List of Archived Posts

2010 Newsgroup Postings (02/11 - 02/23)

PDS vs. PDSE
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
Queing theory paper
"Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked - PCWorld
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
PDS vs. PDSE
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
The origins of CICS
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Happy DEC-10 Day
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
PDS vs. PDSE
Chip and PIN is Broken!
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Credit card data security: Who's responsible?
OT: PC clock failure--CMOS battery?
Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
HONE & VMSHARE
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Michigan firm sues bank over theft of $560,000
Michigan firm sues bank over theft of $560,000
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
The origins of CICS
"Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Happy DEC-10 Day
Happy DEC-10 Day
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
Happy DEC-10 Day
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
What was old is new again (water chilled)
Happy DEC-10 Day
What was old is new again (water chilled)
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Industry groups leap to Chip and PIN's defence
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Happy DEC-10 Day
Happy DEC-10 Day
Happy DEC-10 Day
SWTL and 522
Happy DEC-10 Day
End of an Era
search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
LPARs: More or Less?
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
LPARs: More or Less?
LPARs: More or Less?
Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer
LPARs: More or Less?
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer
Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

PDS vs. PDSE

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: PDS vs. PDSE
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2010 09:24:58 -0500
John.McKown@HEALTHMARKETS.COM (McKown, John) writes:
Does anything other than S/360 derived systems even use CKD type DASD? PDS directories are built around CKD. And, in their day, moving the search logic out to the peripheral was probably a good idea.

basically traded-off lack of real storage (for indexes) for i/o resources (channel, controller, device) ... by the mid-70s, that trade-off had started to invert ... and multi-track searches for VTOC and PDS directories were the wrong thing. set-sector introduced in early 70s with 3330s, attempted to offset the channel/controller overhead for simple CKD searches ... but didn't help with the multi-track searches.

it was also somewhat seen in the discord between IMS group and system/r (original relational/sql) in the late 70s ... IMS pointing out that the implicit relational indexes consumed a lot more hardware resources ... and system/r pointing out that it eliminated a lot of IMS administrative care&management. The increasing amounts of real storage really started to tip the balance by the mid-80s ... allowing the relational indexes to be cached.

misc. past posts mentioning system/r
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

misc. past posts discussing the ckd/multi-track search trade-off changing by the mid-70s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

in the early 80s, the MVS group gave me a cost estimate of $26m to migrate off of CKD ... even if I gave them fully tested & integrated code (i.e. just cost for documentation and training). I could only use incremental sales for ROI business case ... and the claim was that customers would just buy the same amount of non-CKD as they were buying CKD (I couldn't use long-term corporate & customer life-cycle costs of continuing with CKD, I had to show $100m-$200m incremental sales).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2010 09:51:30 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
there have been numerous articles about overall general decline in STEM (science, technoloyg, engineering, match) and/or science & engineering. overall decline has been tied to declining position of the country in the world ... and programs to improve position tied to increasing enrollment and graduates. nsf stats on enrollment
http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#87 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

another indicator

Danger Signs for the Silicon Valley
http://www.internetnews.com/bus-news/article.php/3864391/Danger+Signs+for+the+Silicon+Valley.htm

from above:
The report also warned Silicon Valley is "disinvesting in education and we're not cultivating talent" and that a recommitment to investment in education is needed.

... snip ...

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2010 11:27:00 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

1971 Xerox PARC EARS (Ethernet, Alto, Research character generator,
Scanned laser output terminal) laser printer
1976 IBM 3800 mainframe datacentre (@ Woolworth)
1977 Xerox 9700 mainframe datacentre
1979 IBM 6670 departmental office (copier sized)
1982 Canon LBP-10 (desktop)
1984 HP LaserJet
1985 Apple LaserWriter


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#69 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#74 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#85 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore.

misc. more on laser printers

Date: 09/05/79 08:35:28
From: wheeler
Subject: 6670 printer for building 15.

Research is planning on ordering a 6670. Somebody from 6670 group will be here either today or tomorrow to talk about device. Also STL already has 6670 installed and somebody down there has down some expanded programming support for it. Files can be processed by SCRIPT/VS specifying that the output is going to a 3800. STL has written a post processor to convert 3800 controls to 6670. Also 6670 has font change capability (BOLD, highlighted, others, etc -- but EXTENDED FONT feature must be explicitly ordered -- STL's post processesor supports this extended FONT capability). Font change capability is analogous to different type balls on selectric


... snip ... top of post, old email index.

... google has "The Times-News - May 2, 1979" newspaper image with artile "'Intelligent' Printers Enter Copying Market"
http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1665&dat=19790502&id=4F8aAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0CQEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6970,256327

old vmshare reference:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/browse?fn=66705700&ft=MEMO

from above:
Renamed on 10/07/81 15:44:49 by $B2

Need a comparison of the Xerox 5700 and IBM 6670.

We (at MITRE) would very much like to get a 6670, and have money for such a device in our new budget. However, our Purchasing Department is going to insist that we go out on competitive bid for the device, unless we can show them just cause why not.... Has anyone done a comparison of the 6670 and the 5700? Or does anyone have justification for preferring a 6670 over a 5700?


... snip ...

then there are number of posts in the above comparing 5700 & 6670

and another from vmshare

http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/browse?fn=6670&ft=MEMO

from above:
Created on 01/30/81 17:30:01 by MTW

Discussion of 6670 Information Distributor

This device is a cross between a copying machine and an RJE device - with communications options, it can impersonate a 2770 and talk to VM via RSCS. It is mentioned in about 6 files here that haven't been updated for a while, but which include a lot of statements like "we're looking at" or "we're going to get". Did anyone? Is anyone using one with VM? How is it? How do you prepare the OCL (Operator Control Language) magnetic control cards? Etc.... Gabe


... snip ...

Then there is thread discussing XEROX 2700 started 12/12/83:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/browse?fn=X2700&ft=MEMO

and xerox history from this site:
http://landley.net/history/mirror/timelines/xeroxparchist.html

from above:
The Xerox 9700 Electronic Printing System, the first xerographic laser printer product, is released. The 9700, a direct descendent from the original PARC "EARS" printer which pioneered in laser scanning optics, character generation electronics, and page-formatting software, is the first product on the market to be enabled by PARC research. Electronic printing enables seamlessly transferring digital documents into the paper domain, and changes the entire notion of documents and document processing.

... snip ...

later mentions the 9700 laster printer was then released in 1980

and from computer history museum:

Birth of the Laser Printer
http://www.computerhistory.org/events/lectures/starkweather_03251997/starkweather_xscript.shtml

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2010 13:51:08 -0500
Patrick Scheible <kkt@zipcon.net> writes:
This has been happening for decades. Silicon valley is where it is because of a large educated population, which is there because of Berkeley and Stanford and the several Cal State colleges. At UC and Cal State, tuition was free or cheap, and it was a great investment in the future of the state. Tuition in the state colleges started becoming a significant cost in 1970, under governor Reagan, and now tuition is so high they are effectively private schools. They are killing the goose that layed the golden egg.

Prescient article from 1970 by a California state senator:

http://thebackbench.blogspot.com/2007/08/tuition-at-university-of-california.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#87 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#1 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

a big factor was stanford in the palo alto area (professors, graduates and students).

there were articles in the early 90s that half of the technology related advanced degress from institutions of higher learning (in california) were going to foreign born. the articles referenced tipping point that it wouldn't take much for graduates to return home (improvements at home, and any decline in US opportunity) ... as well as students starting to attend non-US institutions. it was also this foreign population that played major roles in the internet/technology expansion in the later half of the 90s.

for state institutions ... foreign tuition was significant goldmine ... helping subsidize in-state tuition. I've been told that signing a single foreign student at overseas recruiting fair ... more than paid the expense of sending univ. staff on the recruiting trip. with more foreign students going elsewhere ... that just added to the worsening budget situation at state institutions.

there have been various articles that the deline of california education (at all levels) started with Prop 13 (that doesn't account for US tied for first in $$/student, but US education at or near the bottom of industrial countries)

also in the 90s ... there were articles that many states getting near bankruptcy ... and playing all sorts of games with not funding various and sundry stuff. example was that various of the state funded universities (midwest, west, farwest, etc), anticipating the increasing budget constraints, had shifted from 90% of the univ. budget coming from state legislature to 12% of the univ. budget coming from state legislature.

slightly related (comp.arch) post mentioning in the late 60s, farwest univ datacenter got it changed how they were funded
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#89 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
and other posts in above thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#90 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#91 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#92 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2010 14:24:52 -0500
Larry__Weiss <lfw@airmail.net> writes:
The "Cloud Computing" idea also overlaps with what was called in the 1960's "The Information Utility" or "The Computer Utility".

for the fun of it ...
http://www.google.com/search?q=%22information+utility%22+history&hl=en&lr=lang_en&num=100&tbs=tl:1&tbo=u&ei=bFV0S8iqDYjj8QbilZ2nCg&sa=X&oi=timeline_result&ct=title&resnum=101&ved=0CLQCEOcCMGQ

in the late 60s ... there were a few spin-offs that did online (virtual machine) cp67 timesharing service bureaus. some of them relatively quickly moved up the value stream ... specializing in online financial information (in addition to generalized time-sharing).

Slightly related to the current financial mess ... is one of them acquired the pricing services division from a rating agency in the early 70s. In the congressional hearings into the role that the rating agencies played in the current mess ... it was stated that the seeds were sown in the early 70s when the rating agencies switched from the buyers paying for the ratings to the sellers paying for the ratings (opening things up for conflict of interest). In the most recent events, the testimony was that both the rating agencies and the sellers knew that the (asset-backed) CDOs (approx. $27T total during the period) weren't worth triple-A ratings ... but the sellers were paying for the triple-A ratings (and got them). This enormously increased the magnitude of the problem (lots of institutions buying the instruments that wouldn't otherwise have touched them; the sellers than being able to enormously increase the number of no-down, no-documentation, 1% interest-only ARM mortgages ... w/o regard to buyers qualifications or loan quality; speculators snapping them up since the carrying cost was much less than real-estate inflation rate in many parts of the country).

So some possible scenario that if the sellers were paying for the ratings ... they no longer needed a pricing services division (to do valuations on the instrument). A year ago ... there was short blurb that the institution (that had bought the pricing services division in the early 70s) was helping value the toxic assets for purchase by TARP funds (this is before feds. realized that the allocated TARP funds would hardly make a dent in the total amount of toxic assets ... and had to invent some other use for the funds).

misc. past posts discussing some of these timesharing operations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2010 16:11:49 -0500
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
But what was *really* bad is the the buyers probably knew also, but their job and bonus depended on them buying the junk anyway. No body wanted a fellow with a social disease like ethics.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#4 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC

a lot of the parties, all along the value chain were getting a percentage of the size of each transaction (not just bonus) ... motivation to ignore what it might do to the institution, economy, and/or country (lots of parties taking percentage of that $27T when securitized ... if left as ordinary loans/mortgages ... there would have just been getting bonus based on performance of the loan).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Queing theory paper

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Queing theory paper
Newsgroups: sci.crypt
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 01:14:32 -0500
David Lesher <wb8foz@panix.com> writes:
Given a bank, zupermarket, Post Office, etc with n cashiers|clerks and n customers waiting; I believe the folks who really understand the math state the most efficient scheme is a single queue with the next up going to the open clerk. (Efficient == max customers/hour) Correct?

Banks, post offices and most other places went that way ~~25 years ago. But supermarkets have resisted. I got into a discussion with a friend over same. He denies that single queue is best; I insist the grocery chains don't use it because, among other reasons, they WANT you stuck there where the high profit candy and gossip mags are.

So I'm seeking cites to papers re: queuing, that I can show him. It would help if at least the extract was readable by laymen.


shortest job first maximizes thruput ... it also improves human experience ... because people with less work (or fewer items) also expect it to take less time.

i did dynamic adaptive resource management as undergraduate in the 60s ... that was shipped in vendor mainframe products. it was periodically referred to as "fair share" scheduler ... because default resource management was fair share. however, i did an extremely short pathlength pre-emption ... server could start on big resource hog ... and then if something shorter came along ... (efficiently) temporarily switch to the small task ... and then back to the resource hog (tasks using much less than their resource target got much better response/service ... approx. equivalent to shortest-job-first).

when people are physically in the queue ... there are some human factors related to fifo ... or jumping the queue. if nothing else, having a totally separate queue for small number of items ("express lanes") tends to avoid triggering queue jumping response.

airline checkins & security have had single queue ... with large bags ... somewhat equivalent to grocery stores and shopping carts. possibly big difference is that airline checkin have physically dedicated area for the queueing. grocery stores tend to shared area ... that handles shopping traffic ... and under heavy traffic ... area is taken over by increasing checkout queues. spreading the queues across multiple checkout counters tends to reduce the congestion in the shared area.

airline checkin & security will have preemption for the special customers ... club members, 1st class, other special classifications. their line is typically shorter than the regular line ... and they get to go ahead of those in the regular line (although a few times during heavy business travel periods ... i've seen a few cases where the special line was longer/slower than the regular line).

search engines have quiet a few references for "shortest job first".

this has simple comparison of single queue/multiple servers vis-a-vis queue per server (also has urls to more complex examples)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queueing_model

i also did page replacement algorithms as undergraduate in the 60s ... when there was some disagreements between global versus local. the comments in the wiki article also applies to comparing global vis-a-vis local page replacement ... when each individual real page is viewed as a server ... and all the virtual pages are viewed as needing some service from of a real page. as per above ... single global pool outperforms any partitioning of the pool.

that would argue against having (grocery) express lanes ... if it was possible to have an efficient physical queueing area in grocery store. a merchanism for doing shortest jog first ... whould have fewer than X items going to the head of the single queue (if the human factors of queue jumping response could be worked out).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

"Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked - PCWorld

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From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 12 Feb, 2010
Subject: "Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked - PCWorld
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
"Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked - PCWorld
http://www.techhive.com/article/189144/unhackable_chip_pwned.html

from above:
A secure chip used for preserving secrets on PCs and protecting Microsoft technology on the Xbox has been physically compromised, using acid and an electron microscope

... snip ...

a couple old posts mentioning use of electron microscope for chip analysis was pioneered by los gatos lab debugging blue iliad (1st 32bit 801 chip)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#39 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#47 My Dream PC -- Chip-Based
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#53 Drums: Memory or Peripheral?

for the fun of it ... some other references to los gatos lab

wiki magstripe standards
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_stripe_card

wiki 3624 atm machine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_3624

above wiki page even references one of my postings.

other news items:

Tarnovsky hacks the Holiest of Holies
http://www.p2pnet.net/story/35350
"Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked
http://news.yahoo.com/s/pcworld/20100211/tc_pcworld/unhackableinfineonchipphysicallycracked
"Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2010/021110-unhackable-infineon-chip-physically.html
Researcher hacks 'secure' Xbox 360 processor
http://www.computerworlduk.com/technology/hardware/processors/news/?newsid=18652
Xbox 360 chip can be hacked, claims researcher; Questions security of TPM processor used to protect smartcards, computers
http://news.techworld.com/networking/3211829/xbox-360-chip-can-be-hacked-claims-researcher/
Security chip that does encryption in PCs hacked
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100208/ap_on_hi_te/us_tec_crypto_chip_cracked

at the 2001 intel developers forum, i was giving a presentation on assurance in the TCP (trusted computing platform) track. The person responsible for TPM (trusted platform module) was in the front row, so I took the opportunity to quip that it was nice that it appeared that over the past couple years, TPM was getting simpler (KISS), more like my AADS chip strawman; he then quiped back that I didn't have a committee of 200 people helping me with the design. some reference here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/index.html#presentation
and
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

There had actually been an effort to look at crypto/chip supporting DRM (piracy countermeasures) for the original PC (nearly 30 years ago) ... at the time it was a PC board covered in "magic goo". Constantly came up with measures to defeat the DRM ... as ways of peeling the security/integrity measures and compromising the circuits..

some past posts mentioning AADS chip strawman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aadsstraw

I had earlier claimed that I could effectively do the major features required of TPM in the much simpler AADS chip strawman w/o any changes.

some amount of the stuff related to AADS chip strawman are described in these patents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadssummary.htm

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 11:10:51 -0500
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
This has best been seen recently in the person of the CEOs of insurance companies and financial houses, who explain that if their job didn't pay $XXX million, you couldn't find anyone to do it.

there was article that during the period, the ratio of compensation between CEO and avg. worker had exploded to 400:1 after having been 20:1 for long period (and 10:1 in much of the rest of the world).

there was also business school article that estimated approx. 1000 were responsible for 80% of the mess.

there was also article that the financial services industry ... while destroying the economy during the last decade ... tripled in size (as percentage of GDP) ... some amount of this presumably was repeatedly taking percentage of the $27T of the toxic CDOs as the various transactions went through the system. reference to the $27T number:

Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

some of the above was institutions only buying triple-A rated instruments and sellers being able to pay rating agencies in order to get such triple-A ratings.

misc. past posts mentioning the 400:1 article:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#73 Should The CEO Have the Lowest Pay In Senior Management?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#24 To: Graymouse -- Ireland and the EU, What in the H... is all this about?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#76 lack of information accuracy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#71 Cormpany sponsored insurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#25 Taxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#33 Taxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#53 Are family businesses unfair competition?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#93 What do you think are the top characteristics of a good/effective leader in an organization? Do you feel these characteristics are learned or innate to an individual?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#2 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#58 Traditional Approach Won't Take Businesses Far Places
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#14 realtors (and GM, too!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#17 realtors (and GM, too!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#61 The vanishing CEO bonus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#5 Greed - If greed was the cause of the global meltdown then why does the biz community appoint those who so easily succumb to its temptations?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#41 Executive pay: time for a trim?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#44 Executive pay: time for a trim?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#50 Greed Is
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#80 Are reckless risks a natural fallout of "excessive" executive compensation ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#25 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#41 The subject is authoritarian tendencies in corporate management, and how they are related to political culture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#3 Congress Set to Approve Pay Cap of $500,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#73 Most 'leaders' do not 'lead' and the majority of 'managers' do not 'manage'. Why is this?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#2 CEO pay sinks - Wall Street Journal/Hay Group survey results just released
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#44 What TARP means for the future of executive pay
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#37 Young Developers Get Old Mainframers' Jobs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#48 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook

...

misc. past posts mentioning the $27T:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#59 Quiz: Evaluate your level of Spreadsheet risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#8 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#23 Should FDIC or the Federal Reserve Bank have the authority to shut down and take over non-bank financial institutions like AIG?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#41 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#49 Is the current downturn cyclic or systemic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#56 What's your personal confidence level concerning financial market recovery?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#65 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#1 Future of Financial Mathematics?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#5 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#27 Flawed Credit Ratings Reap Profits as Regulators Fail Investors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#52 Future of Financial Mathematics?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#53 We Can't Subsidize the Banks Forever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#3 Consumer Credit Crunch and Banking Writeoffs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#10 China's yuan 'set to usurp US dollar' as world's reserve currency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#21 China's yuan 'set to usurp US dollar' as world's reserve currency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#25 The Paradox of Economic Recovery
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#29 Analysing risk, especially credit risk in Banks, which was a major reason for the current crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#49 IBM to Build Europe, Asia 'Smart Infrastructure'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#35 what is mortgage-backed securities?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#13 UK issues Turning apology (and about time, too)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#21 UK issues Turning apology (and about time, too)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#9 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#24 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#4 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#5 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

PDS vs. PDSE

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: PDS vs. PDSE
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 12:01:57 -0500
Peter.Farley@BROADRIDGE.COM (Farley, Peter x23353) writes:
PMFJI here, but the facts that Media Manager underlies these "new" (FSVO "new") file technologies and that Media Manager is page-oriented in its use of disk storage *could* be taken as a sign (however faint and clouded) that IBM is (ver-r-ry slowly) moving towards direct support of FBA in z/OS, perhaps only for those file types supported by MM, perhaps eventually for all file types.

Maybe one day a z/OS successor will IPL from the /boot file system?

Wild and rampant speculation with just two chances of being right (slim and none, and slim is out to lunch), but interesting thoughts nonetheless.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#0 PDS vs. PDSE

note that industry fixed-block has been 512 byte records ... & CKD emulation on top of underlying fixed-block has its own space inefficiencies (in addition to processing inefficiencies and significantly increased complexity ... with all the associated costs that complexity brings).

however, the industry is started moving to larger fixed block size ... (because of the per block physical overhead becoming increasing factor)

HDD Manufacturers Moving To 4096-Byte Sectors
http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/09/12/28/1422253/HDD-Manufacturers-Moving-To-4096-Byte-Sectors
Western Digital's Advanced Format: The 4K Sector Transition Begins
http://anandtech.com/storage/showdoc.aspx?i=3691
Western Digital brings Advanced Format to Caviar Green
http://techreport.com/news/18115/western-digital-brings-advanced-format-to-caviar-green

misc. past posts mentioning CKD, multi-track searches, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

for some historical perspective ... original CMS filesystem (1965) was 800byte physical blocks (logical fixed block) mapped on CKD dasd. One of the features was that it provided for "small" record allocation ... i.e. four independent 200byte records within 800byte physical record. This resulted in inefficiency since anytime a 200byte record was involved ... the whole 800byte record had to be read/written (cases where a 200byte physical record could just be written ... would involve first having to read in the 800 byte physical record, update a 200 byte portion and then write out the record).

Of course analogous stuff is seen today in real hardware when there is updates in RAID5 environment.

In any case, direct support of 512byte fixed-block ... could still mean certain inefficiencies for smaller records ... either optimize for space (say allowing mapping of four 128byte blocks in single physical block) or transfer (& "waste" the ondisk space).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 12:37:11 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
there was also article that the financial services industry ... while destroying the economy during the last decade ... tripled in size (as percentage of GDP) ... some amount of this presumably was repeatedly taking percentage of the $27T of the toxic CDOs as the various transactions went through the system. reference to the $27T number:

Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#8 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

taking $13T as GDP ... then the additional bloat in the financial services industry is about $500B/annum. If it went on for a decade, then it would be $5T total that shifted to the financial services industry.

That works out to about 20percent of the $27T in toxic CDOs ... if toxic CDOs went thru an avg of four transactions with financial services industry taking 5percent on every transactions ... that would account for incremental shift in percent of GDP to the financial services industry.

the original article didn't mention whether the financial services industry percent increase in GDP was for the whole decade ... or was an increasing percentage over the decade. If it was increasing percentage over the decade ... then the shift of GDP to financial services industry might only be half the $5T ... say $2.5T ... which means the financial services industry just had to take an overall 10percent of that $27T ... to account for the difference.

this is the scenario that the $27T in toxic CDOs is the modern equivalent to the oldtime stock portfoloio churning ... purely done to increase the compensation for the industry.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 16:20:51 -0500
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
Oh, bother it. We took some of our brightest people and paid them huge salaries and bonuses to destroy the country.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#4 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#5 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#8 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

wall street bonuses ballooned by nearly a factor of four times over a few years that they were doing the $27T in toxic CDOs.

in fact, for 2008, one wall street company that lost money in 2008, took a $10+B fed. gov. bailout ... paid $10B in 2008 bonuses ... which was more than all of wall street paid in bonuses just a few short years earlier (2002).

The Fed's Too Easy on Wall Street
http://www.businessweek.com/#missing-article

from above:
Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of $137 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of $9.8 billion in 2002, $15.8 billion in 2003, $18.6 billion in 2004, $25.7 billion in 2005, $33.9 billion in 2006, and $33.2 billion in 2007.

... snip ...

and now they are complaining about not returning to the days before the $27T in toxic CDOs.

misc. past posts mentioning the above article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#76 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#52 IBM CEO's remuneration last year ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#66 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#42 The Return of Ada
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#4 A Merit based system of reward -Does anybody (or any executive) really want to be judged on merit?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#52 Technology and the current crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#53 Your thoughts on the following comprehensive bailout plan please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#56 VMware Chief Says the OS Is History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#69 Another quiet week in finance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#82 Fraud in financial institution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#18 Once the dust settles, do you think Milton Friedman's economic theories will be laid to rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#26 SOX (Sarbanes-Oxley Act), is this really followed and worthful considering current Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#28 Does anyone get the idea that those responsible for containing this finanical crisis are doing too much?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#31 The human plague
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#32 How much is 700 Billion Dollars??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#8 Global Melt Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#61 The vanishing CEO bonus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#64 Is This a Different Kind of Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#32 How Should The Government Spend The $700 Billion?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#33 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#35 Is American capitalism and greed to blame for our financial troubles in the US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#41 Executive pay: time for a trim?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#73 CROOKS and NANNIES: what would Boyd do?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#80 Are reckless risks a natural fallout of "excessive" executive compensation ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#25 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#41 The subject is authoritarian tendencies in corporate management, and how they are related to political culture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#45 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#49 US disaster, debts and bad financial management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#57 Credit & Risk Management ... go Simple ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#59 As bonuses...why breed greed, when others are in dire need?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#0 PNC Financial to pay CEO $3 million stock bonus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#3 Congress Set to Approve Pay Cap of $500,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#17 Why is everyone talking about AIG bonuses of millions and keeping their mouth shut on billions sent to foreign banks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#36 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#31 OODA-loop obfuscation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#36 Average Comp This Year At Top Firm Estimated At $700,000

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

The origins of CICS

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 12 Feb, 2010
Subject: The origins of CICS
Blog: Greater IBM Connection
part of recent discussion in ibm-main (mainframe mailing list started on bitnet in the 80s)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#47
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#50

... for some IMS Fast Path drfit ...

My wife had been con'ed into going to POK to be in charge of loosely-coupled architecture; while there she did peer-coupled shared data architecture ... which, except for IMS FastPath saw very little uptake until sysplex (one of the reasons she didn't stay long in the position).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

For other topic drift ... old email referring to when Jim left for Tandem ... he was turning over various things to me ... including consulting to the IMS group:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801016
in this post:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#1

I was also involved in tech transfer of sytem/r to endicott for sql/ds ... misc. past posts mentioning system/r (original relational/sql implementation)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

one of the people referenced in this post about jan92 meeting in ellison's conference room, claims to have been the primary person involved in the tech transfer from Endicott to STL for DB2
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 17:19:29 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
in fact, for 2008, one wall street company that lost money in 2008, took a $10+B fed. gov. bailout ... paid $10B in 2008 bonuses ... which was more than all of wall street paid in bonuses just a few short years earlier.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#4 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#5 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#8 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#10 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#11 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Bailed-Out Banks Dole Out Bonuses; Goldman Sachs, CitiGroup, Others Mum on How They Are Using TARP Cash
http://abcnews.go.com/WN/Business/story?id=6498680&page=1

above says it was $10.93 billion total for benefits, bonuses, and compensation.

misc. past posts mentioning above article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#61 The vanishing CEO bonus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#32 How Should The Government Spend The $700 Billion?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#33 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#35 Is American capitalism and greed to blame for our financial troubles in the US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#41 Executive pay: time for a trim?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#73 CROOKS and NANNIES: what would Boyd do?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#80 Are reckless risks a natural fallout of "excessive" executive compensation ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#25 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#41 The subject is authoritarian tendencies in corporate management, and how they are related to political culture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#45 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#49 US disaster, debts and bad financial management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#57 Credit & Risk Management ... go Simple ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#59 As bonuses...why breed greed, when others are in dire need?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#17 Why is everyone talking about AIG bonuses of millions and keeping their mouth shut on billions sent to foreign banks?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#36 Average Comp This Year At Top Firm Estimated At $700,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#81 64 Cores -- IBM is showing a prototype already
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#51 Happy DEC-10 Day

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 18:12:29 -0500
Eric Chomko <pne.chomko@comcast.net> writes:
An ADM-3A terminal, as dumb as it is, was fun. So was what it was hooked up to. You were encourage to play with it. Learn the hardware, understand it, it was documented. The 3270 was strictly business, and the software types and hardware types were so far removed from one another with the oversight of Big Blue. It really was a downer, IMO.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#27 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#31 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#35 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#44 sysout using machine control instead of ANSI control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#45 sysout using machine control instead of ANSI control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#91 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#67 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#80 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#91 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998

recent posts mentioning some 3277 terminal hacks done for human factors characteristics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#31 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#35 Happy DEC-10 Day

I had done a bunch of stuff for terminal support in vm370 ... in part having done the original ascii/tty terminal support in cp67 at the univ. when I was undergraduate. as part of doing ascii/tty support, I tried to make the 2702 controller do some stuff that it couldn't quite do ... which was big part of motivation at the univ to do a clone controller project; program interdata/3 to emulation the 2702 (with various enhancements), reverse engineer the channel interface, build channel interface board for the interdata/3. misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

in the hack done for cp67 tty/asc ... i did a hack involving one byte length field ... this involves 360/67 across the tech. sq courtyard (from the science center and the science center 360/67; we all overlooked poloroid/land's balcony) ... adding support for some sort of ascii device (at harvard?) involving increasing max length to something like 1200 bytes (for tty/ascii), w/o fixing the one byte stuff ... resulting in 27 crashes in one day.
http://www.multicians.org/thvv/360-67.html

anyway ... in the early 80s ... and part of the change over from vm370 (some free and some charged-for) to vmsp (all charged for), there was a significant rework of the multiprocessor support. It was special case to improve the thruput of a TPF virtual guest operating system running under vm370 on 3081 with little or no other workload (this was when 3081 was never going to have a uniprocessor flavor and before they got around to doing 3083, and TPF operating system still didn't have multiprocessor support). The special case changes (TPF) ... unfortunately had a 10% degradation for almost all the other customers running vm370 on multiprocesosr machines.

So they came out with some performance improvements for 3270 ... that for 3270-intensive customers would tend to mask the vm/sp multiprocessor degradation (as well as misc. other stuff w/o actually fixing the underlying problem)

However, this didn't help some very large, important (vm370 multiprocessor) customers that were all ascii/tty. An old email getting brought into the difficulty with one such (federal gov. 3-letter agency) customer:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#email830420
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#57 any 70's era supercomputers that ran as slow as today's supercomputers?

this is older email discussing some of the changes mentioned in the above
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#email790329
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#35 diffence between itanium and alpha

and several more here ... in part done for 3101 glass tty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email791011
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email791011b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email800301
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#0 Why so little parallelism?

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 18:47:34 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
in fact, for 2008, one wall street company that lost money in 2008, took a $10+B fed. gov. bailout ... paid $10B in 2008 bonuses ... which was more than all of wall street paid in bonuses just a few short years earlier.

re;
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#4 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#5 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#8 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#10 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#11 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#13 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

PBS program airing in real time has the company ... in addition to getting the $10B bailout ... also being instrumental behind the AIG bailout (a big portion of the money provided to AIG was then turned around and paid to them at 100cents on the dollar) ... but part of trying to make the company whole again (and keep it out of bankruptcy) ... it was allowed to convert to a bank holding company ... which allowed the company to borrow money from the FED, effectively for free ... which they then turned around and bought US Treasuries paying 3.5% interest ... making a major portion of their profit ... which is then used to justify/pay $10B in bonuses.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

PDS vs. PDSE

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: PDS vs. PDSE
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 19:05:21 -0500
"Charlie Gibbs" <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> writes:
On the other hand, if you wrote 200-byte physical records on a CKD device, the overhead (inter-record gaps, count fields, etc.) would exceed 50%.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#0 PDS vs. PDSE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#9 PDS vs. PDSE

DASD capacity forumulae ... from my conversion of gcard ios3720
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/gcard.html#26.3
DASD Capacity Formulae

Device Cyls Tracks Track Bytes per record type /pack /cyl capacity without key with key 2305-1 48 8 14568 432+D 634+K+D 2305-2 96 8 14858 198+D 289+K+D 2314 200 20 7294 101+(D)534/512 146+(K+D)534/512 D (last on track) 45+K+D (last on track) 3330-1 404 19 13165 135+D 191+K+D 3330-11 808 19 13165 135+D 191+K+D 3340-35 348 12 8535 167+D 242+K+D 3340-70 696 12 8535 167+D 242+K+D 3350 555 30 19254 185+D 267+K+D 3375 959 12 36000 224+#(D+191) 224+#(K+191)+#(D+191) Device Cyls Tracks Track Bytes per record


... snip ...

3375 is a physical 3370 FBA (512byte blocks) with CKD emulated on top. All current CKD devices are actually physically fixed-block with CKD emulated on top (and things are quite a bit more complex)

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Chip and PIN is Broken!

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Chip and PIN is Broken!
Newsgroups: alt.computer.security
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2010 10:17:26 -0500
bok118@zonnet.nl (Gerard Bok) writes:
Vital characteristic of a signature is imho it's uniqueness. There is nothing unique about 4 digits ;-) If it is not unique, don't call it signature as it in now way identifies someone.

human signature is used to imply intent, agrees, approves, and/or authorizes.

for pin-debit at check-out counters ... the PIN entry is part of two-factor authentication; the act of pressing the "yes" button (or touch screen field) is the part of the transaction that is taken as implying intent, agrees, approves, and/or authorizes.

an interface might have something like "please re-entry your pin if you agree" ... the act of PIN-entry is the part of demonstrating human intent (in response to the interface request).

we had been been brought in to help word-smith the cal. state electronic signature legislation ... one of the points that the lawyers made was that there had to be some sort of human interaction to demonstrate human intent.

there was some issue with the things called "digital signatures" ... resulting in cognitive dissonance (possibly because "human signature" and "digital signature" both contained the word "signature") ... where lots of "digital signatures" were being performed w/o the necessary corresponding aspect that demonstrated human intent, agrees, approves, and/or authorizes.

old reference to yes card presentation at cartes2002 about trivial to clone card.
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

there were similar presentations at the ATM Integrity Task Force meetings.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2010 11:37:59 -0500
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
All of this makes a view of a downward spiral. The US is also by far the worst hit industrial country in this recession. Even Germany is well on the path to recovery now; but US unemployment figures are now at 1938 levels.

Some other countries like Russia, Spain, Ireland and Greece have had their issues as well, but these have good paths to recovery.

If the US cannot find a foothold soon there will be a permanent devaluation and a livings standard drop of about a third; from a GDP per person of ~EUR 40k to ~EUR 25k, about on par with Spain and the old DDR area of Germany.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#3 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

'95 ... i had gotten involved in what would the economy look like in 2020; taking the trends over the previous 25yrs and then projecting that out 25yrs ... would make it look worse ... however, the curve would likely somewhat flatten out as it reaches levels comparable to some ot these other countries ... instead of continued downward spiral (jokes about becoming 3rd world country)

there were some issues regarding whether economic policies could spread the decline over a long as period as possible ... trying to avoid sharp adjustments. things like the financial mess and the baby boomer retirement (combination of loss of skills and stressing the economics of the retirement infrastructure) ... are putting crimp in what possibly can be done.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2010 11:56:12 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
The Fed's Too Easy on Wall Street
http://www.businessweek.com/#missing-article

from above:

Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of $137 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of $9.8 billion in 2002, $15.8 billion in 2003, $18.6 billion in 2004, $25.7 billion in 2005, $33.9 billion in 2006, and $33.2 billion in 2007.

... snip ...


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#11 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

this has some number of tibbits ... this mentions holding bonus pools at 2007 (during the top of the financial mess bubble, just before it came crashing down) levels for 2008 (when there was starting to be some accounting of the losses that actually were going on during the financial mess bubble):

13 Other Bankers
http://13bankers.com/2010/02/13/13-other-bankers/

there was recently some parody about somebody doing research on the financial mess and visiting the various goldman sachs branch offices, including the US treasury offices in washington dc.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2010 12:28:22 -0500
johnf@panix.com (John Francis) writes:
I still look back fondly on a couple of nights I spent helping (or at least watching :-) Ted Hess track down a bug in the KL-10 page fault microdode. That meant taking 1026/1042 standalone.

charlie (invented compare&swap instruction when he was working on cp67 multiprocessor fine-grain locking, instruction name was chosen because CAS are charlie's initials) ... was optimizing some cp67 pathlength and removed a "LCTL CR0,CR0" from interrupt routines ... and started having low-core kernel being clobbered.

he had uncovered 360/67 hardware page fault bug that had gone unnoticed for years. "LCTL CR0,CR0" reloaded the virtual address table pointer and reset the hardware look-aside buffer (hardware cache of virtual to real address translation). The LCTL he removed was because they were loading the same virtual address table pointer that was already in in CR0.

Turns out that the 360/67 page fault microcode was zero'ing all the entries in the hardware look-aside buffer ... but not setting the entry invalid bits. That was resulting in all the hardware entries having virtual address zero pointing to real address zero (and might randomly result in software running in virtual address space clobbering stuff in real kernel page zero).

The superfluous "LCTL CR0,CR0" was masking the problem, because it would reset all the entries to zero ... but would also force the invalid bit for all entries.

It turned out that this was rather late in the 360/67 product life ... and there was some decision to not fix the hardware ... and just continue with software masking the problem.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Credit card data security: Who's responsible?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 13 Feb, 2010
Subject: Credit card data security: Who's responsible?
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Credit card data security: Who's responsible?
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2010/021110-tech-debate-credit-card.html

from above:
About a year ago security at Heartland Payment Systems Inc. was breached and information affecting over 100 million credit cards stolen. Was it Heartland's fault, or should the credit card companies shoulder more of the responsibility

... snip ...

for the fun of it ... a little x-over from the "chip&pin broken" discussion/news
http://www.linkedin.com/newsArticle?viewDiscussion=&articleID=109316172&gid=127198
as well as the one in "payment systems network" group:
http://www.linkedin.com/newsArticle?viewDiscussion=&articleID=109316172&gid=50424

...

recent thread in mainframe discussion about introduction of technology in the UK payments effectively allowed the burden of proof in disputes to be shifted from the institution to the consumer (presumably because the technology was invulnerable to any compromise):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#1 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#3 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)

one such case was this:
http://www.stephenmason.eu/e-signatures/pin/

....

note that there was rather large pilot deployment in the US ten years ago ... but it seemed to evaporate w/o a trace about the time of this presentation at cartes2002 (about being able to trivially clone the chip)
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

about the same time, there were similar presentations at the ATM Integrity Task Force meetings. In one of the presentation, somebody from the audience made the rather loud comment/response, "they managed to spend billions of dollars to prove that chips are less secure than magstripe". misc. past posts mentioning yes card exploit:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

the previously mentioned chipcard POS pilot from ten years ago ... was about the same time as a different payment chipcard for home/personal use ... that program included a free give-away of serial-port card reader. there was enormous consumer support problems related to the serial port (things like BSOD and having to reinstall machine from scratch). The consumer support problems resulted in rapidly spreading opinion in the financial industry that chipcards weren't practical in the consumer market (it wasn't actually a chipcard problem, it was the problem with serial port device). In any case, the combination of the yes card (for POS device) and the consumer support problems ... resulted in huge retrenchment in chipcard/token programs. It even extended to the consumer-oriented FINREAD standard in the EU ... lots of past posts mentioning FINREAD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#finread

Problems in both attempts resulted in some amount of resistance to trying another any time soon.

as an aside, there was an article a couple years ago that signature debit fraud is 15 times that of PIN-debit ... contributing to the justification for significantly higher signature debit interchange fees. An issue for credit card associations ... was that PIN-debit transactions didn't go thru their credit card networks ... they wen't thru (different) debit card networks.

if you have "standard" debit card ... it has association "bug" on the front and can be used for signature debit. the interchange fee for signature debit is comparable to credit card and transaction flows over the card association network (and they get part of the interchange fee). it is possible to still request and obtain a "PIN-debit only" card ... which doesn't have an association "bug", can't be used for signature debit ... the interchange fee is much lower and the transaction flows over a different network.

a few years ago there were a number of news articles about debit magstripe being less secure than creditcard magstripe. the issue was that early on ... the magstripe only contained the account number. crooks were able to generate acceptable counterfeit magstripe by purely using a formula. credit cards were forced to add a "secure hash" to the magstripe (magstripe value encrypted with bank/bin specific secret key and truncated) as countermeasure to formula generated counterfeit magstripes. card association networks maintained a table of the bank/bin specific secret keys and were able to authenticate valid magstripe data as it flowed thru the association network.

it turned out that debit cards didn't need secure hash, because PINs were sufficient countermeasure to the formula generated counterfeit magstripe. when debit cards were enabled for signature debit ... and started flowing thru the association networks ... they no longer had the benefit of the PIN as a countermeasure to formula generated counterfeit magstripes.

a slightly related thread in secure chip compromise:
http://www.linkedin.com/newsArticle?viewDiscussion=&articleID=109316682&gid=127198

mentions that the los gatos lab for many years managed the magstripe standards, did ATM cash machines and pioneered use of electron micrscope for chip analysis. magstripe wiki reference:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_stripe_card

DISCLAIMER: for many years I had a wing at los gatos with offices and several labs. One of my projects included high-speed data transport with high-speed terrestrial and satellite links ... including designing our own satellite infrastructure ... putting in TDMA earth stations at a number of locations, including 4.5M dish in the los gatos lab parking lot. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

later the magstripe attackers started "skimming" & data breaches ... obtaining all the information necessary to generate an acceptable counterfeit magstripe (including the secure hash value).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

OT: PC clock failure--CMOS battery?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT:  PC clock failure--CMOS battery?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2010 16:00:08 -0500
ArarghMail002NOSPAM writes:
Not to mention how many assorted scripts and extra pictures show up on current web pages. Plus, it appears that current web page designers think everybody has T1+ bandwidth available to them, which is not always true.

I browse with a PII-400 on an ISDN line, and most pages load slowly.


i used to have two processor p400 with 512mbytes and dialup line. when browsers started supporting tabs ... I had news "folder" with 75 or so news site URLs ... that I would open (each URL in different tab) and then go away for coffee for quite awhile. I could come back and browse the tabs at local speeds; detail news stories I would open in "background tabs" and let the letting go on asynchronously ... while I continued to browse the already loaded tabs. By the time I got thru the first 75 tabs ... any detail articles had loaded in background tabs.

I then did shell script that fetched the 75 under program control, compared it to the previously fetched copy ... and extracted any URLs that were new (that I had never seen before). The resulting list of URLs then were fed to the browser under program control (and I could go to coffee for the whole thing). Somewhere over 200 URLs would easily swamp the machine with paging (aka use to be significantly more than mbyte or two per tab).

Browsers have since reduced memory/tab possibly in half (and they are much better at reusing/recoverying memory when tabs have been killed). I subsequently upgraded to 1gbyte and it was much easier to handle 400 URLs at a time.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2010 17:59:28 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

1971 Xerox PARC EARS (Ethernet, Alto, Research character generator,
Scanned laser output terminal) laser printer
1976 IBM 3800 mainframe datacentre (@ Woolworth)
1977 Xerox 9700 mainframe datacentre
1979 IBM 6670 departmental office (copier sized)
1982 Canon LBP-10 (desktop)
1984 HP LaserJet
1985 Apple LaserWriter


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#69 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#74 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#85 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#2 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore

postscript wiki page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PostScript

laserwriter wiki page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaserWriter

and from long ago and far away

Date: 29 January 1985, 11:57:17 PST
To: wheeler (& couple others)

I thought the following description of Apple's recent printer announcement might be of interest. Several people whom I respect say that Adobe's Postscript interface language is very impressive, and they are apparently making a bid to establish it as a de facto standard in the page printing and typesetting industries. It handles images as well as scalable fonts in a device independent manner. Note the Linotype announcement of an Apple/Postscript compatible typesetter. Printer specifications are at the end of this note.

==================

From: furuta@uw-bluechip.arpa (Richard Furuta)
Return-Path: <furuta@uw-bluechip.arpa>
Message-Id: <8501241036.AA28142@uw-bluechip.washington.arpa>
Date: 24 Jan 1985 0236-PST (Thursday)
To: laser-lovers@washington
Subject: Apple announces its laser printer

APPLE ANNOUNCES NEW HIGH-RESOLUTION LASER PRINTER

CUPERTINO, Calif., January 23, 1985--Apple Computer, Inc. today announced the LaserWriter high-resolution laser printer. The new product allows business users to produce near typeset-quality text and art department-quality graphics from their personal computer workstations. The LaserWriter--printing such documents as newsletters, overhead transparencies, business forms, memos, brochures and reports--can be shared among a work group of up to 31 people using AppleTalk*, Apple's low-cost personal network.

The printer, which is an integral part of The Macintosh* Office, provides flexibility and quality of output usually restricted to printers costing several times as much. The LaserWriter achieves full-page 300-dots-per-inch output through a Canon* LBP-CX10 engine, a powerful built-in computer designed by Apple and a software language called PostScript*.

"The LaserWriter is a breakthrough in visual communication that will change the way people do business on paper," said Barbara Koalkin, Macintosh Office products marketing manager. "To a large extent, business people are judged by the quality of their written documents and presentations. We designed a shared printer that brings near typeset-quality output to the desks of these office workers."

"The LaserWriter not only replaces daisy-wheel and dot-matrix printers, but in many instances it obviates the need to go to an art department or print shop for typesetting and paste-up."

The LaserWriter Has Networking Built In
---------------------------------------

The LaserWriter has the AppleTalk Personal Network built in, so that one printer can be shared by up to 31 people in a work group. In addition to the AppleTalk port, the LaserWriter has an RS-232 port to connect it to devices outside AppleTalk that use this communications standard. Through a built-in program to emulate the Diablo* 630, a popular daisy-wheel printer, IBM* and IBM-compatible personal computers using WordStar* or other IBM PC software can print directly on the LaserWriter with no software modification.

Key business software available for the Macintosh computer will produce output from the LaserWriter without modification. This software includes Jazz*, the integrated business-software package from Lotus Development Corp.; the Microsoft* series; and all Apple* Macintosh software. In addition, new applications are being developed for Macintosh to take advantage of the LaserWriter, including Aldus Corp.'s PageMaker*, a package that allows users to design and compose layouts for such publications as newsletters, data sheets and brochures.

"We at Lotus are impressed with the quality and capability of the new LaserWriter printer," said Eric Bedell, Lotus' Jazz marketing manager. "Letters, reports, forms and presentations created on Jazz look incredible when printed on the LaserWriter."

"We believe that Jazz and the new printer offer the business professional the opportunity to create some of the highest-quality output available in today's microcomputer marketplace."

The LaserWriter printer accommodates the many sizes of paper, transparencies, envelopes and labels that offices use. It can print up to eight pages per minute, and at a rate of two or three pages a minute for even extremely complex graphics.

Vendors of complete systems have shown interest in including the LaserWriter in their product offerings to businesses. One such company, Metaphor Computer Systems, has signed an agreement with Apple under which it will include the LaserWriter in its information retrieval and analysis system marketed to product marketing and financial departments of Fortune 500 companies.

LaserWriter Provides Flexibility for Transparencies and Reports
---------------------------------------------------------------

Apple designed the high-quality LaserWriter to serve a wide range of office needs, both for written reports and for transparencies used in business presentations. For example, the printer can integrate unlimited combinations of text and graphics on a single page, for reports, brochures and newsletters. It can print the very small type sizes needed for forms as well as the large type sizes needed to make transparencies for presentations. Also, the printer incorporates actual typefaces and fonts used in traditional typesetting, such as Helvetica* and Times*, which are preferred in producing forms and newsletters.

"The LaserWriter will revolutionize presentations, one of the main ways people communicate with each other in business," Koalkin said. "Previously, transparencies for these presentations were done by hand or by art departments. Now, the LaserWriter provides the quality of art department transparencies faster than could be done by hand."

Underlying the LaserWriter's versatility is an interpretive programming language called PostScript, developed by Adobe Systems Incorporated. This flexible page- description language was created specifically for high-resolution printers and typesetting machines.

A powerful feature of the PostScript language is that it stores fonts as mathematical formulas, or "outlines," rather than as a bit map for every size, style and orientation of a typeface. Using these outlines, PostScript can direct the printer to generate characters in a wide range of point sizes, from three points up to more than 720 points, limited at the high end only by the size of the paper. (Seventy-two points measures one inch.

Besides text characters, PostScript also directs the production of extremely high-resolution line art and graphics. In fact, the graphic capabilities of the LaserWriter exceed even those possible on the Macintosh screen.

The LaserWriter is the first personal-computer printer to be awarded license to use the original Helvetica and Times typefaces. Times is the most common typeface for newspapers, and Helvetica is the most popular for business forms.

Also built into the printer are Courier and a mathematical Symbol font. The printer can also support all of the current Macintosh typefaces. Apple will be releasing additional "downloadable" fonts for the printer, selected from the typeface libraries of the International Typeface Corp. and the Mergenthaler, Linotype, Stempel, Haas typeface library.

The software is device-independent, which means that any workstation, including the IBM PC, for instance, can take advantage of the LaserWriter through PostScript. Similarly, Macintosh applications can print on any PostScript-compatible printer or typesetter, with no software changes.

"PostScript is being viewed by the printing industry as the first widely adopted page-description standard," Koalkin said. "As demonstration of this fact, Linotype, a division of Allied Corporation, is announcing a line of AppleTalk- and PostScript- compatible typesetters."

"Macintosh users will be able to hook up their machines to these high-end phototypesetters over the AppleTalk Personal Network and achieve resolution of up to 2,540 lines per inch."

Hardware Built to be Reliable, Powerful
---------------------------------------

The LaserWriter contains the most powerful computer ever designed by Apple. At the heart of the LaserWriter is a 12-megahertz Motorola* 68000 microprocessor.

The printer's computer also includes 1/2 megabyte of read-only memory (ROM), plus 1 1/2 megabytes of random-access memory (RAM). This powerful computer is necessary to provide the flexibility and quality of output that businesses need for their day-to-day printing requirements.

The LaserWriter's Canon engine contains the laser and the printer's mechanical parts. The engine was designed for easy servicing without the mess normally associated with adding toner to printers or copiers. Components that need regular replacement, including toner and the imaging scroll, are isolated in a removable cartridge for convenient access. Cartridges last for 2,000 to 3,000 pages, after which users easily remove and replace them without calling a service representative.

Price and Availability
----------------------

The LaserWriter printer will sell for a suggested retail price of $6,995, including toner cartridge. It will be available in March 1985 in the United States and Canada through all Apple distribution channels, and in June 1985 internationally.

*******************************************************************************
Tech Specs on Laser Printer.
---------------------------

LaserWriter Product Specifications
Marking Engine:
Canon LBP-CX laser-xerographic engine

Controller:
Controller hardware contains: 12mhz 68000, 1/2 Meg of ROM, 1 and 1/2 Meg of RAM, AppleTalk* and RS-232C interfaces.

Print Quality:
All text and graphics printed at 300 dots per inch.

Built-in Fonts:
Times*, Times Bold, Times Italic, Times Bold Italic, Helvetica(, Helvetica Bold, Helvetica Oblique, Helvetica Bold Oblique, Courier, Courier Bold, Courier Oblique, Courier Bold-Oblique and Symbol are built-in. Underline, Shadow and Hollow styles for the above fonts can also be generated. Full international character sets. Supports all Macintosh fonts as downloaded bitmaps.

Built-in Font Sizes:
Full range of sizes from 4pt on up. Limited at the low end by the resolution of the printer and at the high end by the size of the paper.

Speed: 8 pages per minute maximum throughput. Actual performance is application and document dependent.

Interface:
AppleTalk and RS-232C.

Printing Protocols Supported:
POSTSCRIPT* and a subset of Diablo( 630 command set.

Recommended Duty Cycle:
Less than 4000 pages per month.

Printing Material Feed:
Automatic from paper input cassette. Manual single sheet feed.

Printing Materials:
Best results with 16-21 lb. single sheet copier bond. Can use most letterhead and colored stock from 8-34 lb. Can also use standard overhead transparency material. Envelopes and labels supported via manual feed.

Printing Material Sizes and Capacity:
Supports Letter, Legal, A4, and B5 sizes. Input cassette holds 100 sheets, output tray holds 20 sheets.

Maximum Printable Surface:
DimensionLetterLegalA4B5
Width (inches)8.07.07.57.0
Length (inches)10.912.510.510.0

Dimensions:
Width18.5 inches
Depth (body only)16.2 inches
Depth (with trays)28.2 inches
Height11.5 inches
Weight77 lbs.

Power:
US Model115 VAC (1 10 percent) 60Hz
European Model220 VAC (1 10 percent) 50 Hz or 240 VAC (1 10 percent) 50 Hz

Safety and Environmental Compliance:
UL 660F listed
CSA LR49439 certified
FCC Class B
BRH certified Class I laser product

Temperature:
Operating50-90 degrees F (10-32.5 C)
Storage32-95 degrees F (0-35 C)

Humidity:
Operating20-80% relative humidity
Standby10-80% relative humidity

Altitude:
Operating0-8200 feet
Non-operating0-49000 feet

Audible Noise:
Operatingless than 55 dB (A)
Standbyless than 45 dB (A)


... snip ... top of post, old email index. --
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 13 Feb, 2010
Subject: Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
http://www.physorg.com/news185118205.html

from above:
Researchers at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory have uncovered flaws in the Chip and PIN system that allow criminals to use stolen credit and debit cards without knowing the correct PIN.
old reference to yes card presentation at cartes2002 about trivial to clone card.
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html
and lots of past posts mentioning yes card exploit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

a couple more ...

Chip and PIN is broken, say researchers
http://www.zdnet.com/security/0,1000000189,40022674,00.htm
European Credit and Debit Card Security Broken
http://news.slashdot.org/story/10/02/11/2129212/European-Credit-and-Debit-Card-Security-Broken
Chip and PIN security busted; UnVerified by PIN attack undermines bank security assurances
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/02/12/chip_pin_security_unpicked/
Chip-and-Pin security shattered by fundamental flaw
http://www.computerworlduk.com/management/security/cybercrime/news/index.cfm?RSS&NewsId=18823
Researchers claim chip and PIN is 'broken'
http://www.itpro.co.uk/620431/researchers-claim-chip-and-pin-is-broken

from above:
The report concluded: "Rather than leaving its member banks to patch each successive vulnerability, the EMV consortium should start planning a redesign and an orderly migration to the next version."

"In the meantime, the EMV protocol should be considered broken."


.. snip ...

Various MITM-attacks were postulated in the early part of the century as exploits ... in addition to yes card exploit being trivial to counterfeit the chip.

About the same time as the cartes2002 presentation ... there were similar presentations at the ATM Integrity Task Force meetings; during one of the presentations ... one of the people in the audience made the comment that "they've managed to spend billions of dollars to prove that chips are less secure than magstripe"

recent thread in mainframe thread about introduction of technology in the UK payments effectively allowed the burden of proof in disputes to be shifted from the institution to the consumer (presumably because the technology was invulnerable to any kind compromise):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#1 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#3 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)

one such case was this:
http://www.stephenmason.eu/e-signatures/pin/

The presentation at cartes2002 (and similar presentations at ATM Integrity Task Force) was about the yes card vulnerability ... see the comments at the end of this
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

was that it was possible to skim necessary data from a compromised end-point (basically nearly same technology used to skim magstripe data) ... which then could be used to create a counterfeit yes card.

At the time the POS terminals would ask the card:

1) was the correct PIN entered (a yes card would always answer YES) 2) should the transaction be offline (a yes card would always answer YES) 3) was the transaction within the credit limit (a yes card would always answer YES)

as mentioned in the reference to the cartes2002 presentation ... once a yes card existed ... there was no way of turning it off ... even deactivating the account wouldn't stop transactions. Basically the technology for skimming the information ... was the same for creating a counterfeit yes card and a counterfeit "magstripe". However, in the case, of a counterfeit "magstripe" a countermeasure was turning the account off ... which had no effect for a counterfeit yes card (since the transaction would go thru w/o going online).

several related issues are also discussed in this recent item ("Credit card data security: Who's responsible?")
http://www.linkedin.com/newsArticle?viewDiscussion=&articleID=109254139&gid=127198
also
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#21 Credit card data security: Who's responsible?

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 14 Feb, 2010
Subject: Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#24 Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud

quote from somebody in similar thread in different group:
Afaik 100% of UK-issued cards allow signature fallback.

That's not likely to change, for complex legal and political reasons I won't go into as it's a very long story.

Forbidding all fallback methods would be a fix, but it would mean issuing new cards, and it would make eg unverified transactions impossible, as well as signature fallback of course.

Merchants and cardholders wouldn't like it, and as I say it's a legal problem too, so I don't think it will happen - especially as there are better fixes if the banks are issuing new cards and/or terminals anyway.


... snip ...

note that the infrastructure supposedly has a countermeasure to reported lost/stolen card with compromised pin ... and that is a suicide pill ... referenced in the web page about the cartes2002 counterfeit yes card presentation. Issuers will have a valid card go online ever "N" transactions ... and merchant terminals may also force an online transaction ... giving the infrastructure the opportunity to administer a suicide pill ... but as in the (cartes2002) reference, counterfeit yes cards will ignore any suicide pill; MITM-attacks will presumably also filter out any attempt to deliver a suicide pill to a valid card. past posts mentioning yes card
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

Also, as mentioned in thread "Who's responsible" ... there had been a rather large US pilot in the first part of the century that seemed to have totally evaporated in the time frame of the Cartes2002 presentation and the presentations at the ATM Integrity Task Force meetings. That pilot and the other large US token effort involving the give-away of serial-port cardreaders ... seemed to combine to create some amount of resistance to attempting similar token-based efforts anytime soon.

I've conjectured that resistance also extended to the apparent pull-back from deployments of the EU FINREAD standard terminal ... aka basically extending the "end-point" out to the FINREAD terminal as countermeasure to using a token with a compromised (end-point) PC. This covers the scenario of the online banking fraud and the associated recommendations that businesses get an extra PC that is only used for online banking ... and is never used for anything else (as an alternative countermeasure to the PC becoming infected during standard internet use). misc. past posts mentioning EU FINREAD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#finread

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2010 00:10:43 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
The Fed's Too Easy on Wall Street
http://www.businessweek.com/#missing-article

from above:

Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of $137 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of $9.8 billion in 2002, $15.8 billion in 2003, $18.6 billion in 2004, $25.7 billion in 2005, $33.9 billion in 2006, and $33.2 billion in 2007.

... snip ...

and now they are complaining about not returning to the days before the $27T in toxic CDOs.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#11 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

another baseline tidbit:

What happened to the global economy and what we can do about it Goldman Goes Rogue - Special European Audit To Follow
http://baselinescenario.com/2010/02/14/goldman-goes-rogue-%E2%80%93-special-european-audit-to-follow/

from above
At 9:30pm on Sunday, September 21, 2008, Goldman Sachs was saved from imminent collapse by the announcement that the Federal Reserve would allow it to become a bank holding company

... snip ...

a few past baseline refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#2 CEO pay sinks - Wall Street Journal/Hay Group survey results just released
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#4 Obscene exec pay packets for poor performance or outright failure. Is it acceptable? Is regulation the answer. What are the issues? What are the practical alternatives?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#20 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#27 US banking Changes- TARP Proposl
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#35 US banking Changes- TARP Proposl
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#65 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#5 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#55 Oldest Instruction Set still in daily use?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#49 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#19 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

HONE & VMSHARE

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 15 Feb, 2010
Subject: HONE & VMSHARE
Blog: Greater IBM Connection
The following is with respect to getting full dump of vmshare files every month. "DP hdqtrs" ... in the following is the sales & marketing division ... one of the places I was making the vmshare files available internally was the worldwide sales & marketing online (virtual machine based) HONE systems (for use by people that dealt with customers):

Date: 06/26/81 11:02:33
From: wheeler

tymshare ran out of my tapes (i sent them a box last year). Just gotten thru getting justification for sending of a new box of tapes. Lots of paper work from my management. Finally today I told them that they were playing nickel & dime games, if necessary I would pay for the box of tapes out of my own pocket (also implied that I could go to DP hdqtrs. with request and they would send 10 boxes of tapes for this purpose).


... snip ... top of post, old email index.

misc. old email mentioning vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare
misc. old email mentioning hone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#hone

HONE was one of my hobbies ... providing highly enhanced systems for their operation. HONE had started with cp67 virtual machine systems to provide branch office SEs with "hands-on" experience with operating system guests running in virtual machines ... after the 23Jun69 unbundling announcement. Then they started offering (mostly CMS\APL base) applications for support of sales & marketing. Eventually the sales & marketing support applications dominated all HONE use (and the use for running guest operating systems died away); HONE applications were even required to preprocess mainframe orders before they could be submitted.

In the mid-70s, the US HONE datacenters were consolidated in building in silicon valley (enter the facebook address into some web satellite photos ... the building next door was the consolidate HONE operation; it has a different occupant now).

Tymshare started providing their vm/cms-based computer conferencing to SHARE for VMSHARE in Aug76 ... VMSHARE archive:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2010 11:14:00 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
another baseline tidbit:

What happened to the global economy and what we can do about it Goldman Goes Rogue - Special European Audit To Follow
http://baselinescenario.com/2010/02/14/goldman-goes-rogue-%E2%80%93-special-european-audit-to-follow/

from above

At 9:30pm on Sunday, September 21, 2008, Goldman Sachs was saved from imminent collapse by the announcement that the Federal Reserve would allow it to become a bank holding company

... snip ...


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#11 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

the AIG bailout was also a significant contribution for Goldman Sachs ... since AIG turned around and gave a significant amount of it to them.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2010 16:27:51 -0500
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
Well, it's not the salary increases that are beyond the person's expertise, it's that the company policy says that a person doing job "A" can't make more than $X, lest they end up making more than a person doing unrelated job "B". Such a policy is set by the CEO, who quite by coincidence is at the very top of the pay scale.

This has best been seen recently in the person of the CEOs of insurance companies and financial houses, who explain that if their job didn't pay $XXX million, you couldn't find anyone to do it.


possibly just obfuscation and misdirection

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#11 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#19 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#26 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

tempting to make the observation that "they want to have *your* cake and eat it to" ... pretending that the bubble, where they were doing $27T in toxic CDOs, hasn't burst and that they can continue their enormously inflated compensation (from the height of the bubble, while the rest of the country adjusts and has significant declines), ... as well as never being held accountable for responsibility in creating the financial mess.

recent posts about early BCS (boeing computer services):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#89 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#90 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998

the folklore at BCS in the late 60s ... was when 360s were announced, Boeing walked in and ordered a huge number of large 360s from the local branch office ... the salesman hardly even knowing what a 360 was (Boeing providing all the specifications for submitting the order). This was supposedly was when salesmen were on straight commission. The resulting compensation was much larger than the Watson's salary ... which prompted the introduction of the sales "quota" system.

Quota looks at the customer(s) and guesses at what they are likely to order for the year. Then the salesman's salary is adjusted based on the ratio of orders to quota. A .20(base)/.80(quota) salary coming in at twice quota ... gives the saleman .2+(2*.8)=1.8 times base salary. The next year, with the (boeing account) salesman now on quota, boeing came in again with large order (boeing claiming it still knew more about the products than the salesman) that resulted in the salesman's compensation again being larger than the watsons. This led to starting to adjust the quotas over the year ... supposedly to make them "fairer" ... but could be interpreted as keeping salesmen from earning more than the top executive. Supposedly the salesman then left and started their own computer services company (also latter ran for president).

misc. past references to folklore about sales quotas
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#43 Killer Hard Drives - Shrapnel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002n.html#72 bps loader, was PLX
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#58 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#26 T3 Sues IBM To Break its Mainframe Monopoly

Then the computer services company was bought by a large auto maker ... and the salesman then went off and started another computer services company.

As total aside a corporate executive that had con'ed my wife in to going to POK to be in charge of loosely-coupled architecture ... spent much of their career in mainframes ... but later did a stint as head of pc-unit(/boca) ... and eventually left. He ahows up for a short stint at CEO of this (salesman's) newer computer services company during period when it has its IPO (and becomes a public company).

That salesman's wiki page sort of corresponds to the boeing folklore ... but says that the salesman left in '62 and founded his first computer services company ... which was before 360 was announced (wiki quote was that salesman filled the year's sales quota in two weeks).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Michigan firm sues bank over theft of $560,000

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 15 Feb, 2010
Subject: Michigan firm sues bank over theft of $560,000
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Michigan firm sues bank over theft of $560,000
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9156558/Michigan_firm_sues_bank_over_theft_of_560_000_

from above:
Experi-Metal says Comerica Bank's online security practices resulted in theft

... snip ...

There has been a number of similar news articles recently. I've mentioned that a week or so ago, one of the TV business news shows came out with recommendation that business get an extra PC that is never used for anything *BUT* online banking.

There is malware that compromise PC ... and has lots of info about common online banking sites ... perform fraudulent transactions from your PC while doctoring screens displayed (doctoring the balance and remove displaying the fraudulent transactions).

In the mid-90s, there were a number of presentations about the earlier dialup online banking services. The consumer online banking presentations talked about moving their service to the internet, largely motivated by the significant customer service costs related to (mostly aftermarket) serial-port modems (one of the services explained that they had a software library of over 60 different proprietary serial-port modem drivers ... to handle variety of different platforms, versions and serial-port modems). Moving the service to the internet, effectively offloaded all those support costs onto the customers' ISP (who could amortize it across a broad variety of online services, not limited to banking).

This was in contrast to the commercial/business/cash-management dialup online services ... claiming that they would never move to the internet (because of a long litney of security concerns).

misc. posts mentioning dialup online banking:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#35 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#32 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#11 Public Computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#61 German court finds Bank responsible for malwared PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#9 Homebanking authentication methods: what's being used by your bank?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#18 Can Smart Cards Reduce Payments Fraud and Identity Theft?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#28 Can Smart Cards Reduce Payments Fraud and Identity Theft?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#31 FC5 Special Workshop CFP: Emerging trends in Online Banking and Electronic Payments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#64 Do you feel secure with your bank's online banking service?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#65 Barbless
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#26 Return of the Smart Card?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#7 An interesting take on Verified by Visa Policy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#20 IBM forecasts 'new world order' for financial services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#2 Cyber attackers empty business accounts in minutes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#61 Hacker charges also an indictment on PCI, expert says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#9 Cyber crooks increasingly target small business accounts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#12 Need new 3270 emulator: SSH, inexpensive, reliable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#49 Hacker charges also an indictment on PCI, expert says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#68 Definition of a computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#70 Client Certificate UI for Chrome?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#73 Definition of a computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#3 Hacker charges also an indictment on PCI, expert says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#44 Nearly 500 People Fall Victim to ATM Skimming Scam
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#65 Crypto dongles to secure online transactions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#56 Crypto dongles to secure online transactions ... addenda
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#59 EU agency runs rule over ID cards for online banking logins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#18 security and online banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#21 security and online banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#72 Users still make hacking easy with weak passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#79 Customers risk online banking fraud by reusing bank credentials
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#86 NY Town's Bank Account Hacked; Poughkeepsie Loses $378K in Fraudulent Transfers

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Michigan firm sues bank over theft of $560,000

From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 15 Feb, 2010
Subject: Michigan firm sues bank over theft of $560,000
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#30 Michigan firm sues bank over theft of $560,000

related recent news item in this group:

New Banking Trojan Discovered in the Wild - Used to perform ACH and wire fraud
http://www.linkedin.com/newsArticle?viewDiscussion=&articleID=109658217&gid=127198
"Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked
http://www.linkedin.com/newsArticle?viewDiscussion=&articleID=109316682&gid=127198
also
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#7 "Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked - PCWorld

and in the discussions in this thread:

Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
http://www.linkedin.com/newsArticle?viewDiscussion=&articleID=109316172&gid=127198
also
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#24 Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#25 Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud

mentions the EU FINREAD standard (from the late 90s) which was countermeasure to much of the compromised PC exploits ... which then seemed to have big pull-back after problems with various token-based deployments. Misc. posts mentioning FINREAD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#finread

EU FINREAD standard was countemeasure to malware that could perform fraudulent transactions from compromised PCs ... even in situations involving a connected hardware token (by simulating real human operations to the hardware token).

FINREAD was independent hardware card reader with its own trusted PIN-pad and trusted display. The PIN-pad was countermeasure to malware that evesdropped PIN-entry on standard keyboard. Such malware might then transmit the PIN to remote location ... or use the PIN to submit fraudulent transactions from the local PC. The independent display was countermeasure to malware that performed a different transaction that what was shown on the PC display (is the transaction you are seeing the transaction you are performing?).

PC would send the transaction to the FINREAD terminal, the FINREAD terminal would display the transaction and ask that PIN be entered if the person approves. The PIN and transaction would then be sent to the hardware token for digital signature ... the digital signature from the hardware token would be returned to the PC for forwarding to financial institution. Malware on compromised PCs could still perform denial-of-service attack ... but couldn't generate (authenticated) transactions w/o the owners knowledge and couldn't generate transactions different than what was shown/represented.

A secure wireless cellphone/PDA might also be used as a FINREAD terminal (possibly with its own embedded hardware token) ... again having its own trusted PIN-entry and trusted display.

One of the things considered in the X9A10 retail payments financial standard working group was that a counterfeit terminal could be represented as a EU FINREAD terminal ... aka there was nothing in the standard that provided assurance to a financial institution that a transaction actually originated from a real FINREAD terminal.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 Feb 2010 09:51:31 -0500
Foreign demand for Teasury securities falls
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100216/ap_on_bi_ge/us_foreign_holdings

from above:
The Treasury Department reported that foreign holdings of U.S. Treasury securities fell by $53 billion in December, surpassing the previous record of a $44.5 billion drop in April 2009.

The big drop in China's holdings meant that it lost the top spot in terms of foreign ownership of U.S. Treasuries, dropping to second place behind Japan.


... snip ...

there is the items about FED (directly) buying treasures ... but there is also item about institutions becoming bank holding company, getting money from the FED at essentially zero, which is then used to buy treasuries at 3.5% ... effectively pocketing the difference. Say if they took in $500B, they could clear about $17B ... basically (another) gift courtesy of the FED (to help prop up the too-big-to-fail financial institutions).

I think it was one of the baseline articles that pointed out that theoritically the FED is providing money to regulated financial institutions so they can turn around and lend it to ordinary people and businesses ... rather than using it to trade/profit their own accounts.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

The origins of CICS

From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 16 Feb, 2010
Subject: The origins of CICS
Blog: Greater IBM Connection
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#12 The origins of CICS

"1970s Relational DBMS" in DBMS wiki page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Database_management_system
Edgar Codd's wiki page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Codd

some history of original relational/SQL implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

was done in bldg. 28, on vm370 370/145.

The first relational product that shipped to customers was on Multics. Multics was done on the 5th floor of 545 tech sq. As aside, the scientific center (responsible for virtual machine systems, the internal network, invention of GML, numerous online applications, etc) was on 4th flr of 545 tech sq. some past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

"Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 16 Feb, 2010
Subject:  "Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#7 "Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked

at the 2001 intel developers forum, i was giving a presentation on assurance in the TCP (trusted computing platform) track. The person responsible for TPM (trusted platform module) was in the front row, so I took the opportunity to quip that it was nice that it appeared that over the previous couple years, TPM was getting simpler (KISS), more like my AADS chip strawman; he then quiped back that I didn't have a committee of 200 people helping me with the design. some reference here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/index.html#presentation
and
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

There had actually been an effort to look at crypto/chip supporting DRM (piracy countermeasures) for the original PC (nearly 30 years ago) ... at the time it was a PC board covered in "magic goo". Constantly came up with measures to defeat the DRM ... as ways of peeling the security/integrity measures and compromising the circuits..

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 Feb 2010 15:22:32 -0500
jmfbahciv <jmfbahciv@aol> writes:
Could both (inflation and deflation) happen?

the financial mess bubble saw huge inflation in consumer real-estate market. this was in part because of trivially available funds from unregulated loan originators ... offering no-documentation, no-down, interest-only, 1% ARM. Speculators had bonanza because the loan costs was much less than typical inflation (planning on flipping after year or two ... before rate reset, and then repeating).

The speculation then created appearance that demand was much larger than it actually was further driving the inflation (spread between 1% ARM and real-estate inflation was much larger than current spread that bank holding companies getting FED money and turning around and buying treasuries; with the speculation further fueling inflation). The only question was who would be left holding the items when the bubble burst.

the (false) appearance of large increase in demand (because of speculation) ... then had builders throwing up more housing developments and strip malls (for the apparent huge increase in number of people needing all the units). local govs. then got in trouble because they were floating bonds to build new infrastructure to support all the new homes/citizens (anticipating that the bonds could be serviced when all the people snapped up the properties and started paying taxes). This bubble spread out into many parts of the economy ... like building supply businesses increasing inventory ... because of all the new construction.

at the same time there was offsetting deflation pressure; globalization, increasing cheap imports, decline in skill/education level and higher paying jobs going overseas (skill/education decline and loss of higher paying jobs somewhat negative feedback). there was also significant influx in illegal immigrant labor (some numbers placing illegal immigrants at +/- 10percent of legal residents).

there was also lots of congressional lobbying to not take any effective action against the illegal immigrant labor. one study had a $10k/annum per illegal immigrant shortfall between the taxes collected (related to the illegal immigrants) and the services governments supply (to illegal immigrants; could be construed as implicit gov. subsidy to the businesses involved).

with the bubble burst ... there is huge deflation/correction ... starting with real-estate market somewhat reverting to the start of the century ... and some things even declining further as oversupply has to be drawn down. the globalization and other deflation pressures continue to exist ... about the only offsetting factor now is the huge (inflationary) money printing & spending being done by the federal gov.

as an aside, there was one article about some of the companies involved in the bailout had strings attached that they supposedly couldn't use the money to continue with enormous spending on congressional lobbying. they supposedly circumvented the restriction by donating money to business organzations, which then did the lobbying

in any case, there are scores/hundreds of individual pieces of the economy ... each potentially with their own inflation/deflation characteristic.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 Feb 2010 15:35:42 -0500
despen writes:
But I'll take a keyboard that doesn't require an extra keystroke to recover from a typo (the reset key) over a real 3270 every time.

to handle that, there was hardware hack for 3277 .. basically a very small fifo connector/box; unplugged the keyboard from the head, plugged in the box, and plugged the keyboard into the box.

transition to 3274 controller and 3278/3279 ... eliminated that capability. a lot of the electronics that had been in the (3277) terminal head was moved back into the 3274 controller ... reducing the cost to build 3278/3279 terminals. the side-effect was that a lot of the dedicated electronics in 3272/3277 was now shared in 3274 controller and there was significant increase in protocol chatter between 3274 and the (3278/3279) terminal. The net was that 3278/3279 response was significantly degraded (compared to 3272/3277 combination) ... of course, if you were working with system that didn't otherwise have small subsecond response ... it possibly wouldn't be noticed.

The other side effect was that PC 3277 emulation cards had significant higher upload/download thruput than PC 3278/3279 emulation cards (aka doing 3278/3279 emulation involved the significantly higher protocol chatter).

recent posts mentioning 3270s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#5 DEC-10 SOS Editor Intra-Line Editing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#13 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#27 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#31 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#35 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#91 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#24 Processes' memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#67 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#69 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#80 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#91 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#14 Happy DEC-10 Day

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Happy DEC-10 Day

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 16 Feb 2010 21:53:02 -0500
despen writes:
Yes, I remember you posting this information before.

Outside your posts I'd never seen or heard of one.

Did IBM ever market the device?

Any idea what it cost?


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#36 Happy DEC-10 Day

box was about the size of a "black box" null modem

from long ago and far away

Date: 10/09/80 12:57:56
From: wheeler

in and out. We currently have fast curser, etc. resistors inside our keyboards. New box will sit between keyboard and 3277 head & includes a 32 character buffer. 32 character buffer solves problem with 3277 where you get input inhibited when trying to type while screen is being written. Along with fast curser it creatly improves useability of 3277.


... snip ... top of post, old email index.

& year later, another production box:

Date: 10/19/81 10:17:13
To: distribution

TMI (a company in NY) offers for about $150 a keyboard buffer for 3277 terminals. This permits one to type while the screen is written (no lost characters) and, based on some prototypes of similar devices it appears to be much more comfortable to use.


... snip ... top of post, old email index.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2010 00:24:19 -0500
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
I feel really productive those days when I produce negative amounts of code.

at the 2001 intel developer's forum, i was giving talk in assurance session in the TCP (trusted computing platform) track. The person responsible for TPM (trusted platfrom module) was in the front row, so I took the opportunity to quip that it was nice that it appeared that over the previous couple years, TPM was getting simpler (KISS), more like my AADS chip strawman; he then quiped back that I didn't have a committee of 200 people helping me with the design ... old reference gone to the wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2010 10:36:43 -0500
Larry__Weiss <lfw@airmail.net> writes:
When in that situation I always try hard to make sure I can reproduce the effects of the bug to make sure it does what I think it does. I put a high value on what I call "experienced code" - that is longstanding unchanged code that is relied upon in a production environment.

after work began on the morph of cp67 to vm370 ... which involved some amount of simplification ... there was enhancement made to cp67 that completely redid the internal kernel serialization mechanism ... which eliminated significant percentage of failures (from dangling pointers) as well as hung/zombie tasks.

after I started converting some amount of stuff at the cambridge science center to vm370 ... mentioned in these old emails:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

the serialization redo wasn't included.

as part of the resource management stuff, there was increasing sophistication done for automated benchmarking ... being able to specify variety of workload characteristics as well configurations and have the benchmarks cycle unattended. ... misc. past post mentioning benchmarking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#benchmark

for the heck of it, one of the workload specifications was real extreme ... 10-20 times the load that would ever be seen in real operations ... which would reliably result in system failures. this prompted me to bring the old cp67 serialization redo to vm370 ... hitting significant portions all over the kernel. after the rework ... was able to reliably execute super-extreme workloads w/o failures.

when it was decided to release the resource manager ... i included all of the structural changes as part of the release. also as part of release of resource manager ... a series of 2000 automated benchmarks were executed (taking three months elapsed time) for validation of the workings over broad range of workloads and configurations.

for other trivia ... in the 23jun69 unbundling announcement ... the corporation started charging for application software (somewhat in response to gov. & other litigation) ... but managed to make the case that kernel software should still be free.

there have been past references that the distraction of future system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

allowed clone processors to get a foothold in the market. after the failure of FS ... there was mad rush to get things back into the 370 software & hardware product pipelines (which had dried up during FS period ... since FS supposed was going to replace all 360/370). That mad rush ... contributed to the decision to letting me release the resource manager stuff (I had continued to work on 360/370 all during the FS period ... even sometimes making derogatory remarks about the FS activity). In anycase, company made the decision to make transition to charging for kernel software (somewhat countermeasure to clone processors) and my resource manager was selected to be guinea pig.

so i got to spend some amount of time with business people working on rules & policies for charging for kernel software. one of the issue was that during the transition period ... "free kernel" software couldn't be shipped that had pre-requisite of charged software). Also, during transition period, kernel software that was directly related to hardware support would be free.

So the resource manager eventually shipped and charged for.

They then decided for the following release that SMP (multiprocessor) support be shipped in the product. I had done a lot of work on supporting multiprocessor ... but based on a bunch of structural changes that I had included in the resource manager. This created a big problem ... with "free" SMP support having prerequisite on priced "resource manager". The eventual resolution was to remove close to 90% of the lines-of-code from the resource manager and place it in the "free" base ... as part of releasing "free" smp support. However, even though the resource manager had been reduced to only about 10% the lines of code ... the price didn't change.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2010 11:32:39 -0500
Eric Chomko <pne.chomko@comcast.net> writes:
Here, take a look at Beowulf clusters and actually learn something for a change!!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beowulf_%28computing%29


slightly related ... old email about medusa
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

related to this old post mentioning meeting in ellison's conference room jan92 (on cluster scaleup)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

much of medusa was about physical packaging, managing heat/cooling and footprint

related posts about wolfpack (and pfister's book)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#45 M$ SMP and old time IBM's LCMP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#46 M$ SMP and old time IBM's LCMP

earlier reply to one of pfister's posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#21 Cache coherence [was Re: TF-1]

past posts about ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2010 11:41:24 -0500
Eric Chomko <pne.chomko@comcast.net> writes:
Absolutely no flamebait intended! I am simply telling you how I feel about IBM's terminal and the type of computing it represented. Sorry if you don't like the 1st Amendment.

we had some big arguments with kingston with the introduction of 3274/3278 about it having poorer human factors for interactive computer (even compared to 3272/3277 ... especially being able to tweak 3277). kingston came back and stated that 3274/3278 was not designed for interactive computing ... it was designed for data entry (basically old keypunch stuff, transcribing hardcopy for computer entry).

recent posts mentioning 3270 terminals:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#5 DEC-10 SOS Editor Intra-Line Editing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#13 360 programs on a z/10
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#27 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#31 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#35 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#44 sysout using machine control instead of ANSI control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#45 sysout using machine control instead of ANSI control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#48 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#91 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#24 Processes' memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#67 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#69 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#80 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#85 Apple iPad -- this merges with folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#86 NY Town's Bank Account Hacked; Poughkeepsie Loses $378K in Fraudulent Transfers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#91 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#14 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#30 Michigan firm sues bank over theft of $560,000
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#36 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#37 Happy DEC-10 Day

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2010 13:58:34 -0500
Larry__Weiss <lfw@airmail.net> writes:
Did I miss something? I thought the price had changed for the 10% one (back to free).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#39 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

sorry for the confusion. original 23jun69 unbundling started to charge for application software but kernel software was free.

then after clone processors got market foothold, decision to start charging for kernel software ... but piecemeal transition.

initially new stuff, unrelated to direct hardware support, would be charged for (also free software couldn't have prerequisite for charged software).

resource manager just did much better effort at optimizing the hardware ... but wasn't actually needed for running the hardware (optional added value charged for).

however, i had also included a bunch of kernel restructuring as part of the resource manager. furthermore the internal efforts related to SMP support were dependent on those restructurings. it was eventually decided to ship SMP/multiprocessor support to customers ... since it was direct hardware support ... it fell into the "free" category.

the conflict was that SMP support was dependent on lots of stuff that had already been shipped as part of charged for software (my resource manager). The resolution was to remove about 90% of the lines of code from my ("charged for") resource manager (restructuring, integrity, serialization redo, etc) into the free software (leaving the resource manager only about 1/10th the size, in number of lines of code, and at the old price).

charged for (new, kernel "add-on") software went thru a number of transition phases. Last series on vm370 release 6 ... was a basic set of charged for kernel addons (BSEPP) and full set of charged for kernel addions (SEPP, which included my resource manager) at higher price (three customer options, all free; free+BSEPP, free+SEPP). The next release instead of being "release 7" was the first all charged for kernel and renamed VM/SP.

If you play with the Hercules 370 emulator (running on intel platforms), the vm370 distribution is the (last) free part of vm370 release 6 (not including BSEPP or SEPP).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

What was old is new again (water chilled)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What was old is new again (water chilled)
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2010 14:42:39 -0500
sharder@DTCC.COM (Scott Harder) writes:
I think it's Thermal Conduction Module, but not 100% sure.

IBM TCP Collection:
http://ibmcollectables.com/gallery/album122
another web page of TCMs
http://www.thegalleryofoldiron.com/TCMS.HTM

3081 wiki page (& thermal conduction module)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_3081

there is folklore about early 3081(?) at customer installation. Machine had closed circuit fluid cooling with heat exchange unit with external cooling facility. There were terminal sensors and flow sensors on inboard closed-loop cooling ... to shutdown before thermal overload. One customer lost flow on the external loop and by the time the thermal sensors tripped because of rising temperature, it was too late and fried the TCMs (all had to be replaced). Subsequently installations were upgraded to have flow sensors on both the inboard and outboard systems (that would trip power, in addition to the thermal sensors).

Field Engineering has required a "bootstrap" service process ... starting with being able to scope FRUs (field replaceable units). TCM physical enclosed all the components so it wasn't possible to scope anything. To satisfy field engineering, lots of sensors were placed in TCM ... connected to service processor. The service processor could be used to diagnose the TCMs ... and it was possible to scope the service processor if it needed diagnosing (get the service processor working and then use the service processor to get the 3081 working).

Not only was the 3081 service processor a proprietary microprocessor ... but required a one-off, proprietary operating system ... and a bunch of other custom developed software.

The decision was then made for the 3090 ... to use a 4331 running vm370 release 6 ... as the bases for the 3090 service processor. The service processor group had to take snap-shot version of vm370 release 6 with some amount of their diagnositic tools ... since the service processor vm370 release 6 ... would be around long after standard support for the software had been discontinued. All the serivce processor screens were done in CMS IOS3270 ... and both vm370 kernel and CMS having enhancements to handle all the sensor probes into the 3090 TCMs for diagnostic. Part way thru the effort, it was decided to upgrade the single 4331 to a pair of 4361s (effectively having redundant service processors in every 3090).

As an aside, vm370 release 6 ... was the last "free" vm370 kernel ... the next release being vm/sp release 1 and all charged for (vm370 release 6 is what is available with emulated 370 Hercules). Recent posts in thread discussing starting to charge for kernel software:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#39
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#42

old post mentioning a couple generations of computer technology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#22

the above also has a reference to research journal article about 4341 being used in 3081 TCM manufacturing testing ... previously free but since the above post ... there has been change and the URLs now take you to a page requesting money.
http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/rd/271/ibmrd2701G.pdf

for other topic drift ... some old memos/discussions about IBM Future System:
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

from above:

The 370 emulator minus the FS microcode was eventually sold in 1980 as as the IBM 3081. The ratio of the amount of circuitry in the 3081 to its performance was significantly worse than other IBM systems of the time; its price/performance ratio wasn't quite so bad because IBM had to cut the price to be competitive.

... snip ...

lots of past posts mentioning Future System
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2010 22:18:22 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
we had some big arguments with kingston with the introduction of 3274/3278 about it having poorer human factors for interactive computer (even compared to 3272/3277 ... especially being able to tweak 3277). kingston came back and stated that 3274/3278 was not designed for interactive computing ... it was designed for data entry (basically old keypunch stuff, transcribing hardcopy for computer entry).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#36 Happy DEC-10 Day

when Jim departed, he left behind "mipenvy" ... old email references:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801006
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801016

one of the earlier versions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email800920

in the aftermath, there was a group that visited/surveyed similar institutions (CMU, Bell Labs, LBL, Stanford, MIT, Univ. of Wisc, others) ... past posts with bits&pieces from that institution survey
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#61 MVS History (all parts)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#56 AT&T Labs vs. Google Labs - R&D History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#11 Yet another squirrel question - Results (very very long post)

misc. past posts mentioning mipenvy:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#7 New IBM history book out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#39 Vnet : Unbelievable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#73 They Got Mail: Not-So-Fond Farewells
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#74 They Got Mail: Not-So-Fond Farewells
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#75 They Got Mail: Not-So-Fond Farewells
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#15 If there had been no MS-DOS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#28 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#31 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#50 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#41 Mainframe Applications and Records Keeping?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#26 sorting was: The System/360 Model 20 Wasn't As Bad As All That
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#50 When Does Folklore Begin???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#1 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#13 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#17 Jim Gray Is Missing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#45 Is computer history taugh now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#63 Cycles per ASM instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#50 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#13 Why is switch to DSL so traumatic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007f.html#70 Is computer history taught now?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#41 another item related to ASCII vs. EBCDIC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#8 WSJ.com - IBM Puts Executive on Leave
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#49 The 50th Anniversary of the Legendary IBM 1401
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#13 360 programs on a z/10

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

What was old is new again (water chilled)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What was old is new again (water chilled)
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2010 09:52:51 -0500
Peter.Nuttall@EUROCLEAR.COM (Peter Nuttall) writes:
I remember working as an operator on shift at a site in London (mid 80's). Think we had a 3081/3084. The water cooling was done by a bank of radiators out in the car park. The site was set on a roundabout and during the summer months the radiators would get so clogged up with the heat/congestion and general rubbish flying about that they employed a guy to just hose down the radiators during the peak times of the day ... Water cooling the water cooling system ... :-).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#43 What was old is new again (water chilled)

from this thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#78 SLIGHTLY OT - Home Computer of the Future (not IBM)

discussing amount of heat and cooling required for old computers.

much lower density of circuits ... so that air flow could be used to pull heat away from the circuits ... but the aggregate heat was such that room air cooling units required lots of power and water.

also mentioned in the above, the science center's 360/67 machine room cooling had large city water pipe coming in, going thru the cooling unit and then dumping directly into city sewer system.

in the mid-70s, the city started making noises about conserving water. the problem was that it would have required a water tower on the roof to recycle the water ... and the building hadn't been constructed to handle such loading (some comments from the period was that few of the large multi-story office buildings had been built to handle such loading, also the science center's 360/67 datacenter wasn't the only one in the building). misc. past posts mentioning science center at 545 tech sq (offices were on 4th flr, machine room was on the 2nd flr)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

the was an interesting problem with the (new) almaden research bldg. computing in the machine room was dropping ... as well as the mainframe computers getting smaller so the machine room was starting to have empty spaces. however, pc/rt were starting to be placed in most of the offices. the pc/rt used quite a bit of power and produced a lot of heat.

a conservation notice started reminding people to turn the machines off at the end of the day. the problem was that the building air conditioning system hadn't been designed for the enormous fluctuation in heat (with the all PC/RTs being turned on in the morning and then turned off at the end of day) and actually having stable/comfortable temperature through-out the building. The solution to avoid the wide swings in temperature ... was to start leaving the machines on.

The building had lots of high-tech wiring for each office ... a large part was CAT5 for 16mbit T/R. However, some early tests found that star-wired (10mbit) ethernet running over CAT5 ... actually had both higher aggregate data transfer thruput as well as lower latency than 16mbit T/R (over the same CAT5).

We started to make use of the datapoint ... as well as several others. We had come up with 3tier network architecture (with lots of routers and ethernet) and was out pitching it to customer executives ... bringing down the wrath of the communication group which was pushing T/R, terminal emulation and trying to suppress 2tier/client-server.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2010 10:39:41 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
also in the 90s ... there were articles that many states getting near bankruptcy ... and playing all sorts of games with not funding various and sundry stuff. example was that various of the state funded universities (midwest, west, farwest, etc), anticipating the increasing budget constraints, had shifted from 90% of the univ. budget coming from state legislature to 12% of the univ. budget coming from state legislature.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#3 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

there was report that number of baby boomers are four times larger than previous generation and twice as large as following generation (reason the generation is called baby boomers). when the baby boomers shift from working to retirement the ratio of workers:retirees declines by factor of eight times.

in the past ... lots of companies were doing retirement as pay-as-you-go (not fully funded); small take of the baby boomers to fund the previous generation ... difference being pocketed as profits/bonuses/salary. the bubble with underfunding for baby boomers retirement being pushed off to the future (somewhat like gov. retirement programs). some number of these companies have declared bankruptcy to get out from under the pension liability ... pushing it off to the gov
http://www.pbgc.gov/

but states have been doing it also

Study: States must fill $1 trillion pension gap
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_pension_shortfall_study

from above:
"Meanwhile, more and more baby boomers in state and local government are nearing retirement, and many will live longer than earlier generations meaning that if states do not get a handle on the costs of post-employment benefits now, the problem likely will get far worse, with states facing debilitating costs," the study said.

... snip ...

not only is there a much larger number of baby boomers ... but living longer further drives up the pension liability.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Industry groups leap to Chip and PIN's defence

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com (Lynn Wheeler)
Date: 18 Feb, 2010
Subject: Industry groups leap to Chip and PIN's defence
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Industry groups leap to Chip and PIN's defence
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/02/18/chip_and_pin_analysis/

from above:
Analysis Banking industry suppliers have lined up to defend Chip and PIN, following the release of research last week from Cambridge University demonstrating how cybercrooks might be able to bypass security controls on credit and de

... snip ...

x-over from this news thread/discussion:
http://www.linkedin.com/newsArticle?viewDiscussion=&articleID=109316172&gid=127198

some of which also archived here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#17 Chip and PIN is Broken!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#21 Credit card data security: Who's responsible?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#24 Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#25 Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud

The game that linkedin plays with putting the news web page in a linkedin frame seems to be having a problem at the moment (clicking the "Read more at The Register") ... just showing pure blank ... the original URL is:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/02/18/chip_and_pin_analysis/

... more from above:
Jay Abbott, a security consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), commented: "At present, the customer is accountable for the fraud as banks argue that PIN verified transactions are secure. Given this attack demonstrates a clear method of bypassing the PIN system, this assertion by the banks stands on shakier ground."

... snip ...

There have been lots of instances regarding quality control of bits in transactions flowing thru interchange. Long ago & far away ... during period of SET (secure electronic transaction) pilots ... there was issue with the "SET" bit. Turning on the "SET" bit represented lower interchange for the merchant (and there was even proposals being floated that having the SET bit on should also change burden of proof ... similar to what has gone on in chip&pin). All the vendors of SET processing absolutely claimed that they could prove that they only turned on the SET bit ... when they had actually done SET operation.

They didn't understand that wasn't the problem. One of the interchange business people gave a presentation at ISO meeting in Europe ... about starting to find increasing number of transactions with the SET bit set ... and they knew that there was never any SET operations involved (aka non-SET operations & non-SET processing).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2010 11:35:31 -0500
Larry__Weiss <lfw@airmail.net> writes:
I've definitely seen that. It is amazing how much workaround is employed. And the users are quite proud of themselves for discovering it, and in the most extreme cases argue against replacing a system with one that actually works better in the usual definition of a better implementation of the specs because they are quite satisfied with the existing system.

I like systems where a higher authority changes the business rules at least once a year, and the users are forced to upgrade to get the new behaviors. A tax collection system is one example.


imagine a tax code that runs to 65,000 pages with legislature body that possibly makes random changes on the last day of the year ... creating a situation where theoritically millions of lines of production computer code needs to be magically changed overnight.

it isn't the collection so much ... supposedly nearly 90+ percent of collection goes thru EFTPS (which is actually outsourced):
http://www.irs.gov/uac/EFTPS:-The-Electronic-Federal-Tax-Payment-System-

there was a group of economists a couple years ago that claimed that going to flat rate tax ... reduces the tax code to possibly 400-500 pages and would improve GDP by a couple percent ... the benefits of the overall improved economic efficiency more than offsets the loss of any claimed benefits from any/all of the special provisions in the existing tax code.

the other benefit the group claimed was that the major part of graft & corruption currently within the beltway swirls around the lobbying for special tax code provisions (contributing to the institution being one of the most corrupt in the world). going to flat rate tax code ... would help eliminate much of that enormous graft and corruption.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2010 12:07:09 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
there was a group of economists a couple years ago that claimed that going to flat rate tax ... reduces the tax code to possibly 400-500 pages and would improve GDP by a couple percent ... the benefits of the overall improved economic efficiency more than offsets the loss of any claimed benefits from any/all of the special provisions in the existing tax code.

the other benefit the group claimed was that the major part of graft & corruption currently within the beltway swirls around the lobbying for special tax code provisions (supposedly making the institution one of the most corrupt in the world). going to flat rate tax code ... would help eliminate much of that enormous graft and corruption.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#48 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

a semi-humorous footnote the group made, was that Ireland has been lobbying against the change to flat-rate tax ... supposedly the complexity of the US taxcode has been given as one of the motivations for companies moving to Ireland.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2010 17:05:21 -0500
Mark Crispin <mrc@panda.com> writes:
My memory may be faulty after nearly 30 years since I last touched an Alto, but I'm pretty sure on these points.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#44 Happy DEC-10 Day

some ('81) survey bits & pieces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#61 MVS History (all parts)

including:


Stanford
Name            CPU     Mips    Memory  Disk    Total   Concurrent
                                (megs)  (megs)  Users   Users
SAIL            KL10(2) 3.6     10      1600    230     70
SCORE           20/60   2.0     4       400     230     55
VAX1            11/780  1.1     4       400     ?       small
VAX2            11/780  1.1     2       200     ?       small
IBM             4331    0.5     4       8-3310s 30      8
(16)            Alto    0.3/4.8 0.25/4  2/32    16      16

... snip ...

also mentioned in this survey reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#11 Yet another squirrel question - Results (very very long post)

above also mentions that xerox has more machines than people (300 machines for 200 employees)

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2010 19:52:44 -0500
Mark Crispin <mrc@panda.com> writes:
That is nonsense. I was there.

To set the record straight.

The SAIL KL was a model A CPU for most of its life. I don't think that it ever became a model B CPU, much less an MCA25. SAIL was most certainly not nearly twice as fast as Score.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#44 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#50 Happy DEC-10 Day

...

http://forum.stanford.edu/wiki/index.php/Early_Computers_at_Stanford#DEC_PDP-10

from above:
Mark Crispin remembers that when he arrived in 1977 there were two processors in the PDP-10 system: the KA10 described above and a KL10, the fastest processor in the PDP-10 line. User jobs were run on the KL10 and the KA10 ran the XGP font compiler and user jobs (in "spacewar mode", formerly the task of the PDP-6 processor).

... snip ...

it is possible that the people making the visits/survey heard it was two processor system (and filled in the rest, there are several references describing it as a 3-processor with KL10, KA10 and a PDP6)

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2010 20:23:10 -0500
Rich Alderson <news@alderson.users.panix.com> writes:
Further, it's unclear to me, looking at the URL Lynn provided, just what this was supposed to be a survey of. It's certainly short of the full complement of PDP-10 architecture machines at Stanford, even in 1981.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#44 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#50 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#51 Happy DEC-10 Day

<reposting, not sure what is going on ... a couple posts <over last couple hrs randomly seem to have disappeared w/o trace

survey heading for the previous table:
The Computer Science Department

The computer science department personnel are as follows:

• 35 - 45 faculty and researchers
• 100 - 135 graduate students
• 50 staff, including administrators, secretaries, programmers, engineers, operators, technicians

Systems and Their Use

The machines are:


... snip ...

and
Two Vax 11/780s are on order. The PDP 10 and the Altos are connected via a 3 megabit Ethernet. The 10 and the 20 are also on the ARPA net. There are many glass teletypes spread throughout the building, most running at 9600 baud.

... snip ...

... also from the survey document:
The Center for Information Technology

This is the main computer center at Stanford. We did not visit it on this trip, but I have previously visited it. CIT serves the campus as a whole, although many departments (not just computer science) have their own machines. CIT offers LOTS (Low Overhead Time Sharing) to undergraduates on a couple of Dec 20/60s, and runs OS/MVT on an IBM 3033. The interactive system on this machine is Wylbur.

Pushing for SUN terminals

When Ralph Gorin (the manager of computers for the Computer Science Department) was asked what he would do with $10,000,000 he said, "buy 250 SUN terminals and another PDP 20" (SUN is a 68000 based personal computer with an all points addressable display.) Clearly, the push is towards greater decentralization of computing power. As we saw elsewhere, they like or tend to buy power in medium sized increments at most.


... snip ...

this old post references a meeting at Palo Alto Science Center trying to interest the company into producing SUN as product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#4a

other internal groups (also at the meeting) claimed that they were doing something better (including boca).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

SWTL and 522

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: SWTL and 522
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 10:26:27 -0500
woodag@OZEMAIL.COM.AU (Andy Wood) writes:
Strangely, the POP for S/370 (which introduced the TOD clock, but retained the interval timer for backward compatibility) defined the interval timer differently.

IBM System/370 Principles of Operation GA22-7000-4: In the basic form, the contents of the timer are reduced by one in bit position 23 every 1/300 of a second. Higher resolution of timing may be obtained in some models by counting with higher frequency in one of the positions 24 through 31. In each case, the frequency is adjusted to give counting at 300 cycles per second in bit position 23. The cycle of the timer is approximately 15.5 hours.

Note that compared to the description in the S/360 POP , the rate is very different, but the claimed cycle time is still 15.5 hours. The S/370 version makes much more sense to me - I calculate that decrementing bit position 23, at 300 times a second will wrap the counter in 15.53 hours.

This where things get more interesting. 300 times a second is once every 3333.33 microseconds, so bit 23 decrements every 3333.33 microseconds. That equates to decrementing bit 24 every 1666.66 microseconds, bit 25 every 833.33 seconds, and ... wait for it ... bit 30 every 26.041666 microseconds. Well, yes the magic number has appeared, but unfortunately we are not yet at the low order bit - bit 31 would decrement every 13.020833 microseconds. So near, and yet so far. I have probably gone wrong somewhere along the way there.


most 360s didn't actually decrement the low-order bit of the location 80 timer ... most were at the 3.3mills than 13+ microseconds. 360/67 had high resolution timer feature that did decrement the low-order bit (this is somewhat analogous to 370 timer defining the reference bit ... but allows different modesl to do actual updates at resolution comparable to their instruction rate).

the update required timer taking the memory bus to update location 80. the timer had a little leeway ... put it would machine check if the timer tic'ed again and there was still a previous tic update pending.

I had added tty/ascii terminal support to cp67 (as undergraduate at the univ) ... and tried to make the 2702 terminal controller do something that it couldn't quite do. this somewhat motivated the univ. to start a clone controller effort; reverse engineer the channel interface, build channel interface board for interdata/3 and program the interdata/3 to emulate the 2702 (along with additional function). one of the first bugs was not having the channel periodically release the memory bus (allowing window for the timer to update location 80) ... and the timer doing machine check because the next tic occured before the previous tic had been updated in location 80.

the implementation was later updated to be an interdata/4 to handle the channel interface and "cluster" of interdata/3 processors handling the line scanner function. Four of us got written up as getting blame for clone controller business. Later Perkin-Elmer acquired Interdata and the box was sold under the Perkin-Elmer logo. misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

a big motivation for the new 370 timer stuff not using location 80 ... was getting the activity off the memory bus (aka the compatibility 370 location timer was only the low resolution timer ... so only needed the memory bus every couple milliseconds ... not microseconds).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Happy DEC-10 Day

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 11:53:42 -0500
Morten Reistad <first@last.name> writes:
I get a weird effect with about 1/5th of your posts, and those of Eugene Myia, and some others from the left half of leftopondia.

The posts are delayed for 2-3 days, and then appear. I have a leafnode+ server running to 4 news sources, Tele2, Get, DFN and Newsguy. The first two lose postings all the time (they are local ISPs), but they tend to fill for each other; and DFN fills in the remaining bits from postings that arrive from Europe. Such posts are very rarely delayed more than one hour.

The pattern from Lynn, Eugene etc is different. These postings go away for days, and then appear; always through Newsguy or sometimes DFN.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#52 Happy DEC-10 Day

however, when the previous usenet service i was using, went away late last summer ... I switched to one supposedly in (or at least managed in) EU ... if anything, I possibly might have more problems making connections to the server ... but it should be (at least physically) closer to you (although internet path hops might go anywhere; even back & forth between EU and US).

I usually don't see delay ... i've seen a couple of connection attempts dropping ... there has only been a few with apparent posting completing w/o error indication ... and the post never showing up (even at the server I was posting to).

just doing traceroute ... the last few hops don't have reverse-IP entries (path goes thru ny.level3.net then ny.alter.net & then verizon & then no reverse-ip). those last few ip-addresses have a subnet with whois entry for "MCI Communications Services, Inc. d/b/a Verizon Business" (so the server appears to be possibly physically hosted in virginia).

the usenet server's webpage claims 100mbit connections to several internet backbones and connections to 60 USENET peers.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

End of an Era

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: End of an Era
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 12:47:10 -0500
Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:
IBM is now charging for articles from the IBM Journal of Research and Development, and soon they'll be moving to an IEEE site.

similar comment in this recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#43 What was old is new again (water chilled)

started out discussing TCMs ... and an older post on the subject:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#22 Evil weather

had referenced this article:
http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/rd/271/ibmrd2701G.pdf

however, the above URL now goes to web page asking for $29

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
Newsgroups: alt.sys.pdp10, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 13:02:21 -0500
sidd <sidd@situ.com> writes:
"They made money selling the crap mortgages, and they made money by collecting on the bogus insurance from AIG when the crap mortgages flopped."

its insurance when you buy something to cover the chance that it happens to you ... it is more frequently called gambling when you start betting on whether or not it happens to somebody else. it gets even more bizarre when the gov. starts supplying the money to make the bets as well as the money to pay off the bets.

part of the reasons they could be selling such large number of mortgages was that they were being packaged as toxic CDOs and then paying for triple-A ratings on the toxic CDOs (toxic CDOs were tried during the S&L crisis, but w/o buying the triple-A ratings, hardly found any market; unregulated non-depository loan originators used buying triple-A ratings on the toxic CDOs, to access enormously larger source of funds ... without the triple-A ratings there would have been significantly smaller number of such mortgages and hardly a blip on the economy; one might claim that the unregulated non-depository loan originators were unregulated ... because they could have little economic impact w/o a ready supply of money).

then there can be bets made on whether there might be problems with the triple-A rated toxic CDOs (could get some really great odds since theoritically, triple-A ratings should have very low probability for problems).

news item just now w/congressman calling for investigation into gov. AIG $180+B ... as being a "backdoor" bailout for other institutions.

misc. recent posts mentioning toxic CDOs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#37 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#61 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#48 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#53 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#8 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#10 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#11 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#26 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#29 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 13:30:59 -0500
thomas.berg@SWEDBANK.SE (Thomas Berg) writes:
As it's Friday: Does anyone know where You can get a copy of the Adventure game that originally was written by Will Crowther and eventually for S/370 ? I had once a copy but it seems have gone to the bit-bucket. Preferably one that is faithful to the original. (And runnable on z/OS.)

Tymshare had gotten a copy from sail/stanford and put it up on their pdp machine ... and then ported it from pdp (fortran) to vm/cms (fortran). I got copies from tymshare and from an institution in the UK ... and made executable available internally (I would send source to anybody proving that they made all the points). Some number of internal people added all sorts of enhancements as well as porting to PLI. The original had a sop to corporate environments limiting play to 100 moves during 1st shift hrs (unless you had the secret or had hacked the executable).

I lost track of that copy over the years, however a couple years ago i managed to trip across a (later) PLI source (a WYLBUR/TSO version ... possibly done at Stanford with some glue code that supposedly allows it to on CMS). I haven't actually tried to run it (and it might actually work under TSO w/o the CMS glue routine).

old ('78) email related to tracking down copy of (vm/cms fortran) adventure:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email780405
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email780405b

above mentions that I was alsos setting up process to getting monthly mailed tapes from Tymshare of a dump of all the vmshare files. some old email mentioning vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare

tymshare had started providing their vm/cms-based online computing conferencing to SHARE in aug76 for "VMSHARE". vmshare archive:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 19 Feb 2010 10:58:27 -0800
m42tom-ibmmain@YAHOO.COM (Tom Marchant) writes:
The implementation of PR/SM is indeed similar to VM. It may even share quite a bit of code, but it is not virtual. You have to allocate the processor storage to each LPAR. Real devices have to be provided for each of them. Consoles, for example.

a lot of PR/SM is the same virtual machine performance assist microcode. To some extent, PR/SM is a relatively static subset of VM ... with some fixed amount of physical resources (although this has become somewhat more dynamic over the years). Early implementations also had problems with microcode being mutually exclusive ... either for PR/SM or for VM (i.e. vm lost some of the microcode assist when run in an LPAR).

some later discussion here
http://www.vm.ibm.com/perf/tips/z890.html

i may have unwittingly contributed to some of the Amdahl hypervisor (with ibm eventually responded to with PR/SM on 3090) by giving some detailed presentations on vm performance assist ECPS microcode at baybunch (monthly user group meeting held at slac that had lots of institutions & vendors) and then getting grilled by a couple Amdahl people at the after hrs event (usually at Oasis or the Dutch Goose).
http://theoasisbeergarden.com/
http://www.dutchgoose.net/Dutch_Goose/Home.html

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 18:43:29 -0500
gahenke@GMAIL.COM (George Henke) writes:
After all is not MVS a far more robost operating system than VM which, by the admission of its own authors, is really little more than a hypervisor developed, of yore, to test different versions of MVS?

some number of commercial online timesharing service bureaus were spun-off providing (secure) online interactive operation. recent mention of tymshare here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#57 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

however, there were others. a couple of them relatively rapidly moved up the value chain providing all sorts of financial information (including to numerous highly competitive organizations on wallstreet in secure environment). misc. past posts mentioning commercial timesharing operation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

for much of its life vm/cms provided major interactive computing in addition to virtual guest testing. in the wake of the 23jun69 announcement, several internal "HONE" datacenters were setup with cp67 virtual machine to provide hands-on experience for branch office personal with guest operating systems. past post mentioning vm/cms-based online HONE system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

however, the science center (besides doing virtual machine systems, initial cp40 and then morphed into cp67) ... also ported apl\360 to cms for cms\apl (doing a lot of work for operation in virtual memory environment). Lots of apl-based applications were developed providing sales&marketing support which were also deployed on HONE. Eventually the online interactive sales&marketing support applications came to dominant all HONE operation (and the virtual guest use withered away) ... including (any kind of) mainframe having to be preprocessed by HONE applications (before they could be submitted).

the technology for majority of the internal network was also done at the science center ... and for a long period, the majority of the internal machines on this network (larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until possibly late '85 or early '86) ... and were vm/cms machines primarily providing interactive computing. misc. past posts mentioning the internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

At one point, I got involved with the disk engineering development & product test labs in bldg. 14&15 ... and they let me play disk engineer. At one point that had tried to use MVS on their mainframe machines for testing of devices under development ... but experienced a 15min MTBF w/MVS operating a single testcell. They had to drop back to (scheduled) stand-alone testing (i.e. dedicated time, preschedule, schedule tending to be 7x24 around the clock).

I decided to redo i/o supervisor so it would never fail ... and eventually was able to support any number of concurrent, on-demand testcell operation ... significantly improving dasd development and test productivity. I happened to do a purely internal document describing the environment and happened to mention the MVS 15min MTBF. I then got a phone call from the MVS operation ... I initially thot would be related to going through the list of things that could be fixed in MVS. Instead it turned out to be part of bringing the wrath of the MVS organization down on me head for even making any references to issues with MVS (some temptation to attribute reputation to carefully managing information)

A couple years later ... with the pending introduction of 3380s, the engineers had several dozen (57) hardware error regression tests ... all of which resulted in MVS hang/failure and needing to reboot; in 2/3rds of the cases, there wasn't even any record of what had caused the hang/reboot. old email reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801015

misc. past posts getting to play disk engineer (and some referencing bringing down the wrath of the MVS organization)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

there was a situation in the aftermath of the demise of the future system effort (was going to completely replace 360/370),
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

a mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipeline (which was allowed to go dry during the future system period) ... as well as concerted effort to launch XA. POK managed to convince the corporation to kill the vm370 product, shutdown the vm370 development group at burlington mall, and move all the people to POK (otherwise they wouldn't be able to make the mvs/xa ship date). Eventually Endicott managed to acquired the vm370 product mission ... but effectively had to constitute a development group from scratch. There is also a joking reference that the head of POK was a major contributor to DEC VAX/VMS since so many people wouldn't move and left, going to work for DEC (on VMS).

There were enormous number of vm/43xx machines mid-range mostly providing interactive computing (both internally within the corporation and at customer sites) ... it somewhat competed with vax/vms in the same market. The big difference between the vm/43xx sales and vax/vms sales were the large vm/43xx corporate orders that in some cases were nearly a 1000 machines. Going into the mid-80s, the mid-range market saw a shift to workstations and large PCs ... it can be seen in the drop off in vax/vms sales as well as lack of uptake for the 4331/4341 followon (4361/4381 had anticipated seeing similar huges sales as 4331/4341, but the mid-range market was moving to other platforms). misc. old email related to vm/43xx
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

Another trivial example was that the original relational/sql implementation was vm/cms system/r ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

there was then technology transfer from SJR to endicott for sql/ds.

this old post mentioning some people in jan92 meeting in ellison's conference room
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

one of the people mentioned, claims to have handled the technology transfer from endicott to STL for DB2.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 19:46:24 -0500
gahenke@GMAIL.COM (George Henke) writes:
True. But it does not predate SVS, VS1, MVT, MFT, and OS Rel 17 from which (except for VS1) MVS evolved. Furthermore, a duck is still a duck no matter what you do to it, no matter how you dress it up. z/VM is certainly larger, more robust, and more powerful, than ever, but no matter what you do to it, it still just a hypervisor as one of the links included by some of the creators of PR/SM in the trail notes pointing out that PR/SM is now officially referred to as the "LPAR Hypervisor".

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#58 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#59 LPARs: More or Less?

science center had original done virtual machine cp40 on a 360/40 with special hardware modifications to support virtual memory (they originally had tried for 360/50, but could get any because so many were going to FAA for ATC system). When standard 360/67 with virtual memory hardware support came available, cp40 morphed into cp67. past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

a more detailed early history can also be found here:
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/

lots of customers that had been sold 360/67s to use with tss/360 ... switched to cp67 when tss/360 had delivery problems (others just dropped back to running the machines in 360/65 mode with os/360).

old post that has part of presentation I made at 68 SHARE meeting in Boston about lots of performance enhancements I had done for MFT (completely reworked stage2 sysgen for careful placement of datasets and PDS members for optimal disk arm mition) and cp67 (lots of code changes to significantly reduce cp67 pathlength)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18 CP/67 & OS MFT14

One of the things that CP67 needed to handle for virtual machine operation was channel program translation ... creating a shadow copy of the virtual machine channel program ... with real addresses (rather than virtual machine addresses). SVS faced the same exact problem in EXCP processing handling the passed channel program. The SVS initial implementation started out by borrowing the channel program translation routine (CCWTRAN) from cp67 (basically MVT laid out in large virtual address space, with minimum support for single virtual address space, most of the work was CCWTRANS doing channel program translation for EXCP).

One of the first distributed development projects was between Endicott and the science center to implement vm370 virtual machines in cp67 running on real 360/67. Part of this resulted in also creation of the cms multi-level source management infrastructure. The science center cp67 service had a lot of non-employees from various higher educational institutions in the boston area. As a result, there had to be a lot of procedures to keep 370 virtual memory activity from unauthorized people. The cp67 system running on the real 360/67 was "cp67l", "cp67h" ran in a 360/67 virtual machine (away from prying eyes of unauthorized people) with the changes to simulate 370 hardware, "cp67i" ran in 370 virtual machine (with changes to conform to 370 rather than 360 virtual memory). This environment was running standard for a year before the first 370 with real hardware virtual machine was available. Then for a long time "cp67i" was standard operating system that ran internally on large number of 370s for long period (before vm370 was available).

It took quite some time for science center got a real 370 to replace 360/67 ... and look at moving from cp67 to vm370. However, i had continued to work on 360 stuff (this was also during the height of future system activity ... and possibly not exactly career enhancing, but was periodicly making less than flattering comments about FS). Eventually this old email references moving a lot of virtual machine enhancements from cp67 base to vm370 base:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

the 23jun69 unbundling announcement started charging for application software (somewhat as result of various litigation) ... but managed to make the case that kernel software was still free. misc. past posts mentioning unbundling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

it has been claimed that the distraction of FS allowed clone processors to gain foothold in the 370 market. Somewhat as a result, there was eventually decision to start charging for kernel software. The mad rush to get stuff back in 370 product pipeline contributed to decision to release a lot of stuff I had been doing all during the FS period. Some of this included the dynamic adaptive resource manager that I had originally done as undergraduate and was picked up and shipped in cp67.

There was a lot of simplification done as part of the morph of cp67 to vm370 ... and one of the things dropped was dynamic adaptive resource manager. As part of the post FS-period ... it was also decided to release my resource manager on vm370 (which I had been shipping to a lot of internal locations). However, the clone processors contributed to the decision to start charging for kernel software ... and my resource manager was selected to be the guinea pig ... and I got to spend a lot of time with business people working out policies for kernel software charing.

misc. past posts mentioning some of the stuff that went into the resource manager
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#clock

one of the other things at the science center was that GML was invented there in 1969 ("G", "M", & "L" are the initials of the peoples' last name) ... and support for GML tag processing was added to the CMS "script" document processor. GML was subsequently standardized as SGML ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

waterloo did a clone of the cms "script" document processing command. these references talk about the waterloo script SGML support morphing into HTML at CERN (which then morphed into varioius other MLs).

A History of Scientific Text Processing at CERN
http://ref.web.cern.ch/ref/CERN/CNL/2001/001/tp_history/Pr/

above mentions using Waterloo's clone of CMS SCRIPT command and getting first laser printer (3800) in 1979. Above also describes evolution from script/GML/SGML to Web & HTML. the evolution from script/GML/SGML to WEB/HTML also described here
http://infomesh.net/html/history/early/

and first webserver outside cern is slac vm/cms system
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 20:05:23 -0500
gahenke@GMAIL.COM (George Henke) writes:
"I remember it well"

I did not arrive on the scene at POK (bldg #10, I think, Global Services) until late, and then only as an outsider consultant (only a Class "B" integrator, not a Class "A" developer like yourself).

But I remember the war stories I heard there, even then, of how the MVS group had tried to do in VM, until top management found out somehow that the MVS group was quietly using (needed) VM to test MVS.

And I remember HONE, but I did not know it was driven by VM. I remember it as maybe a system to pose technical questions to.

And then, of course, there was PROFS, IBM's own precursor to email. It had it all including an organization chart.

"Those were the days"

Thank you.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#58 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#59 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#60 LPARs: More or Less?

one of my hobbies was building production systems with large number of enhancements for internal product distribution. one of the locations I supported was HONE from cp67 thru vm370 and later days.

As relatively new hire at the science center ... one of my early overseas trips was move of EMEA hdqtrs to Paris ... and helping to install HONE clone. As HONE clones proliferated around the world ... I got to do some number of the installs. misc old email mentioning HONE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#hone

there is some ambivalence about PROFS. for instance, the core email processing code in PROFS had been picked up a very early copy of email application called VMSG. when VMSG author offered to the PROFS group to provide them with a significantly enhanced version; the PROFS group attempted to get the person fired. It was eventually all made moot ... while the PROFS group may have thot they had sanitized the code to remove evidenice of its origins ... the VMSG author demonstrated that every PROFS email carried his initials in the comment section of (normally undisplayed) network control field. After that, the VMSG source was restricted to just the author and two other people.

PROFS also picked up the online telephone book facility that Jim Gray and I had originally done. This is old post about the celebration at Berkeley celebrating Jim:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#50 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#51 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#27 Father Of Financial Dataprocessing

in the webcase audio file of the event ... the tandem person on one of the panels talks about Jim doing online telephone book at tandem. Shortly later, I get up and talk about Jim and I had earlier done an online telephone book at IBM.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 21:14:14 -0500
gahenke@GMAIL.COM (George Henke) writes:
I have since come to realize that even though MVS is more robust with more functionality, that when all is said and done, VM is really the only "true" operating system, because it is the only operating system that can run other operating systems. In effect reducing MVS to the level of a CICS.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#58 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#59 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#60 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#61 LPARs: More or Less?

depends on who is doing the code ... and how the information is being managed ... as evidence the MVS 15min MTBF in the disk engineering lab.

this is recent post going into some detail about getting ready to release the resource manager
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#39 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

above mentions having developed a bunch of automated benchmarking technologys as part of performance work at the science center. One of the things i used the automated benchmarking for was creating extreme workloads that would provoke system failures (and then reworking kernel to eliminate all cases of all failures ... this was before redoing i/o supervisor initially for disk engineering).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#benchmark

there was then a final set of 2000 benchmarks with a wide variety of workloads and configuration to calibrate & validate the resource manager (taking 3months elapsed time).

part of the benhmarking technology was a modifications to something called the performance predictor ... the science center was doing a lot of performance monitoring and modeling work ... including workload profiling (eventually evolving into capacity planning). One of the technologies was an analytical system model done in cms\apl. This was eventually packaged for HONE so that branch people could enter customer workload and configuration information and asked "what-if" questions about changes to cusotmer workload or configuration.

for the automated benchmarking, there first of the 1000 final benchmarks were selected to cover a broad range of workloads and configurations ... and all the information fed to a enhanced version of the performance predictor ... the modified predictor then was used to select the workload & configurations for the next 1000 benchmarks ... for each benchmark ... there would be prediction about the results ... and then after the benchmark ... the actual results were compared with the analytical/predicted results; then it would select the next combination. Part of the driver was trying to automate discovery of operational points that weren't correctly managed.

another kind of robustness:
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

there are currently virtualization efforts attempting to address enormous vulnerabilities related to internet connections ... basically use virtualization for combination of exploit isolation and simplification (vulnerabilities typically proportional to complexity). Some amount of this is being referred to as virtual appliances ... simplified, focused environments for specific purposes.

A flavor is create virtual machine with simplified operating system & browser ... allow it to do some amount of risky internet activity ... and then completely dissolve/flush it (along with any compromises).

long ago and far away ... my wife had co-authored peer-coupled network architecture ... in the very early days of SNA/vtam master/slave terminal management ... which the SNA group possibly thot was threatening (this was AWP39 ... for reference pt. APPN was AWP164). She then did a stint in the JES group ... catcher for ASP turning into JES3 and did design document for single integrated JES2/JES3 product.

A couple recent posts mentioning an executive con'ing her into going to POK to be in charge of loosely-coupled architecture.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#12 The origins of CICS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#29 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

while there she created peer-coupled shared data architecture, some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

which except for IMS hot-standby saw very little uptake until sysplex ... which contributed to her not remaining long in the position. There were also battles with the sna organization ... regarding using (master/slave) sna for peer-coupled loosly-coupled operation. There would be temporary truces where she would be allowed to use whatever she wanted within the boundaries of the datacenter walls ... but SNA had to be used for everything that crossed the datacenter boundary.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 21:53:27 -0500
gahenke@GMAIL.COM (George Henke) writes:
I have since come to realize that even though MVS is more robust with more functionality, that when all is said and done, VM is really the only "true" operating system, because it is the only operating system that can run other operating systems. In effect reducing MVS to the level of a CICS.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#58 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#59 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#60 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#61 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#62 LPARs: More or Less?

for another robustness scenario ... when we were doing our ha/cmp product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

i coined the terms disaster survivability and "geographic survivabilty" as part of our world-wide marketing. I was also asked to write a section (about what we were doing) for the corporate continuous availability document. The section was then pulled when both Rochester and POK complained (basically that it would be years before either could support such operation). misc. past post mentioning disaster survivability, geographic survivability, and/or continuous availability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

as part of ha/cmp ... was also doing cluster scaleup for both commercial and numerical intensive markets ... some past emails
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

then in very short period, the work was transferred ... announced as a numerical intensive only product ... and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors. the above all happened with a couple weeks following the jan92 meeting in ellison's conference room mentioned in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

that & other similar stuff contributed to deciding to take early out offer.

for another kind of robustness ... reference here
http://web.archive.org/web/20011109072807/http://www.intel94.com/idf/spr2001/sessiondescription.asp?id=stp+s13

above referenced in these recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#7 "Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked - PCWorld
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#34 "Unhackable" Infineon Chip Physically Cracked
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#38 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2010 11:00:22 -0500
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
Is it the same as this one?
http://home.roadrunner.com/~pflass/PLI/code/advent.pli

I'd like to get more information so I can provide attributions and/or credit the author.


What I have is
Advent_CMS.ZIP

contains:

advent.exec
advent.pli
advent.text
randu.text
randu.fortran
oldad.text
wellput.asm
itime.text
itime.asm
wellput.text
cave.data

... snip ...

advent.pli in ascii is 261662 bytes, ebcdic->ascii conversion with trailing blanks; 106553 bytes with trailing blanks removed. I download yours & it is 106970 bytes with lots of caret/control M & @; 103303 with those characters removed. yours is 3195 lines, the one i have is 3191 lines. I guess it is close enuf for gov. work.

post in bit.listserv.ibm-main mentions there is one in file 269 at cbttape.org.
http://www.cbttape.org/

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2010 11:21:47 -0500
"John Crane" <john_crane_XX@yahoo.com> writes:
Someone actually keeps their email from 1978?

You should write a book on leading an organized life!


some bits & pieces from some archive
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html

problem is that the archive prior to 77 was lost when the almaden datacenter had operational problem with their tape library and random tapes were being mounted for scratch. only a trivial few things prior to 77 survived for random reasons ... a couple
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

for other topic drift ... I remember being in Paris in early 70s doing a HONE clone install as part of EMEA hdqtrs move from the states to Paris ... and having a really difficult time getting electronic/network connection back to the states to read email.

I had gotten blamed for computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s. internal network was larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until possibly sometime late 85 or early 86 ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

Part of that computer conferencing activity came to be called tandem memos. The company then had a "task force" to investigate the phenomena ... including bringing in outside "experts". I remember two of the outside experts brought in to participate were the authors of "The Network Nation" ... reference here:
http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=8903

Somewhat as result there was also a researcher paid to sit in the back of my office for 9months taking notes on how I communicated, they also went with me to meetings. They got copies of all my incoming and outgoing email as well as logs of all instant messages. The result was a research report ... also a Stanford PHD thesis and the material for a number of papers and books. somewhat related posts on computer mediated communication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

One of the books
http://www.powells.com/biblio?PID=24750&cgi=product&isbn=0582071313

some past posts referring to the troubles in the almaden datacenter
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#57 Whom Do Programmers Admire Now???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#66 History of project maintenance tools -- what and when?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#13 A Dark Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#45 Hand cranking telephones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#12 Seven of Nine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#59 A POX on you, Dennis Ritchie!!!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#30 Status of Software Reuse?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#7 Mount a tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#42 vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#51 Scholars needed to build a computer history bibliography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007u.html#29 Folklore references to CP67 at Lincoln Labs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#8 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#13 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#4 Why do IBMers think disks are 'Direct Access'?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#66 Evolution of Floating Point
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#17 old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#51 Source code for s/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#96 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2010 12:13:33 -0500
mike@MENTOR-SERVICES.COM (Mike Myers) writes:
Allow me to fill you in a bit on at least one of the "MVS group's attempt to do in VM".

IIRC, it was shortly after the death of FS (Future Systems) when I and several others were selected for a task force to answer the question "how can we reduce the amount of development required to modify our operating systems (MVS and VM) to support any new processors that POK develops?"

We looked at several ways to make the nuclei of both systems similar and couldn't find an acceptable solution. One of the members of the task force, Karl Finkemeyer, had developed an idea he called "the thin layer" while at the Heidelburg Scientific Center (BTW, this eventually led to PR/SM). We argued that the main uses of VM were: 1) to support migration from one operating system to another and 2) support of the CMS development environment. We determined that "the thin layer" would support the migration issue, as it would provide enough independent system images (two or more) which would allow coexistence of different operating systems in the same CEC. We also believed that if we could effectively run CMS in MVS, that this would solve issue number 2 because it would support hundreds of CMS users. We believed that if we could do both, there would be no need for VM. At least one of the VM advocates immediately resigned from the task force at that time.

Four of us teamed up to do a proof of concept by installing a running CMS under MVS. We added a CMS command to TSO which caused TSO to GETMAIN a sufficiently large area of storage from its own address space and then to load the CMS nucleus in that storage. Using SIE, it would dispatch the CMS nucleus. I implemented a CMS file system mini-disk structure in VSAM using control area access and later planned to use the VSAM actual block processor.

Our proof of concept worked sufficiently well that the decision was made to staff the CMS under MVS project. Karl and I were to be the technical team leads of the two development teams. We were in the process of staffing when the project was killed. My understanding is that a devout VM advocate let the word slip at SHARE, which caused Gene Amdahl to declare publicly that he would support VM if IBM were to abandon it.

Since we never used VM to support our project's development (except as a model for comparing our TSO/CMS version to VM's CMS), I can't agree that our use of VM was necessary to our project's development, and was not the reason the project was cancelled.

Of course, we all know that PR/SM was eventually released and I have always held that CMS under MVS helped pave the way for OMVS, but that's only conjecture.


the decision to shutdown the (vm370 development group) burlington mall location was being kept secret until the last minute ... supposedly to minimize the possibility that any of the group could find alternatives before being moved to POK. It leaked in the bldg. (had previously been occupied by SBC before service bureau corporation was given to CDC) ... a couple months early and then there was a witch hunt to find out who leaked the information (between the closing hanging over their heads and the witch hunt to find who leaked the information ... those last few months weren't very pleasant place).

One of the unfortunate things ... was somebody in the group had done a significant enhancement for O/S simulation (including all kinds of stuff for generalized OS disks). The base CMS code for O/S simulation was under 64kbytes (there was some joke about CMS 64kbytes O/S simulation being a significant better price/performance than the humongous bloated MVS O/S simulation). As part of killing vm370/cms ... and the person responsible not moving to POK (but leaving the company) all of that got lost.

In the early 80s, I ran a corporate advanced technology symposium (the first that had been held for several years ... all sorts of things went by the wayside in the aftermath of FS failure) ... one of the talks was about running CMS applications under MVS. old reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#4a John Harmann's Birthday Party

However, one of the issues with CMS wide-spread success for interactive computing ... was some amount of human factors consideration. Just being able to run CMS applications didn't help/improve MVS (or TSO) human factors.

A trivial example is the enormous degradation of (VTOC & PDS member) multi-track search on response. For a period, research/bldg28 had 370/168 running MVS and 370/158 running vm370 ... with a dasd farm that was connected to all processors. However, there were strict rules that certain controllers were dedicated for vm/cms and certain controllers were dedicated for mvs. One day, an operator accidentially mounted a 3330 MVS pack on a vm/cms string ... and within five minutes the computer center was getting calls from irate users about the degradation to vm370 response. Initially MVS operations refused to move the pack ... so we put up a VS1 one pack system on a MVS string ... and brought up VS1 under vm370 (on 370/158) and started running multitrack searches under VS1. This brought the MVS system to its knees (aka VS1 in 370/158 on heavily load vm370 could outperform a MVS 370/168 system). MVS operations immediately aggreed to move their pack if we moved the VS1 pack.

There were some number of times, when I was brought into large MVS customer (especially several CECs in shared dasd environment) to diagnose performance problem (somewhat as corporate last resort, when nobody else could find the problem) ... and it would turn-out to be some issue with multi-track search and shared PDS library. misc. past posts mentioning multi-track search, CKD, FBA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

One of the funnies during the early 80s ... was a period that the corporation declared VM/CMS as the strategic interactive computing solution (in part because of the huge deliveries of vm/4341 systems). I got contacted by the TSO product administrator asking if I would consider doing an implementation of my resource manager in MVS ... as if just redoing the scheduler would fix all of MVS performance problems.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#email800310
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email800310b

There was problem in San Jose with running out of datacenter floor space for large MVS systems ... and a large MVS-based design tool becoming product development critical bottleneck. With the proliferation of vm/4341s going into every nook&crany ... there was investigation to look at whether MVS with the large application could be similarly deployed on 4341s. The investigation found that after accounting for MVS & VTAM pathlength ... there was very little processor cycles left for running the application (one of the places where they had fumbled the numbers was fogetting to account for "capture ratio" when they were measuring application processor time).

There were a number of these applications ... none of them that would directly run under CMS. However, finally one of the groups found that with an additional 12kbytes of os/simulation "glue" code that they could start moving the applications to CMS ... and start deploying them on 4341s ... with nearly all of the processor cycles going to the application. misc. old 4341 email (some related to san jose disk division activity)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

other posts mentioning getting to play disk engineer in bldgs. 14&15:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#58 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#59 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#60 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#61 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#62 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#63 LPARs: More or Less?

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2010 12:46:34 -0500
"John Crane" <john_crane_XX@yahoo.com> writes:
Someone actually keeps their email from 1978?

You should write a book on leading an organized life!


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#65 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

in the late 70s I had done cmsback that was then deployed at several internal locations ... a couple old email mentioning CMSBACK
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#cmsback

and various posts mentioning cmsback, backup, and/or archive:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#backup

one of the problems in the almaden instance ... was that I had copied old 70s archive tapes (including some stuff dating back to when I was an undergraduate in the 60s) to newer media and even made multiple copies ... but those tapes were in the general tape library ... and weren't in the cmsback infrastructure.

cmsback went thru some internal evoluation and then had some enhancements added to also support client backup and was released as workstation datasave product. In the troubles in the early 90s when it looked like the corporation might be split up into pieces ... and the disk division logo'ed as ADSTAR ... workstation datasave was repositioned as ADSM (ADSTAR Distributed Storage Management). When they were selling off san jose ... ADSM got transferred and relogo'ed TSM:
http://www.almaden.ibm.com/StorageSystems/projects/tsm/

one of the funny things is that TSM now bears little evidence of its vm/cms (cmsback) heritage.

WDSF reference (prior to being repositioned as ADSM):
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e154/how_to_archive.html

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2010 15:28:56 -0500
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
I had gotten blamed for computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s. internal network was larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until possibly sometime late 85 or early 86 ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

Part of that computer conferencing activity came to be called tandem memos. The company then had a "task force" to investigate the phenomena ... including bringing in outside "experts". I remember two of the outside experts brought in to participate were the authors of "The Network Nation" ... reference here:
http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=8903


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#57 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#64 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#65 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#67 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

somebody printed six copies of about 300 pages of the tandem memo stuff on 6670 and packaged them in tandem corporation 3-ring binders and mailed one to each of the executive committee (chairman, ceo, president, etc). I got blamed for that also.

some of it leaked outside the company and there was even an article in nov81 datamation (also blaming me).

misc. past posts mentioning the incident:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#5 New IBM history book out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#6 New IBM history book out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#7 New IBM history book out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#31 Title Inflation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#39 Vnet : Unbelievable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#73 They Got Mail: Not-So-Fond Farewells
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#16 cost of crossing kernel/user boundary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#38 ibm time machine in new york times?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004k.html#66 Question About VM List
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#50 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#37 Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005q.html#5 What ever happened to Tandem and NonStop OS ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#9 It's official: "nuke" infected Windows PCs instead of fixing them
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#24 Google Architecture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#51 the new math: old battle of the sexes was: PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#11 Was FORTRAN buggy?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#35 Top versus bottom posting was Re: IBM sues maker of Intel-based Mainframe clones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#17 Jim Gray Is Missing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#48 time spent/day on a computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#34 Internal DASD Pathing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#30 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#57 Govt demands password to personal computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#29 Online Computer Conferencing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#37 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#38 U.S. house decommissions its last mainframe, saves $730,000

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2010 16:38:49 -0500
mike@MENTOR-SERVICES.COM (Mike Myers) writes:
Of course, we all know that PR/SM was eventually released and I have always held that CMS under MVS helped pave the way for OMVS, but that's only conjecture.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#66 LPARs: More or Less?

oh ... we did some amount of consulting to the executive pushing posix support into MVS ... nominally there was a business case that customers then would naturally move much of their posix workload to MVS platform.

the issue in the early 80s was that there was a sharp decrease in the cost of building a computer platform ... lots of mini-computer & workstation vendors springing up all over the place based on some chip or another. the problem was that the proprietary operating system paradigm from the 60s & 70s ... didn't see a corresponding drop in costs. To some extent these vendors were being forced into something like a "portable unix" ... because of the drastically reduced costs to get it up, running, and shipped on their hardware platform.

customers & the market then started getting caught up in this ... because it started to provide them with independence from proprietary hardware ... a software layer that supposedly offered relative portability across a wide-range of increasingly commoditised hardware platforms. This was large part of motivation behind POSIX standards activity ... further providing the market with hardware independence (and being able to easily switch to the most cost effective hardware platform).

Few of the people associated with the MVS posix support understood the market drivers behind posix.

as an aside, the executive responsible for the original MVS posix support ... was also out doing various and sundry other kinds of activity. One involved NCAR and Mesa Archival. NCAR had hierarchical storage system (early NAS/SAN) with 370 mainframe as controller and CKD dasd farm all interconnected with HYPERChannel to various supercomputers.

supercomputer would send hyperchannel message to the ibm mainframe, the ibm mainframe would locate the data (possibly staging to disk) and load dasd channel program into the hyperchannel device adapter ... and return the channel program handle to the supercomputer. the supercomputer would then directly invoke the channel program (ibm mainframe being used for control but not for actual data flow). For a period, NCAR attempted to spin this off as a product in an independent company Mesa Archival ... with lots of funding by the executive also doing MVS posix support (and we were used to periodically review/audit how they were doing; part of it was migrating the ibm mainframe code to rs/6000 and replacing all the CKD disks with FBA disks).

similar hyperchannel approach was done by some number of other institutions. in the standards groups for IPI disks and HIPPI channels ... part of the standard activity was HIPPI switch support for "3rd party" transfers (allowing the hyperchannel nas/san disk farm implementation to be mapped to IPI&HIPPI environment; aka controller setting up the transfer mechanics but actually occuring from/to a different processor).

HIPPI was standardization of 100mbyte/sec cray channel ... being championed by LANL.

The 3090 group tried to play in 100mbyte/sec HIPPI (disk arrays, high-speed graphics, misc. other stuff) ... but the 3090 channel interface was nowhere near fast enough. The only thing that came close was the expanded store bus ... so there was this interesting thing done with HIPPI interface being cut into the side of the extended store bus. Then because the only operations to expanded store were synchronous 4k byte moves, I/O programming for HIPPI channel became sort of analogy to PEEK/POKE operations (found in the PC world) using synchronous 4k byte expanded store move operations (involving "reserved" expanded store addresses).

misc. past posts mentioning ncar, mesa archival, ncar:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#21 Disk caching and file systems. Disk history...people forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#22 Disk caching and file systems. Disk history...people forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#66 commodity storage servers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#33 Did AT&T offer Unix to Digital Equipment in the 70s?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#10 index searching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#46 What goes into a 3090?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#61 GE 625/635 Reference + Smart Hardware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#29 360/370 disk drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#31 360/370 disk drives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#47 send/recv vs. raw RDMA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#22 303x, idals, dat, disk head settle, and other rambling folklore
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#75 DASD Architecture of the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#33 The attack of the killer mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004p.html#29 FW: Is FICON good enough, or is it the only choice we get?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#50 something like a CTC on a PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#12 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#13 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#15 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#16 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#19 Device and channel
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005n.html#1 Cluster computing drawbacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#10 Intel strikes back with a parallel x86 design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#55 IBM 3330
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#47 What is written on the keys of an ICL Hand Card Punch?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#8 Not Your Dad's Mainframe: Little Iron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006n.html#29 CRAM, DataCell, and 3850
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006u.html#19 Why so little parallelism?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#47 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#51 Barbless
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#34 Startio Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#36 Startio Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#47 Using a PC as DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#58 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#23 Larrabee delayed: anyone know what's happening?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#42 Larrabee delayed: anyone know what's happening?

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2010 17:02:11 -0500
mike@MENTOR-SERVICES.COM (Mike Myers) writes:
Four of us teamed up to do a proof of concept by installing a running CMS under MVS. We added a CMS command to TSO which caused TSO to GETMAIN a sufficiently large area of storage from its own address space and then to load the CMS nucleus in that storage. Using SIE, it would dispatch the CMS nucleus. I implemented a CMS file system mini-disk structure in VSAM using control area access and later planned to use the VSAM actual block processor.

I had earlier done a paged mapped filesystem for CMS on cp67 and then migrated to vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

and shipped internally to the "csc/vm" (and later "sjr/vm") internal customer sites. misc. past posts mentioning paged mapped file system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

I also had done all sorts of fancy stuff with shared segments ... somewhat akin to tss/360 (or FS ... one of my less than complimentary comments about FS was that I had stuff already running that was better than what they were trying to do). However, a large part of CMS used os/360 conventions, assemblers & compilers which gave me lots of problems with some of the fancier features. misc past posts with discussions of some of those problems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

the original intention was to use some of the fancier parts of the 370 virtual memory architecture. However, when 360/165 ran into schedule problems retrofitted virtual memory hardware to the 165 and the favorite son operating system in POK said they could see no reason for the fancier features ... they were dropped (as part of 165 picking up six months in schedule and allowing 370 virtual memory annoncement not to be delayed). The standard vm370 product was also going to make a little use of some of the new features ... but when they were dropped from the hardware product ... vm370 had to go back and do some ugly hacks to compensate.

except for short time for pc/370 (xt/370, at/370) the page mapped stuff was never shipped outside the corporation ... even tho i can demonstrate extremely significant disk thruput and pathlenght improvements. I had some number of benchmarks showing identical applications running on identical 3380s ... ran three times faster with CMS paged mapped filesystem than with standard CMS filesystem.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 21 Feb 2010 11:05:30 -0500
BShannon@ROCKETSOFTWARE.COM (Bob Shannon) writes:
I had been told that one reason for Posix support in MVS was to allow bids for government contracts ...

That's exactly what Cray's "Superlink" product did. It used MVS as a data server, data manager, for the Cray.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#69 LPARs: More or Less?

government was one of the biggest drivers towards commoditization ... including coining the term COTS (did some work in the past with the person that coined the term). The policy was to have posix all over the place ... as well as the applications using posix ... so that the applications could be trivially moved between platforms. The reality may not have always corresponded with the intention (sometimes it just turned into proforma checklist).

Another (besides NCAR and Mesa Archival) was LANL system which was being marketed as Datatree by General Atomics. LLNL had their own system that ran directly on Cray ... and in ha/cmp project ... we were funding port of it to RS/6000 as part of commercial product Unitree.

In the 80s, I would get sporadically get called into customers that were running hyperchannel connected to IBM mainframes. In 1980, STL was bursting at the seems and needed to move 300 people from the IMS group to offsite location. They had tested remote 3270s and found it totally unacceptable for their work. I got roped into writing HYPERChannel remote device support ... so that the 300 IMS people could have local (channel attached) 3270s back to their vm/cms interactive service (as well as remote channel attached tapes & printers in their bldg). There was then attempt to allow the hyperchannel vendor to release my software ... which several organization in the company overruled. Then the hyperchannel vendor had to recreate much of my software from scratch (but local branch people would still frequently call me into their customers).

for other IMS topic drift ... when Jim was leaving for tandem ... he was palming off several things ... including DBMS consulting to the IMS group ... old email refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801016

of course, for a period, it was also the federal govenment that was mandating OSI products (GOSIP) and that tcp/ip and the internet was going to be completely eliminated. Again that turned out to not quite correspond with reality.

One of the things periodically pointed out was that the IETF required two interoperable implementations before things could progress in standards process ... while ISO didn't even require a passed standard to have demonstrated that it was even implementabled.

For a while I was on the XTP technical advisory board (of course the communication group strongly objected to my being there) and help take HSP (high-speed protocol) to x3s3.3 (iso chartered body responsible for standards corresponding to OSI level 3&4). x3s3.3 refused the activity because it was under ISO mandates to standardize things the conformed to OSI.

HSP didn't conform to OSI because

1) it supported internetworking ... a layer that doesn't exist in OSI

2) it went directly from top of transport (layer 4) directly to LAN MAC interface (sits somewhere in the middle of networking, layer 3) bypassing OSI layer 3/4 interface

3) it went directly to LAN MAC interface ... LAN MAC interface doesn't exist in OSI

misc. posts mentioning XTP &/or HSP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#xtphsp

TCP/IP is the technology basis for the modern internet, NSFNET backbone was the operational basis for the modern internet, and CIX was the business basis for the modern internet. We had been working with NSF and various of the institutions for quite a while related to NSFNET backbone ... misc. past email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

with lots of internal objections. At one point the director of NSF wrote the corporation a letter copying the CEO and chief scientest trying to help us with our internal political problems. However that just worked to aggravate the internal politics. misc. past posts on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

Part of the reason for participation in NSFNET backbone ... was we already had a high-speed backbone running internally (one of NSF comments along the way was what we already had running was at least five years ahead of all BIDS to build NSFNET ... aka part of the internal politics was we were prevented from bidding on NSFNET). Misc. past posts mentioning my high-speed data transport project (HSDT)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

Part of the reason that NSFNET RFP called for T1 links was that HSDT could demonstrate a lot of T1 (and higher speed) links already in operation. It turned out that the winning bid didn't actually install T1 links, they installed 440kbit links ... and then to sort of meet the letter of the contract, there were T1 trunks installed with telco multiplexors (multiplexing multiple 440kbit links over the T1 trunks).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 21 Feb 2010 15:23:49 -0500
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#69 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#71 LPARs: More or Less?

for other folklore tidbit ... some old pictures ... including a shot of the login logo screen done for the 300 3270s "channel attached" terminal in offsite bldg for the IMS group:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#oldpicts

the IMS group was effectively seeing the same interactive response at the offsite bldg as they had with the channel attached 3270s in the bldg.

an interesting side-effect was that moving the 3274 ("channel-attached") controllers to the off-site building, the datacenter mainframe saw 10-15% system thrput improvement. The conventional wisdom at the time was to spread all the 3274 controllers across 15 channels shared with disks. However, the 3274 controllers had significant channel busy overhead per operation (independent of bytes transferred). Relocating the 3274 controllers to offsite building (connected to multiple hyperchannel A510 channel emulators) and replacing them with A220 host channel box (that had significantly faster circuits and enormously reduced channel busy for the same operations) resulted in the 10-15% overall system thruput improvement (eliminating the enormous 3274 channel busy interferance with disk i/o). misc. past posts mentioning HSDT activities http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

for other topic drift ... recent thread discussing the 3274 controller having worse human factors for interactive computing compared to earlier 3272
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#41 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#44 Happy DEC-10 Day

the first mainframe tcp/ip product had some issues ... including being quite cpu intensive ... burning a 3090 processor getting about 44kbytes/sec thruput. I added RFC1044 support to the product ... and in some testing at cray research (trip to cray, plane departed SFO 20 minutes late but managed to be wheels up minutes before the earthquake hit) got sustained mbyte/sec between cray and 4341 ... using only modest amount of the 4341 (about 500 times improvement in the bytes moved per instruction executed). misc. past posts mentioning doing rfc1044 support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

The TCP/IP product was also made available on MVS with an emulation for the vm370 diagnose feature (with equally poor processor overhead w/o the rfc1044 support).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Sun, 21 Feb 2010 17:32:01 -0500
jcewing@ACM.ORG (Joel C. Ewing) writes:
VM is cool and can be a very useful tool, but trying to implement a complex multi-user application with shared data using bare VM virtual machines with just the functions provided by VM shows why many would hesitate to classify it along with other Operating Systems, much less consider it the only "true" operating system.

the counter is virtual appliances ... which have significantly simpler, less complex, better integrity, and more efficient. An early example was the internal network implementation (were originally referred to as service virtual machines):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

being more & more leveraged to address various computing needs ... wiki page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_appliance

one of the quotes from above:
Like software appliances, virtual appliances are aimed to eliminate the installation, configuration and maintenance costs associated with running complex stacks of software.

... snip ...

another reference .. TurnKey Linux Virtual Appliance Library
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TurnKey_Linux_Virtual_Appliance_Library

from above
Unlike a conventional server installation, an appliance is designed to "just work" with little to no configuration required

... snip ...

a couple vendor product pages:
http://www.vmware.com/appliances/
http://www.parallels.com/en/support/docs/

the os/360 heritage was single address space (originally "real") that was heavily oriented towards pointer passing API. lots of other computer environments involved APIs that were message passing ... which are much more friendly to multiple address space operation, multiple virtual machine operation, and/or multiple real machine operation (as well as virtual appliance friendly).

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 21 Feb 2010 18:27:19 -0500
zedgarhoover@GMAIL.COM (zMan) writes:
Ah, Star Trek! "Your ship has blown up. The vile Klingon hordes will conquer the universe." Those were the days...

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#57 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#64 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#65 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#67 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#68 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

The science center had a 2250M4 (aka 1130/2250 combo) and in the '60s, somebody ported spacewars from PDP1 to 2250M4. It was 2-person game with the keyboard divided in half, each player having half the keyboard for input.

The author of REXX then did a 3270 multi-user spacewar game. Server kept track of all the client players ... communication between the clients worked the same whether everybody was on the same vm370 machine ... or there were clients on different "real" machines and traffic was being handled via the networking service virtual machine ... recent reference to it being early virtual appliance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#73 LPARS: More or Less?

The client/server protocol was fairly straight forward and some people started doing (automated) battle computers (rather than human interaction on 3270 terminal keyboard). The (automated) battle computers had such an advantage ... later spacewar (server) versions implemented a "penalty" to try and level the playing field (intervals between commands fell below threshold, energy consumption went up non-linear as interval between commands decreased).

past post with small snippet of MFF (client) code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#4 Fast action games on System/360+?

some old email references:

Date: 08/04/80 16:18:25
From: wheeler

to: distribution list; re: games?; new INV2 on d-disk, 'real time', still doesn't work well from 3101. Also new space war game MFF (& CSP, 'the umpire'). The umpire is currently up and running in VMTESTER this minute for users that wish to play with it.


... snip ... top of post, old email index.

in the following, 4979 was glass teletype and series/1 was simulating 3270 to mainframe.

Date: 08/07/80 09:53:09
From: <somebody in STL>
To: wheeler

Ship 'em over and I'll test 'em!
I'm on a 4978 terminal attached to a Series/1. Using PVM to xxxx's signon on SJRLVM1 I've tried MFF twice and both times hung our Series/1 after just a few seconds. I'm impressed! Never found a program that could hang the Series/1 before.
I'll be getting a 3279 within the next few days...goody!


... snip ... top of post, old email index.

Date: 08/07/80 14:03:56
From: wheeler
To: <author>

is source for the MFF battle computer available or does everybody have to write thier own from scratch ???


... snip ... top of post, old email index.


Date: 14 Aug 80 16:39:29

From: <author>
To: wheeler

ok try this new CSP module. New MFF also in a minute.


... snip ... top of post, old email index.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 21 Feb 2010 19:06:15 -0500
... and with respect to INV mentioned in email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#email800804
in this previous post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#74

Date: 09/12/79 22:26:39
From: wheeler

have heard of ZORK but don't have available version. Will check around. ATUAN is the latest ADVENTURE version with several new places and activities, etc. The newest game we have is INV but it is 3270 version. It is very much like the SPACE Invaders video game. Unless you get a boot-legged copy, the 'standard' version won't play between 9&noon and 1&5 (7 days a week, just uses time macro, doesn't figure out the day)


... snip ... top of post, old email index.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer (warning: Conley rant)
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Feb 2010 18:09:21 -0800
jchase@USSCO.COM (Chase, John) writes:
Well, the engineers at Lockheed's (in)famous "Skunk Works" designed the SR-71 Blackbird with slide rules and graph paper. No airplane since has equaled its speed or altitude records.

i sponsored Boyd's briefings at ibm in the 80s ... he had done a lot of work improving both f15 and f18 designs ... and did much of f16, when he was head of light-weight fighter at the pentagon (using lots of supercomputer time).

Boyd told story about the forces behind the f15 suspected he was doing f16 ... which he wasn't authorized. they figured if they could find records of his unauthorized supercomputer use (for doing f16 design) ... they could have him charged with theft of millions of dollars of gov. property (i.e. the unauthorized supercomputer use) and sent to leavenworth for a very long time. fortunately they were never able to find any record of his supercomputer use.

earlier he had done a year running spook base ... one of his biographies lists spook base as having been a $2.5B windfall for ibm (which would have made it significantly larger than boeing datacenter at renton in the same time frame ... the largest that i had been in) ... however, I've only been able to find online references to two 360/65s at spook base.

a couple recent posts mentioning helping with BCS in that timeframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#89 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#90 Notes on two presentations by Gordon Bell ca. 1998

recent reference to dedication of Boyd Hall at air force weapons school (17sep1999)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#84 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day

other past posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd1

misc. URLs from around the web mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd2

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 22 Feb 2010 00:46:58 -0500
"Joe Morris" <j.c.morris@verizon.net> writes:
I assume that was Mike Colishaw. If so, did anyone try to have it running with both US and UK players?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#74 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#75 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

at the time mentioned in the email, the author was on assignment in YKT.

somewhat topic drift ... there was note by Gabe Goldberg on HILLGANG mailing list wed that Mike was taking early retirement on 5Mar.

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 22 Feb 2010 11:46:49 -0500
gahenke@GMAIL.COM (George Henke) writes:
This was to facilitate performance for VM/MVS shops because there was no comparable VM/VSE feature for MVS and VM to control the handshaking between the two

The entire MVS virtual machine would get swapped out whenever an MVS address space, eg TSO user, batch, was swapped out.


it wasn't that the MVS virtual machine got swapped, when there was a virtual machine page fault; it was that the virtual machine was non-dispatchable (didn't execute) while the (virtual machine) page fault was being serviced.

the issue with VM/VS1 handshaking (actually there had been a earlier implementation at univ. with MVT handshaking) was when the virtual machine had a page fault ... the virtual machine was made non-executable while the page fault was being serviced.

Part of VS1 (and earlier MVT) handshaking ... was there was one-for-one mapping between VS1 page and the virtual machine page (in VS1 case, VS1 had single virtual address space ... somewhat like SVS ... and in handshaking, there was a one-for-one mapping between the VS1 virtual address space definition and the virtual machine address space). In any case, since all virtual pages "appeared" to be resident and VS1 would never have its own page fault.

In any case, the virtual machine could have a page fault (at the VM level) and be non-executable while the page fault was being handled. The VM/VS1 handshaking would reflect a "psuedo" (virtual machine) page fault to the VS1 operating system ... allowing VS1 to task switch to some other task (in VS1). If there was nothing else to execute ... then VS1 would enter wait-state ... until VM had serviced the page fault (aka there was not "swapping" ... it was just whether the virtual machine was dispatchable or not). This allowed the virtual guest to have a higher degree of multitasking (virtual guest overlapping execution of other tasks while VM serviced a page fault).

Part of the issue was that VM performed paging operations significantly more efficiently than VS1 (I had done much shorter pathlength as well as a better page replacement algorithm) ... and so VS1 could have higher thruput in virtual machine environment (once handshaking allowed VS1 to continue to execute while VM was servicing a page fault).

There were other issues with virtual memory paging operations. VM's page replacement algorithm tends to approximate LRU (least recently used). Most of the guest operating systems (when they are doing paging) also tend to have page replacement algorithm that approximates LRU. There is a pathelogical scenario if both the virtual guest is taking page faults and VM is taking page faults ... that VM will select a virtual guest page that currently isn't be used (LRU) to be replaced ... and the same time that the virtual guest (possibly MVS) has decided that it wants to use that corresponding page (since it also decides that the current contents of the page isn't being used). The line I used is LRU algorithms tend not to be recursively friendly (i.e. running an virtual LRU algorithm in a virtual machine environment running an LRU algorithm can result in exactly the wrong page being chosen). misc. past posts about page replacement algorithms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock

Another piece of trivia ... in the original transition from MVT to SVS and their page replacement algorithm ... I got into argument that they were doing some tweaks to their implementation that would do exactly the wrong thing. That implementation continued well into the MVS release cycle ... when it finally dawned on them that they would select high-use, shared, R/O linkpak pages for replacement before lower-use, private, R/W data pages.

Originally (VS1) handshaking was in the time-frame when Endicott had also done the VM ECPS microcode assist for 138/148 ... and was trying to convince the corporation that 138/148 (and later 43xx) would be shipped as VM-only machines (somewhat like LPAR capability is shipped on all machines today). Unfortunately, at the same time POK was trying to convince corporate that vm370 should be killed off (in part because POK wanted all the people in the vm370 development group to be moved to POK to support MVS/XA development) ... so corporate never agreed to 138/148 being "vm-only". old post about methology used for creating ECPS microcode assist:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21 370 ECPS VM microcode assist

the basic guideline was that we were told that the machines had 6kbytes of microcode space available ... and to choose the pieces that would give the biggest bang-for-the-buck.

"E" was the low-end/mid-range architecture ... analogous to "XA" architecture that POK had done (primarily for MVS) ... old email ref

Date: 09/16/82 08:31:14
From: wheeler

re: e-architecture; E-architecture is the internal name for the 370 architecture extension that came out with the (original) 4300 series machines. It is supported by VS1E & DOS/VSE. It's primary feature is it moves the equivalent of the page & swap tables to below the microcode interface. There are new instructions to validate, connect, invalidate, & disconnect page frames. This architecture was developed primarily by Germany during the middle 70s & basicly is an attempt to move "troublesome" pieces (for DOS) of the system down into the hardware.

XA architecture is a completely different architecture extension. It was developed in POK and primarily represents their (similar) goal to migrate "troublesome" pieces of MVS down into the hardware ... giving the hardware engineers opportunities to solve MVS system problems that the MVS software programmers have found difficult to deal with.

Note that 4300s primarily run in 370 mode.


... snip ... top of post, old email index.

other old email discussiong 43xx
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 22 Feb 2010 13:19:37 -0500
gahenke@GMAIL.COM (George Henke) writes:
Yes, I believe it was some how connected to Preferred Machine Assist (PMA) where page 0 was actually owned by MVS not VM.

preferred machine assist could be considered step on the way to LPARs ... since part of it involved the virtual machine pages being mapped to fixed real storage.

the earlier version of this (preferred V=R guest) had been done for vm370 at the science center circa mid-70s on a "csc/vm" base. There was then a joint study with AT&T ... which was provided a copy of the (complete) system.

It somewhat propagated around internal AT&T ... where they made some number of enhancements and migrated the source code to new machines as they came out. One of the enhancements that AT&T put into vm370 kernel was support for virtual devices operating over network (could mount a tape in one datacenter and read it from a different machine in a different datacenter).

In the 80s, the AT&T national marketing rep tracked me down about possibly helping AT&T move off the platform. The "csc/vm" base they had, didn't include SMP/multiprocessor support ... and the 3081 strategy was still multiprocessor only ... before TPF customers forced the company into doing 3083 uniprocessor (at the time, TPF still didn't have multiprocessor support). AT&T was being forced to going with clone processor vendor that had single processor products (for the aging vm370 system). That old csc/vm system included my dynamic adaptive resource manager ... so I made a point of it being able to dynamically adapt across a broad range of processors & processor generations ... with nearly two orders magnitude range in performance.

3083 finnally announced
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP3083.html

above also has mention of preferred machine assist being supported.

trivia ... 3083 involved removing one of the processors in 3081 frame. unfortunately, "processor 0" was physically at the top of the box. there was concern that the simplest, straight-forward removal of "processor 1" would make the box dangerously top-heavy.

past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#58 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#59 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#60 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#61 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#62 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#63 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#66 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#69 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#70 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#71 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#72 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#73 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#78 LPARs: More or Less?

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 22 Feb 2010 15:33:05 -0500
gahenke@GMAIL.COM (George Henke) writes:
I will be eternally grateful that:

- colleges do not teach mainframe as they do the "toy machines", - there are no Dummies, etc books in book stores like Barnes and Noble, Borders, etc for mainframe, especially internals, - the uninitiated do not know about or even read IBM mainframe manuals even though they are freely available on the web, - the uninitiated do not understand mainframe manuals even if they were to read them, - top IT management which comes out of said educational institutions thinks that the mainframe can be sunset in 10 years


part of this was that the significant support for educational institutions in the 50s & 60s was severaly cutback after the gov. litigation efforts.

as a result in the 70s there was some amount of shift to other vendors (other kinds of mainframes and/or 370 clones).

in the 80s, there was increasingly move to more commodity platforms as well as platforms that had finer grain increments.

in the 90s, we would visit some number of institutions that stated they were moving off MVS because they couldn't find staff. We were at one large gov. MVS installation ... in their staff meeting when it was announced that the datacenter was moving off MVS ... in large part because they had open recs for MVS staff for over a year that they were unable to fill.

when jim left for tandem, he left behind "mip envy" ... a copy here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email800920

there is also a copy that was a couple dats later at this URL on jim's pages that microsoft research is keeping up
http://web.archive.org/web/20081115000000*/http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/gray/papers/MipEnvy.pdf

in the wake of mip envy there was visits/surveys sponsored to look at what other institutions were doing ... I've posted tidbits from the trip reports/surveys in the past ... recent thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#44
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#50
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#51
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#52

the last post in the above ... references some tidbits where institutions (research & higher learning) had preference for acquiring dataprocessing in finer increments

the above also makes mention of SUN ... machines that had originally been developed and built at stanford. there was then a meeting at (ibm) palo alto science center ... trying to convince IBM into producing the product. There were several other internal organizations in the meeting ... that afterwards all claimed to be doing something better ... and so IBM declined to produce SUN products (and the people went off to form their own corporation).

some amount of JAVA had been influenced by the object-oriented operating system that SUN had done called SPRING (at one point we were approached about heading up a business unit to turn SPRING out as commercial product; there was period that doing object-oriented operating systems were all the rage; aka apple was doing PINK). old email about scheduled meeting with SUN on SPRING and finding the SPRING people had been moved over to JAVA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#email960203
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#44 Larrabee delayed: anyone know what's happening?

SPRING documents are no longer online ... but quote from piece of the document describing SPRING component that sounds very similar to JAVA (aka "A Client-Side Stub Interpreter"):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#32 Whom Do Programmers Admire Now???

however, as per this thread ... claim is that JAVA was outgrowth of GREEN (not SPRING):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#51 A Speculative question

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

LPARs: More or Less?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: LPARs: More or Less?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 22 Feb 2010 16:05:28 -0500
Jim Stewart <jstewart@jkmicro.com> writes:
And how did that work out?

MVS had extremely long pathlength for handling interrupt and then getting any queued I/O restarted (during which the device would be idle, in period that systems were becoming more & more I/O bottlenecked). Also, asyncrhonous I/O interrupts tended to have detrimental effects on large cache machines

so part of XA was allowing for asynchronous queued i/o interface that could start pending I/O request w/o relying on synchronous operating system operation; it could also handle i/o completion as queued interface ... rather than asynchronous interrupts.

One of the things was that operating system had some amount of measure stuff to account for when things got queued, how long they were queued before they got started, how long the I/O executed, etc. Hiding lots of the events in hardware ... negated being able to directly accumulate those statistics. As a side-effect of the changes, the hardware now needed to keep the information internally along with an interface that MVS could extract the information. Current description of the monitoring interface:
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/dz9zr003/17.0?DT=20040504121320

another part was that MVS heritage was pointer passing APIs (from real-storage days, everything all in single address space). Initial move to MVS left an image of MVS in every virtual address space (8mbytes for MVS, 8mbytes for application). However, there were a class of "subsystem functions" that resided outside the kernel ...that not had their own independent address space. It became a lot more difficult for an application in one address space to pass a pointer to parameter list calling a subsystem function resident in different address space.

The initial solutions was something called the "common segment" (initially a special one megabyte area in every address space) ... that a calling application could obtain dedicated area ... move in the parameter list and then make a kernel call that switched to a different (subsystem) address space with pointer to parameter list in the common segment. However, as size/feature/functions of systems grew ... so did the common segment ... eventually reaching five megabytes in some customers (and threatening grow to six megabytes) ... leaving only three megabytes (possibly two megabytes) for application use.

There was large fortran vlsi design tool in burlington that exactly fit into seven megabytes and ran on a carefully constructed MVS system with only a common segment that was only a single megabyte. When it had an enhancement that resulted in exceeded seven megabytes ... there was move to get it running on vm370/cms ... since it could have very close to the full 16mbytes virtual address space.

as interim to XA (available on 3081), "dual-address space" was introduced on 3033. enhanced semi-privileged subsystems could have a special addressing mode for some instructions ... that allowed fetch&store in a different address space (i.e. calling application's) than the one that they were running in. For calling these modified subsystems, it was no longer necessary for the application to move the parameter list to the "common segment" ... since the subsystem now could have addressability directly into the calling applications address space.

XA generalized this ... eventually also added program call & return. The standard call to subsystem required interrupt into the kernel to perform all the changes to the address space pointer hardware. The operating system could set up a special table that specified the rules for each subsystem call (and return) ... including the rules for switching around the address space pointers. This eventually generalizes to allowing calls to library routines ... that are resident in different address space (not directly visable to the application).

current description of program call instruction (have fun with all the diagrams in the following):
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/dz9zr003/10.34?DT=20040504121320

and program return instruction
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/dz9zr003/10.35?DT=20040504121320

a little discussion of address spaces (things like primary address space and secondary address space)
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/dz9zr003/3.8?DT=20040504121320

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 22 Feb 2010 15:42:47 -0800
shmuel+ibm-main@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
I know what a TSO version is, but how could you have a Wylbur version written in PL/I? Wylbur didn't support any language other than its own command/macro language.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#67 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

from the file ...


WELLPUT  TITLE 'W E L L P U T -- WYLBUR/TSO I/O INTERFACE FROM PLI'     00010000
R0       EQU   0                                                        00020000
R1       EQU   1                                                        00030000
R2       EQU   2                                                        00040000
R3       EQU   3                                                        00050000
R4       EQU   4                                                        00060000
R5       EQU   5                                                        00070000
R6       EQU   6                                                        00080000
R7       EQU   7                                                        00090000
R8       EQU   8                                                        00100000
R9       EQU   9                                                        00110000
R10      EQU   10                                                       00120000
R11      EQU   11                                                       00130000
R12      EQU   12                                                       00140000
R13      EQU   13                                                       00150000
R14      EQU   14                                                       00160000
R15      EQU   15                                                       00170000
*********************************************************************** 00180000
• WELLPUT -                                                           * 00190000
• THE PURPOSE OF THIS MODULE IS TO SIMULATE THE I/O ROUTINES TREAD    * 00200000
• AND TWRITE USED BY THE ADVENTURE GAME.                              * 00210000
•                                                                     * 00220000
• CALLING SEQUENCES:                                                  * 00230000
•                                                                     * 00240000
• TREAD (PROMPT_MESSAGE,PROMPT_LENGTH, MESSAGE_AREA,LENGTH,RTN_CODE)  * 00250000
•                                                                     * 00260000
• TWRITE (MESSAGE,MESSAGE LENGTH,RETURN CODE)                         * 00270000
•                                                                     * 00280000
*********************************************************************** 00290000

... snip ...

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 23 Feb 2010 06:28:01 -0800
hal9001@PANIX.COM (Robert A. Rosenberg) writes:
Now he would just get a job in the programming department of a Bank and program a "salami" routine into the code to divert money into his account. The usual way is to just take all the split cent rounding and divert it.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm19.htm#26 Trojan horse attack involving many major Israeli companies, executives

there were some infamous cases a decade ago with major financial institutions outsourcing Y2K-remediation of large financial mainframe programs to the lowest bidder. the money movement was somewhat more sophisticated and organized

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970

Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main, alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 23 Feb 2010 10:10:35 -0500
shmuel+ibm-main@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
I suspect that what Tymshare had was a PDP-10, or maybe the older PDP-6, which was basically an older version of the same machine.

recent reference to mip envy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#80 Senior Java Developer vs. MVS Systems Programmer

which mentions survey/visits to other institution ... with snippets of those visits ... including stanford CS dept. the longer thread in a.f.c. (x-posted to alt.sys.pdp10) including some of the people from stanford CS dept ... and some discussion of stanford sail machine
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#51 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#52 Happy DEC-10 Day

Adventure wiki pages
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventure_game
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventure_Game
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colossal_Cave_Adventure

from above, URL for "Crowther's original source code for Adventure (as recovered from Don Woods's student account at Stanford)" (mar1977):
http://jerz.setonhill.edu/if/crowther/

Tymshare wasn't far away ... and (also) had PDP-10. As previously mentioned Tymshare offerred vm370-based commercial online interactive timesharing (available via tymnet). They had also developed CMS-based computer conferencing and in Aug76 ... provided it free to SHARE as VMSHARE ... VMSHARE archive:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

and some old email mentioning vmshare (frequently mentioning getting monthly snapshots of all the vmshare files and making them available within the corporation):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vmshare

wiki page mentioning (tymshare's) tymnet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymnet

Above mentions Tymnet starting to port to Interdata 7/32 in 1972 and then started development of Tymnet on PDP-10. Aside, as undergraduate in the 60s, I had been part of univ. project that used Interdata/3 for 2702 clone ... four of us gotten written up responsible for clone business some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

In 1984, M/D bought Tymshare.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymshare

Somewhat as part of that I setup interviews for Engelbart (he had augment running on tymshare pdp), trying to interest him in joining IBM.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NLS_%28computer_system%29

M/D also brought me in to do audit of Tymshare's GNOSIS as part of its spin-off as KEYKOS (I still have gnosis document somewhere in boxes) ... a little gnosis/keykos history here:
http://www.coyotos.org/history/index.html

past posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#57 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#64 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#65 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#67 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#68 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#74 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#75 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#77 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#82 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure

--
42yrs virtualization experience (since Jan68), online at home since Mar1970




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