yield bond"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

S&L crisis posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#s&l.crisis

old NYTIMES article equating private-equity to house flipping, but they can even resell for less than they paid and walk away with boat loads of money (since loan goes on the books of the victim company and goes with it, when sold). over half corporate defaults are companies currently or previously in private-equity mill
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

What is strange is that all the private-equity loans that default ... never seem to be associated with the original private-equity borrowers or affect their credit rating (all those records seem just to have evaporated).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

A Christmassy PL/I tale

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: A Christmassy PL/I tale
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 26 Dec 2016 10:04:25 -0800
patrick.vogt@AXA-TECH.COM (Patrick Vogt) writes:
If you look at coding/automation on decentralized platforms, the Mainframe is technically still ahead of the other platforms. It may be slower on implementations but that's not to do with the Mainframe but of people coding like 20 years ago and structures of the companies.

with regard to later statement about mainfrmaes now being out-of-order, RISC chips have been doing out-of-order for decades ... 20 years ago, the I86 chip makers started doing hardware decomposition of I86 instructions into RISC micro-ops (with out-of-order and branch prediction) ... largely eliminating the performance advantage of RISC over I86. out-of-order is one of the methods of attempting to compensate for cache miss & increasing processor/memory speed mismatch.

current cache miss, memory access latency, counted in number of processor cycles is compariable to the 60s disk access latency when counted in 60s processor cycles ... accounts for out-of-level and hardware multi-threaded work ... comparable to starting to do multiprogramming/multitasking in the 60s ... i.e MFT & MVT. Note folklore is that original justification for moving all of 370 to virtual memory was based on horrible MVT storage managment ... regions required 4times the memory typical used, typical MVT 1mbyte 165 only had four regions, moving to virtual memory would allow four times the regions with little or no actual paging (better CPU utilization and aggregate throughput, larger virtual memory size compensating for the horrible MVT storage management problem). ref:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73

note that 360/195 pipeline had out-of-order but no branch prediction, so conditional branches drained the pipeline and most codes only ran half processor peak throughput (and some amount of RISC literature attribute out-of-order to the 195 work). I had gotten sucked into helping with hardware (hyper)threading for 370/195 (never announced or shipped), two instructions streams (simulating two processors) ... running two simulated CPUs typically running at half througput ... keeping single 195 pipeline 100% utilized. hardware threading mentioned in this article about end of (360) ACS (canceled because executives thot it would advance state-of-art too fast and IBM would loose control of the market, also references some ACS features show up more than 20yrs later with ES9000)
https://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

latest mainframes
z900, 16 processors, 2.5BIPS (156MIPS/proc), Dec2000
z990, 32 processors, 9BIPS, (281MIPS/proc), 2003
z9, 54 processors, 18BIPS (333MIPS/proc), July2005
z10, 64 processors, 30BIPS (469MIPS/proc), Feb2008
z196, 80 processors, 50BIPS (625MIPS/proc), Jul2010
EC12, 101 processors, 75BIPS (743MIPS/proc), Aug2012


z196 documentation claims that half the per processor performance improvement (compared to z10), is the introduction of out-of-order (compared to being used for decades in other processors) ... i.e. half of 156MIPS increase from 469MIPS to 625MIPS. Part of the 118MIPS improvement from z196 to EC12 is attributed to further refinement in out-of-order implementation.

z13 claims 30% increased (system) throughput (over EC12) or about 100BIPS with 40% increase in no. of processors or about 710MIPS/proc.

z196 era e5-2600v1 blades are rated at 400-500+BIPS (depending on model/frequency) ... latest e5-2600v4 blades are 3-4 times that, around 1.5TIPS (1500BIPS) ... they've had decades more experience with processor design for throughput.

trivia: mid-70s, I was involved in 16-way 370 effort ... and had involved spare time of some early 3033 processor engineers. People in POK thot it was really great until somebody told the head of POK that it might be decades before the POK favorite son operating system had effective 16-way support. Head of POK then invited some of us to never visit POK again ... 16-way, z900 finally ships in 2000 (almost 25yrs later).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

recent posts mentiong e5-2600:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#15 Dilbert ... oh, you must work for IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#19 Fibre Chanel Vs FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#23 IBM's 3033; "The Big One": IBM's 3033
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#27 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#74 Fibre Channel is still alive and kicking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#103 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#104 You count as an old-timer if (was Re: Origin of the phrase "XYZZY")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#24 CeBIT and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#28 CeBIT and mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#60 Which Books Can You Recommend For Learning Computer Programming?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#61 Can commodity hardware actuallly emulate the power of a mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#24 What was a 3314?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#81 The mainframe is dead. Long live the mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#42 How the internet was invented
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#25 Samsung's million-IOPS, 6.4TB, 64Gb/s SSD is ... well, quite something
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#28 Computer hard drives have shrunk like crazy over the last 60 years -- here's a look back
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#40 The F-22 Raptor Is the World's Best Fighter (And It Has a Secret Weapon That Is Out in the Open)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#53 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#55 Why Can't You Buy z Mainframe Services from Amazon Cloud Services?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#95 Retrieving data from old hard drives?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

PC Compromise and Internet Transactions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: PC Compromise and Internet Transactions
Date: 26 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
almost as soon as on-screen keyboards appeared (as countermeasure to keyloggers), there were mouse/cursor trackers ... then came randomized letter position in screen keyboard to combat rote mouse/cursor trackers ... which then added letter recognition.

mid-90s, consumer dialup banking were making presentation in industry conferences that they were moving to the internet (primarily because of the significant costs in supporting proprietary dialup infrastructure). at the same time the commercial dialup online backing said they would never move to the internet (because of a long list of vulnerabilities ... many which continue to this day). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#dialup-banking

commercial dialup online banking eventually did move to the internet ... and the FED starting publishing guidelines that businesses should have a dedicated PC that is *ONLY* used for online financial transactions ... and *NEVER* used for any other purpose (as countermeasure to long list of PC easy compromises).

In the late 90s, there was EU effort to come up with external hardened box ... that provided secure end-to-end integrity ... especially for financial (attached to PC ... but used PC more like intermediate router) ... as countermeasure to long list of how PCs get compromised (what happened to those efforts is another story, when they were imploding, we sponsored meeting in Redmond with major stakeholders to reverse things, but it was too late). past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#finread

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Attack SS Entitlements

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Attack SS Entitlements
Date: 26 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
Congress have passed some (unfunded) social benefit acts where the benefits are taken from the SS Trust Fund (even when people haven't paid in or related to retirement). Although a small percentage ... congress can now turn around and claim some SS is being used for Entitlements ... but that could be considered just part of congressional duplicity. The much larger problem is congress has borrowed everything out of the SS Trust fund ... and are acting more and more like they don't want to have to pay it back ... lots of this other rhetoric is just misdirection and obfuscation wanting to default on what they borrowed from SS Trust fund.

Baby Boomer (birth bubble) generation was 4times larger than the previous generation and twice as large as the following generation. During baby boomer prime working years, they were paying in much more each year than was being paid out in benefits to earlier generations. As baby boomers retire they will be expecting benefits from the priniciple built up during their working years ... but congress has looted the Trust fund and will have to heavily tax the following generation to pay it back (or figure out some slight of hand to not pay it back).

I've known people who have never worked and got benefits classified as disabled for drug and/or alcohol abuse. Checking online, it says that 1996 law prohibits classifying somebody as disabled if the drug/acohol abuse is "material" factor causing the disability (but that seems to be rather loose).

SSDI requires some work, for 30-40yr olds, requires at least one quarter/year for last ten years (paying FICA), for younger, it is adjusted based on how long they have been of "working age" and for older, it is adjusted because they may not be "employable".

Two trust funds, old-age retirement (OASI) and disability insurance (DI), but I've never seen the differentiation in accounting for the trust fund
https://www.ssa.gov/.../press/factsheets/WhatAreTheTrust.htm

this says that the two funds were combined in 1957 ... possibly enabling skimming disability benefits from retirement fund. There is comment that the US Treasury has credited the trust fund for disability benefit payments to (some of the) uncovered people.
https://www.ssa.gov/oact/progdata/funds.html

this says SSI is paid out of general fund, not trust fund (and no work requirements)
https://www.ssa.gov/ssi/

some might also use the SSI "entitlement" to justify attacking SS retirement

recent posts mentioning SS trust fund:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#22 I Feel Old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#44 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#25 SS Trust Fund
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#23 How Generation Y is paying the price for baby boomer pensions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#88 Goldman Slammed With $5.1 Billion Fine For "Serious Misconduct" In Mortgage Selling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#54 Social Security Trust Fund IOUs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#91 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#65 old Western Union Telegraph Company advertising
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#101 Chain of Title: How Three Ordinary Americans Uncovered Wall Street's Great Foreclosure Fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#95 Social Security Trust Fund
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#37 GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#61 GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#63 GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#90 GOP Announces Privatization Of Medicare And The Details Are TERRIFYING
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#91 Your Social Security cuts are already on the way

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Multitasking question

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Multitasking question
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 27 Dec 2016 10:54:32 -0800
0000000433f07816-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UA.EDU (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
Further, with UNIX shared memory and the older CSA and LPA a single page, possibly executable, can be mapped into multiple address spaces. It better be reentrant.

The address ranges wouldn't need to be identical if the code were location independent. This may have been a goal of the S/360 designers, never exploited in OS/360 software.


os/360 relocation adcons became fixed when executable was loaded into storage before execution.

tss/360 did implement location independent executable images (where same image could be mapped simultaneously into different virtual address spaces at different locations.

when i did page-mapped filesystem for (cp67/)cms in the early 70s, I also implemented location independent support ... but CMS primarily used OS/360 assembler/compile/loader conventions (with relocatable adcons that got fixed at load time, rather than the tss/360 model) ... I frequently had to significantly massage os/360 "generated" code to make it location independent. I then ported the support to vm370/cms ... and a very small subset was included in vm370 release 3, w/o the paged map filesystem and the location independent support.

past posts mentioning horrible contortions I sometimes had to resort to in order to have location independent code.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

I would say that when I did the CMS page-mapped filesystem ... I avoided doing all the things that I saw tss/360 had done wrong (from performance stand point, it did do the location independent correctly). Possibly one of the reasons that the full page-mapped stuff wasn't included in vm370 release 3 was because the (failed) FS effort had pretty much adopted the tss/360 model ... and "page-mapped" got such a bad reputation with the FS failure ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

even tho I could show my cms page-mapped filesystem had 3-4 times the throughput of the native cms filesystem (both original and EDF). some past filesystem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

other trivia, something similar also shows up at the time of decision to migrate all 370 to virtual memory ... recent post mentioning major motivation was the horrible MVT storage management.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#98 A Christmassy PL/I tale

Simpson (from HASP), rather than going to gburg as part of HASP/JES group ... went to Hawthorne and did "RASP" ... a MFT2 based implementation supporting a (os/360 oriented) paged-map filesystem ... which showed some of the advantages for (os/360 based) virtual memory systems.

When it wasn't picked up, he left IBM and joined a clone processor maker ... where he re-implemented RASP from scratch.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Multitasking question

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Multitasking question
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 27 Dec 2016 17:57:31 -0800
0000000433f07816-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UA.EDU (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
Decades ago, I had experimented with similar techniques, even so far as paired +- RLDs. In the course of that, I discovered that CMS obeys its own rules. If I had unresolved WXTRN + absolute offset, it got relocated anyway because CMS assumed the nonzero result meant the WXTRN was resolved.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#98 A Christmassy PL/I tale
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#101 Multitasking question

part of the issue was that CMS had a 64kbyte os/360 system services simulation implementation. With the introduction of MVS ... and its 8mbyte kernel image ... there was a joke that CMS 64kbyte os/360 system services simulation was significantly more effective than the MVS 8mbyte os/360 system services simulation.

In the mid-70s, somebody in the burlington vm370/cms development group did a rewrite increasing the size to approx 128kbyte os/360 system services simulation ... with lots more feature/function compatibility (including read/write os/360 disks supporting file access methods).

However this was about the time that Future System was failing and the mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipelines ... including kicking off 3033, 3081/xa and mvs/xa. the head of POK tells corporate that he needs vm370 product killed and all the people moved to POK or otherwise he won't be able to ship mvs/xa on schedule (this is still mid-70s). All the enhancements not already shipped ... disappear in the shutdown of the burlington site.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

They were not planning on telling the burlington group until shortly before the shutdown goes into effect, to minimize the number of people that could escape the move. Unfortunately(?) the shutdown leaks several months early and lots manage to escape (there was joke that the head of POK is one of the major contributors to DEC vax/vms) ... and then there was witchhunt to find who leaked the information ... fortunately, nobody gave me up.

Endicott finally managed to save the vm370 product mission ... but they had to reconstitute a development group from scratch ... and Endicott was much more interested in providing dos/vs system service simulation (than os/360 system services simulation)

lots of past post about location independent code and fighting RLDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

other multitasking tivia: charlie had invented compare&swap (chosen because CAS are his initials) ... while doing fine-grain cp67 multiprocessor locking at science center ... some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

attempting to get compre&swap added to 370 was repulsed because the POK favorite son operating system people said that test&set (from 360/65MP) was more than sufficient. 370 architecture owners said that in order to add compare&swap to 370, uses other than SMP kernel locking was needed. Thus was born the application multitasking/multithreaded examples that still are included in appendix of POO. This was picked by large mulithreaded/multitasking subsystems like DBMSes (IMS, DB2, etc).

In the 80s, other platforms started adding compare&swap instructions (or instructions with semantics similar to compare&swap) ... as part of supporting large commercial DBMS. Platforms w/o compare&swap semantics had to use kernel calls with significantly higher overhead.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minimum Wage

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Minimum Wage
Date: 27 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
in the late 90s, congress asked GAO do a study of effect of paying workers below living wage ... GAO report found it cost (city/state/federal) govs. avg $10K/worker/year .... basically worked out to an indirect gov. subsidy to their employers. The interesting thing is that it has been almost 20yrs since that report ... and no congress this century have asked the GAO to update the study.
http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?HEHS-95-133
some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#18 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#24 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#2 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?

the (2002) congress is also responsible for letting fiscal responsibility act lapse (couldn't spend more than tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal dept, courtesy of 90s congress). 2010 CBO report had 2003-2009, tax revenue cut was $6T and spending increased $6T, for $12T gap compared to fiscal responsibility budget. By 2005, the U.S. Comptroller General was including in speeches that nobody in congress was capable of middle school arithmetic (for what they were doing to the budget). Since then, taxes haven't been restored and only modest cuts in spending, so debt continues to increase. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

all part of congress this century considered most corrupt institution on earth.

In 1992, AMEX spun off a lot of its dataprocessing in the largest IPO up until that time as FDC. FDC then looked at acquiring Western Union, but backed out because it was doing poorly ... however it later got WU anyway (which was still doing poorly) in merger with First Financial (had to divest MoneyGram as part of the deal) ... which was about the time of the GAO study (that also looked at illegal workers being paid less than minimum wage ... and how much they cost in gov. services, in effect significant more gov. subsidy to their employers). However, with the explosion in illegal workers (being paid less than minimum wage) after the start of the century, by 2005, WU had exploded to half of FDC's bottom line (at the time time, the other half of FDC was enormous outsourcing, including "soup-to-nuts" for over half of all credit cards in the US, issuing, statementing, transactions, callcenters, on&on). Possibly in part because President of Mexico invited FDC executives to Mexico to be thrown in jail (for how much they were making off all the illegal workers), FDC then spun off WU. Claim is one of the reasons that the corrupt congress this century ignored the problem (including not asking for update of the GAO report) was because of heavy lobbying by industries that effectively get the indirect gov. subsidies being allowed to pay less than minimum & living wage.

But the industry lobbying dominated ... turning blind eye to enormous explosion in illegal workers that occurred after the start of the century and being paid less than minimum wage.

There is book written how (national) chamber of commerce became the center of it around the turn of the century ... and it got so bad that local chapters started divorcing themselves from the national organization.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NDTUDHA/
some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#38 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#102 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#18 Qbasic

minimum wage has been used for different purposes at different times ... however recently this shows that minium wage has not only not kept pace with cost of living ... has actually declined in terms of real dollars (sometimes story is being spinned to obfuscate fundamental issues)
http://bebusinessed.com/history/history-of-minimum-wage/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minimum_wage_in_the_United_States

corresponds to this that real wages have remained flat since 1980 ... while productivity has gone up significant (the increasing difference being siphoned off).
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

Even more was siphoned off with enormous explosion in illegal workers last decade, being paid not only less than living wage ... but also less than minimum wage (demonstrated with the explosion in WU revenue between 2000 & 2005 from illegal workers sending paychecks home) ... and then from 90s GAO report (not being updated is strong indication of lobbying pressure) ... gov. services were increasingly necessary to cover the widening gap (effectively indirect gov. subsidy for many industries).

The tens of millions in illegal workers since the start of the century is far more of impact on jobs for working poor than any minimum wage issue

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

PC Compromise and Internet Transactions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: PC Compromise and Internet Transactions
Date: 27 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#99 PC Compromise and Internet Transactions

Turn of the century, lots of financial institutions were starting to add chips to their magstripe cards ... for both home/internet use as well as point of sale. Because of various missteps, they floundered/failed with all traces of the efforts evaporated ... and the prediction was it would be a long time before it would be tried again.

One of the major internet-oriented chip efforts involved the distribution of free chip readers by major financial institution ... however they must have gotten a fire sale on obsolete serial-port readers for the free distribution and the resulting customer support problems were a disaster ... creating a rapidly spreading opinion throughout the financial industry that chipcards weren't practical for home use (and the whole US industry dropping similar efforts). We then sponsored a meeting in Redmond to try and reverse the situation, members of the kernel security group, what was left of PC/SC people that we could find and several financial institutions ... but it was too late.

The "funny" thing in the upthread reference about the mid-90s financial industry meetings regarding moving consumer dialup online banking to the internet, at the top of the list about customer support problems/costs with proprietary dialup infrastructure was serial-port dialup modems. All the financial institutional knowledge about serial-port customer support problems had evaporated in a period of 5yrs.

During the same period there was large US pilot to deploy point-of-sale chipcard that had originated in Europe. Unfortunately this was in its "YES CARD" vulnerability period (one description that they spent billions of dollars to prove that chipcards are less secure than magstripe cards). Before deployment, I tried to convince them of the problems ... but they were so myopically focused on lost/stolen card problem, they were oblivious to some greater threats. That effort also evaporated w/o a trace and there was also prediction that it would be a long time before it was tried again. Old trip report from cartes2002 (gone 404 but lives on at the wayback machine), at the bottom mentions it is as easy to clone a "YES CARD" as a magstripe card and has worse fraud.
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html
"Yes card" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

A combination of both deployment failures heavily influenced the industry to back away. After 15yrs, the point-of-sale is finally being tried again, however the chip design/operation isn't useful for the internet.

Disclaimer: when they complained that the chips could cost tens of dollars, took several seconds to tens of seconds for transaction ... I designed a chip that was more secure, cost less than a dollar, and could do the most secure transaction in 1/10th sec. when they complained that issuing/deployment cost too much, I designed a person-centric secure infrastructure (as opposed to institutional-centric infrastructure where every institution issues their own card) where a single card could be used for all authentication (the same secure trusted card could be used for secure bldg. entry, point-of-sale financial transactions for all financial institutions, and for all online operations). lots of patents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadssummary.htm
refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

We were tangentially involved in the cal state data breach notification act ... having been brought in to help wordsmith some legislation where privacy organizations were heavily involved. They had done extensive public surveys and the number one issue were fraudulent financial transactions as the result of breaches and little or nothing was being done. The problem turns out that normally institutions take security measures in self interest ... but in these situations, the institutions weren't at risk, it was the public. It was hoped that the publicity from the notifications might prompt corrective action.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

trivia ... an industry standard was developed shortly after the Cal. data breach notification act ... and a federal (preemption) data breach notification bill was introduced (didn't pass) that almost totally eliminated all cases for notification ... in part justified on having the industry standard.

For a long time the industry joke about lots of cases of breaches for institutions that had "standard" certification ... the "industry standard" primarily represented revenue for those doing certification and certification would be revoked if you had a breach (and purpose of the industry standard was to get a breach notification act passed that eliminated the notification requirement).

Note in financial industry, there are frequent situations in dispute between consumer and the institutions ... that if the institution is following standard, the burden of proof is on the consumer ... while if the institution isn't following standard, the burden of proof falls on the institution. When financial chipcards were introduced in UK, legislation went into effect that placed burden of proof on the customer involving fraudulent financial transactions. I was contacted by legal representative in one such case ... where the bank couldn't find the surveillance video involving a (fraudulent) ATM transaction ... so the customer had no way of proving it wasn't him. If the burden of proof had been on the institution, the bank would have had to produce the surveillance video showing it was the customer.

posts mentioning "burden of proof"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm17.htm#59 dual-use digital signature vulnerability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm18.htm#0 dual-use digital signature vulnerability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm18.htm#55 MD5 collision in X509 certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm19.htm#33 Digital signatures have a big problem with meaning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm20.htm#0 the limits of crypto and authentication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm21.htm#35 [Clips] Banks Seek Better Online-Security Tools
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#14 Shifting the Burden - legal tactics from the contracts world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#33 Chip-and-Pin terminals were replaced by "repairworkers"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#60 crypto component services - is there a market?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#63 Public key encrypt-then-sign or sign-then-encrypt?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#38 The Trouble with Threat Modelling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#nonreput Sender and receiver non-repudiation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#terror7 [FYI] Did Encryption Empower These Terrorists?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay10.htm#72 Invisible Ink, E-signatures slow to broadly catch on
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#57 RealNames hacked. Firewall issues.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#34 does CA need the proof of acceptance of key binding ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#59 PKI/Digital signature doesn't work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#62 PKI/Digital signature doesn't work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#69 Digital signature
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#17 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#41 xml-security vs. native security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#6 Creating certs for others (without their private keys)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#11 Question about authentication protocols
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#26 How good is TEA, REALLY?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#42 Catch22. If you cannot legally be forced to sign a document etc - Tax Declaration etc etc etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#32 When *not* to sign an e-mail message?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#8 Beginner's Pubkey Crypto Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#28 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#23 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#67 open source voting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#62 Solving password problems one at a time, Re: The password-reset paradox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#52 Credit cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#71 Sophisticated cybercrooks cracking bank security efforts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#72 Why don't people use certificate-based access authentication?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#1 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#3 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#21 Credit card data security: Who's responsible?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#24 Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#47 Industry groups leap to Chip and PIN's defence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#63 Wal-Mart to support smartcard payments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#7 taking down the machine - z9 series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#82 Five Theses on Security Protocols
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#77 towards https everywhere and strict transport security (was: Has there been a change in US banking regulations recently?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#60 A Two Way Non-repudiation Contract Exchange Scheme
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#71 Password shortcomings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#62 Gordon Gekko Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#35 The Conceptual ATM program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#8 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#38 regulation,bridges,streams
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#52 U.S. agents 'got lucky' pursuing accused Russia master hackers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#90 copyright protection/Doug Englebart
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#17 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#20 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#58 US a laggard in adopting more secure credit cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#60 Target Offers Free Credit Monitoring Following Security Breach
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#69 Why is the US a decade behind Europe on 'chip and pin' cards?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#67 Sale receipt--obligatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#43 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#39 LA Times commentary: roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#65 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#6 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#7 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#17 Credit card fraud solution coming to America...finally

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Multitasking question

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Multitasking question
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:04:20 -0800
0000000433f07816-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UA.EDU (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
If by "more effective" one means that CMS produced incorrect results faster than OS produced correct results ...

And OS emulation I/O ignored Length Indicate reported by CP.

And OS emulation failed to count the 4-byte RDW for RECFM=VB.

... but that made it plenty fast.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#98 A Christmassy PL/I tale
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#101 Multitasking question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#102 Multitasking question

fixed in the 128kbyte version ... unfortunately, head of POK killed VM370 product and had all the work destroyed before it shipped, Endicott eventually managed to resurrected the VM370 product (and had to build new development group from scratch) but they were much more interested in doing dos/vs system services ... than going back and trying to fix up the os/360 system services (especially when POK and POK favorite son operating system people were working so hard to kill vm370)

the folklore about the primary reason that POK got back into virtual machines (at all) was that customers weren't migrating from MVS to MVS/XA like they were suppose to, ... so POK started back again with virtual machines .... supposedly just for migration aid for helping customers transitioning from MVS to MVS/XA (*NO* cms interest).

then when one of the clone vendors came out with hardware hypervisor (virtual machine subset in hardware) ... it took POK quite some time to respond with LPAR (on 3090). Funny thing was that several years before, I had worked with endicott to ship all entry&mid-range machines with virtual machine subset support built in ... but it was veto'ed by POK (part of their ongoing campaign to kill off virtual machines).

primary blame for lack of better os/360 simulation in CMS lies with the MVS organization.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minimum Wage

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Minimum Wage
Date: 28 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#100 Attack SS Entitlements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#103 Minimum Wage

and funniest darn thing ... this just shows up

The New Normal 'Safety Net': Surging Disability Benefits Claims
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-12-27/new-normal-safety-net-surging-disability-benefits-claims

and story about (national) chamber of commerce still at it

Election Losses Don't Stop Corporate Efforts to Block Voter-Approved Minimum Wage Hikes
http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/38874-election-losses-don-t-stop-corporate-efforts-to-block-voter-approved-minimum-wage-hikes

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minimum Wage

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Minimum Wage
Date: 29 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#100 Attack SS Entitlements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#103 Minimum Wage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#106 Minimum Wage

conventional wisdom has minimum wage for teenagers, entry level, no/unskilled, no experience

what we know

minimum wage hasn't kept pace with inflation

before 2000, congress was interested in fiscal responsibility budget (spending not exceed taxes) and reliable (GAO) reports on minimum wage, illegal workers, working poor

after 2000, somebody is spending huge amount on expensive lobbying at city, state, and federal level regarding large tax cuts & loopholes, large spending increases, minimum wage, illegal workers, and working poor

after 2000, congress is no longer interested in fiscal responsibility budget (allowing fiscal responsibility act to expire in 2002, cutting taxes at $1T/yr and increased spending at $1T/yr for $12T deficit through 2009, since 2009 spending cut back but taxes not restored so deficit continues to increase around $1T/yr), no longer interested in reliable reports on minimum wage, illegal workers, working poor, etc.

after 2000, there was explosion in bringing in illegal workers at less then minimum wage, based on explosion in WU revenue from fees on illegal workers sending wages home

after 2000, there was drop in legal workers as percent of legal population

with spending having been cut and taxes haven't been restored, to eliminate the $1T/yr defict, start would be to restore taxes to the fiscal responsibility budget level. But that won't fix the situation since interest on debt is now pushing half trillion/yr. Just restoring the $1T/yr taxes to the fiscal responsibility budget level won't be enough, taxes would have to be increased by another $1T/yr ($2T/yr more than now) to cover the debt interest and make payments on reducing the debt (still will take something like 40yrs). some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

hypothesis

the explosion in illegal workers brought in (at below minimum wage) since 2000 have taken over minimum wage jobs (teenagers, no/unskilled, no experience) and also account for the drop in legal workers (as percent of legal population).

large percentage of semi-skilled and working poor with experience have been reduced to minimum wage

which accounts for very significant financial interest in funding the expensive lobbying at city/state/federal level on minimum wage, illegal workers, and working poor (including faking and spinning news stories for obfuscation and misdirection)

a possible alternative spin on the sanctuary cities ... is entities bringing in the huge numbers of illegal workers and paying less than minimum wage hold the threat of INS & deportation over their heads

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minimum Security Required

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Minimum Security Required
Date: 29 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
On the news today, somebody raised the question whether there was sufficient security and countermeasures in lots of breaches that have been in the news.

In the early 80s, IBM brought a lawsuit for several billion dollars against a clone disk maker for theft of proprietary information. Judge ruled that lawsuit can't proceed unless IBM could demonstrate that it had security measures/protection proportional to claimed value. Basically people can't be held responsible for taking attractive target (that didn't have sufficient security) somewhat akin to requiring fences around swimming pools to prevent children wandering in ("attractive nuisance"). posts mentioning security proportional to risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proportional.to.risk

This would show up in the Chinese making off with whole raft of classified details compromising high priority weapons system and Russian breaches of numerous targets.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/confidential-report-lists-us-weapons-system-designs-compromised-by-chinese-cyberspies/2013/05/27/a42c3e1c-c2dd-11e2-8c3b-0b5e9247e8ca_story.html

I was tangentially involved in the cal. state breach notification act ... having been brought in to help wordsmith legislation. The issue was there appeared to be little or nothing being done about fraudulent financial transactions as a result of breaches. The issue in this case was that normally that entities take security measures in self-protection. In the case of these breaches, the institution wasn't at risk; it was their customers and the public. It was hoped that the publicity from notifications might prompt corrective action. posts mentioning data breach notification
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

posts mentioning IBM lawsuit & judge required demonstration of security measures proportional to value at risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#42 IBM was/is: Imitation...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#8 Security Proportional to Risk (was: IBM Mainframe at home)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#48 Speaking of Gerstner years
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#60 Where should the type information be: in tags and descriptors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#7 DDJ Article on "Secure" Dongle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#41 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006q.html#36 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#29 Intel abandons USEnet news
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#25 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#26 Tap and faucet and spellcheckers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#5 Greed - If greed was the cause of the global meltdown then why does the biz community appoint those who so easily succumb to its temptations?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#24 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#4 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#71 CROOKS and NANNIES: what would Boyd do?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#26 Microminiaturized Modules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#82 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#28 Computer virus strikes US Marshals, FBI affected
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#29 Online Computer Conferencing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#71 Trade Secrets and Confidential Information
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#42 Intelligence and foreign policy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#72 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#25 Economic espionage discussed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#58 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#26 Julian Assange - Hero or Villain
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#10 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#82 What Makes Economic History Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#45 U.S. agents 'got lucky' pursuing accused Russia master hackers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#46 Feds indict indentity theft ring
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#32 Surveillance Reform Theater
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#67 We Must Stop The Race to Attribution After Each Cyberattack

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minimum Wage

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Minimum Wage
Date: 30 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#100 Attack SS Entitlements
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#103 Minimum Wage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#106 Minimum Wage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#107 Minimum Wage

Part of obfuscating and misdirection on this issue is to cherry pick anecdotal stories ... that aren't statistically significant.

I was once challenged on 18-wheeler road-use gas tax should be at least $40-$50/gallon and near zero for everybody else. The basic scenario was that it would be extremely disruptive to the current trucking industry ... which has established economic niche that is subsidized by road-use gas tax being equal for all kinds of vehicles. However, road wear&tear is near zero for all vehicles except for 18-wheel heavy trucks and roads are designed based on projected 18-wheeler heavy truck axle-ton mile load lifetime use.

603.1 Introduction

The primary goal of the design of the pavement structural section is to provide a structurally stable and durable pavement and base system which, with a minimum of maintenance, will carry the projected traffic loading for the designated design period. This topic discusses the factors to be considered and procedures to be followed in developing a projection of truck traffic for design of the "pavement structure" or the structural section for specific projects.

Pavement structural sections are designed to carry the projected truck traffic considering the expanded truck traffic volume, mix, and the axle loads converted to 80 kN equivalent single axle loads (ESAL's) expected to occur during the design period. The effects on pavement life of passenger cars, pickups, and two-axle trucks are considered to be negligible.

Traffic information that is required for structural section design includes axle loads, axle configurations, and number of applications. The results of the AASHO Road Test (performed in the early 1960's in Illinois) have shown that the damaging effect of the passage of an axle load can be represented by a number of 80 kN ESAL's. For example, one application of a 53 kN single axle load was found to cause damage equal to an application of approximately 0.23 of an 80 kN single axle load, and four applications of a 53 kN single axle were found to cause the same damage (or reduction in serviceability) as one application of an 80 kN single axle.


... snip ...

past posts quoting above reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#41 Transportation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#42 Transportation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#56 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#59 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#60 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#61 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#62 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#0 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#76 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The top 50 hospitals that gouge patients the most

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The top 50 hospitals that gouge patients the most
Date: 31 Dec 2016
Blog: Facebook
The top 50 hospitals that gouge patients the most
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/health/hospital-price-gouging/

there have been a number of articles about private-equity moving into health care, buying up hospitals, primary care practices, etcs ... similar to how they victimize other industries ... this is article comparing it to house-flipping ... but since they put the loan on the victim company's books ... they can even sell-off for less than they paid ... and still walk away with boat-loads of money (over half corporate defaults are victims that are currently or previously in the private-equity mill)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

The intelligence community and huge uptic in outsourcing to beltway bandits last decade ... part of it is companies can't use money from gov. contracts to lobby congress ... but private equity companies can lobby on behalf of the beltway bandits they bought up. For intelligence community, 70% of the budget and over half the people have been outsourced.

Slight IBM content, after 90s CEO left IBM, he went on to head up one of the major private-equity companies involved in buying up beltway bandits ... including the one that employed Snowden. The beltway bandits are under intense pressure to cut corners and provide money to their private-equity owners, security clearances were outsourced to private-equity subsidiaries that were found to be filling out the paperwork ... but not actually doing the background checks.
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

For a long time, up through at least last decade, sensitive operations required multi-party operations as countermeasure to insider threats ... (at least in Snowden case) seems to have been abandoned by private-equity subsidiaries

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Definition of "dense code"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Definition of "dense code"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2016 11:48:06 -0800
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
Has the definition of "dense code" changed over the years?

there is code-size to better fit in caches.

Optimizing code-size with the GNU gcc compiler for STM32 and other ARM Cortex-M targets
http://blog.atollic.com/optimizing-code-size-with-the-gnu-gcc-compiler-for-stm32-and-other-arm-cortex-m-targets
Reducing Code Size on ARM/Thumb processors
http://www.simplemachines.it/doc/ARM_COMBO_ap01.html
Difference between size of binaries - x86_64 vs ARM
http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/254418/difference-between-size-of-binaries-x86-64-vs-arm

this used to be an issue in days gone by with code fitting in real memory sizes, code organization that work well in virtual paged environment, and/or fit in virtual address space size.

at the science center in the early 70s, there was work on application that analyzed programs and did semi-automated reorganization to better improve throughput in virtual paged environment (it was used by a lot of internal development groups as part of moving from os/360 to VS1 & VS2). This was released to customers in the later half of 70s as VS/Repack.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

Internally there was large fortran program developed for chip design. It started out being hosted on MVS ... in the days when it had 16mbyte virtual address space for every application. However since OS/360 APIs were primarily pointer-pass paradigm, a 8mbyte image of the MVS kernel occupied every 16mbyte virtual address space. Then because subsystems were moved to their own virtual address space, it created a huge problem in the pointer-passing API between applications and subsystems. Solution was "common segment", a one mbyte segment that (also) occupied every virtual address space (leaving only 7mbyte for application use) that was used to allocate space for API parameter calls ... so a pointer could be passed from application and subsystem. However, common requirement size turned out to be proportional to number of subsystems, number of concurrent applications and size of system ... by 3033 time, common area requirement (that allocated in virtual address space) was frequently 5-6mbytes (leaving 2mbytes for application use) ... and threatening to increase to 8mbytes (leaving nothing for application use). The critical chip design program required specially created dedicated MVS that only had a single 1mbyte common area ... but the chip-design program was still constantly bumping its head against the 7mbyte size limitation. The proposal was to move it to vm370/cms environment where it would have nearly the full 16mbytes (less about 128kbyes).

dense has also been used to refer to tight, something being implemented optimally in the fastest, fewest instructions possible (although things like unrolling loops trades off size for efficiency).

6.2 Speed-space tradeoffs
http://lampwww.epfl.ch/~fsalvi/docs/gcc/www.network-theory.co.uk/docs/gccintro/gccintro_40.html

3.10 Options That Control Optimization
https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-3.4.4/gcc/Optimize-Options.html

-O2 Optimize even more. GCC performs nearly all supported optimizations that do not involve a space-speed tradeoff. The compiler does not perform loop unrolling or function inlining when you specify -O2.

past posts mentioning vs/repack
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#7 IBM 7090 (360s, 370s, apl, etc)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#68 The Melissa Virus or War on Microsoft?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#30 Could CDR-coding be on the way back?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#83 Z/90, S/390, 370/ESA (slightly off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#31 database (or b-tree) page sizes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#33 database (or b-tree) page sizes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#20 Very CISC Instuctions (Was: why the machine word size ...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#28 OS Workloads : Interactive etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#45 cp/67 addenda (cross-post warning)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#46 cp/67 addenda (cross-post warning)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#49 Swapper was Re: History of Login Names
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#50 IBM going after Strobe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#50 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#15 Alpha performance, why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#21 "Super-Cheap" Supercomputing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#53 Alpha performance, why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#15 Disk capacity and backup solutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#8 IBM says AMD dead in 5yrs ... -- Microsoft Monopoly vs. IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#32 Language semantics wrt exploits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004.html#14 Holee shit! 30 years ago!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#21 PSW Sampling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#22 Lock-free algorithms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#55 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#7 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#73 Athlon cache question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#76 Athlon cache question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#4 Athlon cache question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#41 Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#48 Secure design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#15 Exceptions at basic block boundaries
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#62 More on garbage collection
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#17 More on garbage collection
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#28 IBM's mini computers--lack thereof
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#18 Code density and performance?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#5 Code density and performance?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#15 {SPAM?} Re: Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#23 Seeking Info on XDS Sigma 7 APL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#20 About TLB in lower-level caches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#46 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006i.html#37 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#18 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#22 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#24 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#11 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#23 Strobe equivalents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#26 Cache-Size vs Performance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#12 Trying to design low level hard disk manipulation program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#1 IBM sues maker of Intel-based Mainframe clones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#16 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#31 Wylbur and Paging
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#55 Capacity and Relational Database
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#53 Virtual Storage implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#57 ACP/TPF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#41 Age of IBM VM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#24 Job ad for z/OS systems programmer trainee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#78 CPU time differences for the same job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#35 Interesting Mainframe Article: 5 Myths Exposed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#16 Kernels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#36 Object-relational impedence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#81 Intel: an expensive many-core future is ahead of us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#69 Speculation ONLY
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#65 APL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#48 Knuth Got It Wrong
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#81 Percentage of code executed that is user written was Re: Delete all members of a PDS that is allocated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#8 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#9 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#5 Memory v. Storage: What's in a Name?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#8 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#73 Execution Velocity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#20 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#82 printer history Languages influenced by PL/1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#19 Assembler vs. COBOL--processing time, space needed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#20 Assembler vs. COBOL--processing time, space needed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#62 Suggestions Appreciated for a Program Counter History Log
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#81 CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#71 assembler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#66 Messing Up the System/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#69 A New Performance Model ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#79 Limit number of frames of real storage per job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#92 ABO Automatic Binary Optimizer

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970







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