List of Archived Posts

2013 Newsgroup Postings (09/21 - 10/30)

UK NHS £10bn project failure
OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
UK NHS £10bn project failure
Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?
OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?
Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
"NSA foils much internet encryption"
Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?
OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
Gilmore response to NSA mathematician's "make rules for NSA" appeal
OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
Steve B sees what investors think
Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Steve B sees what investors think
Steve B sees what investors think
Steve B sees what investors think
"There IS no force, just inertia"
Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
US Air Force Converts F-16 Fighters into Drones
The Reformers
CNTL-ALT-DELETE "a mistake"
Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
Why is the mainframe so expensive?
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Why is the mainframe so expensive?
Quote on Slashdot.org
Why is the mainframe so expensive?
Quote on Slashdot.org
Words Are Thinking Tools: Praxotype
Open source software
Quote on Slashdot.org
US Naval History Conference
50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
Is the zVM list defunct?
Why is the mainframe so expensive?
50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
IBM now employs more workers in India than US
Quote on Slashdot.org
"There IS no force, just inertia"
Open source software
50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
Steve B sees what investors think
Retirement Savings
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30yearsagotoday
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Open source software
IBM now employs more workers in India than US
Google F1 was: Re: MongoDB
IBM now employs more workers in India than US
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
NSA Revelations Kill IBM Hardware Sales In China
Steve B sees what investors think
Steve B sees what investors think
PDCA vs. OODA
architectures, was Open source software
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Clemson Univ. Data Center Tour (1980)
Steve B sees what investors think
Steve B sees what investors think
The Scholars Who Shill for Wall Street
OCC Replies to Elizabeth Warren Reveal Extent of Regulatory Capture on Derivatives
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Nobody Should Shed a Tear for JP Morgan Chase
The REAL Reason U.S. Targets Whistleblowers
Steve B sees what investors think
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Steve B sees what investors think
3Q earnings are becoming the norm at IBM. What is IBM management overlooking?
How do you feel about IBM passing off it's retirees to ObamaCare?
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 yearsagotoday
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 yearsagotoday
The US Is Quietly Losing Its Innovation Edge to China
Behold The Face Of Central Banker Hubris
JPMorgan: Wall Street's Not Saying It's Guilty. It Not Even Sorry
PDCA vs. OODA. Pehaps this has been addressed previously
HSBC exposed in massive data leak in Belgium
High Frequency Terrorism
SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
Access to IBM Z/OS z/VM Documentation
SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
Confirmed: the US DoJ will not put the bankers in jail, no matter how deep the fraud
Oracle Sent Out A Press Release Dissing IBM's Software Business
SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
Boyd Blasphemy: Justifying the F-35
Interesting? How _compilers_ are compromising application security
ObamaCare Web Site Problems

UK NHS £10bn project failure

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: UK NHS £10bn project failure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 21 Sep 2013 07:58:29 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
I want to add, with as much urgency as I can muster, that high-security encryption must be used to provide this protection. No encryption scheme endorsed by Five Eyes provides any protection against them or indeed against similar Chinese groups.

I, for one, judge that the intentions of the NSA are benign; but if it ever was that is no longer the issue. The technology for breaking these 'recommended' schemes is now so widely diffused that they provide only the illusion and not the substance of security.

Paranoia is almost always dysfunctional. In this area it is not. We have all been far too naif for far too long.


it isn't just a single homogeneous entity.

Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

from above:
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

How Booz Allen Hamilton Swallowed Washington
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington

increasing privatizing of intelligence by for-profit companies focused on ever increasing quarterly profits. News is that spying on ex's is so common they even have name for it ... why wouldn't for-profit employees also be involved in industrial espionage? BAH case
http://washingtontechnology.com/articles/2012/02/08/booz-allen-air-force-debarment.aspx

note in the wake of this Success of Failure incident, congress put the agency on probation and not allowed to manage its own efforts ... but that may have just been ploy for further privatizng.
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

even some IBM connection, the head of IBM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V._Gerstner,_Jr.
leaves and becomes chairman of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlyle_Group
which then does private equity buyout of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booz_Allen_Hamilton

past posts mentioning former head of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

slightly related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#55 "NSA foils much internet encryption"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#56 "NSA foils much internet encryption"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT:  NYT article--the rich get richer
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 21 Sep 2013 14:04:12 -0400
Andrew Swallow <am.swallow@btinternet.com> writes:
Time to introduce a rule that bank directors are bared for life if the bank needs bailing out.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#71 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

some of that happened during the S&L crisis as well as hundreds doing jail time ... but not this time.

Lehman collapse anniv. bringing out other articles

Robert Prasch: The "Lessons" that Wall Street, Treasury, and the White House Need You to Believe About the Lehman Collapse
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/09/robert-prasch-the-lessons-that-wall-street-treasury-and-the-white-house-need-you-to-believe-about-the-lehman-collapse.html
Inequality Makes Democracy Impossible
http://www.thenation.com/blog/176272/inequality-makes-democracy-impossible
The Charmed Life of a Big Time Bankster
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/09/20/the-charmed-life-of-a-big-time-bankster/

posts mentioning too big to fail, too big to prosecute, too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

more S&L discussion in this thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#26 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#29 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#52 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#57 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment

other recent posts mentioning S&L crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#0 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#68 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#44 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#53 Should Bethany McLean Be Bothered by the Government Lawsuit Against S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#46 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#86 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#48 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#65 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#18 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#29 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#30 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#61 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#73 Why DOJ Deemed Bank Execs Too Big To Jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#80 Why DOJ Deemed Bank Execs Too Big To Jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#32 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#35 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#41 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#43 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#54 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#59 John Boyd's Art of War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#86 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#87 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#2 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#8 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#9 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#57 What the Orgy of "Lehman Five Years On" Stories Missed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#58 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

UK NHS £10bn project failure

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: UK NHS £10bn project failure
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 22 Sep 2013 08:44:49 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#0 UK NHS £10bn project failure

a little x-over from financial cryptography blog

The Anatomy of an NSA intervention -- NIST & RSA fingered as breached
http://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001446.html

from above:
It is now almost good enough to take to a jury -- the NSA perverted the public standards process, and convinced at least one major supplier of crypto tools to weaken customer's infrastructure by using that flawed standard.

...
Then, within the week, NIST declared itself extremely uncomfortable with the flawed standard, and recommended against it. A couple of days later, RSA announced it was pulling that product.

... snip ...

references this

A Few Thoughts on Cryptographic Engineering: The Many Flaws of Dual_EC_DRBG
http://blog.cryptographyengineering.com/2013/09/the-many-flaws-of-dualecdrbg.html

and

RSA Tells Its Developer Customers: Stop Using NSA-Linked Algorithm
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/09/rsa-advisory-nsa-algorithm/

disclaimer: I was involved in the creation of early electronic commerce and have been inolved in other cryptography for financial operations.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?
Date: 22 Sep 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/Kjx8KieuZr8

Analysis: Time to taper? Not if you look at bank loans
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/18/us-usa-fed-banks-analysis-idUSBRE98H0WB20130918

Five Years After the Financial Crisis, The Big Banks Are Still Committing Massive Crimes
http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2013-09-20/5-years-after-financial-crisis-big-banks-are-still-committing-massive-crimes

from above:
The big banks no longer do very much traditional banking. Most of their business is from financial speculation. For example, less than 10% of Bank of America's assets come from traditional banking deposits. Instead, they are mainly engaged in financial speculation and derivatives. (and see this)

The big banks have slashed lending since they were bailed out by taxpayers ... while smaller banks have increased lending. See this, this and this

A huge portion of the banks' profits comes from taxpayer bailouts. For example, 77% of JP Morgan's net income comes from taxpayer subsidies


... snip ...

from a couple years ago:

Geithner, Bernanke have little in arsenal to fight new crisis
http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/geithner-bernanke-have-little-in-arsenal-to-fight-new-crisis/2011/08/12/gIQAFuFvFJ_story.html
Banks Awash in Cash, Which Isn't Good News
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2011/10/banks-awash-in-cash-which-isnt-good-news.html

The Bernanke testimony was that Fed Reserve made $16T in (free) loans to too-big-to-fail anticipating they would reloan to mainstreet (economic stimulus) ... but they didn't (and he had no way to force them to loan to mainstreet) ... FEDs also bought more in toxic assets from too-big-to-fail (at 98cents on the dollar) than had been appropriated in the original TARP funds (TARP funds were originally appropriated to buy toxic assets, but the amount appropriated was insufficient to deal with the magnitude of the problem even at market price of 22cents on the dollar, however buying at market price would have also resulted in the too-big-to-fail being declared insolvent and would have had to be liquidated).

When Bernanke first found that too-big-to-fail weren't lending to mainstreet as expected (instead using the money for speculation and gambling) ... he could have cut the free money at that point.

...

past posts mentioning Bernanke
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#bernanke
past posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

Note just now they had a former president on morning talk show saying studies show that repeal of Glass-Steagall wasn't the cause of the economic crisis. However, the repeal of Glass-Steagall resulted in fraudulent behavior contaminating regulated depository institutions as well as the rise of too-big-to-fail, and contributed to the lack of prosecution and shutting down those institution (and the related fraudulent activity)

past posts mentioning Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

Made the whole TARP thing public obfuscation and misdirection ... instead of being used to purchase toxic assets (which would have exposed the too big to fail as insolvent) ... it was positioned as a "loan" ... behind the scenes fed then were providing tens of trillions in free loans as well as purchasing the toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar, The tens of trillions in free loans was possibly never expected to be loaned to mainstreet ... used in gambling and speculation scams ... and the proceeds then used for public payoff of TARP as well as enormous bonuses (FED fought in the courts for a year trying to prevent exposing what it was doing behind the scenes).

Warren Buffett: "The Fed Is The Greatest Hedge Fund In History"
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-09-22/warren-buffett-fed-greatest-hedge-fund-history
Buffett Calls Fed History's Greatest Hedge Fund
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-20/buffett-says-federal-reserve-is-greatest-hedge-fund-in-history.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT:  NYT article--the rich get richer
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2013 10:42:16 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Retirement Heist
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#63 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#67 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

there were past studies showing investment houses were really behind move off corporate plans to individual 401Ks because they were able to charge higher fees for individual plans (so aggregate income from lots of individual 401Ks was much higher than single large corporate plan). Also individuals were less sophisticated so the investment houses had more ways to game the system for even more revenue. even more

Researchers Have Found A New Sleazy Side To 401(K)s
http://www.businessinsider.com/researchers-have-found-a-new-sleazy-side-to-401ks-2013-9

from above:
Most 401(k) plans are fraught with conflicts of interest and plagued with expensive, actively managed funds that typically underperform comparable index funds over the long term.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2013 11:49:35 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
I think you've posted that info before. My VM experience was too long ago. So, when VM writes to a screen while the user is typing does that interfere with typing?

I've guessed IBM consoles must do something along these lines, update the messages while the operator can enter commands.

I'm waiting for the day IBM finally realizes that all it's 3270s are now simulated on PCs and additions to hardware features (like local scroll buffers) are quite possible.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#65 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

3270s were half-duplex ... each typed character was sent up the coax to the controller ... if the characters were coming down the coax for screen write ... there was no place for characters being type to go ... and so the keyboard locked ... and required hitting reset to unlock it (the keyboard wasn't locked/unlocked with the screen write ... the keyboard would lock if you happened to hit key while the screen was being written ... and then required hitting reset key to unlock the keyboard).

there was enough electronics in 3277 terminal ... that it was possible to build a small fifo box ... unplug the 3277 keyboard for the head, plug in the fifo box and then plug in the 3277 keyboard into the fifo. the fifo whould hold typed characters if the coax was busy with incoming characters. later on PCs with emulated terminal ... it was possible to get lot more sophisticated with improved human factors.

for 3274/3278, a lot of the electronics in the terminal were moved back into the shared controller (reducing manufacturing cost of 3278 compared to 3277), including some additional keyboard electronics ... and eliminated the ability to put fifo in the keyboard path ... lots of the keyboard stuff had to go over the coax all the way back to the controller. this greatly increased the protocol chatter on the coax as well as introducing latency delays.

this was part of motivation of our complaints to 3274/3278 product owner about it being much worse for interactive computing (compared to 3272/3277) ... and the eventual reply that 3274/3278 was targeted for data entry market (i.e. computerized keypunch) and *not* for interactive computing.

previously reference this thread in ibm-main about mainframe terminals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#25 Teletypewriter Model 33

which also references this past post with old 1980 era peformance comparison of 3272/3277 & 3274/3278
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#19 3270 protocol

this post about former co-worker leaving and getting funding to do a clone controller that would attempt to mask some of the worst human factors of TSO ... trying to make it appear much closer to CMS ... however, it was obsoleted with the rise of terminal emulation on PCs.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#59 Teletypewriter Model 33

above also mention some old MIPS, SUN, Java, etc. folklore

this post in the ibm-main thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#44 Teletypewriter Model 33

references (frequently repeated) story about senior disk engineer getting talk (on 3174 performance) scheduled at the world-wide, annual, internal communication group conference ... and opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The communication group had strangle-hold on datacenter with its corporate strategic *ownership* of everything that crossed the datacenter walls. The communication group was desperately trying preserve its (emulated) dumb terminal install base and fight off client/server and distributed computing. The disk division was seeing the communication group stanglehold on the datacenter with drop and disk sales (data fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms). The disk division had come up with several solutions to address the problem, but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group. past posts mentioning the (emulated) dumb terminal paradigm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

3174 support for token-ring lan still tried to maintain the dumb terminal facade. the growing use of 3270 coax with runs from datacenter throughput buildings to each desktop was starting to exceed building floor loading limits (with the weight of the coax cables). token-ring lan was positioned to not move into modern computing ... but preserve dumb terminal paradigm ... only being used to address the coax weight problem.

we took a lot of arrows in the back (from communication group) for pushing ethernet, distributed computing, and coming up with 3-tier network architecture and making presentations to customer executives on all the pieces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

an example was that that corporate 16mbit token-ring cards were built with design point of 300+ terminals sharing the same bandwidth, with each terminal only needing bandwidth to do dumb terminal emulation. The (risc) PC/RT had done their own (16bit pc/at bus) 4mbit token-ring card. However the RS/6000 had (32bit) microchannel and were told by corporate that they couldn't do their own cards and had to use PS2 cards. The PS2 16mbit token-ring card had lower per-card throughput than the PC/RT 4mbit token-ring card. A PC/RT 4mbit t/r server would have higher throughput than RS/6000 16mbit t/r server. The RS/6000 was severely hamstrung being forced to use all PS2 microchannel cards.

other posts in the ibm-main thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#20 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#21 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#22 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#23 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#24 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#33 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#35 Teletypewriter Model 33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#46 Teletypewriter Model 33

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2013 13:01:00 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#65 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#5 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

mid-80s top executives were predicting ibm worldwide revenue would double from $60B to $120B ... primarily based on mainframe sales (there was massive internal building program to double mainframe hardware manufacturing capacity). however the communication group stanglehold on the datacenter was already showing signs that wouldn't happen (and it wasn't particularly career enhancing to point it out).

the downward slope with going into the red in the early 90s ... probably also contributed to the games played with retirement plans ... cited here:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

recent posts mentioning above:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#63 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#67 OT: NYT article--the rich get riche
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#4 OT: NYT article--the rich get riche

the company was then re-orged into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for splitting up the company ... before Gerstner was hired away to resurrect the company
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

one of the things large corporations (including IBM) did in the 90s was lobbying for accounting change ... being able to treat pension reserves as asset (boosting value/share, price/share and top executive bonuses).

alliance sued claiming treating pension reserves as asset, makes them subject to creditors in any bankruptcy
http://www.endicottalliance.org/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2013 15:14:16 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
My impression is that like lemmings, many IBM customers were willing to drink the latest IBM Kool-aid, token ring.

The major obstacle I encountered was the 3K price point. They really wanted to see a glorified Ethernet adapter for the price of a whole PC?


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#65 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#5 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#6 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

IBM was generating lots of FUD about comparisons between 16mbit t/r and 10mbit ethernet. IBM San Jose research was moving into new Almaden bldg which had been wired with lots of CAT5 for t/r ... however, they found that 1) 10mbit ethernet on cat5 had higher aggregate lan throughput than 16mbit t/r, 2) 10mbit ethernet on cat5 had lower lan latency than 16mbit t/r, and 3) 10mbit ethernet cards had higher per card throughput than 16mbit t/r cards,

About this time, the price for high-performance ethernet cards capable of sustained 8.5mbit/sec throughput was dropping to $69/card.

old 3-tier
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier
throughput and pricing comparison with t&r (used in customer executive presentation) ... heavily skewed in favor t/r
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#40 ibm time machine in new york times?


no. machines         100                  100
adapters/machine     1                    1
no. adapters         100                  100
cost/adapter         $900                 $300
total adapter        $90,000              $30,000
router               -                    $70,000
total cost           $90,000              $100,000

no. LANs             1                    16
router thruput       -                    200mbit
avail. bandwidth     16mbit               160mbit
machines/LAN         100                  6.25
avg bw/machine       .16mbit              1.6mbit

$/LAN                $90,000              $6,250
$/mbit               $5625                $625

... snip ...

used $300/card for ethernet instead of $69/card. Used 16mbit for t/r lan thruoughput instead of less than 8mbit (compared to using 10mbit for ethernet which had 8.5mbit throughput). the ethernet router price included the cost of the mainframe channel attach interface ... the t/r price didn't include the cost of 3174 controllers. It gets much worse if extended out to 300 machine configuration that they were targeting for typical token-ring LAN configuration for dumb terminal emulation. Didn't mention that a 16mbit t/r microchannel card was lucky to get 1mbit throughput while $69 enet card was capable of 8.5mbit throughput

recent ethernet threads that includes references to enormous IBM FUD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#31 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#32 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#33 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#34 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#40 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#27 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#84 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#70 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#72 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#83 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?
Date: 22 Sep 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
also Google+
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#3 Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?

BERNANKE'S OBFUSCATION CONTINUES: The Fed's $29 Trillion Bail-out of Wall Street
http://www.economonitor.com/lrwray/2011/12/09/bernanke%E2%80%99s-obfuscation-continues-the-fed%E2%80%99s-29-trillion-bail-out-of-wall-street/

Neighborhood Watch Programs Needed Everywhere, To Protect Citizens And Whole Communities From Rampant WhiteCollar Crime.
http://mikenormaneconomics.blogspot.com/2013/09/neighborhood-watch-programs-needed.html

The economist who predicted the financial crisis just sounded another alarm-it would be wise to listen this time
http://qz.com/126875/the-economist-who-predicted-the-financial-crisis-just-sounded-another-alarm-it-would-be-wise-to-listen-this-time/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:42:10 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#65 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#5 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#6 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#7 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

lets look at more typical target communication group configuration including adjusted LAN rates for both 16mbit T/R and 10mbit enet ... For 16mbit t/r I'm using 5mbit aggregate lan throughput (goes along with old 1988 reference to max. thruput of 3174 was 5mbit). 10mbit ethernet is published 8.5mbit aggregate lan throughput (as well as peak sustained throughput of individual $69 card)

I'm using $40K for the cost of 3174 as channel interface ... I don't have any real reference other than that is what they increased the price on the 8232 to.


no. machines         300           300          300
adapters/machine     1             1            1
no. adapters         300           300          300
cost/adapter         $900          $69          $69
total adapter        $270,000      $20,700      $20,700
router               $40,000*      $70,000      $140,000
total cost           $310,000      $90,700      $160,700

no. LANs             1             16           32
router thruput       -             200mbit      400mbit
avail. bandwidth     5mbit         136mbit      272mbit
machines/LAN         300           18.75        9.38
avg bw/machine       17kbit        453kbit      907kbit

$/LAN                $310,000      $5,669       $5,022
$/mbit               $62,000       $667         $591

...

the enet router costs include the mainframe channel interface. I'm show a 3174 for channel interface (in lieu of router). the t/r costs doesn't include the costs of the required LAN bridges ... aka SNA (and communication group) doesn't support networking so required to use LAN bridges to tie-together all the t/r lan segments ... with bridges spraying all traffic from all segments to all other segments.

added 3rd column is 300 ethernet with two routers ... each supporting 16 enet lans and each with its own mainframe channel interface.

The people that originated mainframe tcp/ip had figured on using 8232 priced at $5k. When the communication group could no longer block it from coming out, they changed tactics and said that since they had corporate strategic responsibility for everything that crosses the datacenter walls, the product had to be released through the communication group ... which resulted in fiddling lots of stuff. (including pricing the 8232 at $40k).

I've referenced before the initial mainframe tcp/ip product got 44kbytes/sec throughput using nearly whole 3090 processor. I did the changes to support rfc1044 and in some tuning tests at cray research got sustained channel speed throughput between 4341 and cray using only modest amount of 4341 processor. some past posts mentioning doing rfc 1044 support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"NSA foils much internet encryption"

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: "NSA foils much internet encryption"
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 24 Sep 2013 06:52:25 -0700
ip4work@GMAIL.COM (J.P.) writes:
Would just like to add what I've heared from several sources: Crypto is mostly solid, but implementations are weak.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#55 "NSA foils much internet encryption"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#56 "NSA foils much internet encryption"

How a Crypto "Backdoor" Pitted the Tech World Against the NSA
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/?p=85661

other recent refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#0 UK NHS £10bn project failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#2 UK NHS £10bn project failure

recent posts about long ago and far away realizing that there were 3 kinds of crypto 1) the kind they don't care about, 2) the kind you can't do and 3) the kind you can only do for them.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#1 IBM Mainframe (1980's) on You tube
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#31 The Vindication of Barb
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#69 The failure of cyber defence - the mindset is against it
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#77 German infosec agency warns against Trusted Computing in Windows 8
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#88 NSA and crytanalysis

we had been brought in to small client/server startup as consultants because they wanted to do payment transactions on their server; the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now frequently called electronic commerce.

somewhat as a result of having worked on electronic commerce, in the mid-90s we were invited to participate in the x9a10 financial standards working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for *ALL* retail payments. the result was the x9.59 financial transaction standard.

other experience from the 80s was the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about hte beginning until sometime late '85 or early '86)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

which required all links to be encrypted ... in the mid-80s comment was that the internal network had more than half of all link encryptors in the world. there was usually lots of problems with national govs. over encryption ... especially when links cross national boundaries (and argument that helped was that the link went solely from one corporate location to another). old reference to internal network passing 1000 nodes 30yrs ago ... and a list of all corporate locations that had one or more new nodes added during 1983.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8

in any case, the experiences help motivate the direction of x9.59 to be purely authentication and didn't require encryption to hide information. I've periodically commented that the current payment paradigm has problem that account information is effectively used for authentication ... which requires that it be kept confidential and never be divulged ... while at the same time, the same information is required in dozens of busines processes at dozens of business processes at millions of locations around the globe. As a result, I've periodically commented that even if the globe was buried under miles of information hiding encryption, that it wouldn't stop information leakage.

In any case, one of the things x9.59 standard did was slightly tweak the current paradigm and separate authentication informaion from business processes information ... eliminating the requirement for information hiding encryption in order to achieve retail payment integrity (which would then also eliminate the major use for "SSL" in the world today ... aka hiding account information in electronic transactions).

In some of the old key escrow meetings ... I would stress that exposing authentication keys was a fundamental security violation ... however there were some quarters that would complain that people might cheat and use authentication keys for encryption purposes.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?
Date: 24 Sep 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#8 Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?

A couple minutes ago, tv business news is justification for not tapering was that the federal debt is so enormous, tapering would drive the interest rate up ... ballooning the federal debt. However, they could stop the trillions in free money for the too big to fail (some of which is used to buy treasuries and too big to fail makes money on the spread) and use it instead to directly buy treasuries at zero percent interest. That both eliminates the enormous subsidy to the too big to fail and also makes federal debt nearly free (instead of enormous subsidy for too big to fail it would be enormous subsidy for federal gov.)

also:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#3 Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?

and
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/Kjx8KieuZr8
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/8a6mYtFqB3D

posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT:  NYT article--the rich get richer
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 15:11:02 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#63 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#67 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#4 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

besides the ibm specific excerpts at:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

i would highly recommend reading the book
http://www.amazon.com/Retirement-Heist-Companies-American-ebook/dp/B003QMLC6K/

lots of big corporations (especially high-tech ones) were claimed to have fully funded pension reserves in the late 80s that would have paid pensions for every employee even if they all lived to 100 ... w/o having to contribute another cent. the culture of top executives started to change ... focused on lots of accounting tricks to loot those reserves. At one point they list a number of (again high-tech) companies when they have just about exhausted every other way of looting the pension reserves ... they figured out how to dump billions of pension obligations into the plans for top executives. supposedly the laws don't allow pensions for a few top executives to be paid out of the plans that are greater than normal workers. The fiddling allowed billions of obligations to be added for a few executives ... and then declare the plan in trouble, requiring normal worker benefits to be reduced (in order to cover the obligations for a few top executives)

Not mentioned in the IBM excerpts (referenced above) was story about how band of IBM workers and retirees in Vermont got the attention of their congressman to try and reverse some of the most egregious changes. There is story about how one of the auditing firms circulated a memo at resulting senate hearing that the stories about the changes were really misleading. However, the opposition then played tapes of employees of the same audit firm giving talks at corporate symposiums about how the changes really cut employee benefits.

Note this congressman shows up again in the commodities & oil speculation debate. There is chapter in Griftopia about how speculators gamed the system and caused the oil spike way over $100 the summer of 2008.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#griftopia

and there is all sorts of attempts to obfuscate and misdirect attention about what caused the oil price spike. Then the same vermont congressman releases the oil transaction details supporting the griftopia account. Subsequent press articles were more about pillaring him for divulging confidential transaction details than it was supporting transparency showing market manipulation. a few past posts.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#61 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#1 STOP PRESS! An Auditor has been brought to task for a failed bank!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#20 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#52 "Highway Patrol" back on TV

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT:  NYT article--the rich get richer
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 16:06:51 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
Rubin co-chairman of Goldman before stint at US Treasury.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Rubin
and
http://www.marketswiki.com/mwiki/Robert_E._Rubin


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#64 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

Quelle Surprise! More Proof that the FCIC was a Whitewash, Thanks to Angelides and Born
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/09/quelle-surprise-more-proof-that-the-fcic-was-a-whitewash-thanks-to-angelides-and-born.html

from above:
At least Bair put up a tenacious fight about Citi, even though Geithner, an acolyte of its board member Bob Rubin, used every bureaucratic device he could find to stymie her (Neil Barofsky has separately described how underhanded and persistent Geithner is, frequently working through cat's paws). By contrast, another person who tried exposing the extent of the rot at Citi when it should have been safe to do so, long after the worst of the crisis was over, found himself blocked by people who were supposedly tasked with getting to the bottom of the crisis.

... snip ...

other recent references to Rubin and multitude connections to the economic mess and citibank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#13 Jack Lew Shows His True Colors By Forcing Deregulation of Derivatives on the CFTC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#67 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

citi bank one of the too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

referenced article: Was This Whistle-Blower Muzzled?
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/22/opinion/sunday/was-this-whistle-blower-muzzled.html

Sheila Bair
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheila_Bair
and: "Bull by the Horns: Fighting to Save Main Street from Wall Street and Wall Street from Itself"
http://www.amazon.com/Bull-Horns-Fighting-Street-ebook/dp/B0061Q688A/
past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#57 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#58 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#55 U.S. Sues Wells Fargo, Accusing It of Lying About Mortgages
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#57 Bull by the Horns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#14 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#60 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#90 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

Neil Barofsky
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Barofsky
and "An Inside Account of How Washington Abandoned Main Street While Rescuing Wall Street"
http://www.amazon.com/Bailout-Washington-Abandoned-Rescuing-ebook/dp/B00818J57W/
past posts mentioning Barofsky, trying to oversee TARP, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#86 Study: One in Five Firms Misrepresent Earnings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#65 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#66 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#20 HSBC, SCB Agree to AML Penalties
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#24 OCC Confirms that Big Banks are Badly Managed, Lack Adequate Risk Management Controls
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#48 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#28 Neil Barofsky: Geithner Doctrine Lives on in Libor Scandal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#5 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#7 LIBOR: Viewing the Biggest Financial Crime in History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#35 Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#86 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#41 It's a Banker's World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#86 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#15 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#46 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#50 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#61 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#71 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

other past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#38 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#40 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#42 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#43 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#45 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#47 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#58 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#63 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#68 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#1 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#4 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#12 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Gilmore response to NSA mathematician's "make rules for NSA" appeal

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Gilmore response to NSA mathematician's "make rules for NSA" appeal
Date: 25 Sep 2013
Blog: Cryptography Mailing List
We had been asked to come in and help wordsmith the cal. state digital signature act. Several of the parties were involved in privacy issues and also working on Cal. data breach notification act and Cal. opt-in personal information sharing act.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#signature

The parties had done extensive public surveys on privacy and the #1 issue was identity theft, namely the form of "account fraud" as result of data breaches.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#harvest

There was little or nothing being done about this so there was some hope that the publicity from the breach notifications would motivate corrective action. The issue is that normally an entity takes security and countermeasures in self-protection ... the entities suffering the data breaches weren't at risk ... it is the account holders. Since then several Federal breach notification bills have been introduced about evenly divided between having similar notification requirements and Federal "preemption" legislation eliminating requirement for notifications. The federal bills eliminating notifications cite industry specifications call for account encryption (that were formulated after the cal. legislation).

We've periodically commented in the current paradigm, even if the planet was buried under miles of information hiding encryption it still wouldn't stop information leakage. One problem, is account information is basically used for authentication and as such needs to be kept completely confidential and never divulged. However, at the same time, account information is also required in dozens of business processes at millions of location around the world.

The cal. personal information "opt-in" sharing legislation would require institution have record from the individual authorizing sharing of information. However, before the cal legislation passed, an "opt-out" (federal preemption) provision was added to GLBA. GLBA is now better known for the repeal of Glass-Steagall. At the time, the rhetoric in congress was the primary purpose of GLBA was if you already had bank charter you got to keep it, however, if you didn't have a charter, you wouldn't be able to get one (i.e. eliminate new parties from coming in and competing with banks). However, GLBA was loaded up with other features like repeal of Glass-Steagall and the "opt-out" personal information sharing (i.e. the financial institution needed record of person declining sharing of personal information ... rather than "opt-in" which required institution to have record authorizing sharing).

A few years ago, I was at a national annual privacy conference in Wash DC. (hotel just up the street from spy museum). There was a panel discussion with the FTC commissioners. Somebody in the audience asked the FTC commissioners if they were going to do anything about GLBA "opt-out" privacy sharing. He said he worked on callcenter technology used by all the major financial institutions ... and that none of the 1-800 "opt-out" desks had provisions for recording information from the call (aka an institution would *NEVER* have a record of a person objecting to sharing their personal information). The FTC commissioners just ignored him.

misc. Glass-Steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT:  NYT article--the rich get richer
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 23:54:14 -0400
a few more too big to jail from the past couple days

Regulator sues 13 banks in Libor rate-fixing case for selling nearly $2.4 billion in "faulty securities" to credit unions
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/09/24/regulator-sues-13-banks-in-libor-rate-fixing-case-for-selling-nearly-2-4-billion-in-faulty-securities-to-credit-unions/
Stunning Libor Fraud Admissions: "As For Kick Backs We Can Discuss That At Lunch" And Much More
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-09-25/kick-backs-we-can-discuss-lunch-libor-manipulation-full-frontal
Bank of America goes to trial over U.S. mortgage fraud charges
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/23/us-bankofamerica-hustle-idUSBRE98M11H20130923
J.P. Morgan's Legal Headaches: A Tally
http://blogs.wsj.com/moneybeat/2013/09/24/j-p-morgans-legal-headaches-a-tally/
JPMorgan May Settle With Group of Agencies
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/09/24/jpmorgan-may-settle-with-group-of-agencies/
JPMorgan's Legal Hurdles Expected to Multiply
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/09/23/jpmorgans-legal-hurdles-expected-to-multiply/
Fraud Fortress: JPM Settles London Whale, Admits To Violating Securities Laws
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-09-19/fraud-fortress-jpm-settles-london-whale-admits-violating-securities-laws
JPMorgan Settlement To Reach $11 Billion, AP Reports
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-09-25/jpmorgan-settlement-reach-11-billion-ap-reports
JPMorgan's Mortgage Settlement May Reach $20 Billion
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-09-24/jpmorgans-mortgage-settlement-may-reach-20-billion
FBI pursuing fewer white-collar crime cases, group finds
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2013/09/24/203100/fbi-pursuing-fewer-white-collar.html

and past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

while repeal of Glass-Steagall didn't create the mess from last decade, it created too big to fail which has resulted in too big to prosecute as well as too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

allowing too big to fail to continue all sorts of illegal activity ... including money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering

related series on Google+ and linkedin Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#3 Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#8 Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#11 Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?

and then inequality

How America's 401(k) Revolution Rewarded the Rich and Turned the Rest of Us Into Big Losers
http://www.alternet.org/economy/401k-revolution-and-inequality
One Sign Shows It All: The distribution of income is a function of the distribution of Democracy
http://johnhively.wordpress.com/2013/09/25/one-sign-shows-it-all-the-distribution-of-income-is-a-function-of-the-distribution-of-democracy/

previously mentioned "Retirement Heist" not only goes into how big corporations looted pension reserves but also medical health plans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#63 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#67 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#4 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#6 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#12 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 26 Sep 2013 06:40:59 -0700
elardus.engelbrecht@SITA.CO.ZA (Elardus Engelbrecht) writes:
I have occassionaly done a full night work, especially during emergencies like botched installation, upgrade or big changes.

as undergraduate in the 60s, the univ would shutdown the datacenter from 8am sat until 8am monday ... and let me have the whole place to myself ... initially 709/1401 ... and in transition to 360, the 1401 was replaced by 360/30 ... and then both 709 and 360/30 replaced by 360/67 (mostly ran as 360/65). after having been up for 48hrs, it was sometimes difficult to deal with monday classes.

old post with "Real Programmers" tome
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#39

one of the items:
Real Programmers never work 9 to 5. If any real programmers are around at 9am, it's because they were up all night.

... snip ...

mentions getting complaints about tracking mud in halls of ibm san jose research (from cleats in hiking boots) ... path that I walked to work turned to mud when it rained.

slightly different "Real Programmers" version
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#31
as bonus, also has "Real Software Engineers".

past post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18

while the 360/67 mostly ran as 360/65, I did get to play a little with cp67 on the weekend ... has part of share presentation that I did fall of '68 ... references some performance benchmarks from having re-written a lot of the cp67 kernel
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS

The above mentions initial cp67 release May 1968 ... however, three people from the science center came out last week of jan1968 to install cp67 at the univ ... and then I was invited to spring 1968 share meeting in houston for announcement ... I had already started to rewrite a lot of the code by that time.

I also took apart os/360 stage2 sysgen and re-arranged order of all the cards to carefully place datasets and pds members for optimal arm seek motion (pds member ordering also minimized multi-track pds directory search) ... getting almost three times throughput improvement for univ. student job workload.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 13:50:47 -0400
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
I may be blank about that. I remember being surprised that it was like mail order, rather than needing a pin, but I may not be remembering properly.

we were brought in as consultants to small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on its servers ... they startup had also invented this technology call "SSL" they wanted to use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce".

part of the work was creating a payment gateway that handled transactions between the servers on the network and the payment networks. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

the payment gateway initial interfaced into payment transaction processor that was that same used by most of the las vegas casinos and hotels for handling point-of-sale, card-swipe transactions (i.e. the info from browsers getting translated into card-swap). The transactions were flagged/classified as credit card "MOTO" (mail-order/telephone-order) ... which used the same business processes and merchant contractual terms&conditions (as MOTO).

There was no equivalent for debit card PIN operation in MOTO environment ... the only process for "cardholder not preset" and "card not present" (aka non face-to-face environment) was the credit card industry support for MOTO

the credit card associations started work on extensive publickey based infrastructure called SET (secure electronic transaction) most of the people on the effort were technologists, not business people. When they first published their specification, I developed a publickey operation profile (as well as business operation profile) for the specification and got some benchmarks done. I then presented the results at the next meeting. The technologists (including some from SUN & IBM and other technology vendors) claimed that the measured numbers were 100 times too high. The problem was that the benchmarks used the standard public key library (BSAFE) that had special speedups that made it run four times faster. If anybody in the group had ever actually done any public key operations they would have said it was four times too fast (not 100 times too slow). Six months later when first SET pilots were turned on, the benchmarks were within couple percent of actual (the speedups had been incorporated into standard BSAFE library distribution).

The other problem was that the PKI data structures being used for each transactions were 100 times larger than the size of standard payment transactions. In addition to the enormous processing bloat, there was an enormous payload bloat. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subpubkey.html#bloat

As a result of the payload bloat ... the implementation had to strip away all the publickey stuff at their internet payment gateway and add a single bit flag to standard payment transaction indicated valid public key verification had been performed. The problem was transactions with the flag turned on got a substantial merchant interchange fee discount. I pointed this out to the IBM people responsible for the IBM SET payment gateway. Their reply was that their gateway was certified to never turn on the bit when it shouldn't. The real design issue was that w/o end-to-end authentication ... anybody could now turn on the bit (for the discount). Later in an financial standards ISO meeting in Europe, some card association business people gave statistics on transactions that had the bit on ... where they could prove that there was no possibility of public key operations involved (however, with the design they had, they couldn't afford the cost of end-to-end authentication with the enormous 100-times payload bloat).

In anycase, SET start to dwindle away because of the enormously heavy weight implementation ... the enormous processing overhead & latency as well as the enormous processing latency. One of the last ditch attempts to save SET was proposal to merchants that the card associations would try and change REG-E ... reversing the burden of proof in disputes from the merchant/institution to the individual (aka not only SET carried a reduced interchange fee if the bit was set ... but also if the bit was SET ... and the customer disputed the transactions ... the burden of proof now fell on the customer to prove they didn't do it ... as opposed to the burden of proof on the merchant to prove that they did). That change never got very far ... but a similar process has been used in europe to help promote the update of chip&pin. I've commented before about being contacted by a legal representative of a person in the UK who was disputing a chip&pin transaction at an ATM cash machine. Since the burden of proof was on the customer to prove it wasn't them, it was the customer's responsibility to produce the video survellience showing who did it. The bank was claiming they couldn't find the video survellience (if the burden proof was on the institution/merchant as in US REG-E ... the bank would have to produce the video survellience it order to prove it was the person).

some past posts mentioning the YES CARD vulnerability in chip&pin
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

During a LEO presentation at an "ATM Integrity Taskforce" meeting on the chip&pin YES CARD vulnerability ... somebody made the comment that they had managed to spend billions of dollars to prove chips were less secure than magstripe. Aka it was trivial to create a YES CARD clone and there were few countermeasures. In the case of fraudulent transactions on lost/stolen/cloned magstripe ... the account number can be turned off to stop the transactions ... but turning off the account number wouldn't stop fraudulent "YES CARD" transactions. Part of the problem in the US is that there was a large pilot deployed in the US during the YES CARD period ... which then disappeared w/o a trace. In the wake of the YES CARD debacle ... it was likely going to be some time before it was tried again (waiting until it had been thoroughtly proven in other parts of the world).

The other issue was that the SET & chip&pin efforts started approx. concurrently and were totally unrelated ... the SET specification being developed solely for online, internet operation ... and chip&pin being developed solely for point-of-sale operation.

some past posts mentioning the burden-of-proof issue
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#nonreput Sender and receiver non-repudiation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#terror7 [FYI] Did Encryption Empower These Terrorists?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay10.htm#72 Invisible Ink, E-signatures slow to broadly catch on
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm17.htm#59 dual-use digital signature vulnerability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm18.htm#0 dual-use digital signature vulnerability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm18.htm#55 MD5 collision in X509 certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm19.htm#33 Digital signatures have a big problem with meaning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm20.htm#0 the limits of crypto and authentication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm21.htm#35 [Clips] Banks Seek Better Online-Security Tools
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#14 Shifting the Burden - legal tactics from the contracts world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm23.htm#33 Chip-and-Pin terminals were replaced by "repairworkers"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#60 crypto component services - is there a market?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm26.htm#63 Public key encrypt-then-sign or sign-then-encrypt?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#38 The Trouble with Threat Modelling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#57 RealNames hacked. Firewall issues.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#34 does CA need the proof of acceptance of key binding ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#59 PKI/Digital signature doesn't work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#62 PKI/Digital signature doesn't work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#52 Security standards for banks and other institution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#69 Digital signature
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#17 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#41 xml-security vs. native security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#6 Creating certs for others (without their private keys)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#11 Question about authentication protocols
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#26 How good is TEA, REALLY?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#42 Catch22. If you cannot legally be forced to sign a document etc - Tax Declaration etc etc etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#32 When *not* to sign an e-mail message?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#8 Beginner's Pubkey Crypto Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#28 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#23 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#67 open source voting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#62 Solving password problems one at a time, Re: The password-reset paradox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#52 Credit cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#71 Sophisticated cybercrooks cracking bank security efforts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009r.html#72 Why don't people use certificate-based access authentication?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#1 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#3 Korean bank Moves back to Mainframes (...no, not back)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#21 Credit card data security: Who's responsible?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#24 Cambridge researchers show Chip and PIN system vulnerable to fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#47 Industry groups leap to Chip and PIN's defence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#63 Wal-Mart to support smartcard payments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#7 taking down the machine - z9 series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#82 Five Theses on Security Protocols
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#23 A mighty fortress is our PKI, Part II
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#77 towards https everywhere and strict transport security (was: Has there been a change in US banking regulations recently?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#60 A Two Way Non-repudiation Contract Exchange Scheme
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#71 Password shortcomings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#62 Gordon Gekko Says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#35 The Conceptual ATM program
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#8 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#38 regulation,bridges,streams
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#52 U.S. agents 'got lucky' pursuing accused Russia master hackers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#90 copyright protection/Doug Englebart

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 15:53:41 -0400
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
It was a more elegant protocol without contention problems. However, sometimes worse is better, especially when the price is lower.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#5 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#7 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#9 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

part of communication group T/R FUD was comparing 16mbit T/R to what was possibly very early 3mbit ethernet before it used listen before transmit (would just start transmitting) ... in the past I made snide references to the group must have a time machine ... to justify the comparison with something displaced nearly a decade in time.

however, 1988 ACM SIGCOMM ("Measured Capacity of Ethernet: Myths and Reality" proceedings of ACM SIGCOMM, 8/16-19, 1988, V18N4) published analysis of typical 30 station 10mbit ethernet where effective ethernet bandwidth was nearly the full 10mbits. in tests where all 30 stations had low level device driver transmitting minimum sized ethernet packets as fast as possible, effective aggregate throughput dropped off to 8.5mbits/sec (which was still higher than aggregate effective throughput of 16mbit t/r).

This accounted for why the new IBM Almaden Research building, having been heavily wired with CAT5 for 16mbit t/r, switched to 10mbit ethernet ... because

1) effective aggregate 10mbit ethernet LAN thruput was higher than 16mbit t/r 2) avg. per packet latency on 10mbit ethernet lan was less than on 16mbit t/r, and 3) individual ethernet LAN card peak throughput was higher (individual 10mbit ethernet LAN card could operate at full media throughput, however, a single individual 16mbit T/R LAN card was lucky if it could get 1mbit).

last was part of the communication group design point of using 16mbit T/R for doing dumb terminal emulation ... so individual card throughput requirement was way under mbit/sec.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

disclaimer: my wife is co-inventor on late 70s LAN token-passing patent (both US and international, assigned to IBM).

the token-passing elegance needed lan segments with much longer distances and higher transmission latency ... hardly qualifying as LAN (*LOCAL* area network). however, what happens in the internet ... is there are router/gateways that handle the transition from the local area to longer distant interconnect (rather than having a single enormous LAN segment for interconnecting all devices in the country).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 16:13:20 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
If 10mbit ethernet can get close to it's theoretical limit, (and I consider 8.5 close), then the geniuses at IBM should have known there was no market.

That's really dumb.

I remember all the elegant documentation on TR being circulated. It looked like exactly what it turned out to be, a lot of design to solve a non-existent problem.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#5 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#7 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#9 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#18 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

who said any of the geniuses were running IBM???

I also previously mentioned that the individual 16mbit T/R microchannel card peak throughput was less than the PC/RT 4mbit T/R AT-bus card peak throughput ... part of the apparent attempt by the communication group to preserve the dumb terminal paradigm and fighting off client/server and distributed computing ... also my contention that they were trying to position 16mbit T/R as a solution to the point-to-point 3270 coax weight floor loading problem.

recent mention that about that time, top executives were predicting that revenue was going to double from $60B to $120B/annum mostly based on mainframe sales ... even when things were already starting to head in the opposite direction (the company is on downward slide going into red in the early 90s). this involved a massive internal building program to double lots of mainframe related manufacturing capacity. There was also big upsurge in "fast-track" MBAs circulating around the company.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#79 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#49 Internet Mainframe Forums Considered Harmful
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#49 The Original IBM Basic Beliefs for those that have never seen them
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#6 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 27 Sep 2013 10:29:17 -0400
simon@twoplaces.co.uk (Simon Turner) writes:
Interesting. AIUI, in "Chip-and-PIN" cards, it is the card that is responsible for verifying that the PIN is correct, so there would be no point in sending the PIN to your bank (they don't have the card there, so have no use for the PIN). Indeed, in the UK, the banks make a particular point of telling you that they will *never* ask you for your PIN.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#17 Steve B sees what investors think

chip&pin was among a series of cards developed in europe for doing "offline" payment transactions as countermeasure to the extremely high-cost of telco and/or lack of availability. by the time chip&pin started to be deployed ... prices and availability of telco in europe had radically changed (aka the cost of the chips was being offset by the cost of the eliminated telco transactions)

the security countermeasure in chip&pin was primarily for lost/stolen card ... aka two-factor authentication ... aka something you have (card) and something you know (pin). past posts mentioning multi-factor authentication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#3factor

however deployment was during a period where skimming exploits had been common for at least a decade ... and it turned out to be able to skim and create a chip&pin nearly as trivially as a magstripe card. this gave rise to the previously mentioned comment in the ATM Integrity Taskforce meeting about having spent billions of dollars to prove chips are less secure than magstripe ... about YES CARD.

A counterfeit YES CARD clone was programmed to always answer "YES" to the three questions a POS terminal asked
1) was the correct PIN entered 2) should the transaction be done offline 3) is the transaction within the "open to buy" (aka credit limit)

since the YES CARD always said YES to an offline transaction, disabling an account number had no effect (i.e. works for magstripe transactions that are always online).

The people doing the large pilot program in the US (over a decade ago) were myopically focused on lost/stolen card scenario. I pointed out the YES card scenario ... and they said thats OK, the valid cards being deployed would never do an offline transaction. The issue was that it didn't make any difference what the valid cards did ... it was what would a counterfeit, clone card do (they were so focused on valid card attacks, they failed to process when I referred to counterfeit, clone card scenarios).

The disastrous failure of the pilot because of the YES CARD scenario is major factor in the long delay before it is attempted again in the US.

somebody's old trip report to cartes2002 mentioning YES CARD presentation (at the bottom of trip report) ... gone 404 ... but lives on at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html
past YES CARD posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

as I've previously mentioned for chip&pin, the associations also got the burden of proof changed in dispute (as cost of telco was radically dropping, there was no longer business case based on eliminating telco costs ... so motivation was added with radically reduced dispute costs ... burden of proof was shifted from institution/merchant to the individual)

there were also a whole series of "stored value" offline chipcards in europe during the end of the previous century (again to address the european telco expense/availability opportunities) ... some of which made brief foreys into the US. The US market eventually responded with "online" magstripe "stored value" products (gift cards, merchant cards, etc) ... that used the same payment card magstripe POS terminals and telco infrastructure

In the late 90s, we were asked to design & cost the backend dataprocessing infrastructure for a popular european "stored value" chipcard forey for a large US deployemnt. However, at the same time I did analysis of the end-to-end business process ... and what I came up with was that the major factor in the programs was the interest/float that the operators had on values transferred into the infrastructure. In fact, a little later EU central bank made a ruling that the operators would be allowed to keep the interest/float during the startup period (to help underwrite startup costs) but would have to start crediting the accounts with that value. The loss of that float was a major blow to those programs.

some past posts mentioning stored-value chipcard programs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm21.htm#12 Payment Tokens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm27.htm#42 The bank fraud blame game
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm28.htm#49 Price point
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm6.htm#digcash IP: Re: Why we don't use digital cash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadsm7.htm#idcard2 AGAINST ID CARDS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#18 Opinion on smartcard security requested
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#54 Smartcards and devices
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#12 US fiscal policy (Was: Bob Bemer, Computer Pioneer,Father of ASCII,Invento
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#44 Methods of payment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#34 Maximum RAM and ROM for smartcards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#90 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#62 blasts from the past -- old predictions come true
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#63 Wal-Mart to support smartcard payments
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#7 Selectric Typewriter--50th Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#78 The PC industry is heading for collapse

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 27 Sep 2013 10:48:21 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#17 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#20 Steve B sees what investors think

triva ... side-effect of the YES CARD ... it wasn't necessary to know the (correct) pin ... since the YES CARD always said it was a correct pin ... regardless of what had been entered.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 27 Sep 2013 11:26:19 -0400
Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:
I would really, really hate having to give my PIN to a merchant, it's bad enough keying it into those machines but at least they're not supposed to leak the PIN outside of the machine. Nobody else should know the PIN (even the bank does not know it).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#17 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#20 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#21 Steve B sees what investors think

things get more complex ... credit card magstripe had lots of infrastructure evolved over the decades.

earliest credit card magstripes just had account numbers. early counterfeit credit cards just generated account numbers according to known pattern. as a countermeasure ... a truncated secure hash was added to the magstripe ... sort of like pin number for computers. however, the next evoluation in counterfeit credit cards was skimming magstripe ... just copy a known valid magstripe.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#harvest

because of lots of vulnerabilities ... gov. has REG-E which puts heavy responsbility on the banks & merchants in the case of any dispute ... protecting the individual.

somewhat in parallel debit/cash-machines evolved but required PIN.

as credit card use dropped off ... the card association (who's revenue is based on associated transactions flowing through their networks) came up with schemes to allow debit cards to be used at point-of-sale machines (and therefor would flow through the networks ... and they get piece of action).

initial was to offer both signature & pin options for debit card (the user could decide whether to do a signature-based debit card transaction ... identical to credit card ... or pin-based debit card transaction).

there was big legal dispute a decade ago against the associations since they set things up effectively forcing customers to do signature-based debit card transactions ... which the associations charged the merchant significantly higher price (than if it was pin-based). the associations were fined billions of dollars and forced to put signature & pin debit transactions on level playing field.

one of the problems for customers is that there are a lot more pitfalls using debit at point-of-sale (including the money gets debited immediately from bank account ... and it might take quite awhile before it gets put back in case of fraud). the other is that even if you are very, very careful to only use a card with PIN ... an attacker still only has to skim the magstripe ... and then use a counterfeit card in signature mode (just because you always use PIN ... doesn't mean the crook has to ... slight analogy to the YES CARD deployment thinking they didn't have an "offline" problem if all valid cards were always online). It is still possible to get an ATM-only debit card ... that can't be used at point-of-sale ... and always requires a PIN. The banks don't like to advertise it ... since they make a whole lot more money off the point-of-sale variety card (from the associated interchange fees charged merchants on every transactions).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"There IS no force, just inertia"

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: "There IS no force, just inertia"
Date: 26 Sep 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/bZM6kZR

I become acquainted with John Boyd the spring of 1983 and would sponsor his briefings at IBM.

John Boyd
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Boyd_%28military_strategist%29

recent article: 40 Years of the "Fighter Mafia" An informal group begun by Col. John Boyd and mathematician Tom Christie calls for military reform -- by doing more with less.
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/40-years-of-the-fighter-mafia/
"There are two career paths in front of you, and you have to choose which path you will follow. One path leads to promotions, titles, and positions of distinction.... The other path leads to doing things that are truly significant for the Air Force, but the rewards will quite often be a kick in the stomach because you may have to cross swords with the party line on occasion. You can't go down both paths, you have to choose. Do you want to be a man of distinction or do you want to do things that really influence the shape of the Air Force? To be or to do, that is the question." Colonel John R. Boyd, USAF 1927-1997

From the dedication of Boyd Hall, United States Air Force Weapons School, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. 17 September 1999


I found the above sentiment seems to be true in most large bureaucracies

Hugh Laurie's (TV's House) novel "Gun Seller" references Boyd's OODA-loop as well as lengths that the MICC (Eisenhower's goodby speech warning about the military-industrial complex was originally going to be military-industrial-congressional complex, but got shorten at the last minute) would go to when threatened.

Boyd had a story when he was working on the F16 design and the MICC F15 forces were trying to block it. He was using a lot of supercomputer time doing the design and the MICC F15 forces convinced the Air Force to investigate Boyd for theft of millions of dollars from the gov. (i.e. the supercomputer time) which would have put him in Leavenworth for the rest of his life. Fortunately Boyd had anticipated the tactic and had left no trail of his supercomputer use.

Boyd also would comment during Vietnam that he would say that the sensors on trail would never work ... which possibly resulted in him getting posted as command of "spook base". Reference about "spook base" (and the sensors on the trail) ... gone 404, but live on at the wayback machine.
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

Boyd biographies also mention that "spook base" was a $2.5B windfall for IBM.

past posts mentioning MICC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
past posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd1

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 27 Sep 2013 17:01:01 -0400
hancock4 writes:
In 1950, IBM had a modest applied research unit (more a _product development_ research effort), but no pure research. Watson Jr felt pure research was important to the company's prestige and future, and spent heavily to develop that, as well as expand applied research. Indeed, Watson Sr sought improvements for years. Watson Sr wanted IBM machines to be used by outside researchers, partly to expand the sales base and partly for the prestige. He set up a lab at Columbia University, and allowed the SSEC machine to be used for research.

Stockman in "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America" pg457/loc9844-46:
The leader was ExxonMobil, which repurchased $160 billion of its own shares during 2004-2011. It was followed by Microsoft at $100 billion, IBM at $75 billion, and Hewlett-Packard, Proctor & Gamble, and Cisco with $50 billion each. Even the floundering shipwreck of merger mania known as Time Warner Inc. bought back $25 billion.

pg464/loc9995-10000:
IBM was not the born-again growth machine trumpeted by the mob of Wall Street momo traders. It was actually a stock buyback contraption on steroids. During the five years ending in fiscal 2011, the company spent a staggering $67 billion repurchasing its own shares, a figure that was equal to 100 percent of its net income.

pg465/10014-17:
Total shareholder distributions, including dividends, amounted to $82 billion, or 122 percent, of net income over this five-year period. Likewise, during the last five years IBM spent less on capital investment than its depreciation and amortization charges, and also shrank its constant dollar spending for research and development by nearly 2 percent annually.

... snip ...

is only small part of what is going on ... aka "Retirement Heist"
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

and in the wake of failure of "Future Systems", from "Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World" Ferguson & Morris:

... and perhaps most damaging, the old culture under Watson Snr and Jr of free and vigorous debate was replaced with sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers. It's claimed that thereafter, IBM lived in the shadow of defeat

... and:
But because of the heavy investment of face by the top management, F/S took years to kill, although its wrongheadedness was obvious from the very outset. "For the first time, during F/S, outspoken criticism became politically dangerous," recalls a former top executive.

... snip ...

past posts mentioning Future Systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

recent posts mentioning Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#63 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#67 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#4 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#6 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#12 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#15 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

and recent posts mentioning "Great Deformation"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#3 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#5 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#23 What Makes weapons control Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#30 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#34 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#49 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#63 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#5 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#69 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#2 IBM Relevancy in the IT World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#50 IBM Furloughs U.S. Hardware Employees to Reduce Costs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#51 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#57 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#49 The Original IBM Basic Beliefs for those that have never seen them
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 27 Sep 2013 15:02:38 -0700
scott_j_ford@YAHOO.COM (Scott Ford) writes:
Yep I agree worked with some oriental programs, who slept under their desks..these guys were unbelievably good programmers..the group I worked with wasn't quite that bad, no in a negative sense.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#16 Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))

????

for some topic drift ... I become acquainted with John Boyd the spring of 1983 and would sponsor his briefings at IBM.

He would mention that during vietnam, he could claim that the sensors on the trial wouldn't work. That is possibly why he was assigned to command spook base. URL describing spook base, sensors on the trail, and even drones ... gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

Boyd biographies claim spook base was $2.5B windfall for IBM ... possibly pushing $20B in today's dollars. Boyd would say that spook base had the largest air conditioned building in that part of the world.

About that time, I was con'ed into joining Boeing as part of helping form Boeing Computer Services ... consolidating dataprocessing into separate business unit to better monetize the investment. I had imagined Renton was the largest IBM 360 mainframe datacenter in the world, something like $300M in mainframes. At one time the 360/65s were arriving faster than they could be installed ... there were pieces of 360/65s constantly staged in the hallways outside the machine room.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 28 Sep 2013 01:30:22 -0400
hancock4 writes:
After S/360 was developed, a number of of the key engineers left IBM for greener pastures, taking their IBM knowledge with them, perhaps frustrated at their treatment. It is understandable that IBM would be reluctant to hire engineers for a temporary effort and then discharge them, but perhaps those who worked long/hard hours for years on S/360 should've been rewarded more than they got (I don't know what actually happened with bonuses and promotions and such.)

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#24 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

after transfering from science center to san jose research ... they let me wander around a bit ... down to stl and various kinds of dbms and other stuff, over to dasd engineering labs ... where eventually i got to play disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

over to los gatos vlsi lab, drop in on various customers in the bay area ... and of course play at HONE in palo alto ... HONE was world-wide, virtual machine based, online sales&marketing support ... that I had been providing with enhanced operating systems since cp67 days.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

that is addition to what I was suppose to be doing in san jose research ... including some original relational/sql
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

the disk engineering labs had quite a few mainframes and were doing stand-alone, dedicated machine testing, scheduled 7x24 around the clock. they had once tried MVS to see if they could do concurrent testing ... but found that MVS in that environment had 15min MTBF ... even with single testcell. I offerred to do rewritten, bullet-proof, never-fail i/o supervisor ... so they could do any amount of on-demand concurrent testing. this then got me sucked into diagnosing hardware problems when the engineers would fingerpoint at my software when things wouldn't working as expected. this led to them also wanting me to sit in on conference calls with POK channel engineers. I asked why were they having me do it ... where were all the disk engineers with channel expertise. They said that all the senior disk engineers with channel expertise had been hired away.

unfortunately, I did an internal writeup of the i/o supervisor work and happened to mention the MVS 15min MTBF ... and subsequently got really hammered by the MVS group ... I was told that they were going to do everything possible to make the rest of my career at ibm as unpleasant as possible (they would have gotten me fired if they could have figured out how). this was possibly one of the consequences of the FS failure ... groups becoming extremely politicized.

old disk reference gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/19990503110339/http://www.disktrend.com/disk3.htm

dirty dozen ... dec1967 ... then shugart summer of '69 ... then possibly another 200 through the early 70s.

... however for POK & 3081 one of the "mad rush" projects in the wake of the failure of FS
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

this old email saying all those getting "technical" awards for 3081 ... vast majority were managers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#email810706
in this recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#23

past posts mentioning future system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

US Air Force Converts F-16 Fighters into Drones

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: US Air Force Converts F-16 Fighters into Drones
Date: 28 Sep 2013
Blog: Facebook
US Air Force Converts F-16 Fighters into Drones
http://www.securityweek.com/us-air-force-converts-f-16-fighters-drones

I met John Boyd spring of 1983 and would sponsor his briefings at IBM. One of his stories was when he was working on F16 design, the MICC F15 forces tried to block it and convinced air force to investigate him for theft of millions in gov. property (the supercomputer time he was using for F16 design) ... he was facing the rest of his life in Leavenworth. Fortunately he anticipated the tactic and left no trail of his supercomputer use. He also told about saying that the sensors on the trail during vietnam woudn't work ... which possibly resulted him being given command of spook base. URL about spook base, sensors on the trail, and drones (gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

He would say it had the largest air conditioned bldg in that part of the world. Boyd bios claim spook base was $2.5B windfall for IBM (possibly pushing $20B in today's dollars)

Prior to Vietnam, Boyd was asked to review new AF air--to-air missile that claimed it hit every time it was fired. Boyd reviewed the material and films and said that he would be lucky to hit 10%. They argued ... he asked them to rerun the film and then stopped it just before missile hit flare on a drone. He asked what kind of guidance, they said heat seeking. He ask some more questions before getting them to say what kind of heat seeking ("pin-point"). He asked what is the hottest part of the plane ... they said the jet engine. He said *NO*, it was in the plume way behind the jet ... the only time it hits is when shooting straight up the tailpipe and the opponent isn't maneuvering. They package up all the material, leave, and bury his analysis. Role forward to vietnam and boyd's analysis is correct. The top AF commander in vietnam grounds all fighters while they are converted from AF missile to navy sidewinders (having better than twice hit rate). He lasts 3months before being replaced and called on the carpet back in the pentagon. He had violated fundamental pentagon rule ... cutting air force budget (loosing fewer jets & pilots and not using AF missile). Pentagon AF focus on conduct of the war was only with regard to how it affected AF budget.

posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd1

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Reformers

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Reformers
Date: 28 Sep 2013
Blog: Boyd & Beyond
The Reformers
http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArchive/Pages/2008/February%202008/0208reformers.aspx

for the above reference to sparrow/sidewinder ... see further comments in the "40 years of fighter mafia" with "blacktail" providing additional detail
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/40-years-of-the-fighter-mafia/
... also if you click on his URL ... it goes to some M1 & Bradley analysis similar to some of the recent stuff at ELP
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/2013/09/dare-to-compare-m1a2-abrams-sep-versus_7.html

an alternative detailed account on many items: "National Insecurity: The Cost of American Militarism"
http://www.amazon.com/National-Insecurity-American-Militarism-ebook/dp/B00ATLNI04/

as an aside ... for whatever reason, I never experienced any of the personal interactions attributed to him ... at the most there were possibly some conversational games ... but then again I also had to deal with people in IBM that were supposedly the smartest people in the world.

also w/regard to reference to reformers not prevailing over MICC ... I've commented before after '83 Time article, they wanted to do bad things to both Spinney and Boyd ... but there was some congressional cover ... which doesn't exist today.
http://web.archive.org/web/20070320170523/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953733,00.html

For a non-fiction disucssion of MICC, there is previously referenced "National Insecurity" ... for fiction discussion of MICC,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
there is Hugh Laurie (TV's House) novel Gun Seller ... which also references Boyd's OODA-loop.
http://www.amazon.com/The-Gun-Seller-ebook/dp/B000SEGK0M/

I've got lots of similar but different references to the financial mess last decade and the Financial Regulatory Congressional Complex (FRCC). Jan2009, I was asked to HTML'ize the Pecora hearings (1930s Senate hearings into crash of '29 that resulted in Glass-Steagall) with internal HREFs/links between all the pieces as well as lots of URLs between what happened this time and what happened then (there was some expectation that the new Congress would have appetite to do something). I worked on it for some time and then got a call that it wouldn't be needed after all (references to enormous piles of wallstreet money blanketing capital hill). posts mentioning pecora hearing &/or Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

The gov. whistleblorwer office is suppose to provide cover ... but there are many instances where they look the other way. I'm currently following case of former head of FDIC large bank examination department who was calling out many of the transgressions in 2005/2006 and got demoted and marginalized ... and the whistleblower office has gone to great lengths to do nothing.
http://www.amazon.com/American-Betrayal-ebook/dp/B00BKZ02UM/

There all sort of charges trumped up in the Success of Failure case
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107
which carried on for years before they dropped all but a trivial transgression.

Boyd would tell the story about the F15 factions prodding the Air Force in investigating Boyd for theft of millions of dollars in gov. property (supercomputer time he was using for design of F16) which would have put him in Leavenworth for the rest of his life. Fortunately Boyd had anticipated the tactic and they spent thee months unable to find any trail of his supercomputer use. past posts mentioning Boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html#boyd1

Gun Seller goes into some of the lengths that MICC goes to when threatened. I'm less experienced with MICC than FRCC ... but there has been some overlap between MICC (& Team B) and FRCC (really apparent during the S&L crisis as well as the last decade). posts mentioning team b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#team.b

Some personal experience with FRCC was during Internet bubble we were criticizing many of the technologies as vaporware. We were in a financial standards meeting hosted by large financial lobbying organization in downtown DC. During the meeting, we were asked to step out, there was somebody to see us. We were taken to a room and the door was shut and somebody introduced as from a New Jersey ethnic organization and he had been asked to talk to us by some investment bankers. He said that these investment bankers had been expecting to clear $2B from upcoming IPOs and our remarks were predicted as having at least 10% downside to that number. We were being asked to stop criticizing the technologies. He said that it was not personal, purely business and investment bankers are typically amoral. We then went to some high level LEOs and they said those people are like that ... some involved in the Internet bubble IPOs had previously walked away clean from the S&L crisis and were then expected to next get into a real-estate bubble (after the Internet bubble ... and we've seen how well that worked out). Remember Boyd's To Be or To Do advice ... kick in the stomach may be the least of the problems. To Be or To Do reference from old Chet's website (gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20020217191358/http://belisarius.com/modern_business_strategy/moore/mie_33.htm

Standard tactic is to obfuscate and redirect the discussion ... frequently including diversion to character attributes.

possibly related ... I recently shared in Chet's:
http://slightlyeastofnew.com/2013/09/24/national-entropy/

being able to relax existing connections ... "Why We're More Creative When We're Tired, And 9 Other Surprising Things About How Brains Work"
http://www.fastcompany.com/3018084/work-smart/why-were-more-creative-when-were-tired-and-9-other-surprising-facts-about-how-our

note you see MICC (typical?) intimidation in Boyd's story about being investigated for theft of millions of dollars in gov. property (supercomputer time he was using for design of f16) and facing prospect of the rest of life in Leavenworth. Fortunately Boyd had anticipated the tactic and had left no trail of his use (they knew he was doing it, but they were unable to prove it).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

CNTL-ALT-DELETE "a mistake"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: CNTL-ALT-DELETE  "a mistake"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 29 Sep 2013 08:43:55 -0400
Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net> writes:
The Intertec Superbrain had two red buttons at the two near corners of the main part of the keyboard. Both had to be pressed to reset.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intertec_Superbrain


sort of equivalent for mainframe datacenters were the large red emergency power-off buttons ... various stories over the years have boxes being built around the buttons to make it increasingly difficult to accidentially/inadvertently push/pull them.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 29 Sep 2013 08:57:11 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#5 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#7 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#9 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#18 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP

say original token-ring shop floor with 300 stations ... was token-ring cable snaking from one station to the next. The elapsed time/latency for token to make one round trip became proportional to the aggregate length of the cable.

original 3mbit ethernet w/o listen before transmit, worst case problems was the elapsed transmission propagation delay/latency between the two stations at furthest extremes of the cable.

move forward to token-ring cat5 and star-wired to the MAUs. for token-ring with 300 stations, the elapsed time/latency can increase significantly since the signal goes from each station back to the MAU and down to the next station and then back up to the MAU, etc. Rather than cable going directly from station to stations ... there is wire back up to the MAU and then back down ... significantly increasing the token transmission distance.

10mbit ethernet with listen before transmit and cat5 ... also has star-wired and a rebroadcast unit/hub replacing the MAU ... except it can rebroadcast down each arm concurrently rather than serially. As a result, worst case propagation delay/latency (where two or more stations can think that they can transmit) is reduced significantly. It can further be reduced if the HUB acts as tie-breaker and aborts incoming signal if there is already an outgoing broadcast.

The 1988 ACM SIGCOMM Ethernet article was 30 stations on such a CAT5 Ethernet HUB ... with effective transmission throughput dropping to 8.5mbits/sec with low-level device drivers constantly sending minimum sized packets from all 30 stations.

My example was Ethernet and TCP/IP routers ... and 6-10 station Ethernet HUB segements connected upstream to a shared router (each segment with its own dedicated 10mbit ethernet, and router able to handle effective aggregate throughput of all Ethernet segments) ... compared to token-ring MAU units all ganged together with all stations in the configuration sharing common bandwdith (and token passing latency having to cross the complete configuration).

The comparison for token-ring was a typical SNA configuration ... where SNA doesn't actually support networking and/or the concept of routers (therefor the requirement for single integrated token-ring configuration). The token-ring comparison further suffers because the communication group 16mbit token-ring was built to the dumb terminal emulation design point with each station only needing tens of kilobytes per second bandwidth (or less) ... and so individual 16mbit token-ring cards were not able to sustain full aggregate LAN throughput (or less, while individual Ethernet cards of the period, where designed to sustain full aggregate media throughput).

the communication group attempting to preserve their dumb terminal emulation base, doing everything they could to fight off client/server and distributed computing, contributed significantly to the decline of mainframe datacenters in the late 80s and the company going into the red in the early 90s.

earlier token-ring/ethernet posts this year
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#31 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#32 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#33 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#34 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#40 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#27 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#84 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#70 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#72 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#83 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 29 Sep 2013 06:34:51 -0700
wjiphone1 writes:
Only one week? that must be in the US. Here in Europe it is mostly at least 2 weeks. That requires you to document your stuff so that someone else can fix any problems that may arise with your products while your are away. Scary thought - maybe they actually can do without you after all?

at least early 80s, insider fraud was most common ... even after internet and poor internet attack countermeasures ... insider fraud actually very high on the list.

multi-party operations were/are countermeasure to insider fraud.

collusion then is/was response by crooks.

staggered vacations then are a countermeasure to collusion ... periodically mixing up those required for multi-party operations.

In the past, I've had discussions with the NIST role-based-access (RBAC) guys ... that one of the objectives of RBAC is to simplify permissions for establishing multi-party operations (i.e. working out permissions so that no single person has sufficient permissions to complete operation on their own).
http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/SNS/rbac/

somewhat back to earlier thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#16 Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#25 Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))

in the 80s, i did one summer teaching classes and giving lectures around europe, including classes south of paris (joan of arc home town). Required French worker vacation was 5weeks but IBM gave 6weeks. That summer, France increased mandated vacation to 6weeks ... and there were various work incidents/actions because some felt then IBM should increase its vacation to 7weeks (so IBMers would still have one week more than everybody else).

I would come in an hr or two early and stay for a couple hrs after the class ... using online connection & email back to the states. I then asked site manager for weekend access. He explained that the guards had filed written paper work with the government that somebody was working more than 8hrs/day ... and he had to respond with lots more gov. paperwork. He said that I could have weekend access if I really wanted ... but it would be much simpler if I just spent the weekend sight seeing.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))

Refed: **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 29 Sep 2013 08:44:43 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#16 Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#25 Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#31 Work long hours (Was Re: Pissing contest(s))

for other drift, part of the time in Europe was talking to the French BOIS (branch office information system) group on the work to deploy vm/4300 systems into IBM branch offices, first in France and then in other parts of EMEA. old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#email820912

From just about the beginning one of my hobbies had been supporting the HONE system (online, virtual machine based world-wide sales & marketing support) from the beginning back to cp67 days when it was just in the US. Then as it was propagating clones to the rest of the world, I would be asked to do the install (a decade before BOIS, IBM EMEA hdqtrs moved from the states to Paris, and I was brought in to do the install in Paris). past posts mentioning HONE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

vm/4341s were sort of the leading edge of both large compute farms as well as the distributed computing tsunami (both at customers and inside IBM). This is old email about AFDS initially looking at 20 distributed vm/4341s ... growing to 210:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404b

This is doing benchmarks for LLNL looking at getting 70 vm/4341s for compute farm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#email790220

70 vm/4341s compute farm could be considered leading edge of GRID computing (which is also a precursor to modern cloud computing) .... recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#18
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#52
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#83

internal vm/4341s was also major factor in the internal networking passing 1000 nodes the summer of 1983 ... old reference to some 1983 node announcements as well as list of all corporate locations that had one or more new nodes added during 1983
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#8
other past posts mentioning internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

France/EMEA BOIS pioneered the branch office distributed vm/4341 systems, and then similar program starts showing up in the states ... with the "VMIC" machines ... starting out for USA sales/marketing regional hdqtrs.

past email mentioning vm/4300s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

as an aside, the internal network had been non-SNA until the late 80s when the communication group started generating a lot of mis-information as part of push to get the internal network converted to SNA. However, their program of mis-information wasn't just limited to the internal network ... but also extended to claims that the NSFNET backbone could run over SNA ... the NSFNET backbone is the precursor of the modern internet ... discussed in the above (and other) GRID related posts ... referencing this article

Grid Computing; Hook enough computers together and what do you get? A new kind of utility that offers supercomputer processing on tap.
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

old email mentioning NSFNET backbone ... and working with participants leading up to NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

when i was in San Jose Research ... they use to joke that I worked 4shift weeks; ... 1st shift in san jose researach, 2nd shift in the disk engineering lab, 3rd shift in STL (now silicon valley lab) and 4th shift (weekends) up in Palo Alto at the HONE system.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why is the mainframe so expensive?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Why is the mainframe so expensive?
Date: 29 Sep 2013
Blog: Mainframe Experts
re:
http://lnkd.in/XRU8N9

A max. configured z196 with 80 processors and rated at 50BIPS goes for $28M. IBM financials says that the mainframe group earns a total of $6.25 for every mainframe processor dollar or on the avg. IBM would earn a total of $175M from a $28M z196 installation. This works out to be about $3.5M/BIPS.

By comparison, IBM has had a base list price of $1810 for a e5-2600 blade ... two chips, 8cores (processors) per chip, 16 cores (processors) total and has a rating of 527BIPS or $3.44/BIPS (a factor of a million times less than z196).

Big cloud operators claim they build their own blades at 1/3rd the cost of brand name blades ... or possibly $1/BIPS (making it three million times less than z196). Also the i86 server chip vendors have said they are now shipping more server chips to big cloud operators than to brand name server vendors (these volumes don't show up in the standard server system market numbers).

For the big cloud operators, the radical reduction in system prices (a typical large cloud mega-datacenter will have hundreds of thousands of systems and millions or processors) has resulted in other costs becoming increasing percentage of TCO. As a result they have been on the forefront of green technologies (power, cooling, power/calculations, etc) and automated operations (tens of people required for large megadatacenter with hundreds of thousands of systems ... such a large megadatacenter will have more total compute power than the aggregate of all mainframes in the world today).

In 1988, I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial technology they had which eventually morphs into fibre channel standard (FCS). Later some POK channel engineers get involved and define a heavyweight layer on top of FCS that drastically cuts the effectively throughput ... which is eventually released as FICON. Published peak z196 I/O benchmark gets 2M IOPS using 104 FICONS. Also numbers are max z196 system assist processors are capable of 2.2M SSCH/sec with all SAPs running at 100% busy ... however recommendations are to keep SAPs at 70% busy or less ... or 1.5M SSCH/sec. By comparison a recent announced e5-2600 FCS is claiming over million IOPS (aka two such FCS would have higher throughput than 104 FICONS ... which is the heavyweight mainframe channel protocol running on top of 104 FCS ... drastically cutting effective throughput). past posts mentioning FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

The enormous shift of the server market to the big cloud operators (and the downward pressure put on system prices by these operators) is possibly behind the reports earlier this year about IBM trying to sell off that business. However, this has recent IBM announce packing 84 x86 systems (and 2016 cores) in a reduced rack space ... which corresponds to the 2nd generation e5-2600v2 ... 22nm reduced to 14nm process and 12cores/chip rather than 8cores/chip ... which could give 800BIPS/e5-2600 (up from 527BIPS).
http://www.zdnet.com/ibm-launches-nextscale-packs-more-cores-in-racks-7000020432/

84 such systems in a rack would be 6.7TIPS or the equivalent processing power of 1344 50BIPS z196 systems. IBM financials has IBM selling about the equivalent of 180 z196 max configured (@$28M) per year. 1344 50BIPS z196 systems would be the equivalent of 7.5yrs of such z196 sales

recent posts mentioning e5-2600:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#35 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#37 Where Does the Cloud Cover the Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#38 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#51 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#72 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#74 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#2 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#4 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#5 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#7 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#14 Tech Time Warp of the Week: The 50-Pound Portable PC, 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#23 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#49 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#93 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#79 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#80 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#47 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#59 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#60 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#86 IBM unveils new "mainframe for the rest of us"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#53 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#31 model numbers; was re: World's worst programming environment?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#50 Mainframe On Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#51 Mainframe On Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#53 Mainframe On Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#54 Mainframe On Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#70 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 30 Sep 2013
Blog: Old Geeks
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5

The Hardware Facebook Invented Is Radically Changing The $150 Billion Enterprise Market
http://www.businessinsider.com/pictures-facebooks-enterprise-hardware-2013-9

from above:
Because customers are the designers, OCP's hardware projects use fewer materials, cost less and perform better than what traditional vendors typically offer.

Because they are "open source" projects, anyone can help with the designs and OCP gives the designs away for free. An enterprise can take them, modify them, and send them out to contract manufacturers, who are standing by to build them.


... snip ...

recent posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#8 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#10 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#15 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#53 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#66 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#23 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#24 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#32 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why is the mainframe so expensive?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Why is the mainframe so expensive?
Date: 30 Sep 2013
Blog: Mainframe Experts
re:
http://lnkd.in/XRU8N9
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#33 Why is the mainframe so expensive?

Of course, the $175M for max. configured z196 TCO ($3.5M/BIPS processing) is just what is paid to IBM, doesn't include the other costs associated with running mainframe datacenter.

note that one of the issues is that RISC computers have had significant processing throughput over x86 computers for decades. However, the last several generations of x86 server chips have gone to RISC cores with hardware layer that translate x86 instructions into RISC micro-ops for execution. This significant mitigates the throughput difference between RISC and x86 processors ... as well as significantly reducing/commoditizing the processing costs.

By comparison recent mainframe geneology
z900, 16 processors, 2.5BIPS (156MIPS/proc), Dec2000
z990, 32 processors, 9BIPS, (281MIPS/proc), 2003
z9, 54 processors, 18BIPS (333MIPS/proc), July2005
z10, 64 processors, 30BIPS (469MIPS/proc), Feb2008
z196, 80 processors, 50BIPS (625MIPS/proc), Jul2010
EC12, 101 processors, 75BIPS (743MIPS/proc), Aug2012


Half of the per processor throughput improvement from z10 to z196 is claimed to be incorporating features that have been in RISC processors for decades (out-of-order execution, speculative execution, branch preduction, etc) ... further refinments in RISC-like features then contributes to further per processor throughput from z196 to EC12.

A big factor in these RISC throughput features is the continued mismatch in processor speed and memory access latency. When measured in number of processor cycles, a cache miss requiring memory access is compareable to 1960s disk access latency (when measured in number of 1960s processor cycles). Then out-of-order execution is somewhat hardware analogy to software multi-tasking ... being able to switch to different task while waiting for disk access.

When the system costs for a large megadatacenter (with more processing power than the aggregate of processing of all mainframes in the world today) has dropped to a few tens of millions (hundreds of thousands of systems and millions of processors), then other costs for running a large megadatacenter are an increasing percentage of TCO ... motivating the large cloud megadatacenter operations to be on the leading edge of green computing.

A recent, related post in "Old Geeks" "The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software" discussion
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5

The Hardware Facebook Invented Is Radically Changing The $150 Billion Enterprise Market
http://www.businessinsider.com/pictures-facebooks-enterprise-hardware-2013-9

which references the OCP hardware projects (helping reduce hardware system costs).

also here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#34 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

Part of the issue with needing more fiber connections is the horrendous throughput introduced by FICON layer. However, in the peak z196 I/O benchmarks it used 104 FICON to get 2M IOPS ... however all z196 system assist processors running at 100% busy is only capable of 2.2M SSCH/sec ... and they recommend keeping busy no more than 70% ... or 1.5M SSCH/sec.

Published numbers for EC12 is that I/O throughput is only 30% better than z196 ... although EC12 processing is 75BIPS with 101 processors ... is 50% more than z196 with 80 processors at 50BIPS.

So moving to 1024 FICON would be more trying to compensate for FICON throughput issues rather than needing the extra I/O capacity. Native FCS downloads i/o program to remote end as if data (significantly reducing aggregate processing latency & protocol chatter) and outgoing and incoming paths run asynchronously ... being able to achieve nearly media throughput concurrently on both paths. Latest 32gbit FCS then is capable of nearly 64gbit sustained. However, open systems are also doing 100gbit ethernet ... and doing i/o protocols over ethernet. Lots of brand name servers aren't necessarily optimized for level of throughput possible ... or is common at the large cloud megadatacenters.

Trivia: in 1980, santa teresa lab was bursting at the seams and they are moving 300 people from the IMS group to offsite bldg. They tried remote 3270s and found the human factors horrible compared to what they were use to with vm/cms local channel attach 3270s in the bldg. I get con'ed into do channel extender support for them so they can have local channel attach 3270s at the remote bldg back to the STL (since renamed silicon valley lab) datacenter. Part of the support is downloading the channel programs to the remote end ... so the channel protocol chatter & latency isn't impacting throughput (and channel extender runs downlink and uplink concurrently ... even tho mainframe channel is a half-duplex protocol). Role forward to 1988, when I'm asked to help LLNL standardize some of their serial technology then becomes FCS (and is what is under FICON), it includes download I/O programming and running both downlink and uplink concurrently.

more trivia: in 1980, tried releasing what I done for channel extender to customers ... but there was a group in POK playing with some serial stuff ... and they objected ... they were possibly afraid that if the channel-extender support was in the market, it would make it more difficult justifying releasing what they were playing with. However, by the time they released in 1990 with ES/9000 as ESCON ... it was already obsolete.

late 90s ... still in the wake of the "killer micros" and "death of the mainframe" ... there was billions of dollars spent by numerous financial institution on redoing overnight batch settlement. 70s&80s, saw batch financial infrastructures adding "real-time" front-end transactions ... but they were queued for final completion during the overnight batch window. The redo would have straight-through processing ... every transaction going straight through to completion. They were planning on leveraging lots of killer micro parallel processing ... and were using some general libraries to achieve the parallelization. Unfortunately the parallelizing libraries had 100 times the overhead of Cobol batch ... totally swamping the anticipated throughput improvements with lots of parallel killer micros ... and all the efforts go down in flames. This is a major continuing mainframe customer market ... financial institutions with scores of max-ed out mainframes constantly being upgraded. It doesn't take many to account for majority of annual mainframe sales ... and the value of the applications are still larger than what the systems cost.

A couple years ago, I was involved in taking a new generation of parallelizing straight-through process to financial industry association/standard meetings. It would take business rules and translate them into fine-grain SQL statements (helping maximizing parallelization) ... and then rely on the massive investments in RDBMS parallelizing and scaleup to achieve throughput (possibly only 3-5 times more overhead than Cobol batch, rather than the 100 times that tanked the 90s efforts). It was initially met with a great deal of acceptance ... and then things bogged down. We were finally told that there are lot of people in those institutions that still bear the scars from the earlier failures (who are now very risk adverse about changes). It will take another generation before they have the appetite to try again. Note modest configurations easily handled all current workloads (straight through transactions per second) and easily scaleup to well past any projected future requirements. It also significantly reduced life-cycle development and change costs ... just by needing to update business rules.

past post "Release No Software Before Its Time" referencing some IBM Power scaleup results
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#43
some more recent TPC benchmarks
http://www.tpc.org/tpcc/results/tpcc_perf_results.asp
RISC & X86 benchmarks ... including price/transaction ... along with SPEC benchmarks ... even IBM has done hundreds of such benchmarks (but none show up for mainframe)
http://www.spec.org/benchmarks.html

and with regard to clones ... the claim is that much of the innovation in server chip technologies over the past decade is primarily because there is competition with multiple vendors. the other big motivation comes from the large cloud megadatacenters looking for significant increases in power & cooling efficiencies (from competing vendors) ... and may order tens of thousands at a time.

note even IBM is advertising upgrading x86 servers that are even only a few years old to current generation of servers because the gains in performance (and power/cooling efficiency) has been so great that there are massive consolidation opportunities (and cost savings).

problem is that x86 server technology has made much more advances over the past couple decades than mainframe. simple example is FICON layer on top of native FCS. Latest FCS announcement for e5-2600 blade claims over million IOPS while IBM's peak I/O benchmark for z196 is 2M IOPS with 104 FICON. Two of the latest FCS for e5-2600 has higher throughput than the IBM's peak I/O benchmark for z196 with 104 FICON (a heavyweight layer that radically cuts the throughput of native FCS) ... making the comparison just the inverse ... it is the mainframe that requires the hundreds of canoes.

similarly the original e5-2600 blade is rated at 527BIPS while max. configured 80 processor z196 is rated at 50BIPS and newer max. configured 101 processor EC12 is rated at 75BIPS (a single e5-2600 blade is equivalent processing of between 10.5 max. configured z196 systems and 7.6 max. configured 101 processor EC12 systems). This is separate from the millions times difference in the cost/BIPS.

the e5-2500 v2 blades is with newer, smaller, faster chip technology (process goes from 22nm to 14nm) and 12cores per chip rather than 8cores per chip ... giving v2 e5-2600 blade more than 50% more processing than original blade.

The IBM NeXtScale packing 84 x86 systems with 2,016 cores in a rack then has more processing power than the last 7yrs of IBM mainframe sales.

FUD reminds of the token-ring/ethernet stuff from the late 80s. Official IBM literature had 16mbit T/R with much higher throughput than 10mbit Ethernet ... however the new IBM Amaden research center that had just been built had extensive CAT5 originally intended for 16mbit token-ring ... but they found that running CAT5 with 10mbit Ethernet had higher aggregate throughput per LAN as well as lower transmission latency (compared to running with 16mbit token-ring). My best guess (other than pure fabrication by the token-ring group) was that they may have used for comparison the original 3mbit coax Ethernet before listen-before-transmit from nearly decade earlier.

In the late 80s, the communication group was desperately fighting off client/server and distributed computing trying to preserve their (mostly emulated) dumb terminal install base and paradigm. A senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at the annual world-wide internal communication group conference to supposedly talk about 3174 performance ... but he opened the talk with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The communication group had strangle-hold on datacenters with corporate strategic ownership of everything that crossed datacenter walls. The disk division was seeing drop in disk sales with data fleeing the datacenters to more distributed computing friendly platforms. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to address the problem, but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group.

This was major factor going into the early 90s with the company going into the red and predictions about the death of mainframes. In this period, the company had been re-organized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation to breaking up the company ... but then the board brought in Gerstner to resurrect the company (and reverse the plans for breaking up).

Things would be much easier to compare if IBM were to publish TPC and SPEC benchmarks for mainframe like they have hundreds of published benchmarks for RISC and x86 platforms.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Quote on Slashdot.org

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Quote on Slashdot.org
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 1 Oct 2013 12:32:08 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
What I think of Pascal and our disagreement are not themselves important; but such differences strongly suggest that discussions of the relative merits of different statement-level procedural languages is an all but futile undertaking unless the context in which they are to take place is specified in advance and in great, irksome detail.

the IBM mainframe pascal was originally done by the IBM Los Gatos VLSI tools group. They had been doing a lot of language work with Metaware's TWS ... TWS reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004d.html#71 What terminology reflects the "first" computer language ?

other past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#35 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#1 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#6 About TLB in lower-level caches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#12 About TLB in lower-level caches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#14 Newbie question on table design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#58 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#77 CLIs and GUIs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#36 Old-school programming techniques you probably don't miss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#11 Microprocessors with Definable MIcrocode
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#54 PL/I vs. Pascal

It was used for a lot of VLSI tools before being released as product to customers. It was then also used implementing the ibm mainframe tcp/ip support ... I've periodically commented that it had none of the buffer overrun and other exploits that have been epidemic in C-language based implementations. some past posts about C-language vulnerabilities and exploits
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#overflow

there was other throughput issues with the mainframe tcp/ip (got 44kbytes/sec using 3090 processor) ... but I did the changes for rfc1044 support and in some tuning tests at cray research got sustained channel speed between 4341 and cray ... using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). misc. past post mentioning 1044 support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

for the fun of it I did a rewrite in pascal of a major portion of the VM370 kernel (done in assembler) ... and demonstrated it running (faster) in virtual address space interacting with a smaller vm370 kernel. part of the issue was that mainframe PLI came with really heavyweight library environment ... while Pascal could run in effectively as an independent "embedded" environment. Note that this wasn't directly a fault of PLI language ... since MIT Project MAC used PLI language to implement the Multics operating system.
http://www.multicians.org/multics.html

the mainframe product pascal was ported to the rs/6000 ... and typically same pascal programs that ran on mainframe ran also on rs/6000.

after IBM went into the red in the early 90s, IBM was cutting back all over the place ... it transitioned to using a lot more off-the-shelf industry VLSI design tools ... transition included transfering a lot of internal tools to outside vendors. As part of one transfer, I got tasked to port one 50,000+ statement vs/pascal VLSI layout program to other vendor platforms. This was somewhat tramatic since 1) pascals on these platforms appeared like they had never been used for much more than univ. student instruction and 2) in one major case, the pascal support had been outsourced to an organization 12 time zones away (I could drop in the computer vendor hdqtrs location ... but still had to wait for minimum 1 day turn around).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why is the mainframe so expensive?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Why is the mainframe so expensive?
Date: 01 Oct 2013
Blog: Mainframe Experts
re:
http://lnkd.in/XRU8N9
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#33 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#35 Why is the mainframe so expensive?

IBM develops flexible nanocircuitry 10,000 times thinner than paper
http://www.extremetech.com/computing/145800-ibm-develops-flexible-nanocircuitry-10000-times-thinner-than-paper

not just IBM

Stanford snubs silicon with the first working computer built with carbon nanotubes
http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/carbon-nanotubes-move-beyond-the-lab-in-first-functioning-computer/

part of the IBM press push is to offset: Stockman in "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America" pg464/loc9995-10000:
IBM was not the born-again growth machine trumpeted by the mob of Wall Street momo traders. It was actually a stock buyback contraption on steroids. During the five years ending in fiscal 2011, the company spent a staggering $67 billion repurchasing its own shares, a figure that was equal to 100 percent of its net income.

pg465/10014-17:
Total shareholder distributions, including dividends, amounted to $82 billion, or 122 percent, of net income over this five-year period. Likewise, during the last five years IBM spent less on capital investment than its depreciation and amortization charges, and also shrank its constant dollar spending for research and development by nearly 2 percent annually.

... snip ...

Says it saves mainframe costs but doesn't say how it compares to other platforms.

Demand for Linux on IBM's System z Accelerates, Clients Continue to See Cost Savings
http://www.linux.com/news/enterprise/systems-management/740850-demand-for-linux-on-system-z-accelerates-ibm-clients-continue-to-see-cost-savings-

IBMers were working with MIT on CTSS on IBM 7094
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System

some of the CTSS people went to the IBM science center which opened in 1964 on 4th flr of 545 tech sq. Other CTSS people went to project mac on the 5th flr ... The science center was hoping the project mac contract would go to IBM, but it eventually went to GE. The science center still thought they would have the mission for IBM online virtual memory ... but that went to an "official" IBM group for something called TSS/360. The science center did manage to get a 360/40 and they did the hardware modifications to support virtual memory and built virtual machine/memory system cp40/cms
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP-40
cp40 talk given at 1982 SEAS meeting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt
later when they got standard virtual memory computer, 360/67, cp40 morphed into cp67
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS

At one point there was something like 1200 people working on tss/360 at the same time there was total of 12 working on cp67/cms. some past posts about 545 tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

three other people at the science center invented GML in 1969 and GML tag processing was added to CMS script document formating program (CMS script started out sort of as port of CTSS runoff)
http://www.sgmlsource.com/history/roots.htm
a decade later, GML morphs into ISO standard SGML. After another decade, SGML morphs into HTML at CERN
http://infomesh.net/html/history/early/
then the first webserver outside CERN/europe is on the SLAC VM370 system
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml
past posts mentioning gml/sgml/html
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

A copy of CP67 was installed on the Lincoln Labs 360/67 and then last week of Jan1968, three people from science center came out and installed it at the univ. where I was undergraduate. This is recent post in the IBM-MAIN mailing list on working long hrs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#16

I had responsibility for the production os/360 system ran on 360/67 in 360/65 mode ... they would shutdown the datacenter from 8am sat. until 8am monday ... and could have everything all to myself for 48hrs ... 48hrs w/o sleep made classes a little tough on monday. However, I (also) got to rewrite a lot of cp67 that spring and summer ... and gave a presentation at the fall68 share meeting ... part of that presentation (both lots of os/360 performance enhancements as well as lots of cp67 enhancements).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Quote on Slashdot.org

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Quote on Slashdot.org
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 2 Oct 2013 07:21:45 -0700
lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler) writes:
for the fun of it I did a rewrite in pascal of a major portion of the VM370 kernel (done in assembler) ... and demonstrated it running (faster) in virtual address space interacting with a smaller vm370 kernel. part of the issue was that mainframe PLI came with really heavyweight library environment ... while Pascal could run in effectively as an independent "embedded" environment. Note that this wasn't directly a fault of PLI language ... since MIT Project MAC used PLI language to implement the Multics operating system.
http://www.multicians.org/multics.html


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#36 Quote on Slashdot.org

not only didn't Pascal sofware have the vulnerabilities epidemic in C language software ... but Multics PLI also didn't have those vulnerabilities ... old posts referencing IBM Research paper
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#42 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#44 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#45 Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation

original paper now 40yrs ago
http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/history/karg74.pdf
ibm research paper a decade ago
http://www.acsac.org/2002/papers/classic-multics.pdf

there was little competition between the science center on the 4th flr tech sq with cp67/cms (later morphs into vm370) and project mac on the 5th flr and multics ... some past posts mentioning tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

from long ago and far away
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml
and theirs
http://www.multicians.org/mgs.html#SiteN

another cp/67 story (USL was in another bldg in tech sq)
http://www.multicians.org/thvv/360-67.html

complete list of mutlics sites
http://www.multicians.org/sites.html

psuedo competition and one of my hobbies was providing highly modified custom virtual machine systems for internal datacenters. it wasn't "fair" to compare total number of multics to total number of vm370 or even total number of multics to total number of internal vm370 ... but could compare total number of multics to number of internal csc/vm sites (well over 100 at one point). old email referencing csc/vm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

another multics
http://www.multicians.org/mga.html#AFDSC
and I tweaked them with AFDS looking at 20 vm/4341s which turned into 210 vm/4341s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#email790404
posting in multics discussion group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#12

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Words Are Thinking Tools: Praxotype

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Words Are Thinking Tools: Praxotype
Date: 03 Oct 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/dSstGVWDZ1q

Words Are Thinking Tools: Praxotype
http://news.yahoo.com/words-thinking-tools-praxotype-145400279.html

and then

Our Struggles Start With Semantics. And Quickly Scale Up To "ParadigmAntics."
http://mikenormaneconomics.blogspot.com/2013/09/individuals-struggle-with-semantics.html

So one factor is study that majority of people presented with unrefutable facts that contradict their beliefs, they go with their beliefs ... aka their basic world view is based on past experience and beliefs ... and not logic ... sort of anti-Spock. Creativity tends to be something that changes the status quo ... but apparently most people are confined to the status quo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Open source software

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Open source software
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 03 Oct 2013 17:15:43 -0400
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
And Intel took that to ridiculous extremes with EPIC on Itanium.

ARMv7 has predicated execution, which makes reading assembler more difficult, as execution of each instruction is predicated on the current flags values.


original 801/risc was to be a lot simpler ... some of past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801
... sort of the opposite extreme of the future system effort ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

cp.r operating system was implemented in pl.8 ... was suppose to be completely closed system ... there was no hardware protection and execution privileges. claim was that cp.r would only load valid compiled pl.8 programs for execution ... and pl.8 programs could execute all features (things that would require kernel calls in other environments could be done "inline" with cp.r and pl.8).

circa 1980, there were a number of efforts to replace a large variety of different internal microprocessors with 801/risc ("Iliad" processors) ... lots of embedded processors in controlleres, the microprocessors in low&mid-range 370, the as/400 follow-on to s/38, ... etc. some misc. old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#801

for whatever reasons, the efforts floundered and some number left to do risc efforts at other vendors. At least one of the people went to HP and worked on snake (pa-risc) ... and later is one of the major people behind itanium
http://www.hpl.hp.com/news/2001/apr-jun/itanium.html
and
http://www.hpl.hp.com/news/2001/apr-jun/worley.html

one of the referenced "801" emails was somebody asking whether I would be leaving and going to HP also.

another one of the 1980 efforts was the 801/risc ROMP processor that was going to be the follow on to the displaywriter. when that got killed, they decided to retarget it to unix workstation market. they got company that did AT&T unix port to ibm/pc for pc/ix ... to do a port to ROMP ... and you get PC/RT & AIX (however, needed hardware privileged/non-privileged execution modes)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Quote on Slashdot.org

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Quote on Slashdot.org
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 3 Oct 2013 15:24:51 -0700
shmuel+gen@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
Every generation believes that it invented sex. I won't guaranty that ALGOL 60 was first, but it was certainly before PL/I.

this has some PL/I history
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PL/I

in the 70s ... lots of the languages were in downtown NYC in the "time/life" bldg ... when that got shutdown, some eventually show up to STL (now called silicon valley lab). This has reference to time-life
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP7090.html
this also has reference to time/life
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/1401.html

Then they outsourced PL/I to an outside company ... and transferred lots of technology to the company ... including advanced code optimizing techniques from other parts of the company unrelated to PL/I. this results in some amount of uproar comments from around the company. a little longer discussion in this past post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#71

this has some PL/I history
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PL/I

it doesn't mention the outsourcing ... but it does mention STL launched an entirely new compiler in 1992 (possibly part of bringing it back in house).

it does mention work by the IBM Boston Programming Center ... which was also in 545 tech sq ... multics implemented in pli on the 5th flr, ibm science center on the 4th flr, and the boston programming center on the 3rd flr.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#36
other posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

Jean Sammet was also at the boston programming center on the 3rd flr
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_E._Sammet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

US Naval History Conference

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: US Naval History Conference
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Oct 2013 09:51:24 -0400
US Naval History Conference
http://www.usni.org/events/2013-us-naval-history-conference

One of the panelist mention having been in MOL and when that got cut they were sent to interview for the shuttle program. 60s, IBM had meeting in sunnyvale (I was doing lot of software stuff, still undergraduate, but IBM would sucker me into giving presentations and even teaching classes). There was somebody from MOL there ... a special triplex 360/67 was being done for ground systems (similar, but different to the triplex 360s being done for the FAA air traffic control system).

standard duplex 360/67 had lots of stuff not seen in 360/65MP. It included a "channel controller" and being able to address all channels from all processors. Standard "channel controller" had switches that controlled both memory and channel configuration ... and the setting of the channel controller switch settings were available in "control registers" ... see 360/67 functional characteristics on bitsavers
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/funcChar/A27-2719-0_360-67_funcChar.pdf

one of the features in the triplex ... was the control registers could also be changed to alter the configuration.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
Date: 04 Oct 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#70 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe

Note that the (current) dhrystone MIPS/BIPS references are the number of dhrystone benchmark iterations compared to the number of iterations on 370/158 ... assumed to be a 1MIP processor (not actually the count of instructions ... which might be radically different run on different platforms and architectures).

As an aside, I had done benchmarks for LLNL with a precursor to dhrystones on vm/4341 engineering machines .... LLNL was looking at compute farm of 70 vm/4341s. vm/4341 clusters (compute farms) can be considered the precursor to GRID & CLOUD computing ... while they were also the precursor to the distributed computing tsunami ... with corporations (including internal IBM) ordering hundreds at a time and putting them out in departmental areas.

vm/4341 clusters had higher aggregate throughput than 3033, cost less, required much less floor space and all the other environmental resources (power, cooling, etc). The threat to POK high-end machines was such that at one point, the head of POK got the corporate allocation of a critical 4341 manufacturing component cut in half (one of the difference was then clusters of 4341 were required to provide more aggregate throughput than high-end POK machine ... now multiple high-end POK machines are required to provide more aggregate throughput than a modern blade).

some old vm/4341 related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341

I actually worked on project in the mid-80s to have large number of racks where 370 and non-370 processors could be arbitrarily intermixed. However at the same time I was working with NSF for what would become NSFNET backbone (precursor to the modern internet) and had some conflicts between 370/non-370 cluster mixture meetings and meetings with the director of NSF ... old email reference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#email850312 .
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#email850313 .
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#email850314 .
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007d.html#email850315 .

other old NSFNET related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

we were supposed to get $20M to link together all the NSF supercomputer centers ... then congress cut the budget and a couple other things happened ... but then NSF finally released an RFP ... however we were prevented from bidding on the RFP (the communication group found out what was going on and blocked it) ... the director of NSF tried to help writing a letter to IBM, copying the IBM CEO ... but that just made the internal politics worse (including references to what we already had running was at least five yrs ahead of all bid responses).

There was huge amount of communication group misinformation and FUD ... including claims that NSFNET backbone could be run over SNA/VTAM .... somebody was collecting a lot of the communication group email exchanges on the subject and forwarded the collection to us ... reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109

reference to NSFNET backbone precursor to GRID computing (modern internet and the cloud).
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is the zVM list defunct?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Is the zVM list defunct?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 4 Oct 2013 12:10:11 -0700
nhaley@CA.IBM.COM (Neil Haley) writes:
There still is a very active IBM VM list (The IBM z/VM Operating System <IBMVM@listserv.uark.edu>)

note that while outbound ibm-main mailing list is gatewayed to usenet (and therefor also shows up in google groups becuase of the usenet archiving) ... its been a long time since vm list has been gatewayed to usenet.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why is the mainframe so expensive?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Why is the mainframe so expensive?
Date: 06 Oct 2013
Blog: Mainframe Experts
re:
http://lnkd.in/XRU8N9
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#33 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#35 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#37 Why is the mainframe so expensive?

benchmark comparisons including rdbms financial transactions tpc ... provided by lots of vendors ... even ibm (except for mainframe)
http://www.tpc.org/
tpc in large part because jim gray
http://www.tpc.org/information/who/gray.asp

tpc work mostly after he left ibm san jose research for tandem. at ibm research he worked on the original sql/relational implementation, system/r done on vm370 370/145, some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

as he was leaving, he offloaded some number of things on me ... rdbms work, interacting with some of the early system/r customers, consulting with the IMS group in STL, etc, some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801006 .
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801016 .

at the celebration for Jim Gray at Berkeley after his disappearance ... he was credited for many things including enabling ATM cash machine and electronic commerce by his formalization of transactions which gave financial auditors assurance in the integrity of computer records.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#27 Father Of Financial Dataprocessing

Celebration pages at berkeley.edu have gone 404, but live on at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20080616153833/http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/IPRO/JimGrayTribute/pressrelease.html .
from above

Gray is known for his groundbreaking work as a programmer, database expert and Microsoft engineer. Gray's work helped make possible such technologies as the cash machine, ecommerce, online ticketing, and deep databases like Google.

... snip ...

also
http://web.archive.org/web/20080604010939/http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=23082
http://web.archive.org/web/20080604072804/http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=23083
http://web.archive.org/web/20080604072809/http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=23087
http://web.archive.org/web/20080604072815/http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=23088

tribute also by ACM SIGMOD
http://www.sigmod.org/publications/sigmod-record/0806

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
Date: 06 Oct 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#70 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#43 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe

Back in the 70s, I wrote several articles on the downfall of running a virtual memory system under a virtual memory system. This was mitigated with SVS & VS1 with handshaking and a one-for-one mapping between the virtual guests virtual address space and the virtual guests virtual machine addresses but became an enormous problem with MVS and multiple virtual address spaces.

The issue is vm370 managing pages in "real" memory attempts to select the least recently used page for replacement. at the same time the virtual guest is also managing the virtual machine memory and attempting to select its recently used page for replacement. Its easily possibly to get in pathological situation where vm370 selects and removes a virtual machine page ... which is also the same exact page that the virtual guest next wants to use (violating the assumptions underpinning least recently used replacement algorithms).

From a algorithm standpoint, a least recently used strategy assumes that the page that has been used the least in the past is also the page that is least likely to be used in the future. When a virtual guest is also running a least recently used strategy ... it violates the vm370 least recently used assumption; the virtual guest's least recently used pages can be the most likely pages to be used in the future (since it is looking for those pages for the next page to use).

Note that MVS has a similar issue with large DBMS/RDBMS that use a LRU strategy to manage large DBMS/RDBMS cache and needs some sort of interaction between the DBMS/RDBMS and MVS.

past posts mentioning virtual memory management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#wsclock

Note that in 1992, IBM went into the red and was re-organized into 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company. during the period, there was large number of things dropped and/or shelved. Post in recent thread in ibm-main mailing list
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#36

one of the (many) things IBM was doing in that period was eliminating lots of internal VLSI design tools and moving to industry products. part of the transition was transferring many internal tools to vlsi tool vendors ... which included porting the tools to other platforms (common in the vlsi chip industry).

Eventually the board brought in Gerstner to reverse the breakup and resurrect the company. Part of Gerstner efforts was to refocus the company much more on services and significantly reduced emphasis on hardware products ... which further resulted in shelving/eliminating additional activities.

posts mentioning Gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM now employs more workers in India than US

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM now employs more workers in India than US
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 6 Oct 2013 10:16:28 -0700
edgould1948@COMCAST.NET (Ed Gould) writes:

http://nypost.com/2013/10/05/ibm-now-employs-more-workers-in-india-than-us/

This reminds me of the comic strip Pogo: "I have seen the enemy and he is us" (or word to that effect).


there were similar news from spring of 2012 ... and at the time had rather lengthy discussion in the (closed) linkedin IBMers group. some of my past posts in thread "How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#84
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#87
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#90
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#92
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#82
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#2
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#12
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#18
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#31
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#68
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#63
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#65
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#71
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#23
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#67

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Quote on Slashdot.org

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Quote on Slashdot.org
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 6 Oct 2013 12:53:30 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#36 Quote on Slashdot.org
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#38 Quote on Slashdot.org
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#41 Quote on Slashdot.org

multics (5th flr, 545 tech sq) also managed to ship the first relational DBMS product.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics_Relational_Data_Store
and
http://www.mcjones.org/System_R/mrds.html

ibm san jose research was doing sql/relational "system/r" on vm370 370/145 (vm370 outgrowth of virtual machine work by the science center on 4th flr, 545 tech sq) ... but had real uphill slog dealing with the company. past posts mentioning system/r
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

during future system era ... 370 efforts were being killed off (lack of 370 products during the period credited with giving clone processors a market foothold). some number of past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

then when future system implodes there is mad rush to get products back into product pipelines ... q&d dirty efforts are kicked off to do both 303x (3031 is repacked 158, 3032 is repackaged 168, and 3033 is 168 logic mapped to 20% faster chips), 3081 (warmed over fs technology) and 370xa ... partial reference
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

however, head of POK manages to convince corporate to kill off virtual machine product and transfer all the people to POK in support of mvs/xa (claiming otherwise mvs/xa wouldn't be able to make ship schedule several years in the future). endicott finally did managed to save the virtual machine product mission (for entry and mid-ranage 370) ... but had to reconstitute a vm370 group from scratch.

then, in part because the corporation was so focused on the next marvelous DBMS (EAGLE) ... the system/r group was eventually able to do technology transfer to endicott and get it released as SQL/DS ("under the radar" so to speak while the corporation was pre-occupied with EAGLE).

when EAGLE finally implodes, there was a request about how fast could system/r be ported to MVS ... which is eventually released as DB2 ... initially for decision/support only.

for other trivia ... this mentions early jan1992 meeting in ellison's conference room ... one of the people in the meeting claims to have done most of the technology transfer of sql/ds from endicott back to stl for what would become db2.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"There IS no force, just inertia"

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: "There IS no force, just inertia"
Date: 06 Oct, 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/bZM6kZR
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#23 "There IS no force, just inertia"

tribute to Boyd after his death (originally in USNI proceeding)
http://web.archive.org/web/20011224132049/http://www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt

above mentions 40-second boyd ... when he was instructor at Nellis he had standing invitation that he would take on anybody in the world, give them the position of advantage and beat them within 40secs.

he wrote a fighter pilot training manual that included calculations on how to profile different fighter jets ... and the pilot needed to maneuver in regions where they had the advantage and the opponent had the disadvantage. the claim was that intelligence later obtained a soviet fighter pilot training manual that turned out to boyd's translated to russian with measurements/units converted to metrics.

later he used his theories to significantly improve the F15 design and then design the F16 (for which the F15 forces attempted to have prosecuted and sentenced to Leavenworth) and the F18.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy%E2%80%93maneuverability_theory
this is blog mentioning that much of it is classified ... even if the Soviets may have gotten a copy
http://forum.keypublishing.com/showthread.php?72673-Boyd-s-E-M-Theory

note that there are references to d-n-i.net URL ... that domain name went defunct and was obtained by somebody else. eventually much was reconstituted at
http://dnipogo.org/
with
http://dnipogo.org/john-r-boyd/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Open source software

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Open source software
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Oct 2013 09:50:56 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Compilers[1] have been generating output with relative addresses for half a century; the fact that the link editor and loader do relocation is not relevant to the question of whether the compiler needs to generate assembler output.

although issue of being able to do direct memory map of image on disk w/o system having to plough through everything ... past posts about problems i had with cms use of os/360 compilers trying to move to memory mapped paradigm ....
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcons

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
Date: 09 Oct 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#70 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#43 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#46 50,000 x86 operating system on single mainframe

when I worked on ECPS mcode for 138/148 ... we got 10:1 performance improvement. we were told that there were 6kbytes of mcode space and we were to select the 6k highest used kernel paths to move to microcode ... and roughly one-for-one basis. at the time, the low&mid-range 370s were executing an avg. of 10 instructions for every emulated 370 instruction ... old kernel evaulation for choosing 6k ... accounted for approx. 80% of kernel cpu use:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#21

late 70s, an internal program started up to convert large number of different microprocessors to 801/risc including low&mid-range 370 native processors (4361/4381 followon to 4331/4341, as/400 followon to s/36&s/38, embedded controllers, etc). For various reasons, those efforts floundered (and found people departing to do risc efforts at other vendors). I contriubted to a white paper that 4381 should be native silicon ... i.e. technology was advancing to a point where large percentage of 370 could be implemented natively in silicon (rather than m'code). old email mentioning 801/risc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#801

it was also in this period that saw 4300s showing up in departmental areas (leading edge of the distributed computing tsunami) ... old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#43xx

price/performaance and technology dropped through some threshold in this market and saw big explosion in sales. VAX sold approx. same as 4300 into this market involving sales of one or few machine orders. Difference was in the large corporate 4300 orders involving hundreds of machines. This is a decade of VAX numbers sliced&diced by model, year, US/non-US, etc.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0

as can be seen, starting in mid-80s, the numbers started to drop off as that mid-range market shifting to workstations & large PCs. 4361/4381 had expected to see continued explosion in sales (as vax, 4331/4341, etc) ... but 4361/4381 experienced same market shift as vax. this has some other numbers for 88-92
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#52

Note that risc implementations have had throughput advantage over x86 processors for decades. however, the last few generations of x86 server chips have moved to risc cores with hardware layer that converts x86 instructions into risc micro-ops for execution (largely mitigating the difference in risc and x86). This is sort of the late 70s IBM effort trying to move everything to risc ... but done in hardware rather than microcode. Also the hardware implementation is pipelined and runs asynchronously (rather than sequential/serialized). Even the z196 & EC12 have started incorporating processing technologies that have been in risc for decades.

Part of risc technology for decades (and x86 moving to risc core with hardware layer translating x86 instructions into risc micro-ops) has been out-of-order execution ... with increasing sophistication of things like branch prediction and speculative execution (allowing fetching of instructions past conditional branch ... where basis for condition hasn't been evaluated yet) is the increasing latency to memory (as measured in processor cycles).

when cache-miss and resulting latency of memory access is measured in number of processor cycles ... it is comparable to the 60s disk access latency when measures in number of 60s processor CPU cycles. Then out-of-order execution is sort of like 60s multiprogramming/multitasking allowing execution to go on while other execution is waiting for disk i/o. Another technology to increase processing throughput while waiting for cache-miss (and memory access latency) is hyperthreading ... hardware execution of multiple concurrent instructions streams.

This is discussion about major factor in decision to move to virtual memory for all 370s was showing that it could get OS/360 effectively running 16 initiators on a one mbyte machine. The issue was that OS/360 required contiguously addressed memory for an initiator/partition and there was issue/problem in its memory management so typical application running only used 25% of contiguous memory reserved. Running 16 concurrent applications on one megabyte machine (with virtual memory) increased throughput because of better CPU utilization overlapped with waiting for disk i/o.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#3

Note that the data cames from work by one of the people responsible for HASP ... had moved on and was doing a prototype virtual memory based OS/360 called RASP. The RASP work then wasn't directly used and the person leaves for Amdahl and recreates it from scratch (although there was some IBM litigation about possibly having taken some of the IBM version with him when he left). Although not directly a factor in the decision, the RASP work was substantiated by customer MVT "handshaking" work, running MVT in 16mbyte virtual machine under CP67. In any case it spawns decision to start making all 370s with virtual memory (modulo 370/195) ... DOS/VS, OS/VS1, and OS/VS2 (initially SVS and then later MVS).

Note that 195 (360 & 370) had pipelined out-of-order execution (but didn't support branch prediction and/or speculative execution). Normal codes on 370/195 typically only ran at half peak throughput (stalling whenever there was conditional branch). I got sucked into helping do some work on hyperthreading for 370/195 (that never shipped) where it simulated two SMP processor with two instructions streams (instructions and registers in the pipeline were flagged with one-bit instruction stream identifier). There was expectations that two instruction streams running at half throughput would then have chance of achieving near peak throughput.

As mentioned upthread, something like half the per processor throughput improvement moving from z10 to z196 is attributed to the introduction of out-of-order execution.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2013 10:34:09 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Not exactly a rumor, it was a fraud perpetrated by a Dr. Wakefield:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MMR_vaccine_controversy

Investigations by Sunday Times journalist Brian Deer revealed that Wakefield had multiple undeclared conflicts of interest, had manipulated evidence, and had broken other ethical codes. The Lancet paper was partially retracted in 2004 and fully retracted in 2010, and Wakefield was found guilty by the General Medical Council of serious professional misconduct in May 2010 and was struck off the Medical Register, meaning he could no longer practice as a doctor.

And, yet, to this day, there are all kinds of people that believe this junk.


This gets into a whole public relations industry that help in fabricated science
http://www.merchantsofdoubt.org/
and
http://www.amazon.com/Merchants-of-Doubt-ebook/dp/B003RRXXO8/

somewhat spawned by the tobacco industry in the 50s trying to obfuscate the lung cancer issue ... but then they went on to working for other industry special interests ... including MICC in the 80s and the Team B analysis. references to Team B
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#team.b
and MICC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military-industrial-complex
recent reference here
https://medium.com/war-is-boring/d14c47e51c31

There have been studies about portion of the population when faced with indisputable facts that contradict their *beliefs* ... they go with their *beliefs*.

also discussed here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Availability_cascade

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Retirement Savings

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Retirement Savings
Date: 10 Oct 2013
Blog: Facebook
Major HFT is front-running by as little as a couple tens of milliseconds news that affect the emotion ... skimming off the other traders ... with HFT accounting for majority of trades and the uneven playing field, there are increasing warnings that ordinary investors will be driven from the market ... just leaving HFT players trying to scam each other.

Besides the enormous damage to the federal budget and increase in spending the last decade, there was removing regulatory and enforcement oversight of the financial industry. That was major factor in the $27T in triple-A rated toxic CDOs done during last decade, and majority of the financial mess (along with the hundreds of trillions in CDS gambling bets).
Evil Wall Street Exports Boomed With 'Fools' Born to Buy Debt
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&refer=home&sid=a0jln3.CSS6c

the lack of regulation and oversight also allowed the too-big-to-fail to carry trillions of the triple-A rated toxic CDOs "off-book" ... and when things crashed, that would have been sufficient to take down all those institutions. At the end of 2008, just the four largest too-big-to-fail were carrying $5.2T "off-book".
Bank's Hidden Junk Menaces $1 Trillion Purge
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=akv_p6LBNIdw&refer=home

Much of the economic measures done since the crash have been directed 1) at clearing the enormous amount of off-book toxic assets without having to acknowledge their existence (and forced liquidation of the institutions) and 2) obfuscate the horrible damage done to the budget last decade.

there are increasing number of ways that HFTs are scamming the system ... this is just one
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-10-08/dear-sec-show-us-data
... at the bottom of the above, there are references to a few more.

HFT isn't "investing" in the traditional sense ... it is just skimming from everybody else on the spread between the moment when then get in and the time they get out. The scams are gimmicks where they guarantee that spread.

trivia: late 90s, we were asked to come in to NSCC (before they merged with DTC to form DTCC) to look at improving the integrity of trades and exchanges. I worked on it for awhile and then got told it was suspended. It turns out a side-effect of the integrity work would have greatly increase transparency and visibility ... which is an anathema to wallstreet culture. This was even before HFT ... but there was reference that something like 1/3rd of the trades activity (offers and accepts) couldn't stand the light of day

Self-regulating assumed that people would recognize consequences but

1) individuals could win big and any consequences fell on the institutions while the individual walks away with the winnings

2) "moral hazard" ... too-big-to-fail ... nobody holds the institution (nor individual) accountable

3) large percentage of traders are considered sociopaths which include characteristic that they have difficulty associating consequences and actions

copied from facebook "IBM Retirees"
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml
and
http://www.amazon.com/Retirement-Heist-Companies-American-ebook/dp/B003QMLC6K/
which also references corporate health programs.

As an aside, middle of last decade ... I got caught in large public equity company doing reverse IPO (largest reverse IPO up until that time) and all of corporate hdqtrs got eliminated in process.

References private equity last decade morphs into analogy to "flip this house" except they load the original loan on the company flipped ... they make large profit even if they sell the company for less than they paid (more than half corporate debt defaults are by companies involved in private equity reverse ipo)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2013 09:34:38 -0400
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9242780/_39_Free_Unix_39_The_world_changing_proclamation_made_30_years_ago_today

from above:
On Sept. 27, 1983, a young Richard Stallman set the stage for both Linux and the open source software movement

... snip ...

also leading up to Unix Wars
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_wars

and Open Software Foundation
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Software_Foundation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Oct 2013 09:00:19 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9242780/_39_Free_Unix_39_The_world_changing_proclamation_made_30_years_ago_today

On Sept. 27, 1983, a young Richard Stallman set the stage for both Linux and the open source software movement

--- snip ...

also leading up to Unix Wars
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_wars

and Open Software Foundation
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Software_Foundation


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#54 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today

a little over 30yrs ago, spring1982 ... i held internal advanced technology conference ... one of the themes was building something could compete with unix and portable across number of architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#4a

this was about the start of the OCO-wars (object code only) ... and just before emergence of ibm/pc. oco-wars reference in the vmshare archive (online computer conferencing provided by tymshare to share organization starting in aug1976)
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/browse?fn=OCOBUS&ft=MEMO
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/browse?fn=OCO:BDAY&ft=MEMO

23jun69 was the announcement of starting to charge for application software as the result of various litigation ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

but they made the case that they could still ship kernel software for free.

then came the future system effort that was going to replace 360/370 and be completely different. during the FS period they were suspending and/or shutting down various 370 efforts ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

a lot of the stuff that i had done as undergraduate that was incorporated into cp67 ... recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#38
and also this most recent addition to linkedin discussion in Boyd group in PDCA vs. OODA (all the way at the bottom) ... also ms/dos reference
http://lnkd.in/j9U4bS

then in the morph and simplification from cp67 to vm370, some amount of my stuff was dropped. during the FS period, i continued to work on cp67 stuff ... even makig critical refs. and parady of FS (which wasn't exactly career enhancing activity). Then I moved a bunch of stuff from cp67 to vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

then with the failure of FS effort, there was mad rash to get stuff back into 370 product pipelines ... which contributed to designing to release various pieces that i had continued to work on. one of the pieces was making the dynamic adaptive resource management ... a separately packages kernel product and selected to be the guinea pig for starting to charge for kernel software (i got to spend some amount of time with business and legal people about kernel charging policies). some past posts about dynamic adaptive resource management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

note that with the current 370 simualtor, HERCULES ... they've been making available packaged kernel software (with source) that predates kernel software charging.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hercules_%28emulator%29

my charged-for vm370 dyamic adaptive resource manager was first release with vm370 release 3. then increasing amounts of kernel software was added to the charged-for category. vm370 release 6 was the last release that had "free" software (with separate charged for components). then they changed the name to vm/sp and everything became charged for (followed by the switch to OCO and OCO-wars).

The change to charged for kernel-software and then OCO ... could be considered a response to the rise of 370 clone processor business. And the lack of 370 products during the Future System period is considered responsible for the rise of the 370 clone processor business.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Oct 2013 20:01:33 -0400
Wayne Salamon <xenon@wsalamon.net> writes:
Very debatable, as we don't know where software quality would be without the open source movement. Many closed source products aren't exemplars of quality.

What I do know is that for research purposes, open source has opened up many possibilities. In my work, clusters built on Linux would not be feasible if we had to license operating systems and other software, even at 0 license cost.

In the 90s we paid around $50,000 for a Solaris source license so we could instrument parts of the network stack and tweak things. By 1995 we were developing on FreeBSD and Linux without need to constrain publication of results, for one thing.

Stallman's response was essentially "Let the market decide."; very dangerous indeed to some entrenched interests.

Even with the Gnu compiler collection, Intel and Portland Group still serve their markets, and now we have Clang/LLVM.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#55

recent "GreaterIBM" item:

The Origins of Cloud Computing -- from the 1920s
http://greateribm.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/the-origins-of-cloud-computing-from-the-1920s/

leading up to outsourcing and Service Bureau Corporation.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service_Bureau_Corporation

Service Bureau Corporation went to CDC in the period of litigation that also resulted in 23jun1969 unbundling announcement, recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#55

however, there was online virtual-machine based commercial bureaus that were spin-offs of cp67 and the cambridge science center (includes reference to cp/cms as free software):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS
one of the first
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VP/CSS
some more history
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_CP/CMS

there was also tymshare ... which provided their online cms-based computer comferencing free to share (for vmshare) starting in Aug1976 ... archive
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

However there is this articale on Grid Computing and NSFNET backbone also precursor to modern cloud computing:
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

we were working with several of the institutions that would become part of the NSFNET backbone. We were originally to get $20M to tie together the NSF supercomputer centers. Congress then cut the funding and several other things happened, and eventually NSF released an NSFNET backbone RFP. Internal politics prevents us from bidding, the director of NSF tries to help by writing letter to the company (copying the CEO), but that just makes the internal politics (as well as references to what we already had running was at least five years ahead of all bid responaces). some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

the other is the work on collecting large numbers of workstation processors for both commercial processing ... old reference to meeting in Ellison's conference room early jan1992
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
as well as work with national labs and supercomputer centers. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

within hrs of the last email in above, the cluster scaleup work was transferred and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors. Within a couple weeks it was announced as ibm supercomputer (for scientific and technical ONLY) ... press preference 17Feb1992
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
another press reference later that spring commenting that the interest in large number of processors caught them by SURPRISE (11May1992)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Oct 2013 21:20:30 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#56

more topic drift, there was some overlap in the executives involved in not letting us bid on NSFNET backbone and executives transferring cluster scaleup, telling us we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors (and announcing for scientific and technical *only*)

including misinformation like NSFNET backbone could run over SNA/VTAM ... somebody in the communication group collected emails from that discussion, packaged them up and forwarded them to us ... heavily pruned & redacted old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email870109

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30yearsagotoday

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30yearsagotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 16 Oct 2013 16:45:56 -0400
Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:
Stallman is indeed pretty smart, but I doubt he would have had more success with a new OS than was seen with Plan 9 or Inferno. Perhaps if unix had not become free those OSs would have been more successful, but they would probably not have become free themselves and the world may have been deprived of the benefit of having a half decent free OS at all.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#54 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#55 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#56 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#57 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

tymshare did 370 gnosis ... with lots of stuff. when m/d bought tymshare, they spun gnosis off as keykos (disclaimer: i was brought in to evaluate/audit gnosis as part of the spin-off). gnosis had some huge pathlength supporting 3rd party charging for applications developed and deployed on gnosis platform ... which were eliminated as part of morphing into keykos.

keykos was high-integrity capability-based system ... but benchmarks (with gnosis accounting overhead removed) claimed it could do transactions at higher rate than ACP/TPF (aka airline control program) ... in part because of higher level abstraction and more efficient use of resources.
http://cap-lore.com/CapTheory/upenn/Key370/Key370.html

then there were some number of keykos derivatives for x86 ... designed for super high-integrity EAL 7+ evaluation level with high performance.
http://cap-lore.com/CapTheory/upenn/
http://www.eros-os.org/
http://www.capros.org/

past posts mentioning gnosis, keykos &/or capros
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#69 TSS ancient history, was X86 ultimate CISC? designs)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#22 No more innovation? Get serious
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#73 7090 vs. 7094 etc.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#33 Did AT&T offer Unix to Digital Equipment in the 70s?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#35 Did AT&T offer Unix to Digital Equipment in the 70s?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#10 TSS/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#59 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#0 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#4 markup vs wysiwyg (was: Re: learning how to use a computer)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#43 IBM doing anything for 50th Anniv?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#63 Hercules and System/390 - do we need it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#75 30th b'day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003g.html#18 Multiple layers of virtual address translation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#41 Segments, capabilities, buffer overrun attacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#15 two pi, four phase, 370 clone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#20 A Dark Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#50 Slashdot: O'Reilly On The Importance Of The Mainframe Heritage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#19 Secure OS Thoughts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#22 Secure OS Thoughts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003l.html#26 Secure OS Thoughts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#24 Intel iAPX 432
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#54 Thoughts on Utility Computing?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004c.html#4 OS Partitioning and security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#27 NSF interest in Multics security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#29 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#49 EAL5
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#41 Multi-processor timing issue
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#33 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#7 How do you say "gnus"?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#6 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#7 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005b.html#12 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#67 intel's Vanderpool and virtualization in general
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#43 Secure design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005d.html#50 Secure design
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#13 Today's mainframe--anything to new?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#30 Public disclosure of discovered vulnerabilities
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005s.html#12 Flat Query
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#37 PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#34 PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#13 What part of z/OS is the OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#7 Very slow booting and running and brain-dead OS's?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#42 vmshare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#11 Multiple mappings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#16 "The Elements of Programming Style"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#26 user level TCP implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#25 LAX IT failure: leaps of faith don't work
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#17 Oddly good news week: Google announces a Caps library for Javascript
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#24 folklore indeed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#50 How does ATTACH pass address of ECB to child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#12 Kernels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#7 was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#23 Doug Engelbart's "Mother of All Demos"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#14 Two views of Microkernels (Re: Kernels
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#3 New machine code
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#4 Possibility of malicious CPUs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#28 Opinion: The top 10 operating system stinkers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#84 Adventure - Or Colossal Cave Adventure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#9 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#53 Far and near pointers on the 80286 and later
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#75 What is the protocal for GMT offset in SMTP (e-mail) header
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#63 VMSHARE Archives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#31 Colossal Cave Adventure in PL/I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#2 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#71 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#35 junking CKD; was "Social Security Confronts IT Obsolescence"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#37 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#42 i432 on Bitsavers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#55 Any candidates for best acronyms?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#39 Just a quick link to a video by the National Research Council of Canada made in 1971 on computer technology for filmmaking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#40 GNOSIS & KeyKOS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#43 Virtual address Memory Protection Unit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#53 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#59 Operating System, what is it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#57 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#58 1132 printer history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#57 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#7 Blades versus z was Re: Turn Off Another Light - Univ. of Tennessee
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#38 There can be no System Security without System Integrity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#80 Still not convinced about the superiority of mainframe security vs distributed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#55 Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#33 Delay between idea and implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#6 The Subroutine Call
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#57 Doug Englebart
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#58 Doug Englebart

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 16 Oct 2013
Blog: Old Geeks
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5

recent "GreaterIBM" item:

The Origins of Cloud Computing -- from the 1920s
http://greateribm.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/the-origins-of-cloud-computing-from-the-1920s/

leading up to outsourcing and Service Bureau Corporation.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service_Bureau_Corporation

Service Bureau Corporation went to CDC in the period of litigation that also resulted in 23jun1969 unbundling announcement, recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#55

however, there was online virtual-machine based commercial bureaus that were spin-offs of cp67 and the cambridge science center (includes reference to cp/cms as free software):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS
one of the first
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VP/CSS
some more history
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_CP/CMS

there was also tymshare
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymshare
... which provided their online cms-based computer comferencing free to share (for vmshare) starting in Aug1976 ... archive (also mentioned upthread)
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

....

arpanet claims starting 1969 ... with IMPs ... the transition to tcp/ip was 1jan1983.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARPANET

the ibm internal network ... on cp67 ... also at cambridge center started nearly the same time and was larger than the arpanet(/internet) from just about the beginning until sometime late 85 or early 86. I've claimed that the internal network had gateway like capability in every node from just about the beginning ... accounting for its fast growth ... which didn't come until 1jan1983 for arpanet/internet with tcp/ip. At 1jan1983, there were approx. 100 network IMP network nodes that had approx. 255 connected host. At that time, the internal network was quickly approaching 1000 nodes ... which it passed later in 1983. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#vnet

compuserve reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CompuServe

Tymshare (provided online vmshare to SHARE organization starting AUG1976) had developed TYMNET ... tymshare starting in 1964 ... with dialup ... in then it developed local minis for dialup networked to remote datacenter. Other online services started to leverage tymnet (including compuserve)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tymnet

A version of the technology developed at science center for the internal network was also used for the univ. bitnet starting in 1981 (and was also larger than arpanet/internet for some time)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET

for other topic drift ... some more tymshare in recent a.f.c. thread in "free software"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#58

tymshare did 370 gnosis ... with lots of stuff. when m/d bought tymshare, they spun gnosis off as keykos (disclaimer: i was brought in to evaluate/audit gnosis as part of the spin-off). gnosis had some huge pathlength supporting 3rd party charging for applications developed and deployed on gnosis platform ... which were eliminated as part of morphing into keykos.

keykos was high-integrity capability-based system ... but benchmarks (with gnosis accounting overhead removed) claimed it could do transactions at higher rate than ACP/TPF (aka airline control program) ... in part because of higher level abstraction and more efficient use of resources.
http://cap-lore.com/CapTheory/upenn/Key370/Key370.html

then there were some number of keykos derivatives for x86 ... designed for super high-integrity EAL 7+ evaluation level with high performance.
http://cap-lore.com/CapTheory/upenn/ ..
http://www.eros-os.org/ ..
http://www.capros.org/ ..

recent posts in this discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#53 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#66 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#23 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#24 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#32 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#34 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Open source software

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Open source software
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 16 Oct 2013 22:21:10 -0400
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
And from what I hear writing relocatable code in 360ease was a real bear.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#50 Open source software

os/360 used "relocatable adcons" (address constants) .... which were absolute address constants that were modified (relocated) to reflect the absolute real address of the location where they were loaded.

tss/360 had a paged-mapped filesystem and supported relocatable code images ... i.e. it was possible to page map an executable image on disk to set of virtual addresses .... w/o having to modify any contents of that image ... i.e. the image on disk could be mapped to any virtual address w/o having to modify/update anything before execution.

i did a paged mapped filesystem for cp67/cms (and later ported to vm370/cms) ... and some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

... and cms made extensive use of os/360 compilers, applications and conventions ... which gave me lots of problems trying to do arbitrary mapping of executable image on disk to any virtual address ... and made it worse where i supported mapping shared executable images on disk to multiple different virtual address spaces with potentially different virtual addresses (which absolutely precluded having any location specific information).

misc. past posts mentioning my troubles attempting to deal with os/360 "relocatable" address constants
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM now employs more workers in India than US

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM now employs more workers in India than US
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 17 Oct 2013 06:24:06 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#47

for other reference to latest activity

Stockman in "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America" pg464/loc9995-10000:
IBM was not the born-again growth machine trumpeted by the mob of Wall Street momo traders. It was actually a stock buyback contraption on steroids. During the five years ending in fiscal 2011, the company spent a staggering $67 billion repurchasing its own shares, a figure that was equal to 100 percent of its net income.

pg465/10014-17:
Total shareholder distributions, including dividends, amounted to $82 billion, or 122 percent, of net income over this five-year period. Likewise, during the last five years IBM spent less on capital investment than its depreciation and amortization charges, and also shrank its constant dollar spending for research and development by nearly 2 percent annually.

... snip ...

Stockman goes into some detail how stock buybacks (reducing number of shares and increasing corp. value/share) is being used by top executives to significantly increase their bonuses.

and is only small part of what is going on aka "Retirement Heist"
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

the book goes into several more scenarios not listed in the above webpage.

recent refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#49 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#5 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#2 IBM Relevancy in the IT World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#50 IBM Furloughs U.S. Hardware Employees to Reduce Costs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#51 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#57 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#49 The Original IBM Basic Beliefs for those that have never seen them
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#63 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#4 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#6 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#12 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#24 Voyager 1 just left the solar system using less computing powerthan your iP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#37 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#53 Retirement Savings

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Google F1 was: Re: MongoDB

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Google F1 was: Re: MongoDB
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 17 Oct 2013 12:42:07 -0700
lefuller@SBCGLOBAL.NET (Lloyd Fuller) writes:
And this product is called NOMAD from Select Business Solutions.  It has only been available since 1976 or thereabouts.   And you can even MIX hierarchical and RDBMS if you want.

recent post in thread on cloud killing traditional hardware & software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#59

includes reference to this posting by "greateribm"

The Origins of Cloud Computing -- from the 1920s
http://greateribm.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/the-origins-of-cloud-computing-from-the-1920s/

4th generation languages from virtual machine-based commercial service bureaus (originally cp67 spinoffs from ibm cambridge science center)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomad_software

also
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramis_software
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOCUS

some of this evolution with competitive offerrings from the different virtual machine based commerical service bureaus ... including NCSS, IDC, and TYMSHARE.

some more discussion here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth-generation_programming_language

note TYMSHARE started offering its cms-based online computer conferencing to SHARE in Aug1976
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

now in parallel with this was Codd and relational DBMS was being done at IBM San Jose Research ... original SQL/relational implementation was System/R on vm370/cms at SJR. Lots of folklore that while corporation was pre-occupied with getting out the strategic DBMS product "EAGLE", it was possible to do tech. transfer to Endicott and get it released as SQL/DS. Later when "EAGLE" imploded and crashed&burned ... there was request about how long would it take to port System/R to MVS. past posts mentioning System/R
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

past posts mentioning science center at 545 tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM now employs more workers in India than US

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM now employs more workers in India than US
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 17 Oct 2013 14:03:52 -0700
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#47
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#61

NSA Revelations Kill IBM Hardware Sales In China
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/10/wolf-richter-nsa-revelations-kill-ibm-hardware-sales-in-china.html

from above:
But there was nothing to spin in Asia-Pacific, where revenues plunged 15%. Revenues in IBM's "growth markets" dropped 9%. They include the BRIC countries - Brazil, Russia, India, and China - where revenues sagged 15%. In China, which accounts for 5% of IBM's total revenues, sales dropped 22%, with hardware sales, nearly half of IBM's business there, falling off a cliff: down 40%.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 09:23:34 -0400
Wayne Salamon <xenon@wsalamon.net> writes:
Agreed. The problem is that we can't run the experiment of a closed-source-only world to determine where software quality would be. What forces were supposed to produce better quality? One would be market competition driven by the profit motive. We can pick off a few examples.

MS killed off the real competition for word processors, spreadsheets, etc. and I wouldn't call Office high quality; it gets the job done for lots of people. So we have a huge market that is dominated by one company.

In compilers, I would argue that GCC has incentivized Intel and Portland Group to produce compilers for high performance markets, filling a gap for certain customers, leveraging a common standard.

I worked in a group that licensed the Sun C compiler in the 80s/90s, and it was a PITA to manage because the licensing server would die, requiring the administrator to restart it, which didn't always work. Once GCC for SunOS on Sparc was stable enough, we dumped Sun C, removing a large hassle in just trying to get work done. Stallman's point of free-as-in-freedom was well received.

The availability of GCC has relieved many researchers of encumbered development environments. Same goes for operating systems with BSD/Linux/GNU.


the available of source enabled supporting other hardware platforms ... since closed source had been tightly tied to specific hardware.

raising the difference in quality between closed and open is frequently obfuscation and misdirection ... and trying to protect status quo ... similar to description that patent office was originally created to protect the individual inventor from large organizations (trying to defend status quo) ... which has not been completely turned 180 degrees and used by large organization to inhibit invention and protect their status quo.

unix source (before the unix-wars) enabled explosion in workstation vendors.

posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#54 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#55 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#56 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#57 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#58 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30yearsagotoday

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 19 Oct 2013 09:50:52 -0400
Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> writes:
Minix itself was a Unix clone, and so was XINU. Cromemco had a Unix clone, as did some company with "River" in the name. Microsoft had their variant, which actually was Unix since they had right to the source code, Xenix. And BSD became "free" around the time of Linux, I remember the Dr. Dobbs article about it, 386BSD or something like that. I remember the article in Dr. Dobbs about GNU, written by Stallman himself, and at the time it seemed distant (because it was just getting started, but I think also because I assumed it would be on hardware I couldn't afford). By the time that 386BSD or whatever was published in Dr. Dobbs, it was a lot more accessible.

Lots of unix work-alikes ... even before the unix-wars

Berkeley did BSD, UCLA did Locus, CMU did MACH. Locus was used by IBM for AIX/370 & AIX/386 (locus did distributed file system, partial file fragment caching, process migration ... even special conditions between different kinds of platforms). MACH was used for lots of stuff (including NeXT which then evolves into apple operating system) ... along with Andrew File System (also from CMU)

IBM had funded MIT project Athena jointly with DEC ($25m each), which gives X-windows and kerberos (plus lots of other stuff). lots of platforms pickup kerberos ... redmond even subcontracts to commercial kerberos company to do the initial implementation for windows ... becoming the basis of their authentication infrastructure

ibm funds CMU to tune of $50m that turns out MACH, Andrew Filesystem, Andrew Widgets, Camelot (transaction processing) and some number of other things. IBM then provides startup investment for Camelot spun off as Transarc. IBM then buys Transarc.

Big part of BSD is BSD networking, 4.3 Tahoe & 4.3 Reno in the late 80s ... even platforms that weren't BSD based ... incorporated 4.3 Tahoe/Reno TCP/IP stack

past posts mentioning unix-wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#19 What ever happened to Tandem and NonStop OS ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#0 How long before Microsoft goes the way of DEC (and in part, IBM)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#85 SV: USS vs USS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#66 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#67 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#45 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#13 A z/OS Redbook Corrected - just about!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#14 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#43 Article for the boss: COBOL will outlive us all
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#41 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#54 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#55 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#64 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

NSA Revelations Kill IBM Hardware Sales In China

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: NSA Revelations Kill IBM Hardware Sales In China
Date: 19 Oct, 2013
Blog: IBMers
NSA Revelations Kill IBM Hardware Sales In China
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/10/wolf-richter-nsa-revelations-kill-ibm-hardware-sales-in-china.html

from above:
But the fiasco was tucked away under the lesser debacle of IBM's overall revenues, which fell 4.1% from prior year, the sixth straight quarter of declines in a row. Software revenue inched up 1%, service revenue skidded 3%. At the hardware unit, Systems and Technology, revenue plunged 17%. Within that, sales of UNIX and Linux Power System servers plummeted a dizzying 38%. Governmental and corporate IT departments had just about stopped buying these machines.

... snip ...

There are recent stories that CIA "fired" Snowden 4-5yrs ago for trying to get into files that he wasn't authorized ... but then for-profit company contracted for doing security checks was checking off boxes w/o doing the checks as way to maximize profits ... not only for Snowden but also for some number of other people.

Reference to 70% of intelligence budget goes to for-profit companies and over half the employees are at for-profit companies (some possibility that they may also be using intelligence assets for industrial espionage for their own profit).

Spies Like Us
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

from above:
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

How Booz Allen Hamilton Swallowed Washington
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-23/visualizing-how-booz-allen-hamilton-swallowed-washington

Succeess of Failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

whistleblower in the above was treated really badly ... lots of fabricated charges that were all subsequently dropped ... because threaten careers and corporate profits. Congress investigated and put agency on probation, not allowed to run its own projects ... but that may have just been ploy to further privatize the gov (some snide references to congress gets 5% kickback on contracts going to private companies)

Private-equity buyouts especially put companies under heavy profit pressure. References to "flip-this-house" ... industry mophs this last decade ... 100% loans are used to buy company and put on book of the bought company. Difference with "flip-this-house" is loan stays with company after it is resold ... company can be sold for less than originally bought and still make enormous profits (in "flip-this-house" mortage is payed off when house is sold). Over half of corporate defaults are companies that have been bought in private equity deals (heavy pressure to service loan used to buy the comapny)

Treasure Islands: Uncovering the Damage of Offshore Banking and Tax Havens
http://books.google.com/books?id=u655GkaMkwgC&pg=PA216&lpg=PA216#v=onepage&q&f=false

pg216/loc4511-14:
Plenty of good firms have gone bust as a result of this offshore debt-loading, which the New York Times in 2009 described as "a Wall Street version of 'Flip This House.'" 48 More than half of the companies that defaulted on their debt that year were either previously or currently owned by private equity firms.

... snip ...

wallstreet "Flip This House" (real-estate speculators pay off their mortgage when the house is flipped, wallstreet transfers the loan to the sold company, they even make a profit if the company is sold for less than what they paid)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html

even some ibm involvement. Guestner wins in competition to be next CEO of AMEX (looser leaves with protoge Jamie Dimon, looser goes on to take-over Citibank in violation of Glass-Steagall, Greenspan grants an exemption while he lobbies for repeal Glass-Steagall creating too big to fail, Dimon then becomes CEO of another too big to fail. AMEX is in competition with KKR for private-equity take-over of RJR and KKR wins. KKR has some problems with RJR and hires Gerstner away to turn it around.

IBM goes into red and is re-organized into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company. Board then hires Gerstner to resurrect the company (and reverse the breakup). Gerstner later leaves to be head of another private-equity company, Carlyle. Carlyle does private-equity buyout of Booz Allen

past posts mentioning Gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
past posts mentioning too big to fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
past posts mentioning Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
past posts mentioning private equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity
past posts mentioning Success of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
past posts mentioning whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 19 Oct 2013 11:17:55 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
It was 9th grade in mine. I was told by my 8th grade teacher that I would not be able to do the algebra and told me to sign up for the arithmetic class. I was so fucking bored by then that I decided it was better to take the algebra class and fail than to sit through yet another arithmetic class waiting for everyone to finish.

end of 5th grade had achievement test with

2x+y=5
x+y=3

solve for x&y.

I had no idea what it was. I asked and told it was something called algebra. Over the summer when the bookmobile came through town, i checked out & finished every math book they had (which was thru highschool trig). start of 6th grade, i was told i had to go to the regular math classes ... that continues through highschool graduation.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 22 Oct 2013 09:05:14 -0400
jmfbahciv <See.above@aol.com> writes:
The teacher wanted to _calm the boyo down_ and wanted to start giving him Ritalin. I knew how this kid thought and I also knew how schools treated very bright kids when they are the only very bright kid in the school...not class but school. The boy was bored. He did not need calming-down drugs. Note that it is not me who is calling them a claming-down drug but the teacher who is using them as a calming-down drug.

The _fact_ that giving him more math problems to do kept him from fidgeting should be considered instead of bashing me as stupid idiotic and telling more lies.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#67 Steve B sees what investors think

i took to reading science fiction books during math class ... I got a "zero" for class conduct ... but got 100 for everything else so it still avg. out to an A.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

PDCA vs. OODA

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject:  PDCA vs. OODA
Date: 22 Oct 2013
Blog: Boyd Strategy
re:
http://lnkd.in/j9U4bS

OODA-loop comments (done while at Boyd&Beyond 2013)

I was allowed to do a lot of computer stuff as undergraduate in the 60s. One of the things was dynamic adaptive resource management with both feedback ad feedfoward. Part of the effort was adding a lot of instrumentation/measurement (creating observation). While measurement was critical feeding orientation ... however part of the feedback was taking the feedforward prediction of what was going to happen ... and calculating the difference between what was predicted and what was subsequently observed. This additional step helped significantly improve the quality of the model or (continuous) orientation.

The other part was to create an abstraction of past, current and predicted future ... so not only captures the rate ... but also direction & rate of change.

So lots of this was picked up by the vendor and shipped in offical products ... used by lots of corpoations and gov. agencies. Old reference ... gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine.
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

which i didn't learn about until much later. One of the agencies was active member of the vendors user group organization. normally member "installation code" tended to be somehow related to the corporate identity ... in this case their installation code was "CAD" ... supposedly for "cloak&dagger"

Later when I was teaching computer&security classes, some of these guys would show up in the classes. At one class, one of the members bragged to me offline that they knew where I was every day of my life, back to birth (& i don't even have a clearance) ... note this was before the Church commission. Supposedly this was justified on so much of the agency was dependent on software I was responsible for.

In any case, I was already predisposed to like Boyd (and OODA-loops) when I met him in the early 80s. One of the slight difference was lots of Boyd's briefings involved conflict, opponents and winning. However, my use of the OODA-loop paradigm was more about succeeding (rather than winning) ... i.e. dynamic adaptive resource management successfully working.

cloak&dagger trivia reference from 1979
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/browse?fn=BIGVM&ft=MEMO

other high-assurance, high-integrity, archaeological trivia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS-DOS
before ms/dos there was seattle computer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Computer_Products
and before seattle computer there was cp/m
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/M
and before cp/m, kildall worked on cp67/cms at npg school (gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine) http://web.archive.org/web/20071011100440/http://www.khet.net/gmc/docs/museum/en_cpmName.html
npg reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Postgraduate_School
cp/67 reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS

except (as per upthread) ... PDCA puts plan first .... before observe, orient, and/or understanding.

big consulting houses have frequently somebody with deep understanding that lays out the PDCA methodology and then they attempt to cookie-cut it with bunch of kids fresh out of school (if they get into trouble, they may have access to somebody that knows what they are doing).

We've been in to see quite a few of the big beltway bandit system integrators ... sample may be biased since it is typically on massive failed billion dollar dataprocessing reengineering & modernization efforts ... which was extremely heavy on planning and fresh out of school faces.

There is possibility a case could be made that it wasn't simply the methodology that resulted in the failures ... but there was purposeful desire upfront for failure

Success of Failure
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

forensics has frequently been they would take high-level description and run it through their formula methodology w/o bothering to do in-depth analysis and understanding of existing infrastructure (taking time to observe, orient and understand what is going on might impact their profit margin).

not nearly as large ... but recent item which has many of the characteristics of some of the billion dollar failures

Pennsylvania Kills An IBM Contract That's 3 Years Late And $60 Million Over Budget
http://www.businessinsider.com/pennsylvania-kills-ibm-project-2013-8

from above:
It said the computer system built so far was unreliable and full of bugs (had "a higher number of software defects than industry norms.")

Plus, it blamed IBM's revolving-door workforce. The initial project manager and the top executive left in 2009 and IBM preceded to have 638 people work on the system, rotating most of them off in less than a year.


... snip ...

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#90 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#92 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#27 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#34 PDCA vs. OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#86 PDCA vs. OODA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

architectures, was Open source software

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: architectures, was Open source software
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 10:10:43 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Disabling interrupts is irrelevant unless you're running something like 65MP; certainly in the mainframe world uniprocessors are scarce as hen's teeth, and disabling interrupts doesn't prevent concurrent access.

[1] Has IBM finally cleaned up the last of the reentrant nonrefreshable code from OS/360?


when charlie was working on fine-grain locking for cp67 multiprocessor at the science center ... he invented compare&swap instruction ... chosen because CAS are charlie's initials.

initial attempt to get compare&swap added to 370 were rebuffed because the POK favorite son operating system people claimed that "test&set" was sufficient (global kernel spin-lock from 65mp). the 370 architecture owners said that to get compare&swap added to 370, we would have to come up with other justifications (getting arorund the POK favorite son operating system people) ... thus was born the uses for enabled multi-threaded (multiprogrammed) applications for serializing operation (examples still are included in modern principles of operation).

this became popular for large DBMS applications that would otherwise require kernel calls to perform serialization (even on single processor machine where interrupts could result in thread switch during critial sequence of instructions).

eventually compare&swap (or instructions with similar semantics) started showing up on other platforms supporting large DBMS operations (whether single processor or multiple processor).

misc. past posts mentioning compare&swap and/or SMP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

I've periodically commented that IBM's 801/risc was to go to the opposite extreme from IBM's horribly complex failed Future System effort ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

there was also a maniacal obsession that 801/risc wouldn't support cache consistency for multiprocessor configurations. part of this was result from the enormous throughput penalty that 370 paid in multiprocessor cache consistency for its strong/rigid memory model.

801/risc rios chip set for rs/6000 had no provisions for cache consistency ... and also no atomic compare&swap instruction. as a result, large DBMS operations sufferred throughput requiring kernel calls for serialization (in comparison to same DBMS operations running on platforms with atomic compare&swap instruction).

eventually a compare&swap simulation was added to rs/6000 AIX ... as a fastpath in the supervisor call interrupt handler ... the important issue was that while there was no multiprocessor concurrent operation ... it required that the simulation be disabled for interrupts ... that might result in thread switch during critical section.

misc. past posts mentioning 801/risc, iliad, romp, rios, power, power/pc, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

note that other platforms had started doing slightly relaxed memory models which significantly reduced penalty for cache consistency in large multiprocessor scaleup.

there was a spin-off from the rios/power austin group for AIM/Somerset that was apple, ibm, motorola ... sort of marrying the memory cache consistency from motorola's 88k risc processor with rios ... to produce power/pc. we had been doing cluster scaleup for rs/6000 (since it had no multiprocessor scaleup) ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

and the executive we reported to, left to go over to head up AIM/Somerset.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIM_alliance

i had also gotten sucked in early for SCI standardization effort that came out of SLAC ... asynchronous, packetized, parallel simplex transfers. Standard component was directory-based cache consistency model that had standard 64-way operation. Sequent & Data General adopted it for 256-way intel i86 (at the time 486) ... board with four 486 processors with 4-way shared cache ... and then SCI used to provide consistency for 64 such boards. Convex used it for 128-way ... 64-way 2-processor (HP snake, pa/risc, convex later acquired by HP). SGI used it for MIPS processor multiprocessor scaleup.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalable_Coherent_Interface

much earlier, I had been involved in doing a 16-way 370 ... and had co-opted some of the processor engineers working on 3033 development to work on it in their spare time (lot more interresting to what they were doing for 3033). Things were going along really well ... until somebody happen to mention to head of POK that it might be decades before the POK favorite son operation system (MVS) had effective 16-way support. At that time, several of us were invited to never show our face in POK again (and the 3033 processor engineers were told to get their noses back to the grind stone).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 12:18:03 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Variety? I'm aware of only three mechanisms for dealing with multiple address spaces in MVS.

1. The original design for S/370, where access to private storage in another address space required scheduling an SRB into that address space, with data communicated in common storage.

2. The more recent addition of moves between a primary address space and a secondary address space.

3. The Access-Register mode added by ESA, which is what almost all new code uses.


os/360 was heavily tied to pointer-passing APIs ... everything occupying the same real address space.

initial move to 370 virtual memory os os/vs2 svs ... bascially MVT layed out in a single 16mbyte virtual address space.

move to os/vs2 mvs ... with separate 16mbyte virtual address space for each application ... an 8mbyte mvs kernel image was mapped into every application address space (allowing pointer-passing api to continue). however, there were also a lot of "sub-systems" that had been outside the kernel that got their own address space also. In order to support pointer-passing api between applications and sub-systems in different address space ... the "COMMON SEGMENT" was created that was mapped to all virtual spaces ... allowing applications and sub-systems to exchange parameters & results (using pointer-passing API)

as configurations sizes increased ... there were more and more concurrent applications and subsystems ... by 3033, "COMMON SEGMENT" (or common system area, aka CSA) was pushing 5-6mbytes ... leaving as little as 2mbytes (out of every virtual 16mbytes) for application use.

in the wake of future system failure, there was mad rush to get products back into 370 pipelines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

3033 & 3081 started somewhat concurrently with some left-over future system technology. also 370 architecture enhancements ... which were published in nov1978 ... referred to as "811" (for the publication date). this contained 370/xa for 3081 ... but also things like access registers. some more reference
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/

as part of trying to help slow-down the growth in CSA, somebody retrofitted part of access registers to 3033 as dual-address space mode ... starting pointer-passing API to use direct addressability into separate address space ... instead of requiring CSA space.

this particular person was also involved in several other projects, including use of 801/risc as microprocessor for 4381 (4341 followon, eventually aborted and falling back to traditional CISC microprocessor)). Not long later, he leaves for HP and is involved in the PA/RISC (snake) effort ... and later behind HP's wide-word ... which eventually grows into Intel's Itanium.

recent posts mentioning 3033 dual-address space and/or Itanium:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#22 Is Microsoft becoming folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#81 Still not convinced about the superiority of mainframe security vs distributed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#42 True LRU With 8-Way Associativity Is Implementable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#62 Making mainframe technology hip again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#40 Open source software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 12:47:13 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
Variety of "address spaces", presumably address space vs. data space; maybe main vs. expanded storage, etc.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#71 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

3090 had some number of technology issues. relative throughput of disks were getting slower ... so it needed more & more concurrent applications to increase multiprogramming levels ... more & more concurrent programming to overlap with slowing disk access.

old post about disk throughput increasing ... but slower than other system system components throughput were increasing ... so relative system disk throughput was decreasing ... specific 67/2314 compared to 3081/3380
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/93.html#31

disk division executives took exception to my comments and assigned the division performance group to refute. after several weeks, they effectively came back and said I had understated the problem (when changes like RPS-miss were taken into account). Part of the analysis is respun into share presentation on configurations for improving throughput.

for 3090 channel configuration, they assumed that 3880 disk controller throughput was compareable to earlier 3830 disk controller ... however they were using slower processor for command operations ... which significantly increased channel busy time related to processing channel programs. as a result ... they had to significantly increase the number of channels in 3090 configuration (to achieve target IOPS). This resulted in adding another TCM to 3090 increasing manufacturing costs (there was reference to 3090 billing the 3880 group for the additional 3090 manufacturing cost).

so 3090 needed more real storage to handle increase in multiprogramming level and concurrent operations (to offset disk throughput constraint). they also needed more real storage to reducing paging operations ... also bottlenecked by disk throughput constraints. The problem came up that they couldn't physically package sufficient real storage within the processor latency constraints. So they came up with expanded storage paradigm for the additional real memory ... it didn't directly execute instruction ... but there was a fast, wide, high-throughput bus with synchronous instructions that moved 4k pages very quickly back&forth between processor memory and expanded store.

later advances in technology eliminated physical packaging constraints .... however, for various software reasons, later processor configurations would continue to allow configuring normal real storage as if it was a combination of processor storage and expanded storage.

past posts with pieces of share presenetation B874 at SHARE 64, 18Aug84
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#3 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#68 DASD Response Time (on antique 3390?)

other past posts mentioning share presentation B874
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#49 Rethinking Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#15 multilevel store
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#18 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#46 AS/400 and MVS - clarification please
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#5 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#71 308x Processors - was "Mainframe articles"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#7 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#34 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#52 Hercules; more information requested
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009l.html#67 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#1 "The Naked Mainframe" (Forbes Security Article)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#70 25 reasons why hardware is still hot at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#31 Wax ON Wax OFF -- Tuning VSAM considerations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#32 OS idling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#33 History of Hard-coded Offsets
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#18 Mainframe Slang terms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#35 CKD DASD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#61 Speed of Old Hard Disks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#1 Multiple Virtual Memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#5 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#32 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#73 Tape vs DASD - Speed/time/CPU utilization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#39 A bit of IBM System 360 nostalgia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#62 ISO documentation of IBM 3375, 3380 and 3390 track format

past posts mentioning expanded storage:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#61 TF-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#73 Expanded Storage?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#74 Expanded Storage?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#25 ESCON Data Transfer Rate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#53 TSS/360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#53 VAX, M68K complex instructions (was Re: Did Intel Bite Off More Than It Can Chew?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#8 What are some impressive page rates?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#26 Crazy idea: has it been done?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#32 What goes into a 3090?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#2 Fix the shuttle or fly it unmanned
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#41 comp.arch classic: the 10-bit byte
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#46 comp.arch classic: the 10-bit byte
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#2 Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#3 Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#4 Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#10 RISCs too close to hardware?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004o.html#57 Integer types for 128-bit addressing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#17 Amusing acronym
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#13 Today's mainframe--anything to new?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#13 Performance and Capacity Planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#13 VM maclib reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#38 Is VIO mandatory?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#14 Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#15 {SPAM?} Re: Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#16 {SPAM?} Re: Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#17 {SPAM?} Re: Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#18 {SPAM?} Re: Expanded Storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#34 Multiple address spaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#1 Multiple address spaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#57 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006l.html#43 One or two CPUs - the pros & cons
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#35 REAL memory column in SDSF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#36 REAL memory column in SDSF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006r.html#42 REAL memory column in SDSF
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006s.html#16 memory, 360 lcs, 3090 expanded store, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#23 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#26 Tom's Hdw review of SSDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#48 Virtual Storage implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#11 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#9 Poster of computer hardware events?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#49 IBM LCS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#15 Flash memory arrays
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#40 Fantasy-Land_Hierarchal_NUMA_Memory-Model_on_Vertical
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#6 Fantasy-Land_Hierarchal_NUMA_Memory-Model_on_Vertical
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#8 Fantasy-Land_Hierarchal_NUMA_Memory-Model_on_Vertical
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#10 Different Implementations of VLIW
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#11 Different Implementations of VLIW
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#29 Thanks for the SEL32 Reminder, Al!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#54 Mainframe Hall of Fame: 17 New Members Added
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#86 locate mode, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#69 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#35 Why does Intel favor thin rectangular CPUs?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#13 What was the historical price of a P/390?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#11 Mainframe Executive article on the death of tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#43 Interesting presentation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#55 Mainframe Executive article on the death of tape
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#18 How to analyze a volume's access by dataset
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#39 Central vs. expanded storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#41 Central vs. expanded storage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#62 3090 ... announce 12Feb85
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#45 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#69 how to get a command result without writing it to a file
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#74 Vector processors on the 3090
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#39 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#122 Deja Cloud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#47 nested LRU schemes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#28 390 vector instruction set reuse, was 8-bit bytes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#41 A History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Clemson Univ. Data Center Tour (1980)

From: Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Clemson Univ. Data Center Tour (1980)
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 13:04:23 -0400
Thomas David Rivers <rivers@dignus.com> writes:
I started my graduate studies at Clemson in 1984... I watched to see if I could recognize anyone, but I suppose I was just before my time.

for other clemson topic drift ... there is lots of computer and IBM related historical information
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/
historical computer designs
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/hist.html
IBM Future System (FS) - 1970s
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/fs.html
IBM Stretch (7030)
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/stretch.html
IBM Advanced Computing Systems 1961-1969
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs.html

and end of ACS-360
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

from above:
IBM management decided not to do it, for it would advance the computing capability too fast for the company to control the growth of the computer marketplace, thus reducing their profit potential. I then recommended that the ACS lab be closed, and it was.

... snip ...

above also mentions ACS-360 features that eventually show up with ES/9000 in 1990

recent posts mentioning end of ACS-360
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#73 One reason for monocase was Re: Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#46 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#47 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#65 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#67 relative speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#19 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#22 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#18 What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#26 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#52 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#1 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#10 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#13 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#44 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#72 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#83 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#8 DEC Demise (was IBM commitment to academia)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#73 Future of COBOL based on RDz policies was Re: RDz or RDzEnterprise developers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#29 model numbers; was re: World's worst programming environment?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 13:26:55 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#67 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#68 Steve B sees what investors think

also
http://slashdot.org/submission/1882028/teachers-dont-like-creative-students
http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2011/12/teachers-dont-like-creative-students.html

past posts on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#105 5 ways to keep your rockstar employees happy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#65 Teachers Don't Like Creative Students
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#71 Is orientation always because what has been observed? What are your 'direct' experiences?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#50 The Unleashed Mind: Why Creative People Are Eccentric

for other drift, recent post about after highschool
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#69 PDCA vs. OODA

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 21:58:02 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
At one point I got interested in WWII and read the Rise and Fall of the Third Reich. A lot of it in school. I think a few of the teachers noticed. This was a pretty thick paper back and eventually the spine gave way and I had to split the book in 2. I attached my own taped-on pasteboard covers so that I had volume 1 and 2.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#67 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#68 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#74 Steve B sees what investors think

7th grade we were suppose to do book report ... most did reports on ~100pg books, i chose gibbon's decline & fall of roman empire.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Scholars Who Shill for Wall Street

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Scholars Who Shill for Wall Street
Date: 25 Oct 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/TvmfDjizfaa

also x-linked at facebook
https://www.facebook.com/lynn.wheeler/posts/10201738971651660

The Scholars Who Shill for Wall Street; Academics get paid by financial firms to testify against Dodd-Frank regulations. What's wrong with this picture?
http://www.thenation.com/article/176809/scholars-who-shill-wall-street

The Big Fail
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/07/opinion/krugman-the-big-fail.html

from above:
It's that time again: the annual meeting of the American Economic Association and affiliates, a sort of medieval fair that serves as a marketplace for bodies (newly minted Ph.D.'s in search of jobs), books and ideas.

... snip ...

"Inside Job" references how leading economists were captured similar to the capture of the regulatory agencies.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inside_Job_(2010_film)

"Economists and the Powerful: Convenient Theories, Distorted Facts, Ample Rewards" goes into the capture of economists in more detail
http://www.amazon.com/Economists-Powerful-Convenient-Distorted-ebook/dp/B009K44OW2

loc72-74:
"Only through having been caught so blatantly with their noses in the troughs (e.g. the 2011 Academy Award -- winning documentary Inside Job) has the American Economic Association finally been forced to adopt an ethical code, and that code is weak and incomplete compared with other disciplines."

... another quote loc957-62:
The AEA was pushed into action by a damning research report into the systematic concealment of conflicts of interest by top financial economists and by a letter from three hundred economists who urged the association to come up with a code of ethics. Epstein and Carrick-Hagenbarth (2010) have shown that many highly influential financial economists in the US hold roles in the private financial sector, from serving on boards to owning the respective companies. Many of these have written on financial regulation in the media or in scholarly papers. Very rarely have they disclosed their affiliations to the financial industry in their writing or in their testimony in front of Congress, thus concealing a potential conflict of interest.

... snip ..

other reference:

Glenn Hubbard, Leading Academic and Mitt Romney Advisor, Took 1200 an Hour to Be Countrywide's Expert Witness
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/glenn-hubbard-leading-academic-and-mitt-romney-advisor-took-1200-an-hour-to-be-countrywides-expert-witness-20121220

recent posts referencing academics:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#20 The Big Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#29 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#1 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#48 Ex-Wall Street chieftains living large in post-meltdown world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#52 Lehman Brothers collapse: was capitalism to blame?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OCC Replies to Elizabeth Warren Reveal Extent of Regulatory Capture on Derivatives

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: OCC Replies to Elizabeth Warren Reveal Extent of Regulatory Capture on Derivatives
Date: 25 Oct 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/72NLXXgREK1

OCC Replies to Elizabeth Warren Reveal Extent of Regulatory Capture on Derivatives
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/10/occ-replies-to-elizabeth-warren-reveal-extent-of-regulatory-capture-on-derivatives.html

posts mentioning Too Big To Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

recent posts mentioning Elizabeth Warren:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#42 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#12 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#16 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#31 Fed proposes annual assessments for large financial companies

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 25 Oct 2013 14:00:18 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
for 3090 channel configuration, they assumed that 3880 disk controller throughput was compareable to earlier 3830 disk controller ... however they were using slower processor for command operations ... which significantly increased channel busy time related to processing channel programs. as a result ... they had to significantly increase the number of channels in 3090 configuration (to achieve target IOPS). This resulted in adding another TCM to 3090 increasing manufacturing costs (there was reference to 3090 billing the 3880 group for the additional 3090 manufacturing cost).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#72 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

the problem was/is that the legacy channel paradigm pays huge legacy overhead for its half-duplex design point ... channel resource is tied up for actual transfer ... but transfer in either directions blocks transfer in the opposite direction ... also a channel resource is tied up when it is waiting on latency for the back&forth protocol chatter ... the really slow 3880 interactions/responses would leave the channel resource totally idle.

3090 marketing tried to respin the significant increase in 3090 channels as significantly increasing i/o throughput (as opposed to needed to compensate for the drastric reduction in channel throughput resulting from the slow 3880 processor).

i had seen somewhat the opposite effect in 1980, when I was con'ed into doing channel extender support when 300 people from the IMS group in the IBM Santa Teresa lab (now Silicon Valley lab) were moved to off-site bldg. A channel simulator was put at the off-site bldg, with "local" channel attached controllers. The host channel extender support treated channel programs as data which was shipped down to the remote channel emulator. This eliminated much of the channel program protocol channel overhead from the local processor "channels" ... moving them to the remote channel emulators (which also then experienced purely local tranmission protocl latency ... rather than having the constant round-trip back to the processor channels).

somewhat concurrent with the SCI dual-simplex, serial-optic standardization work out of SLAC for memory bus architecture, in 1988 I also got asked to help LLNL with some dual-simplex serial technology that they want to standardize ... which eventually morphs into fibre-channel standard
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibre_Channel

capable of concurrent transfer in both directions (aka dual-simplex) as well as supporting download of i/o programs to remote end ... to minimize related protocol chatter latency.

note back in 1980, the vendor wants to get authorization to release my channel-extender support ... but some people in POK that have been playing with some serial-optic technology block the approval ... apparently afraid if my channel-extender support is in the market place, it will affect the ability to get their stuff released. It eventually ships in 1990 with ES/9000 as ESCON ... and is already obsolete. In theory it is 200mbits/sec transfer in both directions (400mbit/sec aggregate), but the half-duplex channel end-to-end protocol overlaid on top ... barely manages to sustain 17mbytes/sec aggregate.

Then some of the POK channel engineers get involved in fibre-channel standard and come up with something similar to ESCON ... overlayed on FCS called FICON. Recent "peak" z196 I/O benchmarks has 104 FICON "channels" (i.e. heavyweight channel protocol chatter layer on top of FCS, drastically cutting native throughput) getting 2M IOPS. By comparison a recent FCS announced for e5-2600 is claiming over 1M IOPS (for a *single* FCS, aka two such FCS has higher throughput than 104 FCS with FICON layered on top).

posts mentioning FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

other past posts in this thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#54 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#55 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#56 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#57 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#58 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#64 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#65 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#71 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Nobody Should Shed a Tear for JP Morgan Chase

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Nobody Should Shed a Tear for JP Morgan Chase
Date: 25 Oct 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/bMBrBZL9S3Q

Nobody Should Shed a Tear for JP Morgan Chase
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/nobody-should-shed-a-tear-for-jp-morgan-chase-20131025

other stuff

JPMorgan Settles With FHFA For $5.1 Billion
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-10-25/jpmorgan-settles-fhfa-51-billion
The lies that will kill America; Pundits run to the defense of a massive bank and other tales of the lapdog media
http://www.salon.com/2013/10/25/the_lies_that_will_kill_america_partner/

somewhat related:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#15 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#76 The Scholars Who Shill for Wall Street

recent posts mentioning jpmorgan chase
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#36 JPMorgan Chase slammed by regulators for control failings after botched derivatives bet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#27 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#65 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#4 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#6 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#17 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#24 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#35 Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#69 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#76 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#79 "JP MORGAN SAW ITSELF AS ABOVE THE REGULATORS" Do you agree?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#9 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#19 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#23 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#41 It's a Banker's World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#42 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#79 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#95 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#15 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#31 Fed proposes annual assessments for large financial companies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#0 JPMorgan Caught in Swirl of Regulatory Woes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#6 Barclays, Traders Fined $487.9 Million by U.S. Regulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#14 Barclays, Traders Fined $487.9 Million by U.S. Regulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#15 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#22 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#76 Barclays, Traders Fined $487.9 Million by U.S. Regulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#2 IBM Relevancy in the IT World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#9 Why DOJ Deemed Bank Execs Too Big To Jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#10 What Makes Infrastructure investment not bizarre
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#18 copyright protection/Doug Englebart
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#20 JPMorgan Nears Settlement on 'London Whale' Case
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#57 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#78 Libor Rate-Probe Spotlight Shines on Higher-Ups
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#86 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#58 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#67 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#3 Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The REAL Reason U.S. Targets Whistleblowers

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The REAL Reason U.S. Targets Whistleblowers
Date: 27 Oct 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/Tx7QKxDecJk

The REAL Reason U.S. Targets Whistleblowers
http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2013-10-27/real-reason-us-targets-whistleblowers

posts mentioning whistleblowers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

somewhat related

War Is Racket
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket
somewhat modernized "War Is Racket": Economic Hit Man
http://www.amazon.com/Confessions-Economic-Hit-Man-ebook/dp/B001AFF266/
and "Merchants of Doubt"
http://www.amazon.com/Merchants-of-Doubt-ebook/dp/B003RRXXO8/
"National Insecurity"
http://www.amazon.com/National-Insecurity-American-Militarism-ebook/dp/B00ATLNI04/
"Prophets of War"
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA/

some overlap with "War Is Racket": Triumphant plutocracy; the story of American public life from 1870 to 1920
http://archive.org/details/triumphantpluto00pettrich

from yesterday
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/Ej9nPqNan2D

gov. privatization by for-profit companies "Spies Like Us"
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
Private contractors like Booz Allen now reportedly garner 70 percent of the annual $80 billion intelligence budget and supply more than half of the available manpower.

... snip ...

US Spies on Its Allies For Business Intel, Not For National Security
http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=10913

...

and from facebook Boyd and Beyond

Boyd's "People, Ideas, Things" is warped into "Things, People, Ideas" by MICC for-profit institutions looking for ever increasing quarterly profits. In expanding budget, for-profit institutions could leverage more people for needing more things .... but in flat or declining budget, to increase quarterly profits, will need to increasingly shift funding from people to things.

Technology Alone Cannot Win Future Wars, Senior Military Leaders Say
http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?List=7c996cd7-cbb4-4018-baf8-8825eada7aa2&ID=1314&RootFolder=%2Fblog%2FLists%2FPosts

with

What If Obamacare Was A Fighter Jet?
http://my.firedoglake.com/jpsottile/2013/10/24/what-if-obamacare-was-a-fighter-jet/

unless more people have to be sacrificed for MICC profit: "Part 1, reforming the U.S. Army"
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/2013/10/part-1-reforming-us-army.html

posts mentioning Military Industrial Complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2013 09:39:23 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I lose. I didn't get thru Gibbon until High School. I was working night shift, and when I got home I'd read for a couple of hours to unwind.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#67 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#68 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#74 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#75 Steve B sees what investors think

7th grade I had job after school and weekends. Much of the year, I would chop/saw wood after dinner ... and then read after that ... then I would typically get up at 5.30am to (re)start the fire in the stove.

last year I read Heather's "The Fall of the Roman Empire",
http://www.amazon.com/Fall-Roman-Empire-Barbarians-ebook/dp/B000SEI0JQ

which is based on lot more recent archeology ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#22 Death From Above
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#23 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#31 Rome speaks to us. Their example can inspire us to avoid their fate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#66 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#75 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2013 13:06:00 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Perhaps, but there seems to be a market for proprietary compilers, so I don't see gcc stiffling innovation.

GCC 4.9 To See Significant Upgrades In 2014
http://developers.slashdot.org/story/13/10/27/0613202/gcc-49-to-see-significant-upgrades-in-2014
GCC 4.9 Will Make Compilers More Exciting In 2014
http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=MTQ5NjM

past posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#54 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#55 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years ago today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#56 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#57 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#58 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#64 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#65 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#71 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#72 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#78 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 years agotoday

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Steve B sees what investors think

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Steve B sees what investors think
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2013 13:49:11 -0400
item from today

There's one key difference between kids who excel at math and those who don't
http://qz.com/139453/theres-one-key-difference-between-kids-who-excel-at-math-and-those-who-dont/

recent posts in thread:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#67 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#68 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#74 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#75 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#81 Steve B sees what investors think

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

3Q earnings are becoming the norm at IBM. What is IBM management overlooking?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 3Q earnings are becoming the norm at IBM. What is IBM management overlooking?
Date: 27 Oct, 2013
Blog: IBMers
Stockman in "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America" pg464/loc9995-10000:
IBM was not the born-again growth machine trumpeted by the mob of Wall Street momo traders. It was actually a stock buyback contraption on steroids. During the five years ending in fiscal 2011, the company spent a staggering $67 billion repurchasing its own shares, a figure that was equal to 100 percent of its net income.

pg465/10014-17:
Total shareholder distributions, including dividends, amounted to $82 billion, or 122 percent, of net income over this five-year period. Likewise, during the last five years IBM spent less on capital investment than its depreciation and amortization charges, and also shrank its constant dollar spending for research and development by nearly 2 percent annually.

... snip ...

Stockman spends lots of time on top executives totally absorbed with the basis for their bonuses.

Why the "Maximizing Shareholder Value" Theory of Corporate Governance is Bogus; One mantra you see regularly in the business and popular press goes something along the lines of "the CEO and board have a fiduciary duty to maximize shareholder value."
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/10/why-the-maximizing-shareholder-value-theory-of-corporate-governance-is-bogus.html

from above:
If you review any of the numerous guides prepared for directors of corporations prepared by law firms and other experts, you won't find a stipulation for them to maximize shareholder value on the list of things they are supposed to do. It's not a legal requirement. And there is a good reason for that.

Directors and officers, broadly speaking, have a duty of care and duty of loyalty to the corporation. From that flow more specific obligations under Federal and state law. But notice: those responsibilities are to the corporation, not to shareholders in particular.


... snip ...

top executive bonus plans tied to stock price can severely compromise executive ethics ... as seen in ENRON & WORLDCOM scenarios. Rhetoric on the floor of congress tauting Sarbanes-Oxley was that it would prevent future ENRONS & WORLDCOMS and that in case of incorrect public company financial filings, it would guarantee that the top executives and auditors did jail time (however there was a lot of of side comments that the appropriate regulatory agencies already had sufficient authority to have prevented ENRON & WORLDCOM). However Sarbanes-Oxley still required that appropriate regulator agencies do something. Possibly because GAO didn't think that those agencies were doing anything, it started do reports of public company fraudulent financial filings ... even showing increase after SOX (and nobody doing jail time)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How do you feel about IBM passing off it's retirees to ObamaCare?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How do you feel about IBM passing off it's retirees to ObamaCare?
Date: 27 Oct, 2013
Blog: IBMers
Stockman in "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America" pg464/loc9995-10000:
IBM was not the born-again growth machine trumpeted by the mob of Wall Street momo traders. It was actually a stock buyback contraption on steroids. During the five years ending in fiscal 2011, the company spent a staggering $67 billion repurchasing its own shares, a figure that was equal to 100 percent of its net income.

pg465/10014-17:
Total shareholder distributions, including dividends, amounted to $82 billion, or 122 percent, of net income over this five-year period. Likewise, during the last five years IBM spent less on capital investment than its depreciation and amortization charges, and also shrank its constant dollar spending for research and development by nearly 2 percent annually.

... snip ...

Stockman spends quite a bit of time about how top executives are now focused on maximizing their bonus tied to stock price. This was also part of the ENRON/Worldcom from early part of the century and resulted in the Sarbanes-Oxley act (even tho claims are that regulatory agencies had sufficient authority to have prevented ENRON). The rhetoric in congress justifying SOX was that it would prevent future ENRONs and that top executives and auditors would guaranteed to do jail time for fiddling public company financial reports. Note that possibly even GAO didn't think SEC was doing anything and started doing reports of public company fraudulent financial reports even showing uptic after SOX (and nobody doing jail time).

and in the wake of failure of "Future Systems", from "Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World" Ferguson & Morris:

... and perhaps most damaging, the old culture under Watson Snr and Jr of free and vigorous debate was replaced with sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers. It's claimed that thereafter, IBM lived in the shadow of defeat

... and:
But because of the heavy investment of face by the top management, F/S took years to kill, although its wrongheadedness was obvious from the very outset. "For the first time, during F/S, outspoken criticism became politically dangerous," recalls a former top executive.

... snip ...

mid-80s, top executives were predicting that revenue would double mostly based on mainframe sales (even though things were already starting to head in the opposite direction, wasn't exactly career enhancing to point it out) and they had massive internal building program to double mainframe manufacturing capacity.

and from upthread: besides the ibm specific excerpts at:
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

i would highly recommend reading the book
http://www.amazon.com/Retirement-Heist-Companies-American-ebook/dp/B003QMLC6K/

late 80s, senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference, supposedly on 3174 performance ... however he opened his talk with statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had stranglehold on datacenters (with its strategic ownership of everything that crossed the datacenter walls) and was fighting off client/server and distributed computing (trying to preserve its dumb terminal install base). The disk division was seeing the effect of data fleeing to more distributed computing friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. the disk division had come up with several solutions to reverse the trend, but they were constantly vetoed by the communication group. a few years later, the continued downturn and the company goes into the red.

IBM had been reorganized into 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company when the board hires Gerstner to reverse the breakup and resurrect the company.

past posts mentioning Gerstner
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 yearsagotoday

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 yearsagotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2013 10:32:05 -0400
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
The evolution of RACF from Oracle Parallel Server in the 90's to what we have today has been interesting. OPS would originally handle "cache invalidations" for buffered data by flushing it out to disk and reading it back on the other instance(s). They adopted direct cache transfers from the hardware caching paradigms in RACF to move the data buffer-to-buffer from one instance to another over the interconnect (shared memory, ethernet, infiniband, FC) instead to increase performance (once interconnects got fast enough, 10mbit enet wasn't, 100mbit wasn't great, 1Gb works fairly well, and 56Gb infiniband is awesome).

I had done the cache-to-cache scenarios as part of the HA/CMP distributed lock manager ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

reference to meeting in Ellison's conference room early jan1992
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

at the time, got lots of resistance because there were some tricky edge-cases in failure/recovery scenarios. it wasn't until a little over a decade ago, that some of their people contacted me about running through the scenarios for direct cache transfers.

part of the effort for distributed lock manager ... was DB2 mainframe had some cluster (loosely-coupled) support ... but it was mainframe only. The non-mainframe DB2 was completely different product and source base. As result went to various of the RDBMS vendors that had shared source base between their vax/cluster and unix products ... and part of the HA/CMP DLM was providing vax/cluster type semantics that made the port easier. As an aside, the RDBMS vendors with vax/cluster support tended to have a list of things done wrong and/or inefficiently in vax/cluster ... and had lots of advice on what to do when starting from scratch.

note that the mainframe DB2 people complained that if I was allowed to proceed (with these other RDBMS vendors), I would be at least five years ahead of them. this possible contributed to the cluster scaleup be transferred by the end of Jan1992 and we were told that we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors. some past email referencing cluster scaleup work (scientific, numerical intensive with national labs and other institutions as well as commercial with RDBMS).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

shortly after cluster scaleup was transferred, it was announced as supercomputer for scientific and technical *ONLY* ... press item from mid Feb 1992
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
later that spring ... another press item about cluster interests at national labs had caught company by *surpirse*
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

being told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors contributed to our decision to leave later in 1992. other folklore is that oracle reverse engineered the HA/CMP DLM to allow them to port to other unix platforms.

recent posts mentioning earlier work with national labs, supercomputer centers and other institutions.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#32
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#33
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#35
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#43
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#78

past posts mentioning distributed lock manager:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#64 distributed locking patents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#32 Multitasking and resource sharing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#40 Disk drive behavior
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#66 KI-10 vs. IBM at Rutgers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#2 Block oriented I/O over IP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#47 OT - Internet Explorer V6.0
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001k.html#5 OT - Internet Explorer V6.0
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#67 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#1 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#4 Blade architectures
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#8 Avoiding JCL Space Abends
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#70 A few Z990 Gee-Wiz stats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#1 Hard disk architecture: are outer cylinders still faster than inner cylinders?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004i.html#2 New Method for Authenticated Public Key Exchange without Digital Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#0 Specifying all biz rules in relational data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#5 Tera
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#10 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#70 CAS and LL/SC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#40 clusters vs shared-memory (was: Re: CAS and LL/SC (was Re: High Level Assembler for MVS & VM & VSE))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005.html#55 Foreign key in Oracle Sql
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#26 Crash detection by OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#28 Crash detection by OS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005i.html#42 Development as Configuration
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005r.html#23 OS's with loadable filesystem support?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005u.html#38 Mainframe Applications and Records Keeping?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#8 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#41 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#14 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006j.html#20 virtual memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#24 computational model of transactions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#32 When Does Folklore Begin???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#62 Greatest Software, System R
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#3 Why so little parallelism?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006x.html#18 The Future of CPUs: What's After Multi-Core?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#42 Keep VM 24X7 365 days
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#25 A way to speed up level 1 caches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#50 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#61 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#19 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#24 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#63 Is Parallel Programming Just Too Hard?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007m.html#55 Capacity and Relational Database
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#49 VLIW pre-history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#33 Google And IBM Take Aim At Shortage Of Distributed Computing Skills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#46 "Server" processors for numbercrunching?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#42 Newbie question about db normalization theory: redundant keys OK?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#43 distributed lock manager
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#69 How does ATTACH pass address of ECB to child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#81 Random thoughts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#70 Time to rewrite DBMS, says Ingres founder
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#40 Fantasy-Land_Hierarchal_NUMA_Memory-Model_on_Vertical
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#56 performance of hardware dynamic scheduling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#91 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#18 Microsoft versus Digital Equipment Corporation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#39 American Airlines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#63 Intel: an expensive many-core future is ahead of us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#71 Curiousity: largest parallel sysplex around?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#45 Are blade servers becoming irrelevant with advances in virtualization and multi-core processor technology ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#3 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#40 "Larrabee" GPU design question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#43 "Larrabee" GPU design question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#26 Natural keys vs Aritficial Keys
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#36 Ingres claims massive database performance boost
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#67 Disksize history question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#39 ACP, One of the Oldest Open Source Apps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#84 A Faster Way to the Cloud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#57 U.S. begins inquiry of IBM in mainframe market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#35 DB2 announces technology that trumps Oracle RAC and Exadata
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#32 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#62 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#66 SYSENTER/SYSEXIT_vs._SYSCALL/SYSRET
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#54 Unix systems and Serialization mechanism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#14 Age
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#82 Hashing for DISTINCT or GROUP BY in SQL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#23 zLinux OR Linux on zEnterprise Blade Extension???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#60 Maybe off topic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#8 New job for mainframes: Cloud platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#28 NASA unplugs their last mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#53 history of Programming language and CPU in relation to each other
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#52 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#77 OT: but hopefully interesting - Million core supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#37 PDP-10 byte instructions, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#4 Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#22 What Makes code storage management so cool?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 yearsagotoday

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 yearsagotoday
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2013 12:33:26 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
part of the effort for distributed lock manager ... was DB2 mainframe had some cluster (loosely-coupled) support ... but it was mainframe only. The non-mainframe DB2 was completely different product and source base. As result went to various of the RDBMS vendors that had shared source base between their vax/cluster and unix products ... and part of the HA/CMP DLM was providing vax/cluster type semantics that made the port easier. As an aside, the RDBMS vendors with vax/cluster support tended to have a list of things done wrong and/or inefficiently in vax/cluster ... and had lots of advice on what to do when starting from scratch.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#86 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamation made 30 yearsagotoday

aka ... the non-mainframe DB2 had started out as complete rewrite from scratch for OS2 ... and took long time before it acquired more robust industrial strength dataprocessing features

past post about press regarding non-mainframe DB2 (Purescale) vis-a-vis Oracle RAC (and a few other things) ... almost 20yrs after we were working on it.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#43 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#46 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time

past posts mentioning being involved in the original relational/sql implementation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The US Is Quietly Losing Its Innovation Edge to China

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The US Is Quietly Losing Its Innovation Edge to China
Date: 28 Oct 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/YDu6Cxapz99

The US Is Quietly Losing Its Innovation Edge to China
http://thediplomat.com/china-power/the-us-is-quietly-losing-its-innovation-edge-to-china/

from above:
The sapped U.S. strength in innovation is epitomized by the NIH research funding trends. Between 2003 and 2013, the number of applications increased from nearly 35,000 to more than 51,000, while NIH appropriations shrunk from $21 billion to $16 billion (in 1995 dollars)

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Behold The Face Of Central Banker Hubris

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Behold The Face Of Central Banker Hubris
Date: 28 Oct 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/SmhgXgwksVv

Behold The Face Of Central Banker Hubris
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-10-27/behold-face-central-banker-hubris

who came out in support of Keating & Lincoln Savings & Loan??? only cost the gov. $3.4B

Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present pg222/loc4346-56:
In early 1985, Alan Greenspan wrote a long letter to federal regulators in support of Charles Keating of Lincoln Savings & Loan, who had been a client of Michael Milken's, later imprisoned for securities fraud. Greenspan had returned to his profitable economic Wall Street consultancy, Townsend-Greenspan, in 1977 after serving as President Gerald Ford's chief economist.

pg222/loc4360-67:
By the mid-1980s, when Greenspan wrote the letter, and after only a few years of deregulation, these investments were raising alarms, although the banks' widespread demise was still several years off. The thrifts like Lincoln invested in a wide range of risky assets, including junk bonds, shopping malls, ski resorts, and even uranium mines.

pg223/loc4369-73:
Greenspan wrote the FHLB that the "new management" of Lincoln "effectively restored the association to a vibrant and healthy state, with a strong net worth position, largely through expert selection of sound and profitable direct investment." Greenspan's service in Washington and his growing reputation got Keating his waiver. Four years later Lincoln was virtually insolvent, costing the federal government $3.4 billion to pay off its debt and depositors.

... snip ...

posts mentioning Too Big To Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too.big.to.fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

JPMorgan: Wall Street's Not Saying It's Guilty. It Not Even Sorry

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: JPMorgan: Wall Street's Not Saying It's Guilty. It Not Even Sorry
Date: 28 Oct 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/EWFvBLPFkkD

JPMorgan: Wall Street's Not Saying It's Guilty. It's Not Even Sorry; For the big banks, cutting penalty deals without admitting wrongdoing is just a cost of doing business.
http://www.nationaljournal.com/economy/jpmorgan-wall-street-s-not-saying-it-s-guilty-it-s-not-even-sorry-20131021

posts mentioning Too Big To Fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too.big.to.fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

PDCA vs. OODA. Pehaps this has been addressed previously

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: PDCA vs. OODA. Pehaps this has been addressed previously.
Date: 28 Oct 2013
Blog: Boyd Strategy
re:
http://lnkd.in/j9U4bS
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#69 PDCA vs. OODA

mid-90s we were called in to fix payment card target marketing (small pilot for 60m accounts and scale to 600m) .. 2/3rds of budget had already been spent (large consulting house) ... turns out we had to scrap everything and start from scratch and finish within budget left. part of the problem was involved hits to several different business processes at different physical locations. we started out going around and talking to all the different people responsible for the different business processes (something that nobody had bothered to do)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

HSBC exposed in massive data leak in Belgium

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: HSBC exposed in massive data leak in Belgium
Date: 28 Sep 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
HSBC exposed in massive data leak in Belgium
http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/10/hsbc-exposed-massive-data-leak-belgium

from above:
The story was based on the records of 3,137 secret bank accounts belonging to 2,450 Belgian clients of HSBC Private Bank in Switzerland. The data also includes internal notes of Swiss bankers' communications with these clients, exposing how the bankers helped clients set up offshore companies and maintain a veil of secrecy over their finances.

... snip ...

recent posts mentioning icij.org
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#27 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#28 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#46 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#95 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#6 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#11 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#3 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#19 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#68 OT: NYT article--the rich get richer

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

High Frequency Terrorism

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: High Frequency Terrorism
Date: 28 Sep 2013
Blog: Facebook
High Frequency Terrorism
http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2013-10-28/high-frequency-terrorism

recent posts mentioning HFT
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#29 Destructive Destruction? An Ecological Study of High Frequency Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#41 Computer Simulations Reveal Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#75 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#67 The End Of 'Orderly And Fair Markets'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#49 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#58 Traders Said to Rig Currency Rates to Profit Off Clients
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#59 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#89 FBI Finds Holes in System Protecting Economic Data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#10 What Makes Infrastructure investment not bizarre
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#12 What Makes Infrastructure investment not bizarre
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#50 IBM Furloughs U.S. Hardware Employees to Reduce Costs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#16 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#53 Retirement Savings

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 29 Oct 2013 08:39:04 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
Lynn Wheeler's numbers are arithmetically correct, but they are also problematic.

Mainframe channels perform multiple concurrent I/O operations that are not adequately reflected in them.


my references have been IBM's published numbers for the z196 peak I/O benchmark ... which doesn't have any reference to how many concurrent I/O operations each channel is doing (i.e. even raising the issue could be somewhat considered misdirection) ... but just how many aggregate I/O operations peak z196 configuration can do. I actually have no idea whether IBM's published numbers are arithmetically correct ... they are just what the published IBM's numbers are.

several times I have discussed the evoluation of bus&tag channels, lessons I learned from doing mainframe channel extender support in 1980, interactions with the group that would release ESCON (a decade later for es/9000 in 1990 ... by which time it is already obsolete), and being asked in 1988 to help LLNL standardize some serial technology ... which morphs into fibre-channel standard (and we had operational units in 1991). Later some POK channel engineers become involved in fibre-channel standard and define an extremely heavy-weight layer that drastically cuts the native FCS throughput ... which eventually ships as FICON

The IBM z196 peak I/O benchmark lists 104 FICONs (heavy-weight protocol layer on top of 104 native FCS that drastically cuts the native FCS throughput) and 14 SAPs getting 2M IOPS. Peak SAPs throughput is published at 2.2M SSCH/secs all running at 100% busy ... but recommendation for SAPs is keep to peak 70% busy or 1.5M SSCH/secs.

By comparison a recent native FCS has been announced for e5-2600 claiming over million IOPS (for single FCS) ... two such native FCS then would have higher aggregate throughput than the aggregate throughput of 104 FCS with FICON protocol layered ontop.

posts mentioning FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon

One of the issues that I learned doing the channel extender support in 1980 for the IBM Santa Teresa Lab (since renamed Silicon Valley lab, at the time, 300 people from the IMS group were being moved to offsite bldg) was effectively simulation of dual-simplex operation with channel programs downloaded (as data) to remote end of channel ... effectively channel programs&data were written continously on the outbound channel and data read continously on the inbound channel. There was no longer any concept of half-duplex channel executing channel program with lots of channel program protocol chatter back&forth latency making the resource busy. Separate dedicated path for outgoing and incoming data and throughput is purely the raw media throughput of the outgoing and incoming channels (there is no concept of channel busy separate from data being actually transmitted).

Part of the issue with serial fibre-optic for fibre channel standard
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibre_Channel
and similar work going on about the same time with scalable coherent interface (that I also got dragged into)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalable_Coherent_Interface

was trying to eliminate the increasing end-to-end latency penalty in protocols. The objective was to move to protocols that just treated the media as raw continuous transport.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Access to IBM Z/OS z/VM Documentation

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Access to IBM Z/OS z/VM Documentation
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 29 Oct 2013 08:38:54 -0700
On 10/28/13 13:06, John McKown wrote:
Thanks for the pointers. No offense, but I still don't much like InfoCenter. I may learn to like it. Right after I learn to like Lima beans.

So, IBM pubs center doesn't have an HA setup. Interesting. I guess they're busy restoring. Have they considered using Amazon AWS? Am I getting too nasty?


long ago my wife had been in the JES group (one of the catchers for ASP and co-author of JESUS ... JES unified system ... all the features in JES2 & JES3 that corresponding customers couldn't live w/o) when she was con'ed into going to POK to be responsible for loosely-coupled architecture. While there she did the peer-coupled shared data architecture ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

however at the time, there was very little uptake except for IMS hot-standby ... which contributed to her not staying long in the position (another was periodic skirmishes with the communication group trying to force her into using sna/vtam for loosely-coupled operations).

later we do IBM's ha/cmp ... a couple recent posts on ha/cmp from today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#86
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#87

as referenced in the above post ... (mainframe) DB2 complained that if I was allowed to continue ... I would be at least five yrs ahead of them.

one of the things I coined when out marketing ha/cmp were the terms disaster survivability and geographic survivability ... to differentiate from simple disaster/recovery. somewhat as a result, i was asked to write a section for the corporation's continuous availability strategy document ... however the section got removed when both rochester (as/400) and POK (mainframe) complained that they couldn't meet the specification. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 29 Oct 2013 09:57:44 -0700
lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler) writes:
Part of the issue with serial fibre-optic for fibre channel standard
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibre_Channel
and similar work going on about the same time with scalable coherent interface (that I also got dragged into)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalable_Coherent_Interface

was to trying to eliminate the increasing end-to-end latency penalty in protocols. The objective was to move to protocols that just treated the media as raw continuous transport.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#94 SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead

pure aside, in the late 80s, the IBM Hursley lab did something similar to FCS & SCI (and what I worked with for channel extender in 1980) with Harrier/9333 ... at the time it was 80mbit/sec serial "copper" links (concurrent in both directions, not fiber-optic) ... they packetized scsi i/o program and downloaded to remote end ... where it was executed ... significantly reducing the latency penalties and significantly increasing aggregate throughput (compared to standard scsi bus ... where actual physical disk drives in the benchmark comparisons were essentially otherwise identical).

as part of ha/cmp, I was hoping to see harrier/9333 evolve into inter-operable fractional FCS ... old post with some discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#15

however, end of Jan1992, cluster scaleup is transferred and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors ... and we decide to leave. Then Harrier/9333 evolves into (non-interoperable) SSA with serial copper upgraded/doubled to 160mbits/sec (concurrent in both directions) or approx. 40mbyte/sec aggregate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_Storage_Architecture

by comparison ESCON is 200mbits/sec links or 400mbits/sec (50mbyte/sec) aggregate ... but is lucky to achieve 17mbyte/sec aggregate throughput

small mention of 9333 here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_IBM_magnetic_disk_drives

some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#email881011
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#email901024
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#email920629
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#email920630
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#email960203

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Confirmed: the US DoJ will not put the bankers in jail, no matter how deep the fraud

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Confirmed: the US DoJ will not put the bankers in jail, no matter how deep the fraud
Date: 29 Oct 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/102794881687002297268/posts/REHiVewVpVw

Confirmed: the US DoJ will not put the bankers in jail, no matter how deep the fraud
http://financialcryptography.com/mt/archives/001452.html

referenced in above:

Bill Black: The New York Times Publishes the Most Ironic Sentence of the Crisis
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/10/bill-black-the-new-york-times-publishes-the-most-ironic-sentence-of-the-crisis.html

posts mentioning too big to fail, too big to prosecute and/or too big to jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Oracle Sent Out A Press Release Dissing IBM's Software Business

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Oracle Sent Out A Press Release Dissing IBM's Software Business
Date: 29 Oct 2013
Blog: IBMers
Oracle Sent Out A Press Release Dissing IBM's Software Business
http://www.businessinsider.com/oracle-disses-ibms-software-business-2013-10

other recent IBM problems

Pennsylvania Kills An IBM Contract That's 3 Years Late And $60 Million Over Budget
http://www.businessinsider.com/pennsylvania-kills-ibm-project-2013-8

from above:
It said the computer system built so far was unreliable and full of bugs (had "a higher number of software defects than industry norms.")

Plus, it blamed IBM's revolving-door workforce. The initial project manager and the top executive left in 2009 and IBM preceded to have 638 people work on the system, rotating most of them off in less than a year.


... snip ...

it is IBM marketing that has the wide-spread reputation for FUD
http://changingminds.org/techniques/resisting/fud.htm

really gaining hold during the "Future System" period when 370 products were being suspended and/or killed off. It was the lack of products during the Future System period that is credited with giving the clone processors a market foothold (and IBM marketing resorting to FUD in lieu of competitive products).

The article refers to Oracle "dissing" IBM because a reference was made to Oracle moving to #2 software business because of IBM's drop in revenue:
Friday morning Oracle told us in a press release that it is declaring itself to be the second-biggest software company in the world, taking over IBM's spot, thanks to IBM's declining revenues.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 29 Oct 2013 15:40:33 -0700
dcrayford@GMAIL.COM (David Crayford) writes:
But is that unique to a mainframe? When you compare it to a POWER system or whatever Oracle are flogging these days it doesn't stand out. Even commodity servers hooked up to an enterprise class HBA can handle massive amounts of I/O throughput.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#94 SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#96 SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead

it possibly was 3090 when IBM marketing respun the requirement for significant increase in the number of channels.

fundamentally, mainframe channel is considered busy when it is doing lots of end-to-end back&forth channel programming protocol chatter. original number of 3090 channels were originally done based on assumption that 3880 disk controller was as efficient as the (previous) 3830 disk controller. However, the 3880 disk controller had a much slower processor for handling channel protocol activity ... which enormously increased channel busy. when POK finally realized the significance, they had to significantly increase the number of channels in order compensate for the enormous increase in channel busy (as a result of the slower 3880 processor) as a means of achieving target I/O throughput. The increase in channels resulted in needing an additional TCM ... which increases the 3090 manufacturing cost. At the time, there was semi-facetious suggestion that POK bill the 3880 disk controller group for the increase in 3090 manufacturing costs.

In any case, marketing then respins the significant increase in 3090 channels (from needing to compensate for significant increase in channel busy by 3880) to the significant amount of aggregate i/o bandwidth (even if it couldn't be effectively used). harkens back to 70s during the future system period when marketing really got its reputation for FUD compensating for lack of competitive products (the lack of new products during the FS period is credited with giving clone processors a market foothold).

Note that part of 3090 (and vector processor facility) was targeted for supercomputer market. However important part of supercomputer market was high-speed i/o, 100mbyte/sec (800mbit/sec) "HiPPI" channel (standardization work for cray channel out of LANL) ... for things like large disk arrays (for instance thinking machines had a 32+8 disk array ... i.e. parallel transfer across 32 drives).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HIPPI

from above:
To understand why HIPPI is no longer used, consider that Ultra3 SCSI offers rates of 320 MB/s, and is available at almost any corner computer store. Meanwhile Fibre Channel offered simple interconnect with both HIPPI and SCSI (it can run both protocols) and speeds of up to 400 MB/s on fibre and 100 MB/s on a single pair of twisted pair copper wires.

... snip ...

standard 3090 i/o interface was totally unable to handle 100mbyte/sec operation. What some Kingston engineers did was cut into the side of the extended store memory bus and implement a peak/poke paradigm for HiPPI i/o ... the 4k-byte extended bus synchronous move instructions were used to create i/o commands at reserved extended store memory locations.

as part of ha/cmp cluster scaleup work ... we got periodically dragged into both LANL and LLNL (as well as other national labs).

serial scsi
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_attached_SCSI
serial ata
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA

as previously mentioned, I had hoped that 9333/harrier would have evolved into interoperable fractional FCS ... as opposed to non-interoperable SSA
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_Storage_Architecture

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 29 Oct 2013 18:47:17 -0700
scott_j_ford@YAHOO.COM (Scott Ford) writes:
Still old adage the channels are slower than the process, hence usually a bottleneck. My past life before development I was a Comm guy ,hardware and software..saw of lot of bottlenecks

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#94 SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#96 SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#99 SHARE Blog: News Flash: The Mainframe (Still) Isn't Dead

original mainframe tcp/ip product was implemented in vs/pascal ... but had some other issues ... getting approx. 44kbytes/sec using nearly full 3090 processor. I did the enhancements to support rfc1044 and in some tuning tests at cray research got sustained channel speed throughput between cray and 4341, using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). misc. past posts mentioning rfc1044
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

In late 80s, I was the asked to be on technical advisory board for XTP protocol ... communication group tried hard to prevent my being on the XTP/TAB ... one of the objectives was elimination of serialization and sync points with various kinds of protocol processing hardware chips to make things flow continuously asynchronously (w/o any buffer copies)... and cut total system processor pathlength to 500 instructions or less per packet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xpress_Transport_Protocol

above claims that XTP didn't employ congestion avoidance ... but I had wrote spec. for adaptive rate-based congestion control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/xtprate.html
past posts mentioning xtp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#xtphsp
old email with overview of xtp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#email881113
mention of xtp for us submarines
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#email890801b

part of the influence in XTP design was some of people from silicon graphics that had worked on their graphics protocol engine that had high performance pipelined design as data flowed out of system continuously through asynchronously processing pipelined stages.

besides mention in the wiki article, some amount was sponsored out of llnl/sandia ... gone 404 ... but lives on at the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20020209014400/http://www.ca.sandia.gov/xtp/

the above does mention rate control (adaptive rate control addresses congestion avoidance).

say 8gbit/sec FCS (fibre channel) ... 2gbyte/sec aggregate ... say 256k 4k records/sec in each direction, 512k aggregate ... at 500 instructions/record ... say 1/4 BIPS, 1BIPS then handles 2M IOPS.

this mentions meeting on cluster scaleup early Jan1992 in Ellison's conference room
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

end of Jan1992, cluster scaleup is transferred and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors ... and we decide to leave.

later, two of the other people at the Ellison meeting have also left and joined small client/server startup and are responsible for something called "commerce server". We are brought in as consultants because they want to do payment transactions on the server; the startup had invented this technology called SSL they want to use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce".

One of the things that had to be done was map "SSL" technology to payment business processes. part of this included doing something called "payment gateway" that sits on the internet and handles traffic between "commerce servers" (on the internet) and the "payment networks" ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#gateway

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Boyd Blasphemy: Justifying the F-35

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Boyd Blasphemy: Justifying the F-35
Date: 30 Oct 2013
Blog: Boyd Strategy
re:
http://lnkd.in/bqjTRnv

The Impact of Advanced Fusion in 5th Generation Fighters on Combat Capability
http://www.sldinfo.com/the-impact-of-advanced-fusion-in-5th-generation-fighters-on-combat-capability/

from above:
When Col John Boyd documented the concept of the Observe-Orient-Decide-Act (OODA) loop as it pertains to tactical aviation and the energy maneuverability egg it was in an era when fighter physical performance was the dominant factor.

... snip ...

In briefings, Boyd would say he say he criticized the F16 heads-up display because it showed scrolling digital numbers ... which required lots of pilot brain-power and attention to convert into useful information. (negative benefit).

As an aside, I've seen periodic references by others to SLD website being heavily oriented towards supporting MICC positions. posts mentioning military industry congressional complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

One of the latest at ELP: New DOD IG report shows more woe for the F-35 program
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/2013/10/new-dod-ig-report-shows-more-woe-for-f.html
also his F35 reading list
http://elpdefensenews.blogspot.com/p/f-35-reading-list.html

2011 naval history conf. air power ... one point was f35 was already in progress for decade while in previous 12m, 100 different drones had gone from idea to delivery. other point was operations was combination of pilot and mission specialist(s) ... a couple more iterations of fly-by-wire would eliminate the human pilot.

Except F-35 still needs a "cooperating" enemy (with or w/o a pilot) ... requiring F22s for cover. Instead of a trillion on couple thousand F-35 a couple decades late, that requires cooperating enemy ... ramp up volume production and have a couple million lethal drones that can spend days on target, for the same amount of money using latest technology (the numbers far exceed the numbers of pilots that would be available).

The discussion about fly-by-wire advances ... goes along with assumptions about "fusion" ... eliminating pilot in the loop ... either locally or remotely (there may be human mission specialist in the loop). You can build datalinks that may be blocked but not taken over ... further pushing the requirement for autonomous operation. With thousands in theater ... could even have specialized that target enemy blocking attempts (similar to some of the past SAM countermeasures).

If you have to have F22 anyway for cover ... possible do swarms of these drones queued off the F22 ... with the datalinks between the F22 and the drone swarms ... much shorter distances so harder to block. The drone swarms would have much longer staying power in theater ... so would need autonomous operation & hand-over protocols as different F22s depart and arrive. This scenario is slightly analogous to transition from big battleships to carriers with lots of planes extending the reach. Drone swarms would then have lots of other tactical implications ... including being able to overwhelm non-swarm foes.

posts mentioning Boyd &/or OODA-loop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Interesting? How _compilers_ are compromising application security

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Interesting? How _compilers_ are compromising application security
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 30 Oct 2013 08:22:54 -0700
PaulGBoulder@AIM.COM (Paul Gilmartin) writes:
I consider all the above misapplications of Postel's Robustness Principle. (I'm not sure that there are any proper applications.) Our minds have collectively contaminated by the pervasive liberality of HTML renderers.

no disparaging Jon Postel ... before he passed, he would let me do part of STD1. as an aside ... recent head of ISI (where Jon was located) formally was ibm executive.
http://viterbi.usc.edu/about/administration/bio_schorr.htm

jon also would co-sponsor my talk on electronic commerce at isi ... recent ibm-main post referencing electronic commerce
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#100

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

ObamaCare Web Site Problems

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: ObamaCare Web Site Problems
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 30 Oct 2013 11:33:26 -0700
anthony.sambataro@NIH.GOV (Sambataro, Anthony [E] , NIH/NBS) writes:
I've read that the Obamacare software contains 500 million lines of code, how can that be?

I thought more like 5m LOC ... but may come to reach $400M-$500M (but that includes everything not just writing code, but also full roll-out and operation) ... but would be like $100/LOC (if operations included).

common metric of less than 100LOC/person/day, 500M LOCS is more than 5million worker days or well over 20,000 worker years.

for comparison ... a recent IBM problem

Pennsylvania Kills An IBM Contract That's 3 Years Late And $60 Million Over Budget
http://www.businessinsider.com/pennsylvania-kills-ibm-project-2013-8

from above:
It said the computer system built so far was unreliable and full of bugs (had "a higher number of software defects than industry norms.")

Plus, it blamed IBM's revolving-door workforce. The initial project manager and the top executive left in 2009 and IBM preceded to have 638 people work on the system, rotating most of them off in less than a year.


... and ...

A year ago, laid-off IBM employees told us that the company's ongoing layoffs are creating a lot of churn in large projects like these and hurting the company. They named a handful of cases where other big clients pulled the plug on IBM contracts.

... snip ...

referenced article:
http://www.businessinsider.com/ibm-laid-off-employee-says-company-is-blowing-it-2012-4

including Disney @ $100m/annum, Texas @ $863m, and Indiana 10yr, $1B

and comparison with other large program (with large millions of LOC)

What If Obamacare Was A Fighter Jet?
http://my.firedoglake.com/jpsottile/2013/10/24/what-if-obamacare-was-a-fighter-jet/

will eventually be nearly two decades ... the article does raise issue about long-term, broken procurement process throughout the federal gov (however, especially epidemic in DOD where they keep putting off date when DOD has to comply with mandatory financial audit).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970






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