List of Archived Posts

2017 Newsgroup Postings (07/28 - )

Census processing, 1950
OT: book: "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan official who helped beat Soviets
Dunkirk
chip card
IBM System/360
Initialized paged memory without a hard commit
Tandem Memos
Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan official who helped beat Soviets
Corporate Profit and Taxes
Pentagon Would Ban Contractors That Don't Protect Data
The original Adventure / Adventureland game?
What is missing?
What the Enron E-mails Say About Us
The original Adventure / Adventureland game?
The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS
IBM RAS
OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
IBM RAS
OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Military Contractors
IBM ... the rise and fall
OT: book: "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
This Is How The US Government Destroys The Lives Of Patriotic Whistleblowers
OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS
OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Stop Romanticizing Glass-Steagall
Google Employee's Anti-Diversity Manifesto Goes 'Internally Viral'
OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Disregard post (another screwup)
Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Disregard post (another screwup)
The Man Who Wrote Those Password Rules Has a New Tip: N3v$r M1^d!
Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
VM/370 45th Birthday
"Subprime Is Contained" (& Other Evidence That "They Really Don't Know What They're Doing")
Disregard post (another screwup)
Aug. 9, 1995: When the Future Looked Bright for Netscape
endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)
System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)
endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)
endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
Pareto efficiency
Pareto efficiency
Feds WIMP
On second thoughts
On second thoughts
RISC and PC/RT ancient history, was Re: On second thoughts
Pareto efficiency
computer component reliability, 1951
computer component reliability, 1951
endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
IBM: A History Of Progress, 1890s to 2001
IBM: A History Of Progress, 1890s to 2001
Pareto efficiency

Census processing, 1950

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Census processing, 1950
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 28 Jul 2017 20:02:45 -0700

hancock4 writes:

Article in P/S about census punched card processing for 151 million people
in 1950.  Looks like a mix of IBM and Univac machines based on the photos.

https://books.google.com/books?id=DC0DAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA153&dq=punch%20card&pg=PA152#v=onepage&q=punch%20card&f=false

we worked essentially for free on 2000 census on selection of backend
systems ... census was paying a consultant, and we technically worked
for the consultant but effectively for free (although when census was
audited, I was the one they asked to stand up in front of the room
all day answering questions).

their backend systems from late 70s used for 1980 census ... were being
moved out March 1997 and new stuff would then be immediately moved in
... to start the testing preparing for 2000 census (all the selection
for backend systems had to be done & finished & ordered ... for deliver
spring 1997 as soon as moving vans took away the old stuff).

this reference mentions Univac mainframes in Oct1979 for 1980 census
operation
https://books.google.com/books?id=6J4qlVG62wkC&pg=PA9&lpg=PA9&#v=onepage&q&f=false

misc. past posts mentioning 2000 census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#16 Why are Mainframe Computers really still in use at all?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#21 Methods of payment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004j.html#43 Methods of payment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#63 was: 1975 movie "Three Days of the Condor" tech stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#92 Billion-dollar IT failure at Census Bureau
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#21 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#56 Handling multicore CPUs; what the competition is thinking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#56 What's the most interesting thing you do in your non-work life?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#87 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#11 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#98 ACA (Obamacare) website problems--article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#37 OT this guy salary one dollar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#72 George W. Bush: Still the worst; A new study ranks Bush near the very bottom in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#39 Failure as a Way of Life; The logic of lost wars and military-industrial boondoggles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#107 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#18 FBI Rewrites Federal Law to Let Hillary Off the Hook
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#12 Why a Single-Payer Health Care System is Inevitable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#40 Misc. Success of Failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#76 GLBA & Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#71 ComputerWorld Says: Cobol plays major role in U.S. government breaches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#89 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: book: "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT:  book:  "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 29 Jul 2017 16:36:05 -0700

hancock4 writes:

This book, by Thomas Piketty, is a detailed economic analysis of
today's finances.  It includes historical discussions of the
concentration of wealth during the industrial revolution, the
spread of wealth in the U.S. after WW II, and the concentration
of wealth today.

While it is a somewhat of a heavy read, with lots of charts and data,
it does provide excellent insights into the problem of the 1% and
possible ways to remedy the situation.

shorter flavor ... The Limping Middle Class
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html
slouching towards 3rd world country status and return of the robber barons.
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

reply to post here a couple months ago
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#49 [CM] What was your first computer?

this also has reference to 2011 NYT graphic above, updated through 2014

How GE, GM, Coca-Cola And Kodak Put Shareholders Ahead Of Employees
https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2017/06/29/how-ge-gm-coca-cola-kodak-put-shareholders-ahead-of-employees/
from here
http://www.epi.org/productivity-pay-gap/

in this recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#49 Shareholders Ahead Of Employees

also references this

Bad Ideas; Reknowned economist James K. Galbraith, one of our expert
panelists, pulls no punches in talking about the damage wrought by
financial innovation
https://www.gfmag.com/magazine/june-2017/bad-ideas

other recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html##100 Why CEO pay structures harm companies

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality

past posts mentioning Piketty
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#73 These Two Charts Show How The Priorities Of US Companies Have Gotten Screwed Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014e.html#63 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#7 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#14 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#15 Why IBM Is Tumbling: BRIC Sales Plunge, Total Revenue Lowest Since 2009
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#21 Thomas Piketty Is Right About the Past and Wrong About the Future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#55 Piketty Shreds Marginal Productivity as Neoclassical Justification for Supersized Pay
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#84 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#53 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#65 A call for revolution

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan official who helped beat Soviets

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan official who helped beat Soviets
Date: 29 July 2017
Blog: Facebook

Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan
official who helped beat Soviets
https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/trump-taking-wrong-approach-china-210000436.html

... Volcker talking to civil engineering professor about money has
been diverted from infrastructure spending for so long ... there
aren't civil engineering jobs, lack of jobs, students stop taking
classes, w/o students, univ. start shutting down programs and dropping
professors ... Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the
Education of a President
http://www.amazon.com/Confidence-Men-Washington-Education-ebook/dp/B0089LOKKS

pg290:

Well, I said, 'The trouble with the United States recently is we spent
several decades not producing many civil engineers and producing a
huge number of financial engineers. And the result is s**tty bridges
and a s**tty financial system!'

... snip ...

A few years ago with the shovel ready, infrastructure stimulus funding
... projects were having to hire Chinese companies to get civil
engineers.

AMEX was in competition with KKR for private equity take-over of RJR
and KKR wins. KKR runs into trouble and hires away the president of
AMEX to turn it around.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarians_at_the_Gate:_The_Fall_of_RJR_Nabisco

IBM has gone into the red and was being reorganized into the 13 "baby
blues" in preparation for breaking up the company. The board then
hires away the former president of AMEX who reverses the breakup and
resurrects the company ... using some of the same techniques used at
RJR
http://www.ibmemployee.com/RetirementHeist.shtml

trivia: about same time that IBM has gone into the red, AMEX spins off
much of its mainframe dataprocessing outsourcing business in the
largest IPO up until that time as FDC. In the late 90s, FDC as part of
merger, acquires ailing Western Union (and has to spin off
MoneyGram). However after the start of the century, there is an
enormous explosion in the number of illegal workers being brought across
the border, and WU revenue also starts exploding. by 2005, the
(ailing) WU had become half FDC total bottom line (from the huge
influx of new illegal workers 2001-2005). President of Mexico invites
the FDC executives to Mexico to be thrown in jail (for how much WU is
making off of sending payments home) ... likely contributing to
spinning off of WU in 2005. KKR then does the largest (up until that
time) private-equity reverse-IPO take-over of FDC (15yrs after being
the largest IPO).

more trivia: former president of AMEX leaves IBM to
http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2007/10/barbarians-capitol-private-equity-public-enemy/

Lou Gerstner, former ceo of ibm, now heads the Carlyle Group, a
Washington-based global private equity firm whose 2006 revenues of $87
billion were just a few billion below ibm's. Carlyle has boasted
George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, and former Secretary of State James
Baker III on its employee roster

... snip ...

and gets them into the economic mess, when it crashes, he is replaced
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2008/dec/28/markets-credit-crunch-banking-2008
and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Carlyle_Group

Lou Gerstner, former chairman and CEO of IBM and Nabisco, was
appointed chairman of Carlyle in January 2003, replacing Frank
Carlucci. Gerstner would serve in that position through October
2008.[28][29]

... snip ...

... also had acquired the beltway bandit that will employ Snowden:
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
helping accelerate the rapidly spreading success of failure
culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

disclaimer: 1999 I was asked to try and help prevent the economic mess
... wasn't very successful. Then Jan2009 (ten yrs later), I was asked
to HTML'ize Pecora Hearings (senate hearings into '29 crash, resulted
in Glass-Seagall and criminal convictions with jail time), with lots
of internal HREFs and URLs between what happened then and what
happened this time (comments that the new congress might have appetite
to do something). I work on it for awhile and then get call that it
won't be needed after all (references to capital totally buried under
enormous mountains of wallstreet money).

VP and former CIA director repeatedly claims no knowledge of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
because he was fulltime administration point person deregulating
financial industry ... creating S&L crisis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
along with other members of his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis#Silverado_Savings_and_Loan
and another
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE0D81E3BF937A25753C1A966958260

another family member then presides over the economic mess last
decade, 70 times larger than the S&L crises. S&L crisis had 1000
criminal convictions with jailtime, proportionally the economic mess
should have 70,000.

private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity
gerstner posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner
Pecora Hearings and/or Glass-Steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall
S&L crises posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#S&L.crisis
and "economic mess"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Dunkirk

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Dunkirk
Date: 30 July 2017
Blog: Facebook

Panzer Leader (Heinz Guderian) loc1783-85:

On this day (the 24th) the Supreme Command intervened in the
operations in progress, with results which were to have a most
disastrous influence on the whole future course of the war. Hitler
ordered the left wing to stop on the Aa. It was forbidden to cross
that stream. We were not informed of the reasons for this. The order
contained the words: 'Dunkirk is to be left to the Luftwaffe.

loc1856-61:

Churchill's guess that Rundstedt may have himself decided to hold up
the armor is also wide of the mark. As the commander on the spot I am
able, more-over, definitely to state that the heroic defense of
Calais, although worthy of the highest praise, yet had no influence on
the development of events outside Dunkirk. Churchill assumes, quite
correctly, that Hitler, and above all Goering, believed German air
supremacy to be strong enough to prevent the evacuation of the British
forces by sea. This belief was a mistake pregnant with consequence,
for only the capture of the British Expeditionary Force could have
influenced the English towards making peace with Hitler or could have
created the conditions necessary for a successful German invasion of
Great Britain.

... snip ...

somewhat similar to US Army Air Corp claims that strategic bombing
would win the war w/o US having to invade France. A problem was that
from 5-6 miles up, strategic bombing had difficult hitting
targets. John Foster Dulles was major force behind rebuilding German
industry and military in the 20s through the early 40s, supporting
Hitler and the Nazis. From the law of unintended consequences, 1943 US
strategic bombing program needed location of German industry and
military targets, it got the coordinates and plans from
wallstreet. Later McNamara was LeMay's staff planning fire bombing
German and Japanese cities, it was hard to miss a whole city (even
from 5-6 miles up). European Campaign: Its Originas and Conduct
https://ssi.armywarcollege.edu/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1075

loc2582-85:

The bomber preparation of Omaha Beach was a total failure, and German
defenses on Omaha Beach were intact as American troops came ashore. At
Utah Beach, the bombers were a little more effective because the IXth
Bomber Command was using B-26 medium bombers. Wisely, in preparation
for supporting the invasion, maintenance crews removed Norden
bombsights from the bombers and installed the more effective low-level
altitude sights.

... snip ...

Germany somewhat had its own Dunkirk with the battle of the
bulge. Patton had suggested just let Germans advance to the outskirts
of Paris, they would then have outrun their supplies and it would be
possible to roll them all up with no problem. Eisenhower said that
wouldn't be politically correct/acceptable. Patton was then to attack
one side of the base of the bulge while montgomery attacks the other
side, cutting them off ... and rolling them up. Montgomery never got
into position, so the Germans managed to escape through the gap
... although leaving most of their equipment.

recent mention of Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#53 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#99 The Real Reason You Should See Dunkirk: Hitler Lost World War II There

other recent posts mentioning strategic bombing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#63 One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#91 Godwin's Law should force us to remember & fear our shared heritage with Nazi Germany
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#38 Imperial Hubris
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#55 Should America Have Entered World War I?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#22 Ironic old "fortune"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#60 The Illusion Of Victory: America In World War I
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#69 The knives are out for Trump's national security adviser H.R. McMaster
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#18 5 Naval Battles That Changed History Forever
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#41 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#60 [CM] What was your first home computer?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

chip card

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: chip card
Date: 30 July 2017
Blog: Facebook

The chip card transition in the US has been a disaster
https://qz.com/717876/the-chip-card-transition-in-the-us-has-been-a-disaster/

Very early part of century there was large US pilot, but it was during
the "Yes Card" exploit period. They proceeded even when I gave them
detailed description of the problems. Afterwards, all evidence of the
pilot appeared to disappear w/o a trace and conjecture that it would
be a long time before it was tried again in the US (letting other
jurisdictions work out the bugs). At the end of this Cartes2002 trip
report, there is discussion of "Yes Card" presentation, gone 404, but
lives on at the wayback machine (the softcopy of the presentation is
labeled "confidential").
http://web.archive.org/web/20030417083810/http://www.smartcard.co.uk/resources/articles/cartes2002.html

At 2003 ATM Integrity Task Force meeting, a Federal LEO gave a details
of "Yes Card" exploits ... and somebody in the audience loadly
observed that they managed to spend billions of dollars to prove chips
are less secure than magstripe.

disclaimer: late 90s, I did chip w/o any of the vulnerabilities, much
more secure, and could do a transaction in 1/10th second with
contactless RF power (could even be used for transit gate
operation). Had booths at 1999 world-wide BAI retail banking show
... old post:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#224

trivia: the CEO of one of the security companies in the booths, had
previously done stints as head of IBM mainframe POK and IBM PC Boca.

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#yescard

old reference to article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#73 The chip card transition in the US has been a disaster
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#74 The chip card transition in the US has been a disaster
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#34 The chip card transition in the US has been a disaster

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM System/360

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM System/360
Date: 30 July 2017
Blog: Facebook

IBM System/360
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_System/360

trivia: 1052-7/console ... paper feed up the bottom back has paper
sensor ... when the sensor doesn't detect any paper, all I/O
operations are unit check, intervention required. OS/360 stops and
just sits there and periodically rings the bell. There can be enough
friction that the paper doesn't fall off the top. If you are just
sitting at the console, you will have no indication why everything has
died and the bell periodically rings. I got so frustrated that I slam
my fist into the keyboard ... that jiggles the console and the paper
falls off the top. Of course somebody has to be called in to replace
the 1052-7. past ref
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#43 Paper tape

After I graduate and join the science center ... I find that the CE
keeps a couple spare 1052-7 on site ... because it happens frequently
enough.

At the univ, they closed the datacenter on the weekends and let me
have it all to myself from 8am monday until 8am monday ... 48hrs w/o
sleep made monday morning classes hard

At the IBM science center i would rarely get more than 2weekend
shifts. One weekend something was wrong and I needed the backup tapes
for restore. The room that had backups was locked and I couldn't find
the keys. The doors were thick solid fir and I gave it a little
kick. The wood completely split from top to bottom where I kicked. It
turns out they had moved backup tapes to another room and moved in
personnel records. They moved the door to conference room laid across
two 2drawer file cabinets as table ... it was there for years

This was back when IBM rented computers and datacenters would recover
money by charging for time used (even internally when it was funny
money) at one point I was asked if I could do something because I used
more time than whole rest of the organization put together. I said I
could work less. The subject was never mentioned again

computer renting trivia: 360s had system clock that ran whenever cpu
and/or channels were busy ... that IBM used to base its lease/rental
fees. The science center did a lot of work on CP67 for it to be
available 7x24 ... but system clock would stop when nothing was going
on. The system clock would still keep running for 400ms after
everything had stopped running. However, long after IBM had switched
to selling computers ... MVS still had a timer task that woke up every
400ms ... making sure that system clock never stopped.

posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Initialized paged memory without a hard commit

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Initialized paged memory without a hard commit
Newsgroups: comp.arch
Date: Sun, 30 Jul 2017 14:49:53 -0700

Richard Damon <Richard@Damon-Family.org> writes:

My understanding is that some OSes will have a single dedicated page
of all zeros which they will map into the application space as a
read-only page until the application writes to it, then they will
create a dedicated page for that application. This isn't quite what
you are asking for, but close. This is done more to save swap space
than to try to speed up the program.

Something is going to need to create the real page of memory with the
values, and I suspect let that be the OS rather than something
automagically in the processor will be more efficient. (If the
processor can do this automatically on the write, then the OS is going
to need to pre-allocate a real page of memory for it to do so, which
may tie up a lot of physical memory, if the write triggers a request
for the OS to allocate the page, it is a trivial bit of extra work to
fill it with the right value).

The other things is that I can't see real programs being able to
utilize this for much of a speed up, as you are unlikely to need to do
a lot of reads on memory that you haven't written yet. If it does give
you a speedup, you can probably get more by keeping better track of
how much you have written and just not processing the uninitialized
part.

CP/67 (virtual machine, virtual memory, precursor to vm/370, done at
science center) delivered to university Jan1968 ... had a specially
formated page of all zeros on disk for unallocated, never before
referenced page ... first time referenced the zeros page would be
brought in and if changed and needed to be written out, it would go to
new location.

I almost immediately changed it to instruction sequence, ten registers
all zeroed and STM/BXLE loop (avoiding the page read of the zeros page).

past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

some of the CTSS people
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatible_Time-Sharing_System

had gone to the 5th flr of 545 tech sq to do multics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics

others went to the science center on the 4th flr, did virtual machines,
cp40, cp67, cms
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS

internal network ... some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

... technology also used for bitnet
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET
some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

and a bunch of online applications, performance optimization and
monitoring, capacity planning, etc

also invented GML in 1969 (letters chosen for three inventors
initials) ... after decade, morphs into ISO standard SGML, after
another decade morphs into HTML at CERN. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Tandem Memos

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Tandem Memos
Date: 30 July 2017
Blog: Facebook

Jim Gray, I and some others would sponsor fridays after work at local
places around San Jose plant site. After Jim Gray left for tandem, we
would get invited to visit Gray on friday afternoon ... when tandem
sponsored beer and other things.

After one of the visits to Tandem, I wrote up trip report and
distributed it on the internal network ... which kicked off the
"Tandem Memos" ... from ibmjargon:

Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh
of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry
middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely
distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed
dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and
also constructively criticised the way products were are
developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious
interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try
reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

In the late 70s and early 80s, I got blamed for online computer
conferencing (precursor to social media) on the internal network
(larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until
sometime mid-80s). Folklore is that when corporate executive committee
was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal
network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

Trivia: 6th started providing funds out of his office for some of the
things I was doing.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan official who helped beat Soviets

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan official who helped beat Soviets
Date: 30 July 2017
Blog: Facebook

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#2 Trump is taking the wrong approach to China on tech, says ex-Reagan official who helped beat Soviets

In the early 80s, there was article (Wash. Post?) calling for 100%
unearned profit on the US auto industry. The scenario was supposedly
the foreign auto import quota was to (reduce competition and) give the
domestic makers enormous profits that they would use to completely
remake themselves. However, they just pocketed the money and continued
business as usual. In 1990, the US auto industry had the C4 task force
to work on completely remaking themselves and because they were
planning on heavily leveraging technology, they invited
representatives from technology companies to send participants. In the
meetings they could accurately describe what the foreign competition
was doing better and what US needed to do to respond. However, as
recent bailouts have indicated they still continued business as usual.

One of the issues was auto industry took 7-8yrs from start to rolling
off the line, running two efforts concurrently offset 3-4yrs so there
was something new more often with cosmetic changes in between. By the
mid-80s, the foreign competition had cut that elapsed time in half to
turn out completely new product and by 1990 were in the process of
cutting it in half again ... aka, agility/OODA-loop running at
least four times faster. (this is totally separate from things like
Toyota quality). GM had major example with Corvette with especially
tight tolerances under the "skin" ... delay between original design
and ready to manufacture, suppliers frequently had changed their
products so they no longer would fit the design ... which required
expensive redesign and further delay.

Offline, I would chide the POK mainframe brethern attending how could
they expect to help, since they had similar problems.

Toyota reference
http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/how-toyota-turns-workers-into-problem-solvers

C4 taskforce postings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#auto.c4.taskforce

posts mentioning Boyd and/or OODA-loop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Corporate Profit and Taxes

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Corporate Profit and Taxes
Date: 30 July 2017
Blog: Facebook

tipping point, productivity diverging from worker compensation, the
limping middle class
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/jobs-will-follow-a-strengthening-of-the-middle-class.html
and
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/opinion/04reich-graphic.html?ref=sunday

How GE, GM, Coca-Cola And Kodak Put Shareholders Ahead Of Employees
https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2017/06/29/how-ge-gm-coca-cola-kodak-put-shareholders-ahead-of-employees/

has updated version of the 2011 NYT graphic ... from here
http://www.epi.org/productivity-pay-gap/

trivia: during the economic mess, there is claim that wallstreet
financial services tripled in size as percent of GDP ... for nearly
destroying the country's economy ... and are still fighting hard to
maintain their position.

2002, congress lets fiscal responsibility act lapse (spending can't
exceed revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt). 2010 CBO
report that 2003-2009, tax revenue cut $6T and spending increased $6T
for $12T gap compared to fiscal responsibility act (also couldn't
account for $1+TRILLION of the DOD increase and first time taxes cut
to not pay for two wars). Sort of confluence of 1) Federal Reserve and
wallstreet wanted huge federal debt, 2) wallstreet and special
interests wanted huge tax cut, 3) military-industrial(-congressional)
complex wanted huge spending increase.

Milton Friedman
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Friedman

Friedman promoted an alternative macroeconomic viewpoint known as
"monetarism", and argued that a steady, small expansion of the money
supply was the preferred policy.[12] His ideas concerning monetary
policy, taxation, privatization and deregulation influenced government
policies, especially during the 1980s.

... snip ...

Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-01-12/milton-friedman-s-cherished-theory-is-laid-to-rest

Even now, when economic models have become far more complex than
anything in Friedman's time, economists still go back to Friedman's
theory as a mental touchstone -- a fundamental intuition that guides
the way they make their models. My first macroeconomics professor
believed in it deeply and instinctively, and would even bring it up in
department seminars.

... snip ...

The Champions of the 401(k) Lament the Revolution They Started
http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-champions-of-the-401-k-lament-the-revolution-they-started-1483382348?mod=e2fb
Economists and the Powerful: Convenient Theories, Distorted Facts,
Ample Rewards
http://www.amazon.com/Economists-Powerful-Convenient-Distorted-ebook/dp/B009K44OW2
"Inside Job" references how leading economists were captured similar
to the capture of the regulatory agencies.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inside_Job_(2010_film)

"The Undoing Project" goes into some detail how Kahneman and Tversky
disproved economists' assumptions. Kahneman (a psychologist) gets
Nobel prize in economics, in part for debunking some cherished
economic theories

1992 AMEX spins off much of its mainframe dataprocessing outsourcing
business in the largest IPO up until that time as FDC. In the late
90s, FDC as part of merger, acquires ailing Western Union (and has to
spin off MoneyGram). However after the start of the century, there is
an enormous explosion in the number of illegal workers being brought
across the border, and WU revenue also starts exploding. by 2005, the
(ailing) WU had become half FDC total bottom line (from the recent
huge explosion in the influx of illegal workers). President of Mexico
invites the FDC executives to Mexico to be thrown in jail (for the
explosion in the money WU is making off of sending payments home)
... likely contributing to spinning off of WU in 2005. KKR then does
the largest (up until that time) private-equity reverse-IPO take-over
of FDC (15yrs after being the largest IPO).

this is account on some changes in large corporate lobbying that
happened around the turn of the century.
https://www.amazon.com/Influence-Machine-Commerce-Corporate-American-ebook/dp/B00NDTUDHA/

note before the turn of the century, congress requested GAO reports on
illegal immigrants and workers. sometimes what you don't see is as
important as what you see ... I've been unable to find such reports
since the turn of the century

inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality
economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
Fiscal Responsibility Act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act
regulatory capture posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#regulatory.capture
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity
MICC posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Pentagon Would Ban Contractors That Don't Protect Data

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Pentagon Would Ban Contractors That Don't Protect Data
Date: 31 July 2017
Blog: Facebook

Pentagon Would Ban Contractors That Don't Protect Data
http://www.realcleardefense.com/articles/2017/07/31/pentagon_would_ban_contractors_that_dont_protect_data_111923.html

We were brought in to help word smith some cal. state
legislation. They were working on electronic signature, but also data
breach notificaiton, and "opt-in" personal information sharing. They
had done detailed consumer/public surveys on privacy issues. Number
one was fraudulent financial transactions as a result of breaches and
there was little or nothing being done. The issue is that normally
entities take security measures in self protection. The issue in these
cases was that the institution wasn't at risk but other entities,
frequently the public. The hope was that the publicity as a result of
the notification would prompt corrective action. Note since the
(original) cal. state legislation, there has been a dozen or so
federal bills introduced (none yet passed), about evenly divided
between those similar to the cal. state legislation and those that
would effectively eliminate notification requirements. This battle has
been going on for 20yrs now.

data breach notification posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#data.breach.notification

trivia: we were brought in as consultants to small client/server
startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server, they
had also invented this technology they called "SSL" they wanted to
use, the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". I had
complete authority for the server to gateway to payment networks but
could only make recommendations on the server to client side (some of
which were almost immediately violated that continue to account for
exploits).

the majority of breaches involve attacks on financial infrastructure
(for fraudulent transactions) and somewhat from having been involved
in electronic commerce ... we then get invited to participate in x9a10
financial standard working group which had been given the requirement
to preserve the integrity of the financial infrastructure for all
retail payments. We do detailed end-to-end reviews of different retail
payments. A couple metaphors;

security proportional to risk: the value of previous financial
transaction information to the (defenders) merchant is the profit on
the transaction (possibly a couple dollars) and to the transaction
processor a couple cents. The value to the (attackers) crooks is the
credit limit and/or account balance (hundreds to thousands of
dollars). As a result the attackers may be able to outspend the
defenders by two orders of magnitude.

security proportional to risk posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#security.proportional.to.risk

dual-use: the information from transactions needs to be readily
available for dozens of business processes at millions of locations
around the world. at the same time the information from transactions
is used for authentication and needs to be kept completely
confidential and never divulged. I've periodically claimed that even
if the planet was buried by miles of information hiding encryption, it
still wouldn't stop information leakage.

as a result, we did a financial standard (still to be deployed) that
slightly tweaks the current infrastructure eliminating being able to
use information from previous transactions for fraudulent transactions
(aka dual use, form of replay attack). Also eliminates major use of
SSL hiding financial transaction information.

reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#x959
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html#aads

other trivia: last decade there was enormous uptic in outsourcing to
for-profit companies, frequently to private-equity subsidiaries that
are under intense pressure to cut corners to generate revenue for
their parents any way possible ... 70% of intelligence budget and over
half the people
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

in the wake of Snowden, they found that for-profit subsidiaries doing
security clearances were filling out paperwork, but not actually doing
background checks. also accelerated the growing success of failure
culture ... where they find they make more money from a series of
failures:
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

another example: OPM Contractor's Parent Firm Has a Troubled History
https://theintercept.com/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas/

success of failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
private equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

in the late 90s, I would semi-facetiously claim that I would take a
$500 milspec part, aggressively cost reduce by more than two orders of
magnitude, while making it more secure ... including on panel in
standing room only ballroom
http://csrc.nist.gov/nissc/1998/index.html

eliminating information hiding encryption appealed to one part of the
agency (at ft. meade) ... but the agency was more ambivalent about
security that can't be hacked, one part didn't like it ... but it
appealed more to the information assurance directorate. I also got
into dustup with GSA over the chips used in CAC-card. People would
complain about how much security cost and then if I eliminated all
cost, they would then complain there was no motivation. Once had a
session with former agency director (working for beltway bandit) on
super security ... and the meeting ended when they said they couldn't
figure out how to make any money from it.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The original Adventure / Adventureland game?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The original Adventure / Adventureland game?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2017 12:02:41 -0700

Charles Richmond <numerist@aquaporin4.com> writes:

You are thinking of Zork.  Zork was written in a LISP dialect called
MDL (alias MUDDLE).  Colossal Cave Adventure (once known as Crowther
and Woods Adventure) was written in FORTRAN in the beginning.  Of
course, ports to C followed in a few years.

Zork was translated to FORTRAN by Bob Supnik and his version (which
had the same puzzles until almost the last Zork version additions) was
called DUNGEON.

i first ran into fortran vm/cms copy at TYMSHARE in the late 70s,
TYMSHARE had got fortran copy from Stanford PDP10 ... and ported to
vm/cms. I made executable available on the internal network ... and
would send source to people that showed that they got all points. Almost
immediately PLI versions appearing with more points.

other TYMSHARE trivia ... TYMSHARE had made their CMS-based online
computer conferencing system available to (IBM user group) SHARE
for free as VMSHARE starting in Aug1976 ... archives here
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare

I had deal with TYMSHARE to get monthly tape copy dump of all VMSHARE
files for putting up on internal datacenters and internal network ...
biggest problem I had was with IBM lawyers who were concerned that
IBM employees would be contaminated by customer information.

recent "Adventure" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#100 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#0 Ironic old "fortune"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#65 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#66 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#34 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#67 Explore the groundbreaking Colossal Cave Adventure, 41 years on
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#62 Play the Pentagon-Funded Video Game That Predates Pong

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What is missing?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What is missing?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Aug 2017 08:56:32 -0700

Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:

Except that the "Wordstar diamond" for cursor control was ^S ^D ^E ^X
(and other keys radiating out from that center point). The movement
keys were on the left side of the keyboard.

My terminal (an ADM31A) needed an aftermarket PROM to make the arrow
keys work in Wordstar.

i had 2741 at home mar1970 to summer 1977, which was replaced with 300
baud CDI miniterm 1977-1979, and then was replaced with 1200 baud
(early) IBM 3101 (topaz) glass teletype. old email about 3101 (including
burning new proms to support "block mode" ... sort of partial 3270)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html/email791011
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html/email791011b
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html/email800301
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html/email800311
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html/email800312
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html/email800314
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html/email810820

in these posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#0 Why so little parallelism?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#4 Why so little parallelism?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006y.html#31 "The Elements of Programming Style"

old picture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/home3101.jpg
home 3101

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What the Enron E-mails Say About Us

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: What the Enron E-mails Say About Us
Date: 01 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

What the Enron E-mails Say About Us
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/07/24/what-the-enron-e-mails-say-about-us

enron posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron

#2 on time's list of those responsible for economic mess
http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1877351_1877350_1877330,00.html

economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess

#2 responsible for GLBA and repeal of Glass-Steagall ... but got
ranking for law to prevent regulation of CDS (gambling bets,
originally billed as favor for ENRON). The head of CFTC proposed
regulating CDS gambling bets and was quickly replaced by #2's wife.

Gramm and the 'Enron Loophole'
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/17/business/17grammside.html

Enron was a major contributor to Mr. Gramm's political campaigns, and
Mr. Gramm's wife, Wendy, served on the Enron board, which she joined
after stepping down as chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading
Commission.

... snip ...

Phil Gramm's Enron Favor .. gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine
https://web.archive.org/web/20080711114839/http://www.villagevoice.com/2002-01-15/news/phil-gramm-s-enron-favor/

A few days after she got the ball rolling on the exemption, Wendy
Gramm resigned from the commission. Enron soon appointed her to its
board of directors, where she served on the audit committee, which
oversees the inner financial workings of the corporation. For this,
the company paid her between $915,000 and $1.85 million in stocks and
dividends, as much as $50,000 in annual salary, and $176,000 in
attendance fees

... snip ...

"Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of
the Radical Right" loc:2953-55:

The most fateful Mercatus Center hire might have been Wendy Gramm, an
economist and director at the giant Texas energy company Enron who was
the wife of Senator Phil Gramm, the powerful Texas Republican. In the
mid-1990s, she became the head of Mercatus's Regulatory Studies
Program.

loc2955-57:

There, she pushed Congress to support what came to be known as the
Enron Loophole, exempting the type of energy derivatives from which
Enron profited from regulatory oversight. Both Enron and Koch
Industries, which also was a major trader of derivatives, lobbied
desperately for the loophole.

loc2958-59:

Some experts foresaw danger. In 1998, Brooksley Born, chair of the
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, warned that the lucrative but
risky derivatives market needed more government oversight.

loc2959-61:

But Senator Gramm, who chaired the Senate Banking Committee, ignored
such warnings, crafting a deregulatory bill made to order for Enron
and Koch, called the Commodity Futures Modernization Act.

... snip ...

regulatory capture posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#regulatory.capture

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The original Adventure / Adventureland game?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: The original Adventure / Adventureland game?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 01 Aug 2017 14:11:55 -0700

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#11 The original Adventure / Adventureland game?

from a (updated PLI) data file (with duplicates removed):

You are in a little maze of twisting passages, all different.
You are in a little maze of twisty passages, all different.
You are in a little twisty maze of passages, all different.
You are in a maze of little twisting passages, all different.
You are in a maze of little twisty passages, all different.
You are in a maze of twisting little passages, all different.
You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike.
You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all different.
You are in a twisting little maze of passages, all different.
You are in a twisting maze of little passages, all different.
You are in a twisty little maze of passages, all different.
You are in a twisty maze of little passages, all different.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS
Date: 01 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes;
The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a
shadily acquired MS-DOS.
https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/07/ibm-pc-history-part-2/

...before ms/dos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS-DOS
there was seattle computer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Computer_Products
before seattle computer there was cp/m,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/M
before doing cp/m, kildall worked with cp/67 (precursor to vm370)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/CMS
at npg school
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Postgraduate_School

posts mentioning CP/M
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#82 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#12 Rolander, Tom oral history (DRI, CPM, etc)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#81 GREAT presentation on the history of the mainframe
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#0 IBM & SABRE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#39 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#2 NPS, Gary A. Kildall Conference Room Dedication Ceremony, 21April2017
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#82 does linux scatter daemons on multicore CPU?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#88 IBM Story
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#20 Programmers Who Use Spaces Paid More
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#72 Mannix "computer in a briefcase"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#84 Mannix "computer in a briefcase"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#95 Hard Drives Started Out as Massive Machines That Were Rented by the Month

3270 terminal emulation helped with early uptake of IBM/PC ... however
later, the communication group was trying to prevent it doing anything
else, trying to maintain status quo and blocking any change
.... periodically reposted:

late 80s, a senior disk engineer gets a talk scheduled at internal
annual world-wide communication group conference supposedly on 3174
performance ... but opens the talk with the statement that the
communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the
disk division. The issue was that the communication group had
stanglehold on datacenters with strategic responsibility for
everything that crossed the datacenter walls and was fiercely fighting
off client/server and distributed computing, trying to preserve their
(emulated) dumb terminal paradigm and install base. The disk division
was seeing data fleeing the data center to more distributed computing
friendly platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come
up with several solutions to address the problem but they were
constantly being vetoed by the communication group. A few short years
later the company has gone into the red.

terminal emulation past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

along with way, 3270 terminal support involved coax cables (for every
terminal) running from datacenter all over bldgs ... and the weight of
3270 coax was starting to exceed bldg weight loading limits. This
could be considered some of the motivation for Token-Ring (cat-5 and
hierarchy of MAUs spread around bldgs). However, communication group
attempts to strangle distributed computing and client/server involved
crippled the cards. AIX Unix group had done their own PC/RT AT-bus
4mbit token-ring card ... but the group was prohibited from doing
their own RS/6000 microchannel cards. The PC/RT 4mbit T/R card, had
higher per card throughput than the microchannel 16mbit T/R cards
... i.e. part of trying to preserve the dumb terminal paradigm was
16mbit T/R cards had design point of 300+ stations sharing common
bandwidth. New Almaden Research bldg. had been extensively wired with
CAT5 for 16mbit T/R. However, they found that $69 10mbit ethernet
cards had higher per card throughput than $800 16mbit T/R cards
.... and 10mbit ethernet lans had lower latency and higher effective
aggregate throughput than 16mbit T/R lans.

801/risc, pc/rt, rs/6000, etc posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM RAS

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM RAS
Date: 02 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

When I transferred to san jose they let me wander around, plant site,
disk development, stl, dbms development, HONE, numerous customers,
etc. Disk development had a number of mainframes, prescheduled 7x24
stand alone, for development testing. They had recently tried MVS
... but it had 15min MTBF in this environment, requiring reboot. I
offerred to rewrite input/output supervisor so it would be bullet
proof and never fail, allowing on-demand, anytime concurrent testing,
greatly improving productivity. I write an internal only report on the
work and happen to mentiong the MVS 15min MTBF, bringing down the
wrath of the MVS group on my head. I get a call from MVS group
... expecting that they wanted help doing something similar for the
MVS product ... but it turns out they want to know my managers
name. Turns out they were looking to separate me from the IBM company,
when that wouldn't work ... they then were looking to make my stay at
IBM as unpleasant as possible. past posts geting to play disk engineer
in bldgs 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

I slightly get revenge on the MVS group (no intention of helping
them), when 3380 disks are ready to ship ... FE has regression test
buckets of likely 3380 problems. MVS is still hanging/failing for all
cases (requiring re-IPL), and in 2/3rds of the cases, no indication of
what caused the failure. Old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801015

I do some work with Jim Gray on original sql/rdbms implementation
(system/r) and when he leaves IBM (for tandem), he palms off some
number of things on me (including DBMS consulting with the IMS
group). At Tandem, Gray studies how systems fail and finds that
hardware has increasingly become reliable and majority of system
outages have become software, human mistakes, and
environmental/disasters. Summary of his findings from 1984:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

Later we are doing IBM's HA/CMP (high availability, cluster
multi-processor) including cluster scaleup and are doing our own
detailed studies of how systems fail ... some old posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp
old post specifically about Jan1992 meeting in ellison's conference
room on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
and related old email from the period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

I coin the terms disaster survivabilty and geographic survivability
when I'm out marketing HA/CMP to customers. I'm then asked to write a
section for the corporate continuous availability strategy document
... however it gets pulled when both Rochester (AS/400) and POK
(mainframe) complain that they can't meet the requirements. some posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

shortly after the Ellison's conference room meeting, the cluster
scaleup work is transferred to Kingston, announced as IBM
supercomputer and we are told we can't work on anything with more than
four processors. We then decide to leave IBM.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 02 Aug 2017 18:22:05 -0700

hancock4 writes:

In contrast, I knew of several prestigous private colleges that
knowingly admitted more freshmen then they had room for and had
deliberate weeding-out courses.  My argument is that, at the time, the
incoming students didn't know that and got slammed hard by the tough
courses.  For instance, there were several schools where, on the first
day, the lecturer would say something like, "look at the students next
to you.  They won't be here at the end of the year."

in mid-90s we worked with some univ. that noted the dumbing down of
incoming students ... one of the largest mid-western state univ. noted
that they had to dumb down entering freshman courses 2-3 times over
period of twenty some years.

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#45 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#33 EZPass: Yes, Big Brother IS Watching You!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#125 UC-Berkeley and other 'public Ivies' in fiscal peril
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#75 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards

also state gov was effectively bankrupt (various financial engineering)
... same period the univ. had gone from something like 80+% funding from
state legislature to 11% funding from state legistlature.

on the other hand, when we were recruiting from cal. state univ., the
only 4.0 graduates we saw were foreign students from the other side of
the pacific. some past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#2 The SOB that helped IT jobs move to India is dead!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005e.html#48 Mozilla v Firefox
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006g.html#21 Taxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#45 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#51 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#57 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#55 Can outsourcing be stopped?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#20 Five great technological revolutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#18 Great Brian Arthur article on the Second Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#75 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#18 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#55 copyright protection/Doug Englebart
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#25 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014h.html#32 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#27 US Education

this has also come up in past a.f.c. discussions about state's postpone
high school graduation requiring 7th grade proficiency in math and
english ... and US OECD education ranking near the bottom of
industrialized countries.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM RAS

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM RAS
Date: 02 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#16 IBM RAS

IBM mainframe disk had a long standing problem. Turns out if power
failed in the middle of write operation, there was enough residual
power for disk&controller to finish write ... but mainframe memory was
gone ... so zeros were generated for the completion of the write along
with valid error correcting codes. Power restored, read operations
would complete with no error (even though zeros were propagated for
the remainder of the record). For os/360 flavors it would particularly
show up if VTOC was being updated at the power failure.

Original CMS wrote changed filesystem control information always to
new location and eventually updated MFD record in single write. Power
failure before the MFD write wouldn't reflect the changes ... however
if the power failure happened during the MFD write, could corrupt the
filesystem.  New CMS EDF went to a pair of MFD records where it would
alternate writes. After restart it would read both records, and figure
out both non-zero and which one is most current.

FBA (but not CKD) went to convention that it wouldn't start write of
record, unless the complete record was available to finish write. Now
there hasn't been real CKD disks made for decades ... all being
emulated on industry standard fixed-block disks ... emulation taking
advantage fixed-block characteristics.

posts mentioning CKD, VTOC, multi-track search, FBA, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dasd

2000 was brought into datacenter that had 40+ some of the IBM's
largest mainframes ... something like $30M a pop ... none ever older
than 18months .... constantly being upgraded ... number needed to
finish every day's batch settlement in overnight window ... 450K
statement Cobol application. Did some performance analysis and found
something that resulted in 14% improvement ...  would be $180M savings
in IBM mainframes ... I had originally semi-jokingly said I would do
it for 5% of savings in lieu of any other payments ... but they didn't
remember that afterwards. They had a group of something like 80 people
that had been caring and feeding for the application ... but had been
primarily myopic focus on low-level hot-spot analysis ... had missed
some higher level logic.

z900, 16 processors, 2.5BIPS (156MIPS/proc), Dec2000
z990, 32 processors, 9BIPS, (281MIPS/proc), 2003
z9, 54 processors, 18BIPS (333MIPS/proc), July2005
z10, 64 processors, 30BIPS (469MIPS/proc), Feb2008
z196, 80 processors, 50BIPS (625MIPS/proc), Jul2010
EC12, 101 processors, 75BIPS (743MIPS/proc), Aug2012
z13, 141 processors, 100BIPS (710MIPS/proc), Jan2015
z14, 170 processor, 146.5 BIPS, (862MIPS/proc), Aug2017

Trivia: that customer couldn't stand what current generation of PDUs
did in the event of power failure. They hired top engineer company and
had them redesign the major PDU product ... and give the design to
them for free. Within a year, almost every major business critical
operation was running with the new PDUs.

misc. posts mentioning PDUs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#82 write rings
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#85 Mainframe power failure (somehow morphed from Re: write rings)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#61 Where do the filesystem and RAID system belong?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#44 Calculating a Gigalapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#62 ibm icecube -- return of watercooling?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#6 how to set up a computer system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#64 Transactions for Industrial Strength Programming
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005m.html#41 IBM's mini computers--lack thereof
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#41 COTS software on box ? to replace mainframe was Re: Curious(?) way to ZIP a mainframe file
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#4 Is SUN going to become x86'ed ??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#63 Little bit OT IBM & Air NZ outage report to stay Top Secret
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#78 Software that breaks computer hardware( was:IBM 029 service manual )
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#26 EPO's (Emergency Power Off)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 03 Aug 2017 10:24:28 -0700

rpw3@rpw3.org (Rob Warnock) writes:

Reminds me of the old joke:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_phases_of_a_big_project
...
1. Enthusiasm,
2. Disillusionment,
3. Panic and hysteria,
4. Hunt for the guilty,
5. Punishment of the innocent, and
6. Reward for the uninvolved.

... and "heads roll uphill" ... a few past refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#91 Ux's good points.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#22 MS to world: Stop sending money, we have enough - was Re: Most ... can't run Vista
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#26 MS to world: Stop sending money, we have enough - was Re: Most ... can't run Vista
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#41 IBM--disposition of clock business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#15 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#54 How will mainframers retiring be different from Y2K?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Military Contractors

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Military Contractors
Date: 03 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

private equity parents have lots of leverage ... both OPM & DynCORP here
https://theintercept.com/2015/06/24/opm-contractor-veritas/
there was huge uptic in outsourcing to for-profit corporations last
decade, frequently with private equity parents with lots of political
juice ... intelligence 70% of the budget and over half the people
(including Snowden's employer)
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/
accelerating the rapidly spreading success of failure culture
... where they make a lot more money off a series of failures
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

private-equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity
success of failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure

son-in-law fallujah 2004-2005 and then back again baqubah 2007-2008
... worse than fallujah. this account has part of the reason was that
iraqi fighters continued to learn between fallujah and baqubah while
US rotated in and out.
https://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-Killing-Our-Way-ebook/dp/B007VBBS9I/

"The author takes the reader into the midst of the conflict in and
around Baqubah--Iraq's 'City of Death'--a campaign that lasted most of
2007. The author and his fellow Bonecrushers watched as the city went
from sectarian fighting amongst the Shiite and Sunnis, to an all-out
jihad against the undermanned and dangerously dispersed US forces
within Baqubah and the outlying areas."

... snip ...

GAO $60B airlifted pallets of shrink wrapped $100 bills disappear into
iraq ... lots of it as part of surge for bribes and tribute in various
areas to reduce conflict (although huge amounts skimmed along the way)
... right out of Roman Empire.

Original justification for Iraq invasion was Iraq supported Al-Queda
and it would only cost $50B, it then morphs into WMDs. Cousin of White
House Chief of Staff Card was dealing with Iraq in the UN and given
proof that the WMDs (tracing back to US in the Iran/Iraq war)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war
had been decommissioned, shared with cousin Card and others in White
House and then locked up in military hospital.
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/
The decommissioned WMDs were found early in the invasion, but
information classified until fall 2014 (four years after book was
published).
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html

WMD posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmds

Military-industrial-Complex wanted Iraq invasion so badly that
corporate reps were telling former eastern block countries that if
they voted for the invasion in the UN, they would get membership in
NATO and (directed appropriation) USAID (could only be used for
purchase of US arms).
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

MICC posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM ... the rise and fall

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM ... the rise and fall
Date: 04 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

1995 ... the rise and fall
https://www.ecole.org/en/session/49-the-rise-and-fall-of-ibm

there was the communication group fiercely fighting off client/server
and distributed computing trying to preserve their dumb terminal
paradigm and install base. in late 80s, a senior disk engineer got
talk scheduled at annual worldwide internal communication group
conference (supposedly on 3174 performance) and started out saying
that the communication group was going to be responsible for the
demise of the disk division ... the disk division was seeing data
fleeing datacenters to more distributed computing friendly platforms
with a drop in disk sales The disk division had come up with a number
of solutions but were constantly being vetoed by communication group
(communication group had corporate strategic responsibility for
everything that crossed datacenter walls). A few short years later,
IBM has gone into the red.

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#termainl

my wife had included 3-tier (middle-layer) in response to gov. request
for super secure, distributed computing campus environment. we then
included that in customer executive presentations ... mainframe,
middle-layer, clients ... and were taking arrows in the back and lots
of FUD from communication group, SAA people, and token-ring people.

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#3tier

In the early 90s (before we left), we would periodically drop by
Somers and talk to various people about what needed to be changed in
the IBM company; there were lots of people (many with 30+ yrs
experience) who could clearly articulate what needed to be done. We
would go back a couple months later and nothing had changed. We
hypothesized that any major change would devalue life-long IBMers'
experience ... and in self-interest, they were hoping to preserve the
status quo and delay major changes until after they retired. Somebody
that I had done a lot of work with in the 70s, was made head of SAA
and got a large, top-floor corner office in Somers. We would also stop
by his office and complain about some of what his SAA people were
doing.

past posts mentioning Somers:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000f.html#5 IBM Somers NY facility?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#66 Toyota Beats GM in Global Production
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#34 IBM Poughkeepsie?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#67 I would like to understand the professional job market in US. Is it shrinking?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#55 Handling multicore CPUs; what the competition is thinking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010g.html#29 someone smarter than Dave Cutler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#79 I actually miss working at IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#50 Having left IBM, seem to be reminded that IBM is not the same IBM I had joined
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#64 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#57 How will mainframers retiring be different from Y2K?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#36 CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#41 World Wide Web turns 25 years old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#40 Could this be the wrongest prediction of all time?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#80 IBM Sells Somers Site for $31.75 million
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#81 IBM Sells Somers Site for $31.75 million

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: book: "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT:  book:  "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 04 Aug 2017 13:34:42 -0700

Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

How GE, GM, Coca-Cola And Kodak Put Shareholders Ahead Of Employees
https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2017/06/29/how-ge-gm-coca-cola-kodak-put-shareholders-ahead-of-employees/
from here
http://www.epi.org/productivity-pay-gap/

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#1 OT:  book:  "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"

Mega-Banks Blow 100% of Earnings on Share-Buybacks & Dividends, Crimp
Lending, Constrain Economy
http://wolfstreet.com/2017/08/02/share-buybacks-dividends-eat-100-of-bank-earnings-crimp-lending-constrain-economy-fdics-hoenig-to-senate/

this is subject that comes up frequently in IBM employee discussions,
since stock-buybacks now permeate most large corporations.

Stockman's "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism"
https://www.amazon.com/Great-Deformation-Corruption-Capitalism-America-ebook/dp/B00B3M3UK6/

pg464/loc9995-10000:

IBM was not the born-again growth machine trumpeted by the mob of Wall
Street momo traders. It was actually a stock buyback contraption on
steroids. During the five years ending in fiscal 2011, the company spent
a staggering $67 billion repurchasing its own shares, a figure that was
equal to 100 percent of its net income.

pg465/10014-17:

Total shareholder distributions, including dividends, amounted to $82
billion, or 122 percent, of net income over this five-year
period. Likewise, during the last five years IBM spent less on capital
investment than its depreciation and amortization charges, and also
shrank its constant dollar spending for research and development by
nearly 2 percent annually.

... snip ... aka top executives bonus plan tied to stock market.

IBM: Financial Engineering 101 Says This Is Bad
http://seekingalpha.com/article/2608915-ibm-financial-engineering-101-says-this-is-bad
Why the "Maximizing Shareholder Value" Theory of Corporate Governance is
Bogus
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/10/why-the-maximizing-shareholder-value-theory-of-corporate-governance-is-bogus.html

stock-buyback posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#stock.buyback
inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality
"Too Big To Fail" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

This Is How The US Government Destroys The Lives Of Patriotic Whistleblowers

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: This Is How The US Government Destroys The Lives Of Patriotic Whistleblowers
Date: 04 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

This Is How The US Government Destroys The Lives Of Patriotic
Whistleblowers
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-12-23/how-us-government-destroys-lives-patriotic-whistleblowers

Boyd told story that when SECDEF couldn't get Chuck and him thrown in
Leavenworth for the rest of their lives (behind paywall, but mostly
lives free at wayback machine) ... SECDEF created new security
classification, "NOSPIN" (unclassified but not to be given to Chuck)
http://web.archive.org/web/20070320170523/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953733,00.html

there is a joke in Washington that the highest security classification
is "downright embarrassing" (usually nothing to do with national
security, but individual careers).

somewhat related, enormous outsourcing to for-profit companies,
intelligence 70% of budget and over half the people
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

We didn't know it at the time, but we were possibly involved on the
periphery. In 2002 the agency released IC-ARDA (since renamed IARPA)
unclassified BAA that basically said none of the tools that the agency
had did the job. Just before closing, we got a call asking us to
respond. We quickly got in response and then had a number of meetings
showing we could do what was needed ... and then nothing. It wasn't
until this series that we had any idea of what might be going on, more
profit from a series of failures.
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

Former CIA Analyst Sues Defense Department to Vindicate NSA
Whistleblowers
https://theintercept.com/2017/02/10/former-cia-analyst-sues-defense-department-to-vindicate-nsa-whistleblowers/

"Loomis says he thinks those redactions were more for the sake of
Hayden's reputation than protecting real classified information. He
eventually documented the saga in a self-published book called 'NSAs
Transformation: An Executive Branch Black Eye.'"

...snip ...

Thomas Drake
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/government-elections-politics/united-states-of-secrets/the-frontline-interview-thomas-drake/
ThinThread
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ThinThread

Success Of Failure posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#success.of.failure
whistleblower posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#whistleblower

posts mentioning Boyd and/or OODA-loop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
Virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Aug 2017 11:49:28 -0700

Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:

We also pay low sums of money to the people who educate us, feed
us, nurse us and do all the dirty, smelly jobs that nobody really wants to
do. There are minimum wage jobs you couldn't pay me enough to do.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#17 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#19 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

claim is that wallstreet financial tripled in size (as percent of GDP)
during economic mess for destroying the economy. they did over $27T in
toxic CDOs 2001-2008, largely because of the ability to pay for
triple-A. the triple-A rating eliminated any reason that lenders had to
care about borrower's qualifications and/or loan quality ... since they
could sell them off as fast as they could be made (including to
operations restricted to dealing in "safe" investments, like large
pension funds).

Also wallstreet bonuses quadrupled during economic mess (enormous
amounts being skimmed off the transactions; NY state comptroller
published aggregate went from $8B/yr to $33B/yr by 2006, 2002:$9.8B,
2003:$15.8B, 2004:$18.6B, 2005:$25.2B, 2006:$33.9B, 2007:$33.2B)

Late 90s, FDC (transaction processor for over half payment cards in the
US, for many banks everything totally outsourced to FDC) had acquired
the ailing Western Union (in merger with First Financial). After the
start of the century, there was enormous explosion in large companies
bringing in illegal workers ... and WU saw corresponding explosion in
their revenue off illegal workers sending payments home. Just between
start of the century and 2005, WU revenue exploded until it was half of
FDC bottom line. 2005 FDC spins off WU, possibly in part because
president of Mexico had invited FDC executives to Mexico to be thrown in
jail (for the huge amounts that WU was making off the illegal
workers). Also, explosion in illegal workers brought in the first half
of last decade, created significant downward pressure on wages.

Triple-A ratings eliminate any reason that lenders had to care about
loans and/or borrowers. Then wallstreet started making securitized
mortgages designed to fail, pay for triple-A, sell to their customers,
and take out CDS gambling bets that they would fail (creating enormous
demand for dodgy mortgages, now they cared about loan quality, but not
as one might expect).

The largest holder of these CDS gambling bets was AIG and was
negotiating to pay off at 50cents on the dollar when the SECTREAS steps
in and has them sign document that they can't sue those making the CDS
gambling bets and to take TARP funds to pay off at face value.  The
largest recipient of TARP funds is AIG and the largest recipient of face
value payoffs is the firm formally headed by SECTREAS; possibly the
original motivation for TARP funds ... even tho the original claim was
to purchase off-book toxic assets ("troubled asset relief program"),
however just the four largest TBTF were carrying $5.2T at the end of
2008, and only $700B was appropriated for TARP. The "real" program was
done behind the scenes by federal reserve buying trillions in off-book
toxic assets at 98cents on the dollar and providing tens of trillions in
ZIRP funds.

economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
triple-A rated toxic CDO posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo
"Too Big To Fail" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
inequality posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#inequality
ZIRP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 05 Aug 2017 13:50:55 -0700

hancock4 writes:

In his later years, Henry Ford's leadership almost ruined the
company.  Things got so bad that even his wife voted against
him, forcing him to finally retire and allow for changes.  Ford
was dead set against stopping the Model T even though the competition
had developed better cars.  He then was dead set against stopping
the Model A, again despite the competition.

in the 80s & 90s ... lots of large companies started creating
subsidiries to which they shifted profit away from parts of the
businesses that employed lots of people. airlines shifted profit to
separate (computerized) ticketing subsidiary ...  airline operations
could show a loss (which could be leveraged against the unions) while
ticket subsidiary showed significant profit ... totally offsetting
airline operation losses ... so that the parent company still showed
significant profit.

autos had shifted much of the profit to loans and other financial
operations. there is story that ford's financial arm was making 90% of
ford's parent company profit and around turn of the century the CFO
sells off the financial arm ... the explanation was that the CFO was
about to retire ... and basically got commission on the sale (no longer
cares that he is unloading ford's profit making).

also after the run of the century, congress makes it much easier to
offshore money. posterchild is large equipment maker that creates its
(distributership) profit subsidiary in Luxenbourg.
https://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks

previously equipment was made, sold and delivered in the US. then
equipment is made in the us, sold at cost to the luxembourg
"distributership", which sells at profit in the US (and shipped directly
from US plant to US customers) ... with all the profit being booked in
Luxembourg ... for which there is extremely attractive tax rate.

2002, Congress lets the fiscal responsibility act lapse (spending can't
exceed tax revenue, on its way to eliminating all federal debt). 2010,
CBO report that 2003-2009, taxes were reduced by $6T and spending
increased by $6T for $12T gap compared to fiscal responsibility budget
(first time congress cuts taxes to not pay for two wars). Since then
taxes not restored and only modest cuts in spending so debt continues to
increase. Supposedly confluence of interests, 1) federal reserve and
wallstreet wanting huge federal debt, 2) wallstreet and special
interests wanting huge tax cuts, and 3) miltiary-industrial complex
wanting huge spending increase (and "perpetual war").

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#17 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#19 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#24 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

Suggested motivation behind huge federal debt by federal reserve and
wallstreet, was TBTF were using the tens of trillions in ZIRP funds to
buy treasuries ... averaging $300B/year off the spread between ZIRP
funds and treasuries (only works if there is enormous federal debt).

tax evasion, avoidance, havens posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.htmL#tax.evasion
fiscal responsibility act posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act
military-industrial(-congressional) complex posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
perpetual war posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war
economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
ZIRP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS
Date: 05 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#15 The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes; The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS

IBM (mid-range) 4331/4341 late 70s dropped below some cost
threashold. 4300 competed against DEC VAX in the mid-range market and
sold about the same numbers in single unit orders. However, large
corporations were also buying 4300s in multiple hundreds at a time,
for placing out in departmental areas ... leading edge of the coming
distributed computing tsunami. I'm involved in some of the distributed
computing support but was also got con'ed into doing benchmarks on
engineering 4341 (before product ship) for LLNL that was looking at
getting 70 of them for compute farm ... low space & environmentals for
departmental areas ... but could pack huge number in traditional
datacenter. Some old 4300 email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#4341
old post with late 70s LLNL benchmarks ... leading edge of cluster
supercomputers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#0

4361/4381 were 4331/4341 followons and expected to continue to see
explosion in sales ... however by that time, mid-range market was
starting to move to workstations and large PCs. This can be seen in
this decade of VAX numbers ... sales sliced&diced by year, model,
US/non-us
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#0
in the late 80s we started doing IBM's HA/CMP product ... past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp
and also working on cluster scaleup ... this is old post about Jan1992
meeting in Ellison's conference room on commercial cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
.... but we were also working with national labs on
technical/scientific (supercomputer) cluster scaleup ... some old
email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa
within a few weeks of the Ellison meeting, the cluster scaleup was
transferred, announced as IBM supercomputer (for technical/scientific
*ONLY*) and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than
four processors. We then decide to leave.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Aug 2017 11:09:13 -0700

Dan Espen <dan1espen@gmail.com> writes:

I found places that separated the analysis and programmer functions toxic.

Once and a while I happened on someone that could do analysis but not
programming, but that was pretty rare and I only saw simple stuff
done by those analysts.

Always was a programmer/analyst myself and wouldn't have it any other
way.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#17 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#19 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#24 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#25 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

I've known analysts that were akin to software engineers and viewed
programming as hard work and therefor menial.

... from "real programmers" reposted here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#31

Real Programmers never work 9 to 5.  If any Real Programmers are
around at 9 AM, it's because they were up all night.

... in part because (real) programming can require intense concentration
w/o distractions

same post also includes "real software engineers".

somewhat related:

Google got it wrong. The open-office trend is destroying the workplace.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2014/12/30/google-got-it-wrong-the-open-office-trend-is-destroying-the-workplace/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Stop Romanticizing Glass-Steagall

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Stop Romanticizing Glass-Steagall
Date: 06 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

Stop Romanticizing Glass-Steagall
https://www.americanbanker.com/opinion/stop-romanticizing-glass-steagall

Jan2009 I was asked to html'ize the Pecora heargings (30s senate
hearings resulting in Glass-Steagall, had been scanned the fall2008 at
Boston Public library) with lots of internal cross-links and URLs
between what happened then and what happened this time; some
anticipation that new congress would have appetite to do
something. After working on it for some time, got a call that it
wouldn't be needed after all (references to enormous piles of
wallstreet money showing up on capital hill). Start of the century
(before too-big-to-fail had really permeated), I was asked to evaluate
a periodic industry publication that gave numbers for several
thousands measures ... avg. of largest regional banks compared to avg
of the national banks (on their way to being too-big-to-fail). The
regional banks were slightly more profitable than the national
... already indicating that they were too-big-to-be-efficient (major
motivation seems top executive compensation proportional to size of
organization, not profitability ... one of the reasons they changed
the name to "retention bonuses")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

They would have to have cooperation of Federal Reserve, FDIC, SEC, etc
in calculating risk adjusted capital. Glass-Steagall was to keep
regulated "safe" depository institutions separate from investment
banks (where nobody cared about their risky behavior and would let
them fail). One of the gimmicks was to move the risky stuff off the
books just before monthly checks (for a year at Lehman, they had
regulators sitting on site watching them do it, aka "regulatory
capture")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#regulatory.capture

Very early in the century, somebody at NYFED had added new
"qualitative" section to BASEL2 draft (in addition to traditional
quantitative calculation for risk adjusted capital). We were asked in
to discuss how to implement qualitative risk adjusted
capital. However, before BASEL2 was adopted, the qualitative section
essentially disappears.

Also about the same time, I was asked to review a periodic industry
publication (before too big to fail had seriously kicked in) that
compared the avg. of ten largest regional banks with the avg. ten
largest national banks ... for thousands of financial measures. There
was no analysis ... just 60 lines per page for things like avg. cost
to perform teller transactions, etc. After some study, I was able to
show that the national banks were less efficient than the regional
banks. Conjecture that possible major motivation for national banks
were top executives were paid proportional for size of the institution
... not for how good a job they were doing. This was even before the
additional size increases enabled by repeal of Glass-Steagall which
made them even less efficient ... besides taking down the economy and
having the taxpayers foot the bill (as well as even more extensive
"regulatory capture").
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

End of 2008, just the four largest too big to fail were carrying
$5.2T (trillion) in off-book toxic assets. If the institutions were
forced to bring those assets back on the books, they would have been
declared insolvent and FDIC forced to liquidate the institutions
(earlier in the fall, they had been going for 22cents on the dollar,
they would have to book $4T losses)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Google Employee's Anti-Diversity Manifesto Goes 'Internally Viral'

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Google Employee's Anti-Diversity Manifesto Goes 'Internally Viral'
Date: 06 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

Google Employee's Anti-Diversity Manifesto Goes 'Internally Viral'
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/kzbm4a/employees-anti-diversity-manifesto-goes-internally-viral-at-google

I know the feeling. In the late 70s & early 80s, I was blamed for
online computer conferencing (precursor to social media) on the
internal network (larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the
beginning until sometime mid-80s). Folklore is when the corporate
executive committee was told about online computer conferencing (and
the interneal network), 5of6 wanted to fire me. From IBMJARGON:

Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh
of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry
middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely
distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed
dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and
also constructively criticised the way products were are
developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious
interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try
reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

CMC posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

this was even before I started sponsoring John Boyd's briefings.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Aug 2017 12:46:56 -0700

Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:

I'm usually called a software engineer (currently senior principal),
what I do is analysis, design and programming.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#27 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

as undergraduate, was hired by the univ. to be responsible for mainframe
production systems ... I was a "programmer 4".

much of my career I've was able to keep any designation off my business
card. when I was forced to have some title, I managed to have "staff
member". People in silicon valley would frequently say the only
designation worth having was "principal" (or "founder")

there have been couple state cases involving use of "software engineer"
... where term "engineer" has very specific legal meaning.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Aug 2017 16:58:58 -0700

Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:

They were originally called "interstate and defense highways." They were
claimed to have been built to speed evacuation of cities in the event of
atomic attack. Never mind that this was complete nonsense.

... the "defense" was rapidly deploy/move military. Abrams (& A10) were
counter to soviet tanks coming into europe. Abrams are so heavy that
lots of Germany's infrastructure had to be upgraded to take the Abrams
weight.

Note that weight also precludes Abrams being deployed in many areas
around the world that don't have infrastructure to support such heavy
weight.

Another Abrams problem was not designed to handle IEDs ...  they turned
out to be so vulnerable that they had to take special precautions when
taking them out for a drive in Iraq.

Some of the reason that majority of Abrams are mothballed and the
military has been fighting for years to get congress to stop building
more (that just go into stockpile)
http://security.blogs.cnn.com/2012/10/09/army-to-congress-thanks-but-no-tanks/comment-page-4/
http://www.military.com/daily-news/2014/12/18/congress-again-buys-abrams-tanks-the-army-doesnt-want.html

worlds largest Abrams stockpile/graveyard
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAQQ7kdqmlU

industry side of military-industrial complex devotes a lot of money to
making sure their money keeps flowing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

the design of highway system to handle military vehicles then spills
over into 18wheel trucking operation. subsidize "defense" highway system
by justifying for 18wheel heavy trucking industry (which takes business
from more efficient train system).

past posts that highway systems are designed to handle some number of
18wheel heavy truck ton-axle miles (ESALs) ... and that autos & light
trucks have no effect ... old thread with references to calstate road
design documents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#41 Transportation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#42 Transportation

other past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#70 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#109 Minimum Wage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#76 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#47 Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#68 Historian predicts the end of 'science superpowers'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#21 Horrid thought about Politics, President Bush, and Democrats
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#2 Overweight truckers stopped by tech checks

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Aug 2017 18:17:42 -0700

"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:

That's a bit different from our situation.  I'm not going to give you
all the boring details, but imagine a financial product that has a
lifetime of up 120 years and comes in several thousand variations,
leaving aside add- ons.  Every year the costs change.  Sometimes it's
not just the numbers but the whole structure.  Every year the payout
changes.  Every year the code base has be changed to reflect this. It
has to be tested and it has to be shown that the result is still in
compliance with applicable financial regulations.  When new products
are created they have to be integrated into the system.  The code base
goes back to the '60s--much of it was designed to fit on a machine of
that era, not to be readable or maintainable.  Comments often went in
the trash when the code was moved from cards to the tiny little tapes
that were available at the time.  The people who know the code and the
business model are retiring, someone has to take over.

i've previously pontificate about billions being spent in the 90s on
straight through processing to be run on large number of parallel
killer micros (to eliminate the bottleneck of the overnight batch
settlement that had been around since the 60s&70s) ... but they were
using some standard parallelization libraries that 100 times the
overhead of cobol batch. I (and others) pointed it out to them
... which they ignored until hit the wall in some large scale pilots
... and finally things go up in flames (100 times overhead increase
totally swamping anticipated throughput increase by moving from
mainframe cobol batch to large numbers of parallel killer micros).

decade later I was involved with group that had done work on
high-level business rule specification that generated low-level
fine-grain SQL statements. It greatly simplified implementation and
tracking regulation changes. Also it got huge throughput by leveraging
the significantly parallelization work that had been done by RDBMS
vendors (organizings data and generating fine-grain SQL statements
... aligning with the RDBMS cluster scaleup work).

Was able to demonstrate peak (simulated) transaction processing of the
largest financial institutions on modest cluster configurations
... with lots of leftover available capacity.

We tood it to major financial organizations ... which initially saw
lots of interest ... but then hit break wall. Finally were told that
there were lots of financial executives that bore the scars from the
failed efforts in the 90s ... and it would be some time before the
industry took another run at the problem.

past posts mentioning generating fine-grain SQL statements from
high-level business rules:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#68 Now is time for banks to replace core system according to Accenture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#47 COBOL - no longer being taught - is a problem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#19 zLinux OR Linux on zEnterprise Blade Extension???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#19 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#1 Itanium at ISSCC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#8 Why are organizations sticking with mainframes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#49 US payments system failing to meet the needs of the digital economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#0 Burroughs B5000, B5500, B6500 videos
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#31 X86 server
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#35 Why is the mainframe so expensive?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#80 "Death of the mainframe"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#3 We need to talk about TED
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#90 Why do bank IT systems keep failing ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#69 Is end of mainframe near ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#78 Over in the Mainframe Experts Network LinkedIn group
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#48 Windows 10 forceful update?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#84 The mainframe is dead. Long live the mainframe!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016g.html#23 How to Fix IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#82 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#63 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#39 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to  do with computers whatsoever!)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 06 Aug 2017 22:26:59 -0700

Mike Spencer <mds@bogus.nodomain.nowhere> writes:

The Massachusetts Turnpike was built at that time, mid-50s.  I never
knew what financial, regulatory or political details made it possible
for that to become a toll road while the rest of the Interstate system
was free.

It would be nice to imagine that someone in Boston turned up a
crumbling document chartering a Massachusetts Bay Colony Turnpike
Company in sixteen-ninety-mumble that was judged still valid and in
force. :-)

When I graduated and drove cross-country in the winter to join the
science center ... I made observation that mass pike was worse road than
mountain county roads in idaho & montana ... that had lots of frost
heaves ... made references that they didn't actually prepare the road
bed (requires something like 6ft in areas subject to frost heaves). I
was told by Mass. residents that way the highway industry got paid to
repair it every year. I also made references about water soluable
asphalt ... again I was told that way the highway industry got paid to
repair it every year. They then pointed out that US Fed. secretary of
transportation was from the mass. state highway industry.

later there was work on completing (elevated) I93 that merged with
Highway one just before tobin bridge. Multiple lane highway one traffic
coming in from the left, crossing tobin bridge and continuing
right. Multiple lane I93 traffic coming in from the right, crossing
tobin bridge and continuing left .... interstate highway standard have
minimum posted speed requirements, however highspeed X-pattern crossing
small number of tobin bridge lanes would be constant traffic crashes. It
was admitted that somebody made horrible design goof ... but if they
terminated the contract, the state would have to pay something like $30M
penalty to the contractor. If they allowed the construction to be
completed, the federal gov. would pay majority and only cost the state
of Mass. $5M. The posted speed had to be drastically be reduced, not
meeting interstate standards.

then there is big dig that was suppose to cost $2B and graft &
corruption increased it to $22B (with interstate system footing the
bill) ... claim by mass politicians was that federal gov. owned it to
the state of mass for economic stimulus
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Dig

somewhat akin to some southern politicians saying that federal flood
insurance funds repeated payments to the same people year after year was
federal economic stimulus funds owed those states
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#41 Where do the filesystem and RAID system belong?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#42 Where do the filesystem and RAID system belong?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009m.html#41 August 7, 1944: today is the 65th Anniversary of the Birth of the  Computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#18 other days around me
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#48 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamationmade30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#27 Federal Subsidies

posts mentioning water soluble asphalt:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#28 trains was: Al Gore and the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#27 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#12 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#79 [CM] What was your first home computer?

"Big Dig" posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003i.html#25 TGV in the USA?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#73 Cormpany sponsored insurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#41 fraying infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#56 IBM drops Power7 drain in 'Blue Waters'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#0 Urban transportation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#55 TV Big Bang 10/12/09
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#11 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#14 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#15 OT: Tax breaks to Oracle debated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#18 other days around me
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#48 'Free Unix!': The world-changing proclamationmade30yearsagotoday
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#4 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#105 only sometimes From looms to computers to looms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#27 Federal Subsidies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#72 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#6 The Profiteers: Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#57 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#79 [CM] What was your first home computer?

other posts mentioning "frost heaves" on mass pike:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#22 Roads as Runways Was: Re: BA Solves Y2K (Was: Re: Chinese Solve Y2K)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#35 pop density was: trains was: Al Gore and the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#36 pop density was: trains was: Al Gore and the Internet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#42 Transportation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#68 Killer Hard Drives - Shrapnel?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#11 Idiot drivers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#45 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#24 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#26 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#36 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#72 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#72 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#76 IMPI (System/38 / AS/400 historical)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#79 [CM] What was your first home computer?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Aug 2017 15:30:40 -0700

hancock4 writes:

I read a good bio of McN but don't recall the title.  It described how
he focused on numbers rather than substantive facts, and the numbers
were either wrong, misleading, or even lies--they gave a very
distorted view of the reality of the war.  They utterly failed to
provided the political issues, which were very significant.  Vietnam
was very different than WW II, but Mc's numbers failed to account
for that.

john foster dulles played major role in rebuilding germany's industry
and military ... 20s through early 40s, including supporting Hitler and
Nazis.

Air program got 2/3rds of total US WW2 budget ... and half of that
(1/3rd of total) went to strategic heavy bombers. Heavy strategic
bombing started out saying all the money should go to heavy bombers,
nothing else was needed ... British tried to tell them that Germany
learned the hard way the need for long range fighters ... but the US
insisted on relearning it the hard way (also). From the law of
unintended consequences, 1943 strategic bomber program needed locations
of industrial and military targets in Germany ... and it got the
coordinates and plans from wallstreet. Strategic bombing program then
was claiming that they could win the war w/o even having to invade
france.

Problem was that strategic heavy bombing had difficult time hitting
targets from 5-6miles up ... even with norden sightes. European
Campaign: Its Originas and Conduct
https://ssi.armywarcollege.edu/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1075

loc2582-85:

The bomber preparation of Omaha Beach was a total failure, and German
defenses on Omaha Beach were intact as American troops came ashore. At
Utah Beach, the bombers were a little more effective because the IXth
Bomber Command was using B-26 medium bombers. Wisely, in preparation for
supporting the invasion, maintenance crews removed Norden bombsights
from the bombers and installed the more effective low-level altitude
sights.

... snip ...

Later McNamara was LeMay's staff planning the fire bombing of German and
Japanese cities (hard to miss a while city, even from 5-6 miles up).
After the war, McNamara leaves for the auto industry, but returns as
SECDEF for Vietnam ... where Laos becomes the most bombed country in the
world (more bomb tonnage than dropped on Japan and Germany combined).
McNamara later said that LeMay had told him that if US had lost WW2, it
would have been them on trial for war crimes.

McMaster's book is very critical of the Vietnam war ... basically
advisors didn't see US could win (wasn't military issue) ... but it
would be worse position in world opinion if it didn't try.
https://www.amazon.com/Dereliction-Duty-Johnson-McNamara-Chiefs-ebook/dp/B004HW7834/

aka showing the world that gov. was willing to sacrifice tens of
thousands of American lives ... even knowing that it would be a loosing
effort ... and part of military-industrial-complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

then there is Johnson tiring of the war and willing to sign a peace
treaty ... and then had proof that Nixon was commiting treason dealing
with North Vietnam to convince them to not sign anything until after the
election.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#22 Nixon and the war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#23 Nixon and the war
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#24 Nixon and the war

Declassified LBJ Tapes Accuse Richard Nixon of Treason
http://news.slashdot.org/story/13/03/21/0331256/declassified-lbj-tapes-accuse-richard-nixon-of-treason
The Lyndon Johnson tapes: Richard Nixon's 'treason'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21768668
How Richard Nixon Sabotaged 1968 Vietnam Peace Talks to Get Elected
President
http://www.truth-out.org/progressivepicks/item/13994-how-richard-nixon-sabotaged-1968-vietnam-peace-talks-to-get-elected-president
Newly Released Secret Tapes Reveal LBJ Knew but Never Spoke Out About
Nixon's 'Treason'
http://www.thewire.com/national/2013/03/newly-released-secret-tapes-reveal-lbj-knew-never-spoke-out-about-nixons-treason/63188/
Did Nixon Commit Treason in 1968? What The New LBJ Tapes Reveal.
http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/60446
Richard Nixon at 100: not just criminal, but treasonous too
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jan/10/richard-nixon-100-criminal-traitor
Yes, Nixon Scuttled the Vietnam Peace Talks - John Aloysius Farrell
http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/06/yes-nixon-scuttled-the-vietnam-peace-talks-107623.html
Richard Nixon's long shadow
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/george-f-will-nixons-long-shadow/2014/08/06/fad8c00c-1ccb-11e4-ae54-0cfe1f974f8a_story.html
Nixon's Treason Now Acknowledged
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/08/nixons-treason-now-acknowledged.html
Fleshing Out Nixon's Vietnam 'Treason'
https://consortiumnews.com/2014/09/08/fleshing-out-nixons-vietnam-treason/
Nixon betrayal far worse than GOP Iran letter: Column
http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2015/03/10/senators-letter-doesnt-rise-to-nixons-level/24695093/
George Will Confirms Nixon's Vietnam Treason
http://www.commondreams.org/views/2014/08/12/george-will-confirms-nixons-vietnam-treason

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Aug 2017 15:42:40 -0700

GreyMaus <mausg@mail.com> writes:

"The battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton"
(supposed to be a quote from the Duke of Wellington)
I suppose that there is something about the "Eton Wall Game" on youtube.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#63 Difference between fingerspitzengefuhl and Coup d'oeil?

Elements of Military Art and Science Or, Course Of Instruction In
Strategy, Fortification, Tactics Of Battles, &C.; Embracing The Duties
Of Staff, Infantry (Henry Wager Halleck)
http://www.amazon.com/Elements-Instruction-Fortification-Embracing-ebook/dp/B002RKSO9K

... free kindle book from 1846 ... has lots & lots of minutia
... but: loc5019-20:

A rapid coup d'oeil prompt decision, active movements, are as
indispensable as sound judgment; for the general must see, and decide,
and act, all in the same instant.

... snip ...

followed by long discussion of lots of great conquerors started in
their teens; that Napoleon started as officer in his teens as did many
of his generals (and were still quite young) ... most of the
opposition was headed by generals in their 60s-80s .... does mention
that Wellington was same age as Napoleon and studied at the same
military schools in France.

more recent reference: Napoleon: A Life; pg366/loc7648-50:

It was an inspired system, originally the brainchild of Guibert and
Marshal de Saxe. 40 Napoleon employed it in almost all his coming
victories – most notably at Ulm, Jena, Friedland, Lützen, Bautzen and
Dresden – not wishing to relive the perils of Marengo where his forces
had been too widely spread.

pg366/loc7650-51:

His defeats – particularly at Aspern-Essling, Leipzig and Waterloo –
would come when he failed to employ the corps system properly.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Aug 2017 18:57:36 -0700

"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:

Profitability is the basis of free-market capitalism.  That means that ones
goods must fill a need at reasonable cost.  Cost-effectiveness leads to
such projects as the F-111 and the F-35.

boyd would say that when he was head of lightweight fighter plane design
at the pentagon ... he reviewed the early F15 design ... and would ask
whether they wanted another F111 ... he then redesigned the F15, cutting
its weight in half. An issue was the weight for swing wing pivot more
than offset any swing wing benefits. Then he was responsible for the
YF16 (which becomes the F16) and YF17 (which becomes the F18).

When he started on the YF16/F16, the forces behind the F15 tried to get
him committed to Leavenworth for the rest of his life to stop what they
felt was work on F16 which they viewed as competition (despite the fact
that Boyd had significantly improved the F15). The story was that Boyd
didn't have official approval for F16 and so his use of supercomputer
time (as part of designing F16) was theft of tens of millions in
gov. property (which would put him in leavensworth for the rest of his
life). They unleashed the auditors on him ... fortunately he had
anticipated their actions ... and the auditors never found any record of
his supercomputer use.

from recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#13 Why the Pentagon would rather hire bin Laden than Donald Vandergriff.

John Boyd's Art of War; Why our greatest military theorist only made colonel.
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/john-boyds-art-of-war/

Here too Boyd had a favorite line. He often said, 'It is not true the
Pentagon has no strategy. It has a strategy, and once you understand
what that strategy is, everything the Pentagon does makes sense. The
strategy is, don't interrupt the money flow, add to it.'

... snip ...

part of military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex
and "perpetual war"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#perpetual.war

boyd posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

Even Hugh Laurie (actor on TV House) has some understanding of MIC, he
wrote a novel about the military-industrial complex ...  he also
references Boyd and Boyd's OODA-loop in the novel. Gun Seller,
loc4605-11:

The day Alexander Woolf decided to take on the military-industrial
complex was the day everything changed. For him, for his family, for
his business. Things changed quickly, and they changed for
good. Roused from its slumber, the military-industrial complex lifted
a great, lazy paw, and swatted him away, as if he were no more than a
human being. They cancelled his existing contracts and withdrew
possible future ones. They bankrupted his suppliers, disrupted his
labour force, and investigated him for tax evasion. They bought his
company's stock in a few months and sold it in a few hours, and when
that didn't do the trick, they accused him of trading in
narcotics. They even had him thrown out of the St Regis, for not
replacing a fairway divot.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 07 Aug 2017 19:46:26 -0700

Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:

But since the responsibility of a public corporation is to their
stockholders rather than to their customers, we can probably make an
educated guess.

Why the "Maximizing Shareholder Value" Theory of Corporate
Governance is Bogus; One mantra you see regularly in the business and
popular press goes something along the lines of "the CEO and board
have a fiduciary duty to maximize shareholder value."
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/10/why-the-maximizing-shareholder-value-theory-of-corporate-governance-is-bogus.html

from above:

If you review any of the numerous guides prepared for directors of
corporations prepared by law firms and other experts, you won't find a
stipulation for them to maximize shareholder value on the list of
things they are supposed to do. It's not a legal requirement. And
there is a good reason for that.

Directors and officers, broadly speaking, have a duty of care and duty
of loyalty to the corporation. From that flow more specific
obligations under Federal and state law. But notice: those
responsibilities are to the corporation, not to shareholders in
particular.

... snip ...

and serving customers and employees can be beneficial to corporation ...
regardless of what benefits shareholders.

the issue is top executive bonus plans are increasingly tied to share
price ... executives who are only looking at the next couple years
... are increasingly not interested to do anything for the corporate
benefit ... especially if it involves stuff long after they will be
gone.

related ... stock buybacks (and dividends)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#stock.buyback

some recent refs ... including Stockman's "The Great Deformation"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#3 I Feel Old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#65 A call for revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#14 Leaked IBM email says cutting 'redundant' jobs is a 'permanent and ongoing' part of its business model
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#91 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#96 IBM Wild Ducks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#54 Why the Pursuit of Shareholder Value Kills Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#62 Big Shrink to "Hire" 25,000 in the US, as Layoffs Pile Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#93 An OODA-loop is a far-from-equilibrium, non-linear system with feedback
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#5 IBM's core business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#77 Trump delay of the 'fiduciary rule' will cost retirement savers $3.7 billion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#3 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#24 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#47 The rise and fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#97 IBM Another Disappointment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#22 OT:  book:  "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Aug 2017 09:30:15 -0700

Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

McMaster's book is very critical of the Vietnam war ... basically
advisors didn't see US could win (wasn't military issue) ... but it
would be worse position in world opinion if it didn't try.
https://www.amazon.com/Dereliction-Duty-Johnson-McNamara-Chiefs-ebook/dp/B004HW7834/

aka showing the world that gov. was willing to sacrifice tens of
thousands of American lives ... even knowing that it would be a loosing
effort ... and part of military-industrial-complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#34 Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

more recent military-industrial-complex wanted the invasion of iraq so
badly that corporate reps were telling former soviet block countries if
they voted for the invasion, they would get NATO membership and
(directed appropriation) USAID (that could only be spent on US arms).
http://www.amazon.com/Prophets-War-Lockheed-Military-Industrial-ebook/dp/B0047T86BA

Original justification for Iraq invasion was Iraq supported Al-Queda
and it would only cost $50B, it then morphs into WMDs. Cousin of White
House Chief of Staff Card was dealing with Iraq in the UN and given
proof that the WMDs ... tracing back to US in the Iran/Iraq war
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war
had been decommissioned, shared with cousin Card and others in White
House and then locked up in military hospital.
http://www.amazon.com/EXTREME-PREJUDICE-Terrifying-Story-Patriot-ebook/dp/B004HYHBK2/
The decommissioned WMDs (tracing back to US in the Iran/Iraq war) were
found early in the invasion, but information classified until fall 2014
(four years after book was published).
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html

WMD posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#wmds

trivia: there was something like $60B in pallets of shrink-wrapped $100
bills airlifted to Iraq ... lots of went to tributes & bribes to reduce
conflict during the surge (right out of the Roman Empire) ... lots of
the rest just evaporates.

Part of the fall of the Roman Empire was running out of money. They
spent loads of money in bribes and tribute for Barbarian leaders to not
fight and other large sums to hire Barbarians as mercenaries to fight
other Barbarians.
http://www.amazon.com/Fall-Roman-Empire-Barbarians-ebook/dp/B000SEI0JQ

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#22 Death From Above
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#23 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#24 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#37 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#31 Rome speaks to us. Their example can inspire us to avoid their fate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#66 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#75 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#81 Steve B sees what investors think
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#86 Can America Win Wars?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#7 OT: article on foreign outsourcing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#50 A National Infrastructure Program Is a Smart Idea We Won't Do Because We Are Dysfunctional

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Aug 2017 11:24:02 -0700

Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:

The Russkies are ramping up tank production. The Armata is all new and, I
think I have read, better than anything we have. Their latest war games are
right on the border and have Eastern Europeans, particularly in the
Baltics, nervous that they're practice for a real invasion.

I miss Morten's thoughts on this right now.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#31 Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

part of the issue was congress mandating to continue to build (obsolete)
abrams when the army doesn't want them and there are already thousands
mothballed that could be sent over ... that would be more than enough
for any major tank slugfest.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

boyd is credited with the desert storm land battle plan with the left
hook ... in lieu of schwarzkopf's frontal tank slugfest until last tank
standing. however, the abram's didn't get into position to cut off the
republican guard retreat. there have been lots of excuses why they
weren't in place ... but one of them could be that boyd didn't realize
how fragile the abrams are ... so tightly tethered to maintenance and
supply that they weren't able to move any faster than their support
organizations. past posts mentioning boyd
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

note that there were accounts of desert storm major coalition tank
battles with coalition forces taking no damage. however, the land battle
was only the last 100hrs of 43day desert storm. GAO desert storm air
effectiveness study had A10s so easily taking out so many Iraq tanks
... that the crews were walking away from them as sitting ducks.  The
tank battles with coalition forces taking no damage, don't mention
whether the Iraqi tanks had anybody home.

some of the criticsm of abrams in Iraq (including easily taken out by
IEDs) was responded with abrams were suppose to be deployed to static
artillery positions and not expect to move.

the other part is the thread about US going over in the 90s supposedly
to teach them democratic capitalism were really over there to loot the
country. From "Is Harvard Responsible for Putin"??

Fareed zakaria interview with Kissinger had running ticker at the bottom
somewhat paraphrasing Kissnger (because he was somewhat hard to
hear?). Fareed was asking Kissinger about Putin, referring to Kissinger
having 30 or so meetings with Putin. At one point Fareed said something
about clarifying what Kissinger had said (which was reflected in the
ticker at the bottom) and Kissinger said not at all ... and explained
what he met (which was not reflected in the ticker).

Kissinger somewhat indirectly referred to this theme about "Harvard
being responsible for the rise of Putin" (i.e. Russia needed strongman
to oppose the westerners that seemed intent on looting the
country). John Helmer: Convicted Fraudster Jonathan Hay, Harvard's Man
Who Wrecked Russia, Resurfaces in Ukraine
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/02/convicted-fraudster-jonathan-hay-harvards-man-who-wrecked-russia-resurfaces-in-ukraine.html

If you are unfamiliar with this fiasco, which was also the true
proximate cause of Larry Summers' ouster from Harvard, you must read an
extraordinary expose, How Harvard Lost Russia, from Institutional
Investor. I am told copies of this article were stuffed in every Harvard
faculty member's inbox the day Summers got a vote of no confidence and
resigned shortly thereafter.

... snip ...

How Harvard lost Russia; The best and brightest of America's premier
university came to Moscow in the 1990s to teach Russians how to be
capitalists. This is the inside story of how their efforts led to
scandal and disgrace.
http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/Article/1020662/How-Harvard-lost-Russia.html

Mostly, they hurt Russia and its hopes of establishing a lasting
framework for a stable Western-style capitalism, as Summers himself
acknowledged when he testified under oath in the U.S. lawsuit in
Cambridge in 2002. "The project was of enormous value," said Summers,
who by then had been installed as the president of Harvard. "Its
cessation was damaging to Russian economic reform and to the
U.S.-Russian relationship."

... snip ...

i was somewhat on the periphery of this part of discussions how to
deploy 5000 brick&morter banks (@$1M) around the country as part
of creating a democratic capitalist environment ... but that
evaporates when the rest implodes.

Things had started out well (but went down hill after the looting
efforts) .... after wall fell there was extraordinary cooperation and
program to teach Russia about capitalism, From CSPAN, talks about
extraordinary cooperation between US & Russia military in the 90s,
25th Anniversary Implementation of Nunn-Lugar Act
https://www.c-span.org/video/?419918-3/implementation-nunnlugar-ac

topic drift ... this references Summers in part responsible for
economic mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#83 How can we stop algorithms telling lies?

... but it was Rubin that was secretary of treasury and enlisted by
CITI to help with the repeal of Glass-Steagall, when repeal is
underway, Rubin resigns to become what was described as co-CEO of CITI
... and it was Rubin's protegee Summers that replaces him as secretary
of treasury.  The economic mess wasn't until the next administration
with a new/different secretary of treasury (although both Rubin and
the new secretary of treasury had previously been head of the same
wallstreet firm).

economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
Pecora Hearings and/or Glass-Steagall posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#Pecora&/orGlass-Steagall

repeal of Glass-Steagall wasn't directly related to the
economic mess ... rating agencies selling triple-A rating (on things
they knew that weren't worth triple-A), largely enabling over $27T
2001-2008 ... including being able to sell to operations restricted to
only dealing in "safe" investments (like large Pension Funds).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

repeal of Glass-Steagall did enable Too Big To
Fail and excuse for not holding them accountable ... also
enabled too big to prosecute and too big to
jail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

... not just economic mess, but also manipulating LIBOR, FOREX,
commodities, money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists,
enabling tax evasion and other criminal activity.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Aug 2017 11:39:21 -0700

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#31 Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#39 Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

there is this comparison

T-14 ARMATA (Russia) VS M1A2 ABRAMS (USA) Tank Compare
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZ8NwsO-XqE

others

US M1 (M1A2) Abrams vs Russian T-90 S - Main Battle Tank / Military
Comparison
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlegqcKpdXs
Dare to Compare --- M1A2 Abrams SEP versus K2 Black Panther!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ue8TkDpKZo
Dare to Compare --- M1A2 Abrams SEP versus Vickers Mk.VII!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFyAoOFUxSU

some more

The REAL M1 Abrams! Chapter 1: Overview
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULC0TOiZZzc

The REAL M1 Abrams! Chapter 2: Mobility (Part 1/4)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWG6Tp04Nnk
The REAL M1 Abrams! Chapter 2: Mobility (Part 2/4)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWgn7O0c4Ag
The REAL M1 Abrams! Chapter 2: Mobility (Part 3/4)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6zv8QJClBg
The REAL M1 Abrams! Chapter 2: Mobility (Part 4/4)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjhfwkQjyw4

The REAL M1 Abrams! Chapter 3: Firepower (Part 1 of 6)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nLQh-hq8XKU
The REAL M1 Abrams! Chapter 3: Firepower (Part 2 of 6)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiceFAZ9dcM

military-industrial(-congressional) complex
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#military.industrial.complex

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Aug 2017 17:26:25 -0700

usenet@only.tnx (Questor) writes:

All this is a distraction from the fact that the U.S. has one of the worst
healthcare systems among industrialized nations in terms of coverage, cost, and
results.

Private Equity Flouts State Regulations by Buying Medical Practices
https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2017/08/private-equity-flouts-state-regulations-buying-medical-practices.html

Given how state regulators did intervene in the sale of hospitals, their
complacency in the face of what in many states is an illegal practice,
that of non-MDs owning a medical practice, is surprising.

...

So private equity is doing its part to speed up this sorry trend. While
it appears to be too late to harass complicit state regulators with
letters asking them to explain why they are refusing to enforce the law,
the possibility of single payer represents an even bigger monkey wrench
to private equity's exit plans.

... snip ...

... i.e. not just insurance industry threatened by single payer.

some past reference mentioning private equity getting into health,
hospital, clinics, dental, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#17 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#100 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#106 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#107 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#18 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#42 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#30 HP splits, again
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#70 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#9 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#65 A call for revolution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#63 GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#97 In American Towns, Private Profits From Public Works
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#110 The top 50 hospitals that gouge patients the most
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#99 United Air Lines - an OODA-loop perspective

posts mentioning private-equity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

past posts mentioning MBA destroying corporations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#77 search engine history, was Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#57 rebuild 1403 printer chain
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#89 Difference between MVS and z / OS systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#15 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#61 Decimation of the valuation of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#94 Systems thinking--still in short supply
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#89 China builds world's most powerful computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#85 US vs German Armies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#0 Locking our own orientation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#14 Fast OODA-Loops increase Maneuverability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#44 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#49 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#102 pneumatic cash systems was Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#25 Google Employees Weighed in on What Makes a Highly Effective Manager. Technical Expertise Came in Dead Last
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#59 Deconstructing the "Warrior Caste:" The Beliefs and Backgrounds of Senior Military Elites

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Man Who Wrote Those Password Rules Has a New Tip: N3v$r M1^d!

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: The Man Who Wrote Those Password Rules Has a New Tip: N3v$r M1^d!
Date: 06 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

The Man Who Wrote Those Password Rules Has a New Tip: N3v$r M1^d!
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-man-who-wrote-those-password-rules-has-a-new-tip-n3v-r-m1-d-1502124118

This was sent to me (on the west coast) from the east coast, Friday
afternoon. I then distributed it around the west coast. Somebody
printed it on corporate letterhead paper and placed it in number
corporate bulletin boards over the weekend. Numerous people coming in
on Monday thought was real (even though 1April was on Sunday and
corporate directives are never issued on Sunday). Afterwards all
corporate letterhead paper was kept locked up.

CORPORATE DIRECTIVE NUMBER 84-570471                    April 1, 1984

In order to increase the security of all IBM computing facilities, and
to avoid the possibility of unauthorized use of these facilities, new
rules are being put into effect concerning the selection of passwords.
All users of IBM computing facilities are instructed to change their
passwords to conform to these rules immediately.

RULES FOR THE SELECTION OF PASSWORDS:

 1. A password must be at least six characters long, and must not
    contain two occurrences of a character in a row, or a sequence of
    two or more characters from the alphabet in forward or reverse
    order.

    Example:  HGQQXP is an invalid password.
              GFEDCB is an invalid password.

 2. A password may not contain two or more letters in the same
    position as any previous password.  Example: If a previous
    password was GKPWTZ, then NRPWHS would be invalid because PW
    occurs in the same position in both passwords.

 3. A password may not contain the name of a month or an
    abbreviation for a month.

    Example:  MARCHBC is an invalid password.
              VWMARBC is an invalid password.

 4. A password may not contain the numeric representation of a
    month. Therefore, a password containing any number except zero is
    invalid.

    Example: WKBH3LG is invalid because it contains the numeric
    representation for the month of March.

 5. A password may not contain any words from any language.  Thus, a
    password may not contain the letters A, or I, or sequences such as
    AT, ME, or TO because these are all words.

 6. A password may not contain sequences of two or more characters
    which are adjacent to each other on a keyboard in a horizontal,
    vertical or diagonal direction.

    Example:  QWERTY is an invalid password.
              GHNLWT is an invalid password because G and H are
              horizontally adjacent to each other.
              HUKWVM is an invalid password because H and U are
              diagonally adjacent to each other.

 7. A password may not contain the name of a person, place or thing.

    Example:  JOHNBOY is an invalid password.

Because of the complexity of the password selection rules, there is
actually only one password which passes all the tests.  To make the
selection of this password simpler for the user, it will be
distributed to all managers.  All users are instructed to obtain this
password from his or her manager and begin using it immediately.

... snip ...

other past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#52 OT Re: A beautiful morning in AFM.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#53 April Fools Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#42 Password Rules
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#2 Passwords: silly or serious?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#97 Just for a laugh ... How to spot an old IBMer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#34 Special characters for Passwords
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#14 The FBI Is Wrongly Telling People To Change Passwords 'Frequently'

I designed a chip (card, but could have other physical form factors)
for authentication ... big part of current password scenarios are that
not only does it have to be so complex that attackers can't guess it
... it is also so complex that you can't remember it. Also since it is
a shared-secret, there has to be a unique one for every security
domain. It also had person-centric in mind ... so the same chip could
be used for authentication purposes at lots of different environments
(and cost almost nothing), super secure gov, building access, and fast
enough and low power enough that it could be used at transit turnstyle
... not just the same kind of chip, but I person could elect to use
the same exact chip for multiple different purposes. I also authored a
financial standard (x9.59) to use it for high & low value financial
transactions (point-of-sale, unattended, internet, etc).

It had a pincode/password for use of the card ... but because it was
only used between you and your card, it wasn't a shared-secret that
needed to be divulged. It went a long way getting rid of having
hundreds of different impossible to remember passwords. It could be
done as (real) two-factor authentication (something you have as well
as something you know) but could also be done as three-factor
authentication (also including something you are). Refs to chip,
card, financial standard, etc ... also couple dozen (assigned) patents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/x959.html
was in a couple booths at BAI, world-wide retail banking show
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#224

trivia: the CEO of one of the security companies involved at the show
had previously been head of mainframe POK and later head of IBM/PC
Boca.

3-factor paradigm posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#3factor

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 08 Aug 2017 19:54:24 -0700

"J. Clarke" <j.clarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:

????  When did the Germans have better tank engineering than the Russians?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#31 Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#39 Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#40 Disregard post (another screwup; absolutely nothing to do with computers whatsoever!)

From Guderian's book (Panzer Leader), loc2902-3:

Hitler then said: 'If I had known that the figures for
Russian tank strength which you gave in your book were in fact the true
ones, I would not—I believe—ever have started this war.'

loc2903-6:

He was referring to my book Achtung! Panzer!, published in
1937, in which I had estimated Russian tank strength at that time as
10,000; both the Chief of the Army General Staff, Beck, and the censor
had disagreed with this statement. It had cost me a lot of trouble to
get that figure printed; but I had been able to show that intelligence
reports at the time spoke of 17,000 Russian tanks and that my estimate
was therefore, if anything, a very conservative one.

loc2256-58:

The military commission was so insistent on this point that eventually
our manufacturers and Ordnance Office officials concluded: 'It seems
that the Russians must already possess better and heavier tanks than we
do.' It was at the end of July, 1941, that the T34 tank appeared at the
front and the riddle of the new Russian model was solved.

loc2262-64:

At this time our yearly tank production scarcely amounted to more than
1,000 of all types. In view of our enemies' production figures this was
very small. As far back as 1933 I had visited a single Russian tank
factory which was producing 22 tanks per day of the Christie-Russki
type.

... snip ...

best tanks
http://www.chuckhawks.com/best_tanks_WWII.htm
http://www.fprado.com/armorsite/tiger1_in_action.htm

The German Tiger Tank was introduced in August 1942 and was at that time
the most powerful tank in the world. The success of the Tiger was so
profound, that no allied tank dared to engage it in open combat. This
psychological fear soon became to be known as "Tigerphobia"

... snip ...

issue was that russia was way out producing germany ... analogous to US
Sherman production ... both panther and tiger outclassed Sherman,
shermans also referred to as "tommy cookers"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tommy_cooker

past refs 3/4s german military effort was against russia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#60 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#77 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#70 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#38 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#70 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#34 upcoming TV show, "Halt & Catch Fire"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#12 1950:  Northrop's Digital Differential Analyzer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#62 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#63 How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#49 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#51 LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#28 channel islands, definitely not the location of LEO
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#52 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#74 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#36 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#80 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#85 US vs German Armies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#89 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#90 Economist, Harry Dent Hints: Global Banks Facing a Serious Crisis in Months Ahead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#22 Ironic old "fortune"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#17 5 Naval Battles That Changed History Forever

past refs Panzer Leader:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#13 Keydriven bit permutations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#16 Keydriven bit permutations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#69 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#119 For those who like to regress to their youth? :-)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#55 Shout out to Grace Hopper (State of the Union)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016h.html#80 "I used a real computer at home...and so will you" (Popular Science May 1967)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#3 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#53 Dunkirk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#99 The Real Reason You Should See Dunkirk: Hitler Lost World War II There
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#3 Dunkirk

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

VM/370 45th Birthday

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: VM/370 45th Birthday
Date: 09 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

VM/370 45th Birthday
http://share.confex.com/data/handout/share/129/Session_20898_handout_10438_0.pdf

January 1968, three people came out to the university to install
CP/67. I was then included in the virtual machine announcement at the
spring 68 SHARE meeting in Houston 49+ yrs ago ... will be 50yrs next
spring SHARE meeting.

note, science center repeatedly criticized the 7044 reference because
it wasn't a *real* virtual machine ... i.e. there was no operating
system that ran on real machine that could run in their virtual
machine. ... from melinda's paper:

For the first few weeks, the CSC people referred to their concept as a
"pseudo-machine", but soon adopted the term virtual machine after
hearing Dave Sayre at IBM Research use it to describe a system he had
built for a modified 7044. Sayre's M44 system was similar to CP-40,
except for the crucial difference of not providing a control program
interface that exactly duplicated a real machine. The CP-40 team
credited Sayre with having "implanted the idea that the virtual
machine concept is not necessarily less efficient than more
conventional approaches."

... snip ...

Melinda's web pages (scroll down)
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/

I started rewriting large portions of CP/67 spring of 1968,
pathlengths, algorithm, device drivers, order-seek queuing, chained
page I/Os (increase 2301 throughput from 80/sec to 270/sec), etc. Part
of presentation I made at fall '68 SHARE meeting on CP/67 pathlength
improvements running OS/360 under CP/67
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18

Morph of CP67 to VM370 dropped and/or simplified a lot of CP/67
features. Then came the Future System effort where lots of 370
activity was cut-back and/or outright killed. I continued to work on
360/370 stuff at the science center, even periodically ridiculing
FS. Old email about moving from CP67 to VM370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

above references CSC/VM ... one of my hobbies was production systems
for internal datacenters (at one time, I had more internal datacenter
customers than the total peak number Multics systems, little rivalry
between Multics on the 5th flr and science center on the 4th flr).

With the death of FS, there was mad rush to get stuff back into the
370 product pipelines ... which contributed to decision to pick up
lots of pieces of CSC/VM for inclusion in VM/370 release 3. Other
parts of CSC/VM was selected to be guinea pig for starting to charge
for operating system software. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare

23jun1969 unbundling announcement started to charge for application
software, but manage to make case that system software should still be
free; the lack of 370 products during the FS period is credited with
giving clone processor makers a market foothold, the death of FS and
rise of clone makers is credited with decision to start charging for
operating system software. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

CP67 delivered to university had 2741&1052 terminal support with
neat hack that did automatigically determining terminal type (using
SAD CCW on terminal controller to change type of port/line
scanner). The univ. also had some number of ASCII/TTY. I extended the
CP67 to support for TTY terminal support, including the automagic
terminal type identification. This was almost immediately picked up
and shipped in CP67. I then wanted to have a single dial-in number
("hunt group") for all terminals ... which didn't quite work. It turns
out that while it was possible for SAD CCW to change the port/line
scanner, they had taken short-cut and hardwired line speed, i.e. 134.5
baud terminals (2741&1052) didn't work on 110 baud lines (TTY
terminal speed). This somewhat prompted Univ. to start clone
controller project (using Interdata/3) that supported both dynamic
line speed and terminal type. Then four of us get written up for (some
part of) clone controller business. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

In the TTY code, I did some line length calculation one-byte
hack. This is old story about one of the MIT people changing max. TTY
line length to greater than 256 on the CP67 system at the MIT Urban
lab in the bldg across the tech sq quad (to support some ascii device
down at harvard).
http://www.multicians.org/thvv/360-67.html

At the univ. I did something like 7044 ... but didn't realize it at
the time (virtual machine not necessarily less efficient). A
lot of the pathlength work addressed running OS/360 faster, but had
less effect on CMS. I observed that CMS didn't do any overlap with I/O
... so I created a psuedo-synchronous disk I/O CCWs ... the SIO would
finish with CC=1, CSW stored (also reduced the CCW translation
time). I then got strongly admonished by the people at the science
center for violating 360 principles of architecture; if something was
to be done, it had to be with the 360 DIAGNOSE instruction, which was
defined as "model dependent" implementation; using the fiction that
virtual machines could be a special kind of 360 model.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"Subprime Is Contained" (& Other Evidence That "They Really Don't Know What They're Doing")

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: "Subprime Is Contained" (& Other Evidence That "They Really Don't Know What They're Doing")
Date: 10 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

"Subprime Is Contained" (& Other Evidence That "They Really Don't Know
What They're Doing")
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-08-10/subprime-contained-other-evidence-they-really-dont-know-what-theyre-doing

also

What Went Wrong With The 21st Century?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-08-10/what-went-wrong-21st-century

The scene brought to light by the latest connecting of dots answers
the No. 1 economic question of our time: What went wrong with the 21st
century? The simple answer: Economists backed a truck over it.

... snip ...

Why Financialized Corporate Governance Works Poorly
https://corpgov.law.harvard.edu/2017/08/09/why-financialized-corporate-governance-works-poorly/

Whereas the financial system provides extreme examples of the
distortions that such a focus can give rise to when combined with
policy failures, similar issues arise in many other settings in which
the interaction between governments and corporations produces
inefficient outcomes

... snip ...

economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
stock buyback posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#stock.buyback

recent posts mentioning shareholder value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#54 Why the Pursuit of Shareholder Value Kills Innovation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#62 Big Shrink to "Hire" 25,000 in the US, as Layoffs Pile Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017b.html#1 OT:  book:  "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#58 The ICL 2900
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#93 An OODA-loop is a far-from-equilibrium, non-linear system with feedback
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#5 IBM's core business
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#77 Trump delay of the 'fiduciary rule' will cost retirement savers $3.7 billion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#95 The head of the Census Bureau just quit, and the consequences are huge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#3 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#24 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#53 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#17 Wall Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#47 The rise and fall of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#49 Shareholders Ahead Of Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#63 Real World OODA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#83 How can we stop algorithms telling lies?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#97 IBM Another Disappointment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#100 Why CEO pay structures harm companies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#107 Why IBM Should -- and Shouldn't -- Break Itself Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#1 OT:  book:  "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#9 Corporate Profit and Taxes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#22 OT:  book:  "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#37 Disregard post (another screwup)

other recent posts mentioning economists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#17 Destruction of the Middle Class
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#24 Destruction of the Middle Class
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#26 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#29 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#31 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#34 If economists want to be trusted again, they should learn to tell jokes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#92 Trump's Rollback of the Neoliberal Market State
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#93 The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds Kindle Edition
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#97 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#101 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#102 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#104 Trump to sign cyber security order
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#0 Locking our own orientation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#65 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#67 Economists are arguing over how their profession messed up during the Great Recession. This is what happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#69 Economists are arguing over how their profession messed up during the Great Recession. This is what happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#74 Trump delay of the 'fiduciary rule' will cost retirement savers $3.7 billion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#87 Dodd-Frank Was Designed to Fail - and Trump Will Make it Worse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#89 Understanding decisions: The power of combining psychology and economics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#93 United Air Lines - an OODA-loop perspective
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#96 Cognitive Bias Codex, 2016
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#7 Arthur Laffer's Theory on Tax Cuts Comes to Life Once More
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#12 SS Trust Fund
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#44 [CM] cheap money, was What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#96 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#99 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#4 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#8 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#12 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#16 Conservatives and Spending
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#42 MVS vs HASP vs JES (was 2821)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#44 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#45 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#53 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#64 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#73 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#92 pneumatic cash systems was Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#102 pneumatic cash systems was Re: [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#6 Mapping the decentralized world of tomorrow
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#19 Financial, Healthcare, Construction, Education complexity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#79 Bad Ideas

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Disregard post (another screwup)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Disregard post (another screwup)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Aug 2017 12:23:54 -0700

Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

Why the "Maximizing Shareholder Value" Theory of Corporate
Governance is Bogus; One mantra you see regularly in the business and
popular press goes something along the lines of "the CEO and board
have a fiduciary duty to maximize shareholder value."
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/10/why-the-maximizing-shareholder-value-theory-of-corporate-governance-is-bogus.html

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#37 Disregard post (another screwup)
also
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#22 OT: book: "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"

from yesterday:

Why Financialized Corporate Governance Works Poorly
https://corpgov.law.harvard.edu/2017/08/09/why-financialized-corporate-governance-works-poorly/

Whereas the financial system provides extreme examples of the
distortions that such a focus can give rise to when combined with policy
failures, similar issues arise in many other settings in which the
interaction between governments and corporations produces inefficient
outcomes.

... snip ...

stock buyback posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#stock.buyback

related:

"Subprime Is Contained" (& Other Evidence That "They Really Don't Know
What They're Doing")
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-08-10/subprime-contained-other-evidence-they-really-dont-know-what-theyre-doing

also

What Went Wrong With The 21st Century?
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-08-10/what-went-wrong-21st-century

The scene brought to light by the latest connecting of dots answers the
No. 1 economic question of our time: What went wrong with the 21st
century? The simple answer: Economists backed a truck over it.

... snip ...

economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Aug. 9, 1995: When the Future Looked Bright for Netscape

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Aug. 9, 1995: When the Future Looked Bright for Netscape
Date: 10 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

Aug. 9, 1995: When the Future Looked Bright for Netscape
https://www.wired.com/2011/08/0809netscape-bright-future/

from long ago and far away ... 9Aug1995 netscape email (22yrs ago):


Date: Wed, 9 Aug 1995 14:03:19 -0700
From: lynn
To: xxxxxxxx@netscape.com
Subject: (it works)

you aren't currently running thru both firewalls since we don't have
the 2nd dedicated machine up and therefor the plug-board on the 2nd
firewall isn't mapped (although in theory, I could actually map both
firewall plugboards to the same dedicated server machine).

... btw, 2pm friday looks pretty good. i may be a little late ...
possible.

... snip ... top of post, old email index

I controlled webserver to internet gateway to payment networks ... but
could only make recommendations on the browser/webserver side. I gave
a talk to the browser kids(?) about DNS multiple A-record support
... they said it was too hard. I showed them sample code from 4.3 reno
... they still said it was too hard. I made some disparaging remark
about if there wasn't an example in steven's book, they couldn't do
it. It took me a yr to get multiple A-record support into the browser.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 10 Aug 2017 22:02:39 -0700

Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:

If the issue is infant mortality, I provided (in another post) a way
to bypass that (cut to the chase, US lifespan is worse than other
industrialized countries no matter what age group you consider).

... US lifespan stopped improving ... lifespan improvement not only
wasn't keeping up with other countries ... but the actual lifespan
started to decline.

Americans Are Dying Younger, Saving Corporations Billions; Life
expectancy gains have stalled. The grim silver lining? Lower pension
costs
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-08/americans-are-dying-younger-saving-corporations-billions

In 2015, the American death rate -- the age-adjusted share of
Americans dying -- rose slightly for the first time since 1999. And
over the last two years, at least 12 large companies, from Verizon to
General Motors, have said recent slips in mortality improvement have led
them to reduce their estimates for how much they could owe retirees by
upward of a combined $9.7 billion, according to a Bloomberg analysis of
company filings.

... snip ...

In the 80s, Stockman takes credit for accelerating increases in SS
contributions that take care of baby boomers (and following
generations) having increasing lifespans. That no longer is happening,
US lifespan increases have stopped and actually started to decline

Life expectancy to rise more in many industrialized nations than in US
http://www.standard.net/National/2017/02/22/Life-expectancy-to-rise-more-in-many-industrialized-nations-than-in-US

Why do Americans have shorter life expectancy and worse health than
people in other high-income countries?
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4112220/
U.S. life expectancy declines for the first time since 1993
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/us-life-expectancy-declines-for-the-first-time-since-1993/2016/12/07/7dcdc7b4-bc93-11e6-91ee-1adddfe36cbe_story.html
Life Expectancy In U.S. Drops For First Time In Decades, Report Finds
http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/12/08/504667607/life-expectancy-in-u-s-drops-for-first-time-in-decades-report-finds
Dying younger: U.S. life expectancy 'a real problem'
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2016/12/08/has-us-life-expectancy-maxed-out-first-decline-since-1993/95134818/
US life expectancy declines for first time in 20 years
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-38247385

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Aug 2017 10:13:30 -0700

Jon Elson <elson@pico-systems.com> writes:

Washington University made a big mistake.  They went from a 7094 (not sure
which variant) to a 360/50 with LCS.  I wasn't there during the 7094 days,
so didn't realize what a huge downgrade it was until reading through this
stuff.  Anyway, they eventually realized their mistake, and went from the
ghastly 360/50 dragging the anchor (slow LCS memory) to a 360/65 with a pair
of internal memories with interleave, and it was almost 40 X faster.

univ had 709 running tape->tape ibsys with 1401 "front-end" for
tape<->unit-record ... as part of transition to 360/67 ... the 1401 was
replaced with 360/30 ... initially mostly running 1401 emulation. I was
given job of re-implementing 1401 MPIO (tape<->unit-record application)
in 360. I got to design my own monitor, storage management, scheduling,
device drivers, interrupt handler, error recovery, etc. Eventually I had
box of 2000 cards with assembler option that either generated
stand-alone version (boot with BPS loader) or os/360 that did i/o with
DCB macros and get/put. The stand-alone version assembled in around 30
mins (360/30, os/360 release 6), the OS/360 version assembled in about
an hour (5 DCB macros taking 5-6 minutes each to assemble).

the 709 ibsys ran student fortran jobs in around a second each
(tape->tape). initial transition to 360/67 (running as 360/65) with
os/360 release 9.5 took over a minute. adding hasp cut time about in
half, got it down to over 30 seconds (card reading & print spooling
overlapped with job execution).

os/360 student fortran ran three step fortran G, compile, link-edit and
execution. Almost all of that was job scheduler & file open/close ...
hundreds of random access disk I/Os taking 12-15 seconds per job step
(compared to ibsys monitor running sequential tape->tape).

I then did a very careful constructed OS/360 sysgen ... taking the
stage2 sysgen completely apart and reordering things to carefully place
order of files and PDS library members on disk to optimize arm seek and
rational access ... cutting per fortran student job to 12.9seconds
(approx 3 times speedup just from optimize disk motion) ... but still
taking 15-20 times longer than 709.

this is old post with part of fall 68 share presentation ... that talks
primarily about rewritting major parts of cp67 spring&summer of 68 to
improve running of os/360 in virtual machine, but also has some
discussion of careful os/360 sysgen.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#18 CP/67 & OS MFT14

360/65 didn't get faster than 709 (for fortran student jobs) until
waterloo watfor was installed. watfor was its own (ibsys-like) monitor
loaded&started once ... and then processing multiple fortran jobs in
single execution streaming in/out with HASP spool (rather tape->tape).
With my sysgen optimization, the single step job scheduler and file
open/close was about four seconds ... and then watfor ran about 20,000
"cards" (statements) per min on 360/65. Normal student fortran jobs were
around 30-60 cards, operations would typically collect a card tray (3000
cards) of student jobs (50-100 jobs) and run them in single watfor step
... @20,000/min around 9seconds plus 4seconds start/load for around
13seconds elapsed or around between tenth to quarter of second per job
... finally faster than 709.

other old posts mentioning WATFOR:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/96.html#9 cics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/97.html#22 Pre S/360 IBM Operating Systems?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/97.html#28 IA64 Self Virtualizable?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#21 Reviving the OS/360 thread (Questions about OS/360)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#93 MVS vs HASP vs JES (was 2821)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#175 amusing source code comments (was Re: Testing job applicants)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000.html#55 OS/360 JCL: The DD statement and DCBs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#45 Charging for time-share CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000d.html#46 Charging for time-share CPU time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#52 Review of Steve McConnell's AFTER THE GOLD RUSH
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#20 Golden Era of Compilers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#22 Golden Era of Compilers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#12 checking some myths.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#33 Waterloo Interpreters (was Re: RAX (was RE: IBM OS Timeline?))
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#53 WATFOR's Silver Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#54 WATFOR's Silver Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002g.html#1 WATFOR's Silver Anniversary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#3 The problem with installable operating systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#29 Collating on the S/360-2540 card reader?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#31 Collating on the S/360-2540 card reader?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Aug 2017 10:48:09 -0700

Quadibloc <jsavard@ecn.ab.ca> writes:

Basically, commercial computing was IBM's core business, and so
eventually IBM abandoned the thought that anyone would buy one of
their mainframes for a primarily scientific workload.

That wasn't back then: they made a vector add-on for the 3090 and
others with a Cray I-like architecture, but by 1984 it was definitely
starting to happen.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#49 System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)

note: one of co-workers at the ibm science center,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

his father, was somehow involved in the gov. legal action with IBM. he
said that the "BUNCH"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BUNCH

had people that testified that by late 50s, every vendor realized that
the single most important (differentiating) factor to be succesful in
the computer industry was to have a compatible line across whole product
line (possibly simplifying the move to increasingly powerful computers
during period of rapidly increasing use of computers).  Their claim was
that IBM executives were the most successful in enforcing that objective
with the 360.

... snip ...

the 3090 processor engineers complained about the vector feature
addon. They claimed major reason for vector was that floating point
processing ran so slow compared to memory speed ... that memory could
keep a whole load of floating point units feed. However, for 3090,
they had so speeded up floating point processing that scalar floating
point ran as fast as memory ... that having multiple (vector) floating
point units wasn't going to run a whole lot faster than 3090 was
running scalar ... aka that vector was purely marketing.

3090 with vector addon was being pushed to universities and get them
classified as NSF supercomputer centers.

we saw some of this ... I had HSDT project (T1 and faster links), some
past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

was working with the director of NSF, and was suppose to get $20M to
interconnect the NSF supercomputer centers ... then congress cuts the
budget, some other things happen, and finally an RFP was released (in
part based on what we already had running). As regional networks
connect it the centers, it morphs into NSFNET backbone, the precursor
to modern internet. MIT article
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing/

past email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

note that quite of few of the 3090+vector "NSF supercomputer centers",
also tended to have a several (sometimes boat loads) FPS boxes
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floating_Point_Systems

These processors were widely used as attached processors for
scientific applications in reflection seismology, physical chemistry,
NSA cryptology and other disciplines requiring large numbers of
computations. Attached array processors were usually used in
facilities where larger supercomputers were either not needed or not
affordable. Hundreds if not thousands of FPS boxes were delivered and
highly regarded. FPS's primary competition up to this time was IBM
(3838) and CSPI.

Cornell University led by physicist Kenneth G. Wilson made a
supercomputer proposal to NSF with IBM to produce a processor array of
FPS boxes attached to an IBM mainframe with the name lCAP

... snip ...

HSDT also had high-speed satellite network ... I had part of wing at
the IBM Los Gatos lab ... and a 4.5M TDMA satellite dish. For awhile
one of the other links was with Clementi's E&S lab in kingston
that had 3090 and a bunch of FPS boxes.

some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#61 TF-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#71 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#74 Vector processors on the 3090
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#4 IBM Plans Big Spending for the Cloud ($1.2B)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#5 IBM Plans Big Spending for the Cloud ($1.2B)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#63 11 Years to Catch Up with Seymour
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014j.html#35 curly brace languages source code style quides

one of the other 3090 "problems" is that it just had normal IBM
channels that ran 3mbytes/sec. FPS boxes supported HiPPI disk arrays
running 40mbytes/sec. In order for 3090 to support HIPPI
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HIPPI
some mention of fibre channel standard in above

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#ficon they came up with a hack ... by cutting into the side of the 3090 extended store memory bus and using reserved addresses to run "peek/poke" convention to claim that they could do HIPPI I/O. some past posts mentioning 3090 HIPPI support http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#25 ESCON Data Transfer Rate http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003c.html#63 Re : OT: One for the historians - 360/91 http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003j.html#2 Fix the shuttle or fly it unmanned http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#41 comp.arch classic: the 10-bit byte http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003p.html#46 comp.arch classic: the 10-bit byte http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#2 Expanded Storage http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#4 Expanded Storage http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004n.html#10 RISCs too close to hardware? http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#13 Today's mainframe--anything to new? http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006b.html#14 Expanded Storage http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006c.html#1 Multiple address spaces http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#16 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days? http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007l.html#7 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#11 what does xp do when system is copying http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#57 Mainframe Hall of Fame: 17 New Members Added http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#86 locate mode, was Happy DEC-10 Day http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#69 LPARs: More or Less? http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#35 Why does Intel favor thin rectangular CPUs? http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#13 What was the historical price of a P/390? http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#42 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#45 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#69 how to get a command result without writing it to a file http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#39 Has anyone successfully migrated off mainframes? http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#28 390 vector instruction set reuse, was 8-bit bytes http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#41 A History Of Mainframe Computing http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#24 What was a 3314? http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#80 Languages -- virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Aug 2017 13:05:36 -0700

John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:

I've heard it's more like 15-20%, but our overpriced medical non-system has
plenty of problems beyond the insurance overhead.

big-pharma

Americans Pay More For Prescription Drugs Because Our Politicians Take
Bribes From Pharmaceutical Companies
https://downwithtyranny.blogspot.com/2017/08/americans-pay-more-for-prescription.html

2002 congress lets fiscal responsibility act expire (spending can't
exceed tax revenue). 2010 CBO report that just 2003-2009, taxes reduced
$6T and spending increased for $6T, $12T gap compared to fiscal
responsibility act
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#fiscal.responsibility.act

then first major bill after allowing fiscal responsibilty act to expire
was medicare part-d. cbs 60mins does expose on what happened.  18
republicans responsible for getting it passed, insert one line just
before final vote (prohibits competitive bidding and prevent CBO from
distributing report on the effect). Within six months after bill passes,
all 18 have resigned and are on big-pharma payroll. 60mins show drugs
from VA (that allows competitive bidding) that are 1/3rd price of
identical drugs under part-d.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#medicare.part-d

US comptroller general starts including in speeches that part-d comes to
be a long term $40T item, totally swamping all other budget items. By
2005, US comptroller general is also including in speeches that there is
nobody in congress that is capable of middle school arithmetic for
how badly they are savaging the budget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#comptroller.general

... also include private-equity moving into health ... recent reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#41 Disregard post (another screwup)

private-equity posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#private.equity

private-equity getting into gov. contractors were significant factor in
the huge uptic in outsourcing last decade (revolving door, hiring
top-level politicians, military, gov. employees, former presidents,
cabinet members, etc). ... slight ibm content ... former CEO of IBM
leaves to headup major private-equity company that included both former
president and previously current president on its rolls ... and
buys beltway bandit that will employee snowden
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#gerstner

intelligence 70% of budget and over half the budget
http://www.investingdaily.com/17693/spies-like-us/

private-equity owners of for-profit companies ... significantly
accelerating the rapidly growing success of failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html##success.of.failure

this is account of private equity similar to house flipping, except
the "mortgage" that goes on the bought company's books, then they
extract everything they can from the company ... including huge fees,
and then they flip it ... can even sell for much less than they
paid and still walk away with boat loads of money ... in part because
the original loan/mortgage isn't paid off ... but goes with the flipped
company. also over half corporate defaults are companies either
currently or previously in private equity mill
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?_r=0

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 11 Aug 2017 13:22:49 -0700

Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> writes:

Could have sped it up using the Loader instead of the Linkage Editoe.
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#49 System/360--detailed engineering description (AFIPS 1964)

this reference
ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/software/websphere/awdtools/hlasm/s8169a.pdf

has loader appearing later with release 17 (my 360/65 os/360 work was
mostly release 9.5 through release 15/16) ... and would only reduce
from three steps to two steps (combined link-edit and go).
https://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/zosbasics/com.ibm.zos.zappldev/zappldev_127.htm

With my optimized sysgen ... that would have reduced the 3step from
12.9secs to 8.6secs per student fortran job (optimized sysgen reduced
3step from nearly 40secs to 12.9secs ... already cutting 25secs).

watfor amortized the onestep load of 4.3secs across all the jobs that
ran at 20,000 card/statements per minute ... to get to avg.  time of
tenth of second/job. In effect watfor was doing something equivalent to
loader ... but combining compile, load, & go into single step (not just
load&go) ... and also proceeding to next job ... w/o having to return to
standard os/360 step managment between jobs.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 12 Aug 2017 11:09:42 -0700

scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:

It would have significantly reduced medicaid funding, to the
point where 22 million who are currently covered would be left
in the cold (or more likely broke in the E.R.).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#41 Disregard post (another screwup)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#45 "Subprime Is Contained" (& Other Evidence That "They Really Don't Know What They're Doing")
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#48 endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#51 endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)

there was also various proposals to turn over more responsibility to
states to decide how things are run.

old posts about medicaid fraud possibly 20-30% & I had been asked to
look at the issue in one of the states. CMS had offer to increase
fed. gov.  share of state's medicaid from 50% to 60% (20% reduction in
state's costs, 50% to 40%), if the state would implement several "best
practices" anti-fraud provisions (net savings for the feds since the
increase from 50% to 60% is more than offset by the smaller total with
the reduction in fraud).

Numerous state legislatures failed to pass the necessary legislation
because they were heavily lobbied by medicaid providers ... members of
legislature didn't get anything personally from the CMS providing the
state additional funding ... but they did get something from the special
interest lobbying.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#12 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#28 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#29 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#31 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#37 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#69 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#81 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#86 Should the IBM approach be given a chance to fix the health care system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012m.html#66 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#64 OT:  NYT article--the rich get richer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#38 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#48 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014c.html#108 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#49 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#59 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#65 A call for revolution

GAO report on some of federal issues of state funding
https://www.gao.gov/modules/ereport/handler.php?1=1&path=/ereport/GAO-15-404SP/data_center_savings/Health/20._State_Medicaid_Sources_of_Funds
in this report
https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-15-404SP

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Pareto efficiency

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Pareto efficiency
Date: 12 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

Pareto efficiency
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareto_efficiency

As undergraduate in the 60s, I rewrote lots of IBM software, including
resource scheduling algorithm ... and trying to get into multi-factor
resource optimization. Later at the IBM science center in the early
70s, there was lots of work on measuring resource usage and
characterizing resource optimization. One was multi-axis scatter plot
showing all observations. The outer edge of observed values
represented envelope
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-objective_optimization

Later when sponsoring Boyd's briefings, he showed similar envelopes to
characterize fighter plane operation. Boyd would reference that in
training pilots, the objective was to operate in the region where your
performance was better than the adversary's. He would say that later
he used the E-M analysis for trade-offs in designing fighters.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy%E2%80%93maneuverability_theory
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Performance_envelope

However, another factor in the YF16 was unstable airframe,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relaxed_stability

Modern military aircraft, particularly low observable ("stealth")
designs, often exhibit instability as a result of their shape. The
Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk, for instance, employs a highly
non-traditional fuselage and wing shape in order to reduce its radar
cross section and enable it to penetrate air defenses with relative
impunity. However, the flat facets of the design reduce its stability
to the point where a computerized fly-by-wire system was required to
allow safe operation.

... snip ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fly-by-wire

In more sophisticated versions, analog computers replaced the
electronic controller. The canceled 1950s Canadian supersonic
interceptor, the Avro Canada CF-105 Arrow, employed this type of
system. Analog computers also allowed some customization of flight
control characteristics, including relaxed stability. This was
exploited by the early versions of F-16, giving it impressive
maneuverability.

... snip ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Dynamics_F-16_Fighting_Falcon

Part of Boyd story about redesign of F-15 was he started by asking
them if they wanted another F-111 ... and he showed that the
structural weight of the mechanism for wing pivot "cost" more in
capability/performance than any benefit
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McDonnell_Douglas_F-15_Eagle#Smaller.2C_lighter
... although this credits "flight control technology"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable-sweep_wing

however (trivia: I was working at Boeing during part of this period,
just before graduating and joining IBM):

A variable-sweep wing was also selected as the winning design used by
Boeing's entry in the FAA's study for a supersonic transport, the
2707. However it evolved through several configurations during the
design stage, finally adding a canard, and it eventually became clear
that the design would be so heavy that it would be lacking sufficient
payload for the fuel needed. The design was later abandoned in favor
of a more conventional tailed delta wing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_2707

Boyd postings & URLs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

back to pareto efficiency (original URL, this time economics), "Moral
Hazard" ... which has also been used to explain/justify Too Big To
Fail
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_hazard

Economist Mark Zandi of Moody's Analytics described moral hazard as a
root cause of the subprime mortgage crisis. He wrote that "the risks
inherent in mortgage lending became so widely dispersed that no one
was forced to worry about the quality of any single loan. As shaky
mortgages were combined, diluting any problems into a larger pool, the
incentive for responsibility was undermined." He also wrote, "Finance
companies weren't subject to the same regulatory oversight as
banks. Taxpayers weren't on the hook if they went belly up
[pre-crisis], only their shareholders and other creditors
were. Finance companies thus had little to discourage them from
growing as aggressively as possible, even if that meant lowering or
winking at traditional lending standards."[11]

... snip ...

"too big to fail", "too big to prosecute", "too big to jail"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

... however the Oct2008 congressional hearings into the pivotal role
that the rating agencies played 1) rating agencies were selling
triple-A rating on things they knew weren't worth triple-A, 2)
triple-A rating allowed them to sell off everything as soon as they
were made, so they no longer had to care about borrower's
qualifications and/or loan quality (including selling to entities
restricted to only dealing in "safe" investment ... like large pension
funds), 3) largely accounting for being able to do over $27T
2001-2008, 4) rating agencies' business model became misaligned when
they switched from buyers to sellers paying for the ratings.

(triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

In 1999, I was asked to help try to prevent the coming economic
mess. Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to
obscure fraudulent mortgages (poster child were commercial buildings
in Dallas area that turned out to be empty lots). I was to improve the
integrity of the supporting documents in securitized mortgages.
However, triple-A ratings trumps "supporting documents" and they could
start doing no-documentation, liar loans. From the law of unintended
consequences, the largest fines so far on the Too Big To Fail
have been for the robo-signing mills fabricating the missing
documents.

economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
S&L crises posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#S&L.crisis

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Pareto efficiency

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Pareto efficiency
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Aug 2017 09:43:49 -0700

Pareto efficiency (or Pareto optimality)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareto_efficiency

As undergraduate in the 60s, I rewrote lots of IBM software, including
resource scheduling algorithm ... and trying to get into multi-factor
resource optimization. Later at the IBM science center in the early 70s,
there was lots of work on measuring resource usage and characterizing
resource optimization. One was multi-axis scatter plot showing all
observations. The outer edge of observed values represented envelope

Multi-objective optimization
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-objective_optimization

Multi-objective optimization (also known as multi-objective programming,
vector optimization, multicriteria optimization, multiattribute
optimization or Pareto optimization) is an area of multiple criteria
decision making, that is concerned with mathematical optimization
problems involving more than one objective function to be optimized
simultaneously. Multi-objective optimization has been applied in many
fields of science, including engineering, economics and logistics where
optimal decisions need to be taken in the presence of trade-offs between
two or more conflicting objectives.

... snip ...

Later when sponsoring Boyd's briefings, he showed similar envelopes to
characterize fighter plane operation. Boyd would reference that in
training pilots, the objective was to operate in the region where your
performance was better than the adversary's. He would say that later he
used the E-M analysis for trade-offs in designing fighters.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy%E2%80%93maneuverability_theory
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Performance_envelope

However, another factor in the YF16 was unstable airframe,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relaxed_stability

Modern military aircraft, particularly low observable ("stealth")
designs, often exhibit instability as a result of their shape. The
Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk, for instance, employs a highly non-traditional
fuselage and wing shape in order to reduce its radar cross section and
enable it to penetrate air defenses with relative impunity. However, the
flat facets of the design reduce its stability to the point where a
computerized fly-by-wire system was required to allow safe operation.

... snip ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fly-by-wire

In more sophisticated versions, analog computers replaced the electronic
controller. The canceled 1950s Canadian supersonic interceptor, the Avro
Canada CF-105 Arrow, employed this type of system. Analog computers also
allowed some customization of flight control characteristics, including
relaxed stability. This was exploited by the early versions of F-16,
giving it impressive maneuverability.

... snip ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Dynamics_F-16_Fighting_Falcon

Part of Boyd story about redesign of F-15 was he started by asking them
if they wanted another F-111 ... and he showed that the structural
weight of the mechanism for wing pivot "cost" more in
capability/performance than any benefit

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McDonnell_Douglas_F-15_Eagle#Smaller.2C_lighter
... although this credits "flight control technology"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable-sweep_wing

however (trivia: I was working at Boeing during part of this period,
just before graduating and joining IBM, I had been brought in to
help form Boeing Computer Services, consolidate all dataprocessing
into independent business unit to better monetize the investment):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_2707

A variable-sweep wing was also selected as the winning design used by
Boeing's entry in the FAA's study for a supersonic transport, the
2707. However it evolved through several configurations during the
design stage, finally adding a canard, and it eventually became clear
that the design would be so heavy that it would be lacking sufficient
payload for the fuel needed. The design was later abandoned in favor of
a more conventional tailed delta wing.

... snip ...

Boyd postings & URLs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

back to pareto efficiency (original URL, this time economics), "Moral
Hazard" ... which has also been used to explain/justify Too Big To
Fail
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareto_efficiency#Constrained_Pareto-efficiency

The most commonly proffered example is of a setting where individuals
have private information (for example, a labor market where the worker's
own productivity is known to the worker but not to a potential employer,
or a used-car market where the quality of a car is known to the seller
but not to the buyer) which results in moral hazard or an adverse
selection and a sub-optimal outcome

... snip ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_hazard

Economist Mark Zandi of Moody's Analytics described moral hazard as a
root cause of the subprime mortgage crisis. He wrote that "the risks
inherent in mortgage lending became so widely dispersed that no one was
forced to worry about the quality of any single loan. As shaky mortgages
were combined, diluting any problems into a larger pool, the incentive
for responsibility was undermined." He also wrote, "Finance companies
weren't subject to the same regulatory oversight as banks. Taxpayers
weren't on the hook if they went belly up [pre-crisis], only their
shareholders and other creditors were. Finance companies thus had little
to discourage them from growing as aggressively as possible, even if
that meant lowering or winking at traditional lending standards."[11]

... snip ...

"too big to fail", "too big to prosecute", "too big to jail"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

... however the Oct2008 congressional hearings into the pivotal role
that the rating agencies played 1) rating agencies were selling
triple-A rating on things they knew weren't worth triple-A, 2)
triple-A rating allowed them to sell off everything as soon as they
were made, so they no longer had to care about borrower's
qualifications and/or loan quality (including selling to entities
restricted to only dealing in "safe" investment ... like large pension
funds) 3) largely accounting for being able to do over $27T
2001-2008, 4) rating agencies' business model became misaligned
when they switched from buyers to sellers paying for the ratings.

(triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

In 1999, I was asked to help try to prevent the coming economic
mess. Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to
obscure fraudulent mortgages (poster child were commercial buildings
in Dallas area that turned out to be empty lots). I was to improve the
integrity of the supporting documents in securitized mortgages.
However, triple-A ratings trumps "supporting documents" and they could
start doing no-documentation, liar loans. From the law of unintended
consequences, the largest fines so far on the Too Big To Fail
have been for the robo-signing mills fabricating the missing
documents.

S&L crises post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#S&L.crisis
economic mess posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Feds WIMP

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Feds WIMP
Date: 13 August 2017
Blog: Facebook

Why federal prosecutors often wimp out in going after financial
malfeasance
https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/why-federal-prosecutors-often-wimp-out-in-going-after-financial-malfeasance/2017/08/10/6e6421ee-6182-11e7-8adc-fea80e32bf47_story.html

recent related
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#54 Pareto efficiency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#55 Pareto efficiency

First there was too big to fail ... but then started
seeing too big to prosecute and too big to jail
with failure to prosecute TBTF for money laundering for drug
cartels and terrorists. It is then compounded failures to
hold TBTF accountable for manipulating LIBOR, FOREX, commodity
markets, aided offshore tax evasion, other criminal activity.

posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#economic.mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#libor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#money.laundering
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

They have used deferred prosecution and fines as demonstration that
they are doing something. However "deferred prosecution" requires that
they are prosecuted if they repeat the crimes ... they have repeatedly
committed the same crimes and continue to get deferred
prosecution. There is an estimate that they have paid $300B in fines
since the economic mess (but it includes all fines for criminal
activity, not just the economic mess). However, the estimate is that
they have been making $300B/yr off the ZIRP funds that are part
of ongoing bailout. There is the observation that the fines are so
small compared to the total amounts involved, that it is just viewed
as part of cost of running criminal enterprise.

ZIRP posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#zirp

It is not just Justice ... but the regulatory agencies. In the
congressional Madoff hearings, they had testimony from the person that
had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about
Madoff (SEC hands were forced when Madoff turned himself in).

Madoff posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#madoff

The rhetoric on the floor of congress about Sarbanes-Oxley was that it
would guarantee that executives and auditors did jailtime, however it
required SEC to do something. Possibly because even GAO didn't believe
SEC wasn't doing anything, it started doing reports of public company
fraudulent financial filings, even showing increase after SOX goes
into effect (and nobody doing jailtime). Less well known is that SOX
also required SEC to do something about the rating agencies (playing
major role in the economic mess) ... and they did about as much about
the rating agencies as the fraudulent financial filings.

more posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#enron
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#sarbanes.oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#financial.reporting.fraud

They have used the excuse that juries would have difficulty
understanding the complex financial transactions in the economic mess
(as opposed to be a "captured" gov institution). However somewhat like
getting the mob on tax evasion, those economic mess transactions
includes having to fiddle their financial filings, which is made much
simpler to prosecute under SOX.

"captured" agency posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#regulatory.captures

posts mentioning deferred prosecution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#10 Instead of focusing on big fines, law enforcement should seek long prison terms for the responsible executives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#80 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#23 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#44 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#47 Do we REALLY NEED all this regulatory oversight?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#36 Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#37 LIBOR: History's Largest Financial Crime that the WSJ and NYT Would Like You to Forget
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#57 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#61 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#31 Talk of Criminally Prosecuting Corporations Up, Actual Prosecutions Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#44 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#47 rationality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#65 Economic Mess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#10 25 Years: How the Web began
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#0 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#73 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#29 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#41 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#99 Why Is the Obama Administration Trying to Keep 11,000 Documents Sealed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#109 Why Aren't Any Bankers in Prison for Causing the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#45 Western Union Admits Anti-Money Laundering and Consumer Fraud Violations, Forfeits $586 Million in Settlement with Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

On second thoughts

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: On second thoughts ...
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Aug 2017 17:04:40 -0700

John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:

FYI, the Berkeley and Stanford people knew each other but the IBM
group was on the other side of the country and didn't publish anything
until later.  The different skill sets of the two groups made the designs
somewhat different.  Most importantly, Berkeley was using the existing
Unix C compiler, while the 801 group wrote their own very sophisticated
PL.8 compiler.  So Berkeley invented register windows to deal with
Unix compiler's mediocre register management, while IBM didn't since
the PL.8 compiler handled register spills about as well as they could be.

I've periodically claimed that John did 801 in reaction to the enormous
complexity of Future System. At 1977 presentation on 801, they claimed
that lots of 801 hardware simplification could be compensated by the
compiler (cp.r & pl.8).

801 didn't have any (hardware) protection domain. they claimed that pl.8
compiler would only generate correct programs and cp.r would only load
correct (pl.8) programs. it was 32bit addressing with 16 segment
registers ... with references to it being 40bit addressing. It was
inverted virtual memory tables with segment register containue 12bit
value ... and the claim was that inline code could change (virtual
memory) segment register value as easily as it a index/general register
value could be change ... easily allowing for (& claim) 12+28=40bit
addressing.

801/ROMP was going to be for displaywriter followon ... but when that
got canceled, they decided to retarget to unix workstation market.  they
got the company that had done pc/ix for ibm/pc to do implementation for
801/ROMP ... and had to add hardware protection domain for unix+C
paradigm. they were stuck with virtual memory with only 16 256mbyte
segments, and couldn't do inline changes (they did try and do packed
shared segments, where lots of different stuff was packed into the same
256mbyte shared segment). They also had to find something for all the
pl.8 programmers to do.

some past 801, iliad, romp, rios, pc/rt, rs/6000, power/pc, etc posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

On second thoughts

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: On second thoughts ...
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Aug 2017 17:54:35 -0700

Al Kossow <aek@bitsavers.org> writes:

I have heard that 801 team and the folks out here in CA were in communication
so it wasn't an independent invention. Lynn may know more about that.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#57 On second thoughts ...

Let's start at the very beginning... 801, ROMP, RT/PC, AIX versions
https://notes.technologists.com/notes/2017/03/08/lets-start-at-the-very-beginning-801-romp-rtpc-aix-versions/

The ROMP/PL.8 project was initiated by the IBM Office Products Division
(OPD) in 1977 in Austin, starting with the 801 architecture and PL.8
language and compiler. This effort became known as the Research -- OPD
-- MicroProcessor and was given the acronym ROMP.

... snip ...

Sort of part of effort to replace a wide variety of internal different
microprocessors, all with 801. ILIAD was going to be used for replacing
a variety of microprocessors used in low-end & mid-range 370 mainframes.
IBM Endicott even built a brand new building for the project. However,
for various reasons those early efforts failed, and found some of the
engineers eventually leaving for risc projects at other vendors.

Berkeley RISC
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_RISC

Berkeley RISC is one of two seminal research projects into RISC-based
microprocessor design taking place under ARPA's VL SI project. RISC was
led by David Patterson (who coined the term RISC) at the University of
California, Berkeley between 1980 and 1984.[1]

... snip ...

IBM 801
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_801

The 801 was an experimental minicomputer designed by IBM. The resulting
architecture was used in various roles in IBM until the 1980s. The 801
was started as a pure research project led by John Cocke in October 1975
at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center

... snip ...

IBM Los Gatos lab had project doing "Blue Iliad" ... first 32bit 801.
It was big (& hot) chip ... and never got much beyond initial
samples. One of the people involved then leaves and goes to HP ... and
is involved in Snake and later Itanium.

this old post has a few "801" emails from 78 & 79 (including item from
summer 1979, the MIT LISP machine people asking for 801 hardware, and
being offered 8100 systems instead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006t.html#9

other old 801 related email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#801

posts mentioning 801, risc, romp, iliad, rios, pc/rt, rs/6000, power/pc,
etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

RISC and PC/RT ancient history, was Re: On second thoughts

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: RISC and PC/RT ancient history, was Re: On second thoughts ...
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 13 Aug 2017 18:14:19 -0700

John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> writes:

Right, that would have been me.  The IBM people did a virtual machine
underneath called the VRM, and our Unix sat on top of it.  It was
a clever enough idea to keep us from having to deal with the low
level hardware details of the ROMP but it had awful performance
implications.  I sketched out a way to do segment switches on
the fly from applications on top of the VRM but they never implemented it.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#57 On second thoughts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#58 On second thoughts

some claim that the VRM (implemented in PL.8) objective was to give all
the OPD PL.8 programmers something to do.

there were claims that the VRM + UNIX faster and less resources than
have the outside vendor learn low level 801 and implement directly to
the hardware.

this was later proved false when the Palo Alto group implemented BSD
unix directly to the low level 801 hardware in less resources and faster
than either the VRM or the UNIX->VRM implementations. The VRM paradigm
also had the downside that for new devices, device drivers had to be
implemented both in pl.8 for VRM and in C for UNIX.

posts mentioning 801, risc, romp, iliad, rios, pc/rt, rs/6000, power/pc,
etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

for other drift, from recent thread about cp/67 & vm/370 (vm/370 45th
b'day) mentioning something about whether a virtual machine microkernel
can be as efficient or more efficient than traditional kernel
implementation.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#44 VM/370 45th Birthday

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Pareto efficiency

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Pareto efficiency
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Aug 2017 10:58:12 -0700

Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:

... however the Oct2008 congressional hearings into the pivotal role
that the rating agencies played 1) rating agencies were selling triple-A
rating on things they knew weren't worth triple-A, 2) triple-A rating
allowed them to sell off everything as soon as they were made, so they
no longer had to care about borrower's qualifications and/or loan
quality (including selling to entities restricted to only dealing in
"safe" investment ... like large pension funds) largely accounting for
being able to do over $27T 2001-2008, 4) rating agencies' business model
became misaligned when they switched from buyers to sellers paying for
the ratings.

(triple-A rated) toxic CDOs posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#toxic.cdo

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#55 Pareto efficiency

some of the early virtual machine based cp67 commerical online service
bureaus had fairly early moved up value stream to offering financial
information to wallstreet and financial operations. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#online

one of the original cp67 commercial online service bureau spinoffs had
even acuired the pricing services division from one of the major rating
agencies (resulting in facetious comments that when the business model
became misaligned, they no longer needed to know what something was
worth in order to rate it).

then in jan2009 when there was still some facade that TARP funds
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troubled_Asset_Relief_Program

would be used for buying offbook toxic assets, there was brief mention
that the cp67 online service bureau company would be involved in valuing
these offbook assets for purchase. Then there started to be comments
that it was very difficult to actually value the complex securitized
mortgage products for purchase, More importantly there was no comments
about w/o documentation (supporting borrower's qualification and loan
quality) it was almost impossible to rate something. And from the law of
unintended consequences, the largest TBTF fines so far are for the
robo-signing mills fabricating the missing documents.

Other factors were

1) just the four largest TBTF were still holding $5.2T in offbook toxic
assets the end of 2008 ... and there was only $700B appropriated for
TARP wouldn't hardly dent the problem

2) summer/fall 2008, several tens of billions of the offbook toxic
assets had gone for 22cents on the dollar. If the rest of the offbook
toxic assets had been bought at that price, the four largest TBTF would
book $4T loss, declared insolvent and forced to be liquidated.

TBTF posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#too-big-to-fail

posts mentioning offbook toxic assets going for 22cents
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#44 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#67 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#70 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#26 Fraud due to stupid failure to test for negative
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#95 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#24 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#11 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#65 is it possible that ALL banks will be nationalized?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#67 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#23 Should FDIC or the Federal
Reserve Bank have the authority to shut down and take over non-bank
financial institutions like AIG?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010n.html#50 TARP Bailout to Cost Less Than Once Anticipated
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#63 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#27 The Zippo Lighter theory of the financial crisis (or, who do we want to blame?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#42 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#45 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#56 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#41 On Protectionism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#71 Pressing Obama, House Bars Rise for Debt Ceiling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#29 Obama: "We don't have enough engineers"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#39 Advice from Richard P. Feynman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#45 S&P's History of Relentless Political Advocacy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#50 How Many Divisions Does Standard and Poors Have?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#4 Geithner, Bernanke have little in arsenal to fight new crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#25 Wall Street Aristocracy Got $1.2 Trillion in Fed's Secret Loans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#59 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#67 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#38 The Mark to Market Fantasy Fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#41 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#57 The Mortgage Crisis---Some Inside Views
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#82 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#37 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#52 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#74 The Wall Street Pentagon
Papers: Biggest Scam In World History Exposed: Are The Federal
Reserve's Crimes Too Big To Comprehend?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#77 How Pursuit of Profits Kills Innovation and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#70 No One Telling Who Took $586B in Fed Swaps
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#32 US real-estate has lost $7T in value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#45 Fannie, Freddie Charge Taxpayers For Legal Bills
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#46 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#40 Who Increased the Debt?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#42 Who Increased the Debt?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#28 REPEAL OF GLASS-STEAGALL DID NOT CAUSE THE FINANCIAL CRISIS - WHAT DO YOU THINK?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#14 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#28 Why Asian companies struggle to manage global workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012j.html#65 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#75 What's the bigger risk, retiring too soon, or too late?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#64 Singer Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#6 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#12 Why Auditors Fail To Detect Frauds?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#73 These Two Charts Show How The Priorities Of US Companies Have Gotten Screwed Up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#51 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#38 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#47 More Whistleblower Leaks on
Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross
Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#54 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#23 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#3 Lending is still lagging according to Reuters. Why do you think that is?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013n.html#87 Logics of Transformation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013o.html#48 Citigroup is the Real Reason We Need the Volcker Rule
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014.html#98 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#0 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#22 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#24 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#0 Before the Internet: The golden age of online services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014f.html#60 GAO and Wall Street Journal Whitewash Huge Criminal Bank Frauds
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014i.html#14 Instead of focusing on big
fines, law enforcement should seek long prison terms for the
responsible executives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#66 LA Times commentary:  roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#8 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#11 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#126 Wall Street's Revenge
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#131 Memo To WSJ: The CRomnibus Abomination Was Not "A Rare Bipartisan Success"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#17 Cromnibus cartoon
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015b.html#31 What were the complaints of binary code programmers that not accept Assembly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#28 Bernie Sanders Proposes A Bill To Break Up The 'Too Big To Exist' Banks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#69 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#76 Greedy Banks Nailed With $5 BILLION+ Fine For Fraud And Corruption
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#93 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015f.html#16 Interactive Data Corp taps banks for sale or IPO -sources
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#20 After 6 Years Of QE, And A $4.5 Trillion Balance Sheet, St. Louis Fed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#25 After 6 Years Of QE, And A $4.5 Trillion Balance Sheet, St. Louis Fed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#49 seveneves
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#65 Michael Hudson's New Book:
Wall Street Parasites Have Devoured Their Hosts -- Your Retirement
Plan and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015g.html#70 AIG freezes defined-benefit pension plan
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015h.html#25 Hillary Clinton's Glass-Steagall
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#95 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#28 Qbasic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#42 Nobody saw the economic mess coming last decade
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#58 Wall Street strikes back against Bernie Sanders
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#86 Wells Fargo "Admits Deceiving" U.S. Government, Pays Record $1.2 Billion Settlement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#0 Why Is the Obama Administration Trying to Keep 11,000 Documents Sealed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#19 Banking; The Book That Will Save Banking From Itself
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016d.html#98 Trust in Government Is Collapsing Around the World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#89 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#0 IBM is Absolutely Down For The Count
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#8 "Too big to fail" was Malicious Cyber Activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#31 Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#33 Moody's Agrees to Settle Financial Crisis-Era Claims for $864 Million
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#92 Trump's Rollback of the Neoliberal Market State
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#96 Trump, Wall Street and the "banking caucus" ready to rip apart Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#90 Economist, Harry Dent Hints: Global Banks Facing a Serious Crisis in Months Ahead
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#38 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#8 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#27 MVS vs HASP vs JES (was 2821)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#28 Stop Romanticizing Glass-Steagall

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

computer component reliability, 1951

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: computer component reliability, 1951
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Aug 2017 19:36:07 -0700

hancock4 writes:

Heck our S/360-40 was upgraded to 192k in the late 1970s.  I don't think
the box, by that pont, cost too much.

In that era, I went to s site with a 370-158 that had six meg, and a
battery of dual-density (200 meg) 3330's.

Geez, now you get a home PC with 8 gig or even more.  (The sad part is
that you need all of it for today's bloatware.)

I don't know even know what comes with a Z mainframe these days,
I think it's in the terrabytes.  Feels a bit of letdown when your
COBOL program needs all of 75k to execute.  But I noticed the file
cache is big and amazing; if I process a file more than once, the
subsequent runs are extremely quick.  (Also, the one box replaced
five 30xx boxes, which in itself is pretty amazing.)

I'm gonna go play with my punch cards, now.  80 characters.

big change going from 155&165 to 158&168 was from 2mic memory to approx
400ns higher density memory.

decision to go to all virtual memory for 370 was based on os/360 MVT
storage management ... regions typically needed to be four times larger
than used ... 370/165 with 1mbyte typically only supported four regions.
going to virtual memory could increase number regions by factor of four
times with little or no paging. some detailed discussion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

This points out that if it hadn't been for FS project killing off 370
efforts the follow-ons to 370/168 would have been much cheaper and
significantly less expensive to manufacture.
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

i.e. 3033 & 3081 were kicked off in parallel. 3033 started out being
168-3 logic remapped to 20% faster chips. Some logic redesign taking
advantage of extra circuits on each chip ... eventually got 3033
throughput to 1.5 times 168-3.

note an issue was that systems were getting faster than disks were getting
faster ... that met programs were spending relatively more time waiting
for disk i/o ... to keep processors utilized required increasing number
of concurrent tasks/regions. I was starting to highlight this in the 70s
and by the early 80s was claiming that disks relative system throughput
had declined by factor of ten times since the late 60s (i.e. disks got
3-5 times faster, systems had got 40-50 times faster). old post with
early 80s comparison
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/94.html#43 Bloat, elegance, simplicity and other irrelevant concepts

some disk divsion executive took exception and assigned the division
performance group to refute the claims. after a few weeks, they came
back and said that I had slightly understated the problem. This was
then respun into SHARE presentations that provided recommendations
about disk optimization to improve system throughput. posts with
small piece
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#3 using 3390 mod-9s
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#68 DASD Response Time (on antique 3390?)

this century Z machine tends to be approx. a single rack, max configured
going for been around $30m

z900, 16 processors, 2.5BIPS (156MIPS/proc), Dec2000
z990, 32 processors, 9BIPS, (281MIPS/proc), 2003
z9, 54 processors, 18BIPS (333MIPS/proc), July2005
z10, 64 processors, 30BIPS (469MIPS/proc), Feb2008
z196, 80 processors, 50BIPS (625MIPS/proc), Jul2010
EC12, 101 processors, 75BIPS (743MIPS/proc), Aug2012
z13, 141 processors, 100BIPS (710MIPS/proc), Jan2015
z14, 170 processor, 150 BIPS, (862MIPS/proc), Aug2017

industry standard MIP benchmark is based on number of iterations
compared to iterations on 370/158 (or vax) 1mip processor. 2000 to
2017, per processor have increased from 156MIPS (156 370/158) to
862MIPS (862 370/158) ... about 5.5 times ... but the number of
processors have increased by factor of ten times .... so aggregate
almost 60 times increase (for max. configured Z).

note that one of the issues is that current cache miss access to
memory latency ... when measured in count of processor cycles is
compareable to 60s disk i/o latency, when measured in count of 1960s
processor cycles ...  aka main memory is the new disk. This tends to
justify things like out-of-order execution, speculative execution,
hyperthreading, etc ... sort of hardware multitasking, trying to have
processor do something when it would otherwise be waiting on cache
miss memory access.

Also mainframe comparison, z196 era e5-2600v1 blade had 400-530 BIPS
rating (depending on model) and could get 50-60 in single rack ... say
25TIPS. Current e5-2600v4 blade is 3-4 times, maybe 100TIPS per rack
... a rack of e5-2600 blades approaching 1000 times the processing of
z mainframe "rack" ... for a few hundred thousand rather than $30M
(cloud mega-datacenters assemble their own e5-2600 blades for under
$1/BIPS compared to "Z" at couple hundred thousand/BIPS).

IBM financials has been publishing mainframe sales as precentage of
previous sales ... so it takes a bit of sluething to decode what it
means. 2014 EC12 numbers sort of worked out to the equivalent of 50-60
max configured EC12/yr (down from possibly a couple hundred/yr last
decade). However, IBM is still been making money off mainframe
software ... mainframe hardware has dropped to a couple precent of
total revenue but mainframe division was something like 25% of total
revenue and 40% of profit.

recent posts mentioning e5-2600 blades:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#6 How do BIG WEBSITES work?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#17 The Pentagon still uses computer software from 1958 to manage its contracts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#25 ARM Cortex A53 64 bit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#57 What are mainframes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#58 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#88 Paging subsystems in the era of bigass memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#10 WD ships 'world's largest' 12TB HGST Ultrastar He12 Helium 7200 RPM Enterprise HDDs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#75 11May1992 (25 years ago) press on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017e.html#94 Migration off Mainframe to other platform
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#9 The Mainframe vs. the Server Farm: A Comparison
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017g.html#103 SEX

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

computer component reliability, 1951

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: computer component reliability, 1951
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 14 Aug 2017 21:04:45 -0700

hancock4 writes:

If memory serves, the 158 (attached processors) with 6 meg served
about 500 terminals.  Response time was slow and the machine was
at capacity.

The programmers used ROSCOE instead of TSO because that was more
machine efficient.  On unusually busy days the programmers were
told to work at night.

I don't remember what specific models succeded the 158.  But as soon
as they bought new hardware, they added a new major application to it,
so the machine remained at capacity.  Down the road they split off
development from production onto another machine which helped.  The
3330s were replaced with faster disks.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#61 computer component reliability, 1951

370/158 had (six) integrated channels .... "attached processors" was
supposedly cheaper two processor configuration ... but only one
processor had channels. this was part of trying to come out with
something when the future system had shutdown most new 370 activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

however, it somewhat met something for 168 attached processor ...  since
168 had external channels ... while 158 attached processor just didn't
have cables connected.

23jun1969 unbundling announcement led to HONE ... initially branch
office online access to virtual machine cp67 systems for practicing
operating system experience.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

they also started offering cms\apl based sales & marketing support
applications ... which eventually came to dominate all HONE useage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

in the mid-70s, the US HONE datacenters were consolidated in palo alto
(trivia: when facebook moved to silicon valley, it was into new
bldg. next door to old HONE datacenter). Eventually became clusters of
168 attached processors ... 3830 controller with four channel switch and
string switch (two 3830 controllers per 3330 string) gave each 3330
drive connectivity for eight channels (to eight systems). Traditional
SMPs simulated symmetric multiprocessor with each processor (in two
processor configuration) having channel connections to the same devices.
However, HONE wanted all disks connected to 16processors. 3330 disk farm
only provided for eight channel connectins, so eight 2-processor,
"attached" processor systems. some multiprocessor posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

HONE APL workload was CPU intensive ... so having only one processor in
2-processor configuration wasn't a particular hardship. By the late 70s,
it was likely the largest single system operation in the world ... with
load balancing and fail-over across the systems in the configuration.
Something like it was eventually released to customers some 30yrs later,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#43 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#46 From The Annals of Release No Software Before Its Time

In the early 80s, the US HONE datacenter was replicated first in Dallas
and then in Boulder ... for triple-replicated geographic/disaster
survivability.

Later when I was out doing marketing for our IBM HA/CMP product
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

I coined the terms geographic survivability and disaster
survivability to differentiate form disaster recovery.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

at that time, I got asked to write a section for the corporate
continuous availability strategy document ... but it then got pulled
because both rochester (as/400) and POK (mainframe) complained that they
couldn't (then) meet the requirements.

trivia: 76/77 we had 370 16-way multiprocessor project ... which lots of
people was really great ... and we had con'ed some of the 3033 processor
engineers to work on it in their spare time. then somebody told the head
of POK that it could be decades before the POK favorite son operating
system (MVS) had effective 16-way support. Then the head of POK invited
some of us to never visit POK again (and the 3033 get back to their full
time job and stop being distracted). It is DEC2000 before mainframe
finally announces 16-way support (z900, see previous post).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2017 12:24:36 -0700

hancock4 writes:

I wish I saved the article:  in the business section, an airline
reported record profits.  In a separate article, that airline was
in court seeking to abrogate its pension obligations.

periodically mentioned that starting in 80s, corporations with large
number of workers were reorganizing into separate subsidiaries with
profit booked in subsidiary with few workers. airlines in the 90s had
profit being booked in selling tickets while the airline operations were
break-even or loss. 90s saw airlines operations with substantial loses
while tickets had significant profit ... with the parent company showing
substantial overall profit.

parent company could then declare bankruptcy in the airline operations
subsidiary and dump the pension plans on the government.

after turn of the century, corporations would (also) move the profit
subsidiary to offshore tax haven (even when all the operations
actually occured in the US)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

this sort of also shows up in whether corporations are people ... the
city of london now has 30k some corporate "human" voters and 9k human
"human" voters. The question is how much does it cost to create
additional corporations in order to stuff the ballot box?

I referenced some profit/lost/bankruptcy news URLs in past posts
mentioning airline operations.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#92 Innovation and iconoclasm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#1 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#7 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#33 Management Secrets From Inside GE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014g.html#54 Has the last fighter pilot been born?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014k.html#69 LA Times commentary:  roll out "smart" credit cards to deter fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#59 IBM Data Processing Center and Pi
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015d.html#63 Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#81 prices, was Western Union envisioned internet functionality
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016b.html#83 Qbasic - lies about Medicare
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016c.html#17 Globalization Worker Negotiation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#93 Delta Outage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016e.html#98 E.R. Burroughs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#45 OT: DuPont seeks to screw workers of their pensions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#109 Airlines Reservation Systems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#93 United Air Lines - an OODA-loop perspective
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#4 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#25 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:38:43 -0700

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#63 endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)

"City of London" is big player here: Treasure Islands: Uncovering the
Damage of Offshore Banking and Tax Havens
https://www.amazon.com/Treasure-Islands-Uncovering-Offshore-Banking-ebook/dp/B004OA6420/

pg71/loc1477-79:

The City's nine thousand-odd human residents have one vote each in
municipal elections here. But businesses in the City vote too, as if
they were human, with thirty-two thousand corporate votes. 25 In effect,
Goldman Sachs, the Bank of China, Moscow Narodny Bank, and KPMG can vote
in a hugely important British election.

pg87/loc1816-20:

As I've noted, when Britain's formal empire collapsed, it did not
entirely disappear. Fourteen small island states decided not to become
independent and became instead Britain's Overseas Territories, with
Britain's Queen as their head of state. It is a status that has been
preserved until today. Exactly half of them--Anguilla, Bermuda, the
British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Gibraltar, Montserrat, and
the Turks and Caicos Islands--are tax havens, actively supported and
managed from Britain and intimately linked with the City of London.

... snip ...

tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax havens
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evasion

past refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#54 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#65 The Real Snowden Question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#81 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#3 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#26 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#2 IBM Relevancy in the IT World
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#57 The agency problem and how to create a criminogenic environment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013k.html#60 spacewar
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#1 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013l.html#60 Retirement Heist
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013m.html#66 NSA Revelations Kill IBM Hardware Sales In China
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015c.html#56 past of nukes, was Future of support for telephone rotary dial ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015e.html#94 1973--TI 8 digit electric calculator--$99.95
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#92 Thanks Obama
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#35 Deutsche Bank and a $10Bn Money Laundering Nightmare: More Context Than You Can Shake a Stick at
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016f.html#103 Chain of Title: How Three Ordinary Americans Uncovered Wall Street's Great Foreclosure Fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#35 Hammond threatens EU with aggressive tax changes after Brexit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017.html#52 TV Show "Hill Street Blues"

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Aug 2017 10:32:58 -0700

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#63 endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#64 endless medical arguments, Disregard post (another screwup)

reference from this past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#93 Brand-name companies' secret Luxembourg tax deals revealed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014m.html#2 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2015.html#8 LEO

Luxembourg Takes the Heat, but the World's Worst Tax Haven - the
City of London - Remains Unscathed
http://wolfstreet.com/2014/11/08/as-luxembourg-takes-the-heat-the-worlds-worst-tax-haven-the-city-of-london-remains-hidden-in-plain-sight/

The City Within the City

When it comes to financial secrecy, no European jurisdiction - not even
Switzerland or Luxembourg - can hold a candle to the wholly autonomous
City of London, which for centuries has existed as an ancient,
semi-alien entity lodged inside the British nation state; a "prehistoric
monster which had mysteriously survived into the modern world", as a
19th-century would-be City reformer put it

... snip ...

The tax haven in the heart of Britain
http://www.newstatesman.com/economy/2011/02/london-corporation-city

The bill concerned the City of London Corporation, the local-government
authority for the 1.2-square-mile slab of prime real estate in central
London that is the City of London. The corporation is an ancient,
semi-alien entity lodged inside the British nation state; a "prehistoric
monster which had mysteriously survived into the modern world", as a
19th-century would-be City reformer put it. The words remain apt
today. Few people care that London has a mayor and a lord mayor - but
they should: the corporation is an offshore island inside Britain, a tax
haven in its own right.

... snip ...

and receent Luxembourg references:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#18 IBM Pension
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017d.html#93 United Air Lines - an OODA-loop perspective
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017f.html#6 [CM] What was your first home computer?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#25 OFF TOPIC: University of California, Irvine, revokes 500 admissions

Luxembourg Leaks: Global Companies' Secrets Exposed
https://www.icij.org/project/luxembourg-leaks

several times mentioned that starting in 80s, started to see
corporations with large numbers of human workers, reorganizing with
most of workers in one subsidiary, but majority of profits booked in
another subsidiary. They then even have declared bankruptcy on the
subsidiary with the workers ... even dumping workers pension plans on
the government.

After start of the century, many started moving subsidiaries (where
the profits are booked), to offshore tax havens. This was not only
being used by corporations with large numbers of workers (separating
subsidiary with large number of workers from subsidiary where profits
were booked) ... but has also been heavily leaveraged by many silicon
valley technology companies. There have been lots of articles about
Apple doing this with Ireland ... where the Ireland Apple corporation
consists of a shoe box in an empty office, most recent reference from
two days ago: "Ireland refuses to collect commission's 13 billion tax
bill from Apple"
http://www.euronews.com/2017/08/16/ireland-refuses-to-collect-commissions-13-billion-tax-bill-from-apple

past posts mentioning Apple booking its profit in Ireland subsidiary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#81 Ireland feels the heat from Apple tax row
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#91 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#25 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013i.html#79 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013j.html#0 What Makes a Tax System Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#30 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014b.html#33 Royal Pardon For Turing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014d.html#31 Apple's long IRS-Irish history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2014l.html#95 weird apple trivia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#13 1970--protesters seize computer center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2016.html#32 I Feel Old
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017c.html#37 New phone scams

similar to shoebox, google reference: "$16bn-a-year in Google postbox:
Inside giant's secret Bermuda haven"
http://www.news.com.au/technology/online/16bnayear-in-google-postbox-inside-giants-secret-bermuda-haven/news-story/3c4f68e876ea5e1a64eefb7270342006

There are no employees, no office and no signage to be found there.

Its only presence is the tiny metal box bearing the number of the beast,
666, and housed at a post office building in the capital Hamilton.

... snip ...

tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax haven posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submisc.html#tax.evaion

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM: A History Of Progress, 1890s to 2001

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: IBM: A History Of Progress, 1890s to 2001
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Aug 2017 17:54:06 -0700

IBM: A History Of Progress, 1890s to 2001
https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/interactive/ibm_history.pdf
pg.65:

1988

National Science Foundation Network

IBM collaborates with MCI Communications and the University of Michigan
to form the National Science Foundation Network, a computer network that
provides the infrastructure and lays the groundwork for the explosive
growth of the Internet in the 1990s

... snip ...

1st part of the 80s, we were working with the director of NSF and were
suppose to get $20M interconnect the NSF supercomuter centers.  Then
congress cuts the budget, some other things happen and then NSF releases
an RFP (in part based on what we already had running, including calling
for T1 links). Internal politics block us from bidding. The director of
NSF tries to help, writting the company a letter (with support from
other agencies) copying the CEO, but that just makes the internal
politics worse. Then as regaional networks connect into the centers,
it morphs into the NSF backbone ... precursor to the modern internet.
ref:
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/401444/grid-computing/

some old EMAIL
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#nsfnet

instead of installing T1 links, they install some rube golberge
440kbit links and then to somewhat look like that they were meeting
what was called for in the RFP, they install telco multiplexors that
run multiple 440kbit links over T1 trunks (we facetiously ridicule them
saying that some of the T1 trunks are in turn multiplexed over T3
and/or T5 trunks, so why aren't they claiming T5 networks).

NSFNET2 then calls for upgrade to T3. Possibly thinking to shutdown my
criticism, I'm selected to be the red team, and a dozen or so people
from half dozen labs around the world are the blue team. At the final
review, I present first and then the blue team. Five minutes into the
blue team presentation, the executive running the review, pounds on the
table and says that he would lay down in front of a garbage truck before
he let anything but the blue team proposal go ahead (since it was
already obvious that red team proposal was significant better than
the blue team proposal).

some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#nsfnet

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM: A History Of Progress, 1890s to 2001

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM: A History Of Progress, 1890s to 2001
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 18 Aug 2017 22:26:48 -0700

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#66 IBM: A History Of Progress, 1890s to 2001

Note early uptic in IBMPC were corporations that were ordering tens of
thousands at time. They could get a IBM/PC with 3270 terminal
emulation for about the same price as already justified 3270 dumb
terminal and get some local computing with 3270 terminal in single
desktop footprint. By the late 80s, the situation had inverted with
increased PC computing power. A senior disk engineer got a talked
scheduled at annual, worldwide, internal communication group
conference supposedly on 3174 performance but started out with
statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for
the demise of the disk division. The issue was the communication group
had stranglehold with corporate responsibility for everything that
crossed the datacenter walls and was fiercely fighting off
client/server and distributed computing trying to preserve their dumb
terminal paradigm and install base. The disk division was seeing data
fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly
platforms with drop in disk sales. The disk division had come up with
a number of solutions but they were constantly vetoed by the disk
division. It turns out to affect the whole mainframe datacenter
business and few short years later, IBM goes into the red. some past
posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

pg. 73, The Birth of e-business

Entering the 1990s, IBM confronts its most significant strategic
challenges since the Depression and successfully undertakes one of the
great turnarounds in business history.  It moves into major new growth
businesses, principally services and software, and embraces open
standards for computing.  The company also fundamentally reshapes its
culture to refocus on clients and to be more agile, responsive and
collaborative. This transformation coincides with the advent of the
Internet, and IBM is a pioneer in helping clients capitalize on the new
possibilities of global networked computing and business--what it dubs
"e-business." As the 20th century comes to a close, IBM stands, once
again, at the forefront of global technology and business.

... snip ...

we are working on cluster scaleup for our ha/cmp product, some past
posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp
for both technical/scientific with national labs and commercial with
RDBMS vendors. Reference to Jan1992 meeting in Ellison conference room
on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13
some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

Within a few weeks of the Jan1992 Ellison meeting, cluster scaleup is
transferred, announced as supercomputer (for technical/scientific
*ONLY*), and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four
processors. We then decide to leave. Later, two of the Oracle people
that we had worked with, also at the Ellison meeting, have left and are
now at the startup responsible for something called the commerce
server. We are brought in as consultants because they want to do payment
transactions on the server, the startup have also invented this
technology they call "SSL"; the result is now frequently called
e-commerce.

Also end of 1992 IBM has gone into the red and had been reorganized into
the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company. We got a
call from somebody deep in the bowels of Armonk asking us to help with
the breakup (we were already gone some 6months). Lots of business units
used MOUs to rely on supplier contracts with other business units. All
those MOUs had to be cataloged and turn into their own contracts for the
breakup of the company. Before we get started, a new CEO is brought in
that will reverse the breakup and resurrect the company. Dec 1992 "How
IBM Was Left Behind", article behind paywall but some lives free at
wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Pareto efficiency

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Pareto efficiency
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 19 Aug 2017 09:01:17 -0700

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#54 Pareto efficiency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#55 Pareto efficiency
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2017h.html#60 Pareto efficiency

This was also posted to facebook, google+ and linkedin. There was
discussion in google+ that in economics examples, some starting points
can result in non-desirable "maxima".

When I was doing CP/67 dynamic resource management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#fairshare
at the scientific center in the 70s,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
I developed automatic benchmarking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#benchmark

we also had cp67 performance monitor that ran on most internal
datacenters, taking snapshot of workload and resource use every 5mins
and accumulated several years of data for tens of systems. From the
data, developed synthetic workload that could be parameterised to
simulate the observed workloads. It was also used to specify workload
well outside observed operations as stress tests.

there was also work on a cms\apl analytical system model. A version of
the analytical system model was made available on the (virtual machine
based) world-wide sales and marketing online system HONE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone
as performance predictor. IBM SEs would enter customer configuration
and workload profile information about what happens when additional
hardware is added and/or workload is changed. This also led to things
like capacity planning.

In the morph of CP67 to VM370, a lot of CP67 features were dropped
and/or simplified, including the dynamic adaptive resource
manager. Later I started porting all the CP67 work to VM370 for my
internally distributed CSC/VM system. some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

During early porting work, the automatic benchmarking stress tests would
always crash vm370. It wasn't until the CP67 serialization infrations
was ported to VM370 that the stress tests stopped crashing ... and also
eliminated all known cases of zombie/hung users ... some refs
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

During the "Future System" period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys
internal politics were suspending and/or killing 370 activities. Then
when FS imploded, there was mad rush to get things back into 370 product
pipelines. This contributed to decision to picking up lots of CSC/VM for
inclusion in standard VM370 product. Some amount (like integrity
serialization changes and a lot of shared segment work) was picked up
and included in VM370 release 3. Other pieces were selected for VM370
resource manager add-on, guinea pig to starting to charge for operating
system products.

As part of the "resource manager" product, several years of accumulated
performance data on hundreds of internal VM370 was analyzed, resulting
in finding maximum values. This was used to represent the edge/envelope
of an N-dimensional space. Around 900 uniformly distributed points in
the space were used to define specification of benchmarks. Then another
100 points were selected around the outside of envelope for another 100
tests ... for 1000 automated benchmarking tests. A modified version of
the performance predictor was used to predict the operation of each
benchmark and then compared with the actual result. Disparities was
examined to see whether there was problem in the performance predictor
and/or in the "resource manager" operation. After the first 1000
benchmark, the performance predictor was programmed to select
benchmarks and configuration based on all benchmark data to date,
basically "hillclimbing" algorithm, looking for local maxima for another
1000 benchmarks. This was 2000 benchmarks total in preparing for
releasing the "resource manager" that took three months elapsed time to
run.

Having 1000 starting points distributed across the possible space helped
find (& eliminate) less desirable local maximas.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970






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