List of Archived Posts

2013 Newsgroup Postings (05/28 - 06/18)

"Highway Patrol" back on TV
What Makes sorting so cool?
What Makes code storage management so cool?
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
IBM ad for Basic Operating System
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
IBM ad for Basic Operating System
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Become a millionaire and never work again - by being a whistleblower. Fair or perverse?
Why Didn't the SEC Catch Madoff? It Might Have Been Policy Not To
Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken
Supercomputers face growing resilience problems
"Highway Patrol" back on TV
It was 30 Years Ago Today
How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken
Gives There a VM Discussion List?
Check out Moto X: Motorola reveals plans for ink and even pills to replace AL
Check out Moto X: Motorola reveals plans for ink and even pills to replace AL
I/O Optimization
'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
Getting at the original command name/line
Getting at the original command name/line
"Highway Patrol" back on TV
"Highway Patrol" back on TV
'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
I/O Optimization
Getting at the original command name/line
CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek
CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek
Some Things Never Die
CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek
"Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Search for first Web page takes detour into US
"Highway Patrol" back on TV
NSA phone records
NSA phone records
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Traders Said to Rig Currency Rates to Profit Off Clients
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
NYT: N.S.A. Chief Says Phone Logs Halted Terror Threats
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
NYT: N.S.A. Chief Says Phone Logs Halted Terror Threats
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Minicomputer Pricing
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
cp67 & vm370
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
cp67 & vm370
Minicomputer Pricing
Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
cp67 & vm370
DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today
IBM commitment to academia
Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
Minicomputer Pricing
Minicomputer Pricing
Vintage IBM Manuals
Minicomputer Pricing
Minicomputer Pricing
Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation
By Any Other Name
IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today

"Highway Patrol" back on TV

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 28 May 2013 11:51:49 -0400
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
Forgiving does not mean forgetting and putting the person in a position to reoffend; this goes beyond coverup and is an accomplish before the fact. Does the Church move accounts caught stealing large sums for one parish and move them to another without telling the moved to parish? I rather think not.

dtra's motto has been "trust and verify"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On-Site_Inspection_Agency
... also "trust, but verify"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trust,_but_verify

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes sorting so cool?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes sorting so cool?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 28 May 2013 11:48:45 -0400
Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net> writes:
When I was over there in 2002, I saw chicken feet served in the cafeteria that the students frequented. I did not have the guts to try them.

when my wife's father was posted to nanking as advisor to generalissimo ... he took the family with him. my wife says that all local food had to be soaked in heavily chlorinated water for 3hrs before eating

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

What Makes code storage management so cool?

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: What Makes code storage management so cool?
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 29 May 2013 00:48:10 -0400
hancock4 writes:
Once a week our machine was devoted to the IBM CE for half a shift for maintenance. Everything was cleaned and calibrated. We had excellent reliability, given that our machine wasn't a youngster.

There was but one time where we had some serious CPU problem. Then IBM brought in the big guns and made use of all those roller indicator lights on the CPU panel. They also IPL'd from special card decks. They fixed it pretty quickly and off we went.


that was one of the problems with offering 7x24 service ... the early virtual-machine-based online service bureaus enhanced the system to support loosely-coupled (aka mainframe cluster) single system image ... including non-disruptive process migration from one system to another ... allowing systems to be taken offline for hardware maintenance.

misc. past posts mentioning virtual-machine-based online service bureaus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#online

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 28 May 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5
recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#93 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

when I was doing csc/vm in the mid-70s ... one of the issues was that task switching as a result of asynchronous i/o interrupts could totally destroy cache hit ratios. one of my strategies for dynamic adaptive resource management was recognize when i/o interrupt rate was exceeding some thresholds and dispatch tasks disabled for i/o interrupt (but with predictable timer external interrupt). then when time interval had expired ... effectively batch drain all pending i/o interrupts. this significantly improved the cache hit rate for the executable task ... as well as improved the cache hit rate for i/o interrupt handling. The i/o rate even went up compared to allowing asynchronous i/o interrupts ... because of cache utilization operating in much more predictable manner.

the (mainframe) disk engineering & product test labs were running stand-alone, scheduled 7x24 around the clock for disk testing. at one time they had tried MVS to enable concurrent testing ... but found MVS had 15min MTBF (requiring manual re-ipl) in that environment (even with just a single testing). I offered to rewrite input/output supervisor so that it was bullet proof and never fail. The result was that they could do concurrent, anytime, on-demand testing ... greatly improving productivity.

Part of the design of 370/xa SSCH architecture was to support queued i/o processing as way of managing cache utilization. The other was to offload a lot of the enormous MVS I/O pathlength to another process. As part of the i/o supervisor rewrite for disk engineering ... I also radically cut the pathlength for processing and come very close to 370/xa SSCH throughput with standard 370 I/O operations (total processor time for i/o processing was dependent on both the number of instructions as well as the cache hit ratio).

That is separate from the latency required for performing a disk I/O compared to directly accessing processor memory. Extended store for 3090 introduced this operation with a 4k synchronous move instruction ... processor memory technology was such that it wasn't possible to package the desired memory within distance for processor access latency ... slightly analogous to slower LCS from 360 days. To compensate for the longer latency of expanded store ... they implemented a wider bus (more data at once) that moved fixed 4k data each time (standard processor memory then sort of became a software managed cache).

The other problem that really showed up in the 3090 timeframe was the horrible performance penalty paid for the 360 half-duplex channel architecture. Disk division got management direction to use an extremely slow (cheaper) processor for the 3830 disk controller followon, the 3880; somewhat to compensate the 3880 had special hardware path for data movement ... but processing of command/control operations were drastically slower. The 3090 assumed that 3880 would have command processing overhead as 3830 ... and sized the number of channels for target throughput of disk i/o operations per second (IOPS). However, 3880 processing was significantly slower, it drastically increased "channel busy" (because half-duplex architecture locked the channel for duration of 3880 processing). As a result the 3090 had to significantly increase the number of 3090 channels in order to achieve the target throughputs, this required an additional 3090 TCM (at increased manufacturing cost) ... there were jokes that 3090 was going to charge off the cost of the extra 3090 TCM to the 3880 product group. Also the significant increase in 3090 channels (to compensate for the enormous half-duplex channel busy overhead penalty paid for the slow 3880 processor) was respun to enormous numbers of channels demonstrate enormous i/o capacity ... a myth that continues to this day.

In 1988 I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they had ... which becomes FCS in the early 90s ... it is full-duplex with concurrent transfer in both direction ... and totally asynchronous operation ... channel busy reduces to only actual data transfers ... w/o any of the stuff involving 360 channel protocol chatter. In fact, FCS effectively downloads the channel program to the remote end (as data transfer) ... further significantly reducing the channel protocol latency gorp. This is why I've claimed that introduction of ESCON at 17mbyte/sec, it was already obsolete; FCS at the same time was capable of 1gbit/sec concurrent in both directions (2gbit/sec aggregate).

Later, some mainframe channel engineers define a mainframe protocol chatter layer on-top of FCS that enormously reduces the throughput (compared to native FCS) which eventually becomes FICON. Recent peak disk i/o z196 benchmark was 2M IOPS using 104 FICON (with 104 FCS underneath). Also recently there was a FCS announced for e5-2600 claiming over 1M IOPS (on single FCS) ... two such FCS would higher throughput than 104 FICON. Note peak z196 also uses max 14 system assist processors for SSCH processing. 14 SAPs all peak 100% cpu utilization at 2.2M SSCH/sec and recommendations are to run SAPs at (or below) 70% cpu utilization ... or 1.5M SSCH/sec.

other recent posts mentioning FICON:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#10 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#40 Searching for storage (DASD) alternatives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#77 OT: but hopefully interesting - Million core supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#6 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#7 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#8 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#63 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#67 relative speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#68 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#77 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#12 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#16 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#45 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#4 Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#38 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#2 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#4 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#14 Tech Time Warp of the Week: The 50-Pound Portable PC, 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#49 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 29 May 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5
recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#93 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

First student programming job I had was to port 1401 MPIO to 360/30. The univ ran 709 with 1401 front-end doing unit record, card reader to tape and tape to printer/rpunch. Tapes would be manually moved between 1401 tape drives and 709 tape drives (that ran tape->tape). The univ. was sold 360/67 & TSS/360 as replacement for 709/1401.

The initial transition was to replace 1401 with 360/30 and the 360/30 had 1401 hardware emulation mode ... so 1401 MPIO could continue to run ... so having me do port to 360/30 was just part of transition from 709/1401 to 360.

I got to design my own interrupt handlers, dispatcher, device drivers, storage management, error recovery, etc. Eventually came to be about box of (2000) cards ... and took 30mins elapsed time to assemble under early os/360 PCP. I did conditional assembly that would either generate "stand-alone" program loaded with BPS loader and managed the whole machine ... and a version that would run under os/360 and used read/write and five DCB macros. The os/360 version took an hour to assembly ... you could watch the front panel lights when assembler was doing DCB macro processing ... each DCB macro took 5-6 mins elapsed time.

Student fortran jobs took a second or two on 709 IBSYS tape-to-tape. Initial move to os/360 (360/67 running as 360/65, tss/360 never did work out) with 3-step fortgclg took well over minute. adding HASP to OS/360 MFT 9.5 reduced it to a little over 30 seconds. I did highly optimized OS/360 sysgen that carefully ordered position of datasets on disk and order of PDS members in sys1.linklib and sys1.svclib which got almost 3times improvement to 12.9seconds for student 3step fortgclg.

It wasn't until (Waterloo's) WATFOR was installed that student fortran jobs were running faster than 709 IBSYS. Typical operation was run single step WATFOR and batch card tray of student fortran jobs (possibly 40-70 jobs). OS/360 single step was about 4seconds (os/360 "overhead" with my highly optimized sysgen) and WATFOR claimed something like 20,000 cards/min (333 cps) ... so another 6seconds ... 60jobs taking about 10secs elapsed time ... finally around 5-10 times faster than 709 ... improved from initial nearly 100 times slower than 709.

recent posts mentioning MPIO and/or WATFOR:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#24 Is Microsoft becoming folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#31 Java Security?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#39 Old data storage or data base

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 30 May 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5
recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#93 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

IDC: Server market revenue down 7.7 percent in first quarter
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2040281/idc-server-market-revenue-down-77-percent-in-q1.html

IBM recently had advertisement for E5-2600 blades saying that upgrading old servers will save money ... i.e. e5-2600 blades are so much more cost/effective and power efficient (replace large number of older servers with much fewer e5-2600 blades).

A problem is that growth in server demand is increasing slower than the increase in price/performance. Server workload is also moving to public cloud ... and much of the public cloud business doesn't even show up in the "server market" (aka big public clouds aren't buying servers, they are building their own).

IBM marketing for e5-2600 blade isn't directly about any BIPS rating but actually providing significantly better price/performance throughput for typical workloads ... regardless of any Amdahl law issues. As part of IBM selling new e5-2600 blades ... it is effectively claiming that customer could replace a large number of older (already owned) servers with much fewer e5-2600 blades and save money in the change-over. The cost of new e5-2600 blade replacements is offset by less complexity costs with radically fewer servers as well as power savings (even if there are workload increases).

Large public clouds also claim they build their own servers for 1/3rd the price from brand name vendors ... and server chip vendors now claim they are shipping more server chips to public cloud operations than they are shipping to server vendors ... the public cloud server market is now larger than the numbers quoted for the vendor "server market" (as well as public cloud putting significant cost pressure on the vendor "server market").

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 30 May 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5
recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#21 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#93 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

In the 70s, I got sucked into project to do a 16way 370 SMP ... and it first was going really well ... until somebody told the head of POK that it could be decades before MVS had 16-way SMP support (some of us are then invited to never appear in POK again). Part of the issue for a lot of legacy 360 software was assumptions about extremely strong memory consistency which was big problem for SMP cache scaleup.

In 1990, besides already having been sucked into standards work on FCS (fiber channel standard to be used for interconnect for thousands of loosely couple processors and I/O) ... I was also sucked into work on SCI standards (FCS originated from technology out of LLNL and SCI originated from technology out of SLAC). Some of SCI standards use overlapped with FCS ... however SCI was also used for 64-way memory bus cache consistency. Some of the systems built were Data General and Sequent used it for 64 4-way shared cache i486 systems .... 256 I486 multiprocessor, SGI used it for 256-way MIPS shared memory multiprocesssor and Convex used it for 128-way HP "RISC" multiprocessor.

Steve Chen who had been responsible for Cray X-MP and Y-MP and then leaves to start his own supercomputer business ... with lots of IBM backing in the late 80s and early 90s. Traditional supercomputer start getting hit with these massive number of smaller processors. Steve's efforts flounders and he shows up as CTO at Sequent. In the later 90s (before IBM buys Sequent) we are brought in by Steve to do some consulting at Sequent (some number of jokes about IBM buying Sequent to shut it down to eliminate the mainframe competition). exemplar 256-way 1996 with SCI
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequent_Computer_Systems

I've commented before, that by the time 17mbyte/sec ESCON was introduced with ES/9000 in 1990, it was obsolete ... FCS was doing full-duplex 1gbit concurrent, 2gbit aggregate ... and it was also less expensive than ESCON (besides having significantly higher throughput). ES/9000 was also still only 6-way
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_FS9000.html

the common x86 component was 4-chip shared cache board with single core per chip .... and then SCI tied together up to 64 of the shared caches for 256way.

This building block continued as more & more cores were added to chips ... so the 4-chip component became 2cores/chip (8processors per board and 512-way SMP with SCI), 4cores/chip (16processor per board and 1024-way SMP with SCI) and 8cores/chip (32processor per board and 2048-way SMP with SCI). some more on SCI scaleup here .... getting to 1024-way and 2048-way SMP multiprocessor
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-Uniform_Memory_Access

es/9000 1990 w/6processors,
z900 2000 16 processors,
z990 2003 32 processors,
z9 2005 54 processors,
z10 2008 64 processors,
z196 2010 80 processors,
ec12 2012 101 processors

The current issue is that the basic building block of two or four chips per board have become such an ubiquitous commodity component that the large volume operations, where they need more than 2048 processors in any case ... don't bother to pay for the SCI engineering cost ... just stop at the single blade/board level and use loosely-coupled for further scaleup. There are some customers willing to pay for the 1024-way and 2048-way multiprocessor ... but not a significant number.

With a e5-2600 blade at two chips and 16-way SMP rated at 527BIPS and 33BIPS/processor and a e5-4600 blade at four chips, 32-way SMP at over 1TIPS (million MIPS) ... most of the customers are just buying large numbers lowest cost blade (IBM has base list for e5-2600 blade at $1815 or $3.44/BIPS this compares to a 80-processor z196 at 50BIPS and $28M or $560,000/BIPS). Claims for next generation supposedly out shortly could be 1.5TIPS (for 2chip) and 3TIPS (for 4chips, 48processors). 3TIPS is the equivalent of forty 101 processor EC12s rated at 75BIPS per EC12 and 743MIPS/processor

oh, recent post in a.f.c. in "A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing" thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#49

including this email from 1992 with overview of target technology for 1993 & 1994
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#email920722

for 1994 talks about 1gbyte SCI (serial fiber, full duplex, 2gbyte/sec concurrent) and having 32 4-way SMP boards in single box capable of 32BIPS (for 128-way multiprocessor)

somewhat triva ... number of mainframe processors in SMP did start to go up after buying Sequent ... also from sequent wiki:

In 2004, an Itanium based x455 was added to the NUMA family. During this period, the NUMA technology became the basis for IBM's extended X-Architecture (eXA, which could also stand for enterprise X-Architecture). As of 2011, this chipset is now on its fifth generation, known as eX5 technology.[8][9] It now falls under the brand IBM System x.

... snip ...

and more from the sequent article (which also mentions mainframe getting hit hard in addition to ibm's proprietary unix):
An alternative view of IBM's actions, born out of the belief that corporations maintain consistent strategies over the short and medium term despite executive changes, is that IBM acquired Sequent not to nurture it but simply to keep it out of Sun's clutches. Through its acquisition of what became the Enterprise 10000 server line from Cray, Sun had done so much financial damage to IBM's server market share, that IBM was very reluctant to see this disaster repeated. Even if it generated zero revenue for IBM, the net present value of Sequent from IBM's viewpoint was higher inside IBM than inside Sun.

... snip ...

recent posts mentioning SCI &/or NUMA:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#48 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#2 what makes a computer architect great?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#21 New HD
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#37 AT&T Holmdel Computer Center films, 1973 Unix
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#3 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#12 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#16 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM ad for Basic Operating System

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM ad for Basic Operating System
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 30 May 2013 21:50:54 -0400
Lawrence Wilkinson <lawrence@ljw.me.uk> writes:
Oh, please can you try to get that deck somewhere that can read it and put it online, CHM perhaps. I would love to have an image of that for my project and have never found any BPS stuff.

CP67 started out doing assemblies under os/360 and physically punch card output and keeping all the cards for kernel image in a card tray with a BPS loader at the front. load the cards into reader and IPL ... would load all the image into memory and transfer control ... which then writes the core image to disk for disk ipl.

the card tray could also be copied saved to tape ... and card image loaded from tape.

as undergraduate one of the mods to cp67 was re-org the kernel and make low-use routines "pageable". It wasn't virtual memory ... but 4k page-aligned locations ... somewhat like the os/360 2k area for transient svcs ... but doing all fetches using page i/o mechanism. To make this work, the code in the pageable area had to be carefully constructed into page-aligned 4k chunks. One of the low-use routines was console commands that was a 20kbyte routine with single entry point. I broke it up into multiple page-aligned chunks and gave each console command its own entry point ... and it wouldn't work.

Turns out BPS loader is restricted to 255 entry points ... and I went over that ... I had to do some horrible hacks to get things back under 255 entry points. This was never picked up and shipped as part of standard cp67.

Later at the science center, I found a copy of the BPS loader source in a card cabinet in storage room ... and was able to modify it for more than 255 entry points.

VM370 uses this modified BPS loader (with a couple more additions) for generating new kernels ... but started doing it all virtually. Assembly under cms, punch into virtual reader transfered to virtual punch and do virtual IPL ... if the production disk is used ... it writes the new kernel to the production system ... which is then picked up the next IPL.

I haven't checked ... but the modified BPS loader (DMKLD00E LOADER, and possibly source) should be on hercules vm370 distribution. Need some way of creating real cards from softcopy image. May be able to find machine that runs Hercules with scsi 9trk tape drive and create card image on tape ... and then move to real 360 with cards, card punch, card reader and tape drive ... and ipl tape to get cards punched.

there was also a trick involving two "PUNCH" statements at the start of assembly routine that would punch a two card loader at the start of the output from an assembly. If the generated output of the assembly wasn't too complex ... you had a self-loading (ipl'able) program.

there was also a 3card loader that could also handle simple text decks.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 30 May 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5
recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#93 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

also from the Sequent wiki page:

In 1994 Sequent introduced the Symmetry 5000 series models SE20, SE60 and SE90, which used 66 MHz Pentium CPUs in systems from 2 to 30 processors. The next year they expanded that with the SE30/70/100 lineup using 100 MHz Pentiums, and then in 1996 with the SE40/80/120 with 166 MHz Pentiums. A variant of the Symmetry 5000, the WinServer 5000 series, ran Windows NT instead of DYNIX/ptx.[7]

... snip ...

... note that sequent's numa-q 256way in 1996 was pentium ... the original work started with four 486 chip board ... before moving to four pentium chip board. Working with the sequent engineers ... they claimed that they had done most of the work for NT4 scaleup from 4-way smp to 32-way smp. (since they had lots of experience for 32-way going back to the 80s).

... another note ... in the early 90s, we had also been brought in to consult with small client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on their server; the startup had also invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use; the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". At the time many of the common unix platforms used tcp/ip stack from BSD ... which had linear processing for TCP session close FINWAIT processing. With HTTP (mis-)using TCP for shortlived transactions ... heavily loaded webservers were starting to see large thousands of session on the FINWAIT close list ... and FINWAIT close starting to take 90-95 percent of all processor time.

If you remember from the period ... the small client/server startup had increasing number of servers for downloading their client (users were suppose to try different servers ... this is before the work for Google on boundary tcp/ip routers that would automatically load-balance incoming requests against a common pool of backend servers). At one point, the client/server startup added a large sequent server and the problem went away. They issue wasn't so much that server was just much more powerful than the other servers ... but sequent had previously encountered and fixed the FINWAIT "problem" (they had encountered it in commercial account configurations having 20,000 TELNET sessions on single system). It was going to be another 6-12 months before the rest of the vendors deployed their own FINWAIT problem fix.

misc past posts mentioning FINWAIT problem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#1 Early tcp development?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#164 Uptime (was Re: Q: S/390 on PowerPC?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000c.html#52 Does the word "mainframe" still have a meaning?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#3 The demise of compaq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002.html#14 index searching
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002i.html#39 CDC6600 - just how powerful a machine was it?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#45 M$ SMP and old time IBM's LCMP
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002q.html#12 Possible to have 5,000 sockets open concurrently?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003e.html#33 A Speculative question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#50 Question about Unix "heritage"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#46 Shipwrecks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005c.html#70 [Lit.] Buffer overruns
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005g.html#42 TCP channel half closed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#13 RFC 2616 change proposal to increase speed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006d.html#21 IBM 610 workstation computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006e.html#36 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006f.html#33 X.509 and ssh
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#2 Hey! Keep Your Hands Out Of My Abstraction Layer!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#37 Curiosity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#11 What part of z/OS is the OS?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#38 Problem with TCP connection close
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#28 Yet another squirrel question - Results (very very long post)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#36 Making tea
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#7 IBM in Talks to Buy Sun
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#76 Tiny-traffic DoS attack spotlights Apache flaw
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#44 Follow up
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010b.html#62 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#51 Has there been a change in US banking regulations recently?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#9 The IETF is probably the single element in the global equation of technology competition than has resulted in the INTERNET
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#11 Is the magic and romance killed by Windows (and Linux)?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#6 Founders of SSL Call Game Over?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#20 Writing article on telework/telecommuting
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#89 False Start's sad demise: Google abandons noble attempt to make SSL less painful
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012i.html#15 Can anybody give me a clear idea about Cloud Computing in MAINFRAME ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#83 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM ad for Basic Operating System

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: IBM ad for Basic Operating System
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 31 May 2013 16:49:11 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Why? Wouldn't it have made more sense to allocate SYSPUNCH to tape?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#7 IBM ad for Basic Operating System

early cp67 "release 1" installed at univ. jan68, the cp67 group didn't quiet trust the cms filesystem yet. source was on os/360 ... there were several dozen separate source modules that were individually assembled and associated text decks kept. new assembler output card deck would have diagonal (magic marker) stripe across the top with source name across top & front. This would replace the older version in card tray and new cp67 version created by ipl'ing the contents of card tray.

only periodic stable production versions committed to tape for ipl.

within the year ... all source and build was moved from os/360 to cms ... and build was done using purely virtual card punch/reader ... with periodic image written to tape from cms.

later at science center I would output ipl'able card deck to tape followed by everything used to create that version ... source, source changes, utilities, etc. I kept several over the years ... copying from 1600 bpi to 6250 bpi to cartridges. it was from one of these versions that I was able to retrieve all the original implementation for multi-level source update for Melinda Varian (fortunately, just a few weeks before most of the tapes ... all in the almaden research datacenter tape library fell prey to operational problem that was mounting random tapes as scratch). her vm370 (& cp67) history here:
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/

recent posts mentioning Melinda's history (&/or original source maintenance processses)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#67 Was MVS/SE designed to confound Amdahl?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#11 what makes a computer architect great?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#61 Google Patents Staple of '70s Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#8 OT: CPL on LCM systems [was Re: COBOL will outlive us all]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#61 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#68 What Makes code storage management so cool?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 31 May 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5
recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#43 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#50 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#93 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#8 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

I'm currently reading: "Fiasco: The American Military Adventure in Iraq, 2003 to 2005"
http://www.amazon.com/Fiasco-American-Military-Adventure-ebook/dp/B004IATD6U/

it has the new administration deciding on Iraqi invasion almost immediately (before 9/11) ... and starting the fabrication justifying the invasion (somewhat made easier after 9/11). Much of the book is about after the invasion ... and what the troops really needed to be doing after the invasion was also in conflict with the fabrication back in the states (resulting in a lot of unnecessary deaths).

A son-in-law 1st tour in Iraq was fallujah 2004-2005 during much of the worst fighting. then there was the surge which supposedly corrected everything ... but the image fabricated back in the states significantly differed from what was really going on. My son-in-law's 2nd Iraqi tour was 2007-2008 in Baqubah ... this account of his unit's time in Baqubah has it much worse than Fallujah 2004-2005 (even though claims about the surge had corrected everything): "Battle for Baqubah: Killing Our Way Out":
http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Baqubah-Killing-Our-ebook/dp/B007VBBS9I

The equivalent in IBM (w/o the deaths) supposedly was the significant change in corporate culture that the failure of FS brought, "Computer Wars: The Post-IBM World" Ferguson & Morris:
... and perhaps most damaging, the old culture under Watson Snr and Jr of free and vigorous debate was replaced with sycophancy and make no waves under Opel and Akers. It's claimed that thereafter, IBM lived in the shadow of defeat

... and:
But because of the heavy investment of face by the top management, F/S took years to kill, although its wrongheadedness was obvious from the very outset. "For the first time, during F/S, outspoken criticism became politically dangerous," recalls a former top executive.

... snip ...

the culture change included "managing information up the reporting chain" & fabrication as needed. Now during the FS period, I refused to work on FS and continued to work on 370 ... even periodically ridiculing what was going on in FS (which possibly wasn't the most career enhancing activity). During FS, lots of 370 stuff was being killed off (FS was completely different than 370 and was going to replace it), so when FS imploded, there was mad rush to get stuff back into 370 product pipelines (the lack of new offerings during the period is credited with giving 370 clones a market foothold). The culture change (and managing of information along with associated fabrication) played a factor in the downturn in the early 90s.

Other fiasco comparisons was mid-80s, top executives were saying that company revenue was about to double, mostly based on mainframe business ... in middle/late 80s, there was massive internal building program to double mainframe manufacturing capacity (even as the mainframe business was heading in the opposite direction) and massive influx of new "fast-track" MBAs doing six month tours through middle management positions ... frequently leaving chaos in their wake.

Late 80s, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at internal, annual world-wide communication group conference and opened his talk with comment that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division (which has since come to pass). The issue was that the disk division was already seeing data fleeing mainframe datacenters to more distributed computing friendly platforms, with the fall-off in disk sales. The disk division had come up with several solutions to address the opportunity but they were constantly veto'ed by the communication group. The communication group had strategic ownership for everything that crosses the datacenter walls and were trying to protect their dumb terminal (emulation) install base and doing their best to fight off client/server and distributed computing ... including fabricated comparisons between token-ring and ethernet ... referenced upthread and in this linkedin discussion
http://lnkd.in/64yKEh

recent posts mentioning ethernet:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#6 Is Microsoft becoming folklore?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#7 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#31 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#32 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#33 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#34 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#40 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#56 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#59 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#62 America Is Basically Helpless Against The Chinese Hackers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#63 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#27 Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#83 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#11 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#33 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#76 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#19 Where Does the Cloud Cover the Mainframe?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#45 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#84 Metcalfe's Law: How Ethernet Beat IBM and Changed the World

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Become a millionaire and never work again - by being a whistleblower. Fair or perverse?

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Become a millionaire and never work again - by being a whistleblower. Fair or perverse?
Date: 31 May 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
In the congressional Madoff hearings they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get the SEC to do something about Madoff. One of his points was that tips turn up 13 times more fraud than audits ... but that the SEC didn't have a TIP hotline ... but did have a 1-800 number for corporations to complain about audits.

Sarbanes-Oxley had provisions for whistleblower protection ... but it seems to have done as much good as the promise that all executives and auditors will do jail time that sign-off on public company financial filings containing invalid figures (even GAO apparently believed SEC wasn't doing anything and started doing reports about fraudulent public company financial filings, even showing percentage of fraudulent filings increased after SOX).

The two things in the news that seems to have been mostly misdirection and obfuscation ... whistleblowers becoming millionaires when reporting crooks stealing billions ... and the "enormous" fines levied by SEC that turn out to be trivial percent of the amounts involved.

Independent of different motivations for whistleblowers ... frequent the bounty issue seems to be brought up as misdirection. Bounties and rewards have been around for long time (old west movies and bounty hunters).

Supposedly whistle-blower provisions in Sarbanes-Oxley model was the FBI war with organized crime families ... and that the breakthrough finally came with informants. However in the financial world, there seems to be constant activity attacking whistle blower motivations and erosion of whistle blower protections

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why Didn't the SEC Catch Madoff? It Might Have Been Policy Not To

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Why Didn't the SEC Catch Madoff? It Might Have Been Policy Not To
Date: 31 May 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
Why Didn't the SEC Catch Madoff? It Might Have Been Policy Not To
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/why-didnt-the-sec-catch-madoff-it-might-have-been-policy-not-to-20130531

from above:
More and more embarrassing stories of keep leaking out the SEC, which is beginning to look somehow worse than corrupt -- it's hard to find the right language exactly, but "aggressively clueless" comes pretty close to summing up the atmosphere that seems to be ruling the country's top financial gendarmes.

... snip ...

... I've periodically referenced the congressional Madoff hearings had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff ... and that SEC was finally forced to do something when he turned himself in.

article also references this whistle-blower complaint
http://images.businessweek.com/bloomberg/pdfs/foia%20doc1.pdf

Probe of SEC Watchdog Office Could Revisit Madoff Report
http://www.businessweek.com/print/magazine/content/09_36/b4145036681619.htm
more SEC/Madoff whistle-blower reference: How Bad Can It Be for SEC Whistle-Blowers?
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-05-15/the-saga-of-one-sec-whistle-blower-william-d-cohan-correct-.html

recent posts mentioning Madoff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#62 Taleb On "Skin In The Game" And His Disdain For Public Intellectuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#38 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#39 The Alchemy of Securitization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#70 Implementing a Whistle-Blower Program - Detecting and Preventing Fraud at Workplace
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#4 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#31 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#69 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#94 KPMG quits as Skechers and Herbalife auditor amid insider trading allegations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#11 Become a millionaire and never work again - by being a whistleblower. Fair or perverse?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
Date: 1 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/cN9fFJ

Boeing was in competition for C5 with the 747 and lost (the design of the cockpit above the airframe was to allow the nose to swing open for freight onload/offload ... but they lost. I was working at Boeing at the time ... as part of creation of Boeing Computer Services ... i.e. bringing all of dataprocessing into separate business unit to better monetize the investment (including being able to sell services to outside entities). 747 #3 was making FAA certification flts over Seattle and Boeing SST wasn't completely dead.

MICC (Eisenhower warned about in his goodby speech) have increasing organized major weapons systems so that some component was being made in nearly every important congressional district ... the resulting congressional support makes it almost impossible to kill major weapons systems ... no matter how big the failure & disaster .... this especially has been applied to major military aircraft programs. While having piece-meal all over the country contributes to the continuation of the program ... it results in enormous numbers of additional problems when trying to bring the enormous number of different pieces together for integration. After Boeing merger with M/D ... there were lots of comments that Boeing civilian programs could fall victim to similar organization. These comments really picked up when the 787 program started parceling various component manufacturing all over the world.

There was parody written the time of the shuttle disaster ... where condition of queen support for columbus ... a member of the court convinced the queen that the ships had to be constructed up in the mountains where the trees were ... then cut into three pieces for transport to the seaport and then used tar to combine the three pieces. this was analogy where to get some congressional support ... a major component had to be built in their congressional district in the rocky mountains ... the booster rocket had to be built in three pieces in order to transport to launch and then assembled there.

The story is that the decision to move to virtual memory was that MVT had significant storage allocation problem ... that typical MVT regions only effectively used 1/4 of the storage allocated ... and so it wasn't possible to have enough concurrent multiprogramming level to really keep the 155&165 busy. Move from MVT to OS/VS2 SVS allowed four times concurrently executing regions in the same amount of real storage ... getting much more effective use of the processor. Recent folklore discussion about the 370 virtual memory decision (and other stuff)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73

This is discussion about killing off 360 advanced computing system in the 60s
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

based on IBM management deciding it would advance computing technology too fast/far, making it difficult to control the market. End of the above article discusses a number of ACS/360 features that show up in ES/9000 more than 20yrs later.

recent posts mentioning acs/360:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#73 One reason for monocase was Re: Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#46 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#47 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#65 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#67 relative speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#19 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#22 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#18 What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#26 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#52 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#1 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#2 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#10 SAS Deserting the MF?

past posts mentioning HSDT effort
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#hsdt

having transponder on bird going up 41-d and getting invited to launch party:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#27 Tysons Corner, Virginia
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#14 Ping: Anne & Lynn Wheeler
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#23 Health care and lies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005h.html#21 Thou shalt have no other gods before the ANSI C standard
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#11 An Out-of-the-Main Activity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006m.html#16 Why I use a Mac, anno 2006
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006p.html#31 "25th Anniversary of the Personal Computer"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#41 Year-end computer bug could ground Shuttle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#61 Damn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#19 IBM-MAIN longevity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#20 IBM-MAIN longevity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#44 IBM-MAIN longevity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#27 My Vintage Dream PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009k.html#76 And, 40 years of IBM midrange
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009o.html#36 U.S. students behind in math, science, analysis says
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#57 watches
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#69 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#76 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#61 End of an era
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#77 End of an era
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#20 TELSTAR satellite experiment
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#3 We are on the brink of a historic decision [referring to defence cuts]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#0 Happy Challenger Day

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 2 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5
recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#8 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#10 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

next generation: Haswell is here: we detail Intel's first 4th-generation Core CPUs Quad-core chips for laptops and desktops are first, with dual-cores to follow.
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/06/haswell-is-here-intel-announces-first-4th-generation-core-cpus/

talks about desktop i5 & i7 ... doesn't yet have e5. talks about 2-3 times performance increase ... but big change is power consumption way down (up to 20times improvement)

Intel's new mobile lineup: Desktop performance in portable packaging
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2040481/intels-new-mobile-lineup-desktop-performance-in-portable-packaging.html
Intel Haswell CPUs Debut, Put To the Test
http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/13/06/01/1447227/intel-haswell-cpus-debut-put-to-the-test
Intel releases faster, more efficient Core CPUs in renewed bid for mobile market
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2040495/intel-releases-faster-more-efficient-core-cpus-in-renewed-bid-for-mobile-market.html

Intel's new desktop CPU lineup: Benchmark results reveal little competition for 4th-gen Core
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2040500/intel-s-new-desktop-cpu-lineup-benchmark-results-reveal-little-competition-for-4th-gen-core.html

some benchmarks less than 10% faster.

The Core i7-4770K Review: Haswell Is Faster; Desktop Enthusiasts Yawn
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-4770k-haswell-review,3521.html
Intel Haswell Makes Its Debut: Core i7-4770K Review
http://www.techspot.com/review/679-intel-haswell-core-i7-4770k/
Intel kicks off Haswell shipments with quad-core Core processors; Intel launches the first batch of laptop chips with quad-core processors, with more chips due later
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2013/071213-pick-your-hardware-vision-open-271751.html

Misc. more legacy multiprocessor folklore .... compare&swap instruction was invented by Charlie when he was working on fine-gramed cp67 multiprocessing locking at the science center (instruction name Compare-And-Swap originally chosen because CAS are charlie's initials)... some past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

we then tried to get it incorporated into 370 architecture. however the 370 architecture owners' said that the POK favorite son operating system developers claimed that (360) test&set instruction was more than adequate (aka a global spin-lock for kernel entry). The 370 architecture owners said to get compare&swap included for 370, we would have to come up with uses that weren't multiprocessor specific. The result was multi-threaded (multi-tasking) application examples (that work regardless of single processor or multiple processors) that continue to appear in principles of operation to this day
http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/cgi-bin/bookmgr_OS390/BOOKS/dz9zr003/A.6?DT=20040504121320

there are more recent PoPs but the above is one of the last that still provided HTML. ... Part of the comments about AND/OR/Ex-OR included in PoPs is folklore that they were heavily used in MVS kernel and some 370 multiprocessor models were forced to implement those instructions with compare&swap semantics because MVS still hadn't eliminated the related bugs.

I mention upthread working on 16-way 370 SMP ... turns out with some of the 3033 processor engineers (before 3033 was announced/shipped). This was during the mad rush to try and get products back into the 370 pipeline after FS failure. They were doing it in their spare time ... a lot more interesting than what they were being forced to do for 3033 (which started out just remapping 168-3 to 20% faster chips) ... it was tolerated until head of POK was told that it could be decades before the POK favorite son operating system was able to effectively support 16-way multi-processor ... at which time some of us were told to be never be seen in POK again.

misc. past posts mentioning SMP &/or compare&swap instruction
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#smp

by the late 80s, nearly all hardware vendors were supporting compare&swap instruction (or instructions with similar semantics) and the large multi-threaded applications (like high-throughput transaction & DBMS) were using compare&swap

In the early 90s, for our/IBM's HA/CMP, we were working with the four major "open system" RDBMS vendors (Ingres, Informix, Oracle & Sybase). The major development platform for Informix was Sequent multiprocessor platform ... later IBM buys both Informix and Sequent.

ES/9000 has features from acs-360 over 20yrs after acs-360 was ended (because it would advance computing too fast and the company might loose control of the market). z900 finally has 16-way smp nearly quarter of century after the 16-way 370 was killed (because head of POK was told that it could be decades before the POK favorite son operating system had effective 16way smp support)

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
Date: 3 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/mGd4j5
recent posts in thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#4 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#5 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#6 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#8 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#10 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#14 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

IBM battles Amazon over $600M CIA cloud deal
http://washingtontechnology.com/articles/2013/05/31/amazon-protest.aspx

from above:
CIA's major shift in cloud strategy ... driven at least in part by the agency's embrace of big data as an intelligence tool ... has been delayed before. AT&T and Microsoft protested the request-for-proposal specifications of the procurement in mid-2012.

... snip ...

As undergraduate in the 60s, I would make lots of system modifications and the vendor would periodically suggest some changes to be made ... in retrospect, some of the changes possibly originated from these agencies ... however, I didn't learn about them until much, much later .... from long ago and far away ... gone 404, but lives on at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken
Date: 3 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/zERnJD

Some of the 7094/CTSS people went to 5th flr and project mac and did multics ... other of the 7094/ctss people went to the science center on the 4th flr and did virtual machines, internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late '85 or early '86, technology was also used for univ. bitnet/earn); gml was invented at the science center in 1969 (decade later morphs into iso sgml, another decade morphs into html at cern). melinda has a lot of the early ctss and science center attempting to come up with something in ibm for project mac:
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/

at various times there was some rivalry between the 4th and 5th flrs ... however it wasn't fair to compare total number of multics installations with the total number of virtual machine installations ... or the total number of multics installations with just the total number of internal virtual machine installations. However, one of my hobbies was producing highly modified production systems for internal datacenters ... and at one point I had about as many internal installations as the total number of multics installations. misc. past posts mentioning science center on 4th flr
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
misc. past posts mentioning the internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

one of the interesting things was that while Codd did relational at SJR and the original sql/RDBMS was done on virtual machine system 370 at SJR in the 70s ... the actual first commercial RDBMS to ship was on Mutlics. misc. past posts mentioning original sql/relational implementation http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#systemr

Tom has 7094/ctss, cp67 virtual machine as well as multics stories
http://www.multicians.org/thvv/tvv-home.html#stories

at sjr, i would wander around sjr disk plant site. bldg14 was dasd development and engineering that was running their mainframes scheduled 7x24 for stand-alone testing. at one point they had tried MVS for concurrent testing ... but in that environment, MVS had 15min MTBF with just a single testcell ... requiring manual re-ipl. This was in the period when MVS was touting its significant "recovery" capabilities from all kinds of problems and being able to continue operating ... the joke was MVS was just repeatedly covering (re-covering) up what originally happen ... so when things finally ground to a halt, it was no longer able to tell what originally happen.

I offered to rewrite input/output supervisor so that it was bullet-proof and never fail, greatly improving their productivity allowing anytime, on-demand testing with any number of concurrent testcells. past posts getting to play disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

Later I wroteup all the things that needed to be done in an internal report ... and happened to make reference to the MVS 15min MTBF ... which brings down the wrath of the MVS organization on my hand ... they would have gotten me fired if they could have figured out how (they tried to make things otherwise unpleasant)

later when 3380 dasd shipped
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3380.html

... MVS was still failing requiring re-ipl in 100% of FE standard hardware error regression bucket of 57 tests ... and in 2/3rds of the cases there was not even indication of what forced the re-ipl ... old email on the subject
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801015

Virtual memory version of 360/65 was the 360/67 (basically 360/65 with virtual memory hardware added) was sort of targeted for Project Mac ... but lost out to GE. TSS/360 was then the official virtual memory operating system for the 360/67. The science center started virtual machine based CP67 for the 360/67 as alternative to TSS/360. At its peak, TSS/360 had around 1200 people working on it at time when CP/67 had 12 people (and more customers were running cp/67 than tss/360 ... with tss/360 eventually being decommitted).

Note that the ill-fated "Future System" project in the first half of the 70s ... was going to completely replace 370, had a lot of memory mapped features from TSS/360 and Multics ... however lots of it was purely blue sky and hard to tell what was real and what was pure fabrication (one of the factors of FS project imploded ... but not until after billions had been spent; one observation was if any of the other computer vendors had managed to waste that amount of money, they couldn't have stayed in business). past posts mentioning FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

At the univ. in the 60s, I had watched while they tried to get TSS/360 operational on the 360/67 ... and could also do side-by-side comparisons with TSS/360 and CP67. There was sample simulated fortran edit, compile and executed built and ran on both TSS/360 and CP/67. CP/67 with 30 simulated users had better throughput and interactive response than TSS/360 did with 4 simulated users.

Later in the early 70s, at the science center I did a page-mapped filesystem for CMS ... avoided lots of short-comings I had observed in TSS/360 (and was being repeated in FS ... one of the reasons I would periodically ridicule FS and claim what I already had running was better than what they were dreaming about). For moderate filesystem I/O workload mix, I could demonstrate three times the throughput of standard CMS channel program based filesystem. However, with the failure of FS ... page mapped filesystems got bad name in IBM ... and those enhancements were never released to customers. past posts mentioning memory mapped filesystem
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

Note one of the days that ... at least all the east coast ATMs stopped ... was when the datacenter they were connected to in NJ, had roof collapse because of snow weight (single point of failure) ... their disaster/recovery site was on a low number flr of the world trade center ... which had ("recently") been taken out by the explosion in the underground garage ...

recent "Old Geek" discussion on system availability
http://lnkd.in/2W7pMW
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#17

disclaimer: long ago and far away my wife had been con'ed into going to POK to be responsible for loosely-coupled architecture (aka mainframe "cluster") where she did peer-coupled shared data architecture ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#shareddata

she didn't remain long, in part because of constant skirmishes with the communication group trying to force her into using SNA/VTAM for cluster operation ... and in part because of poor uptake (except for IMS hot-standby) until sysplex & parallel sysplex.

In the past, we would periodically drop by the guy running one of the largest financial transaction network in the country ... he would claim 100% system availability based on

automated operator (countermeasure to human mistakes)

• IMS hot-standby ... triple replicated at 3 different geographic locations (countermeasure to environmental problems).

... Jim had left SJR (and work on original relational/sql System/R) for Tandem. After he had been there for awhile, he published a study that system availability was increasingly becoming human mistakes and environmental ... scan of old overview of that study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/grayft84.pdf

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Supercomputers face growing resilience problems

From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Supercomputers face growing resilience problems
Date: 3 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/2W7pMW

Supercomputers face growing resilience problems; As the number of components in large supercomputers grows, so does the possibility of component failure
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9233931/Supercomputers_face_growing_resilience_problems

This is long-term problem it was used in reference to 360/195 ... that there was so many components that even with low-probability of individual failure ... nearly any component failing would bring the machine to stop ... aka system outage was probability of any component failing times the number of components (probability of system outage increased as number of components went up). A major change from 360/195 to 370/195 was addition of loads of transparent hardware error retry facilities (hardware being able to recover from various kinds of transient errors).

When we were doing HA/CMP (high-availability/cluster multiprocessor) ... we were doing work on surviving multiple points of failure (system component replication) ... system outage became probability of multiple concurrent failures ... quickly gets to five-nines (99.999%) system availability. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

At this level, environmental failures start to dominate system availability ... and we worked on geographic distributed operation ... and out marketing, I coined the terms disaster survivability (to differentiate from disaster/recover7) and geographic survivability.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#available

At the same time we were doing cluster scaleup ... referenced here in meeting in Ellison's conference room early Jan1992 (working with both national labs on scientific and numeric intensive as well as major RDBMS vendors on commercial)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

end of Jan1992, cluster scaleup was transferred and announced as supercomputer for scientific and numeric intensive ONLY (and we were told we couldn't work on anything with more than four processors). Now nearly all supercomputers are cluster scaleup with redundancy and failure isolation (requiring multiple concurrent failures). some of old email from the period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 03 Jun 2013 15:59:18 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
That's 370, and you'd find both lines too slow and too small. The XT/370 and AT/370 were also not desing to implement the full S/370 architecture, only the problem state instructions. If I wanted to simulate the S/370 I'd run Hercules on an off-the-shelf PC.

xt/370 & at/370 was emulated problem state chips running about 100kips 370 (about speed of 370/125) with specially modified vm370 doing i/o via communication with cp/88 running on the pc processor.

I got blamed for 6month slip in xt/370 first customer ship schedule when i showed a lot of applications page thrashing in 384kbyte memory ... and they retrofitted another 128kbytes to bring it up to 512kbyte.

xt/370 throughput was significantly exacerbated by filesystem (& paging) disk i/o simulated a single record at a time on pc/xt 100millis/record hard disk. compared to similar pc applications developed specifically for pc/xt environment, cms applications were enormously disk i/o intensive (and the bloat had increased in the more decade since vm370 was first introduced; somewhat obfuscated by mainframe disk throughput).

throughput improved somewhat with at/370 ... since the standard pc/at hard disk was faster than pc/xt disk.

the next machine was a74, full 370 ... about 350kips ... more like 370/145 than 370/125 ... but with 16mbytes real memory (instead of 512kbytes) ... old email with details of a74 announce
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#email880622

Hercules on current generation x86 processor might hit more like 10,000 times the a74 370 processor rate

past posts mentioning a74
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#55 Why not an IBM zSeries workstation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000e.html#56 Why not an IBM zSeries workstation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#19 Very CISC Instuctions (Was: why the machine word size ...)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#51 DARPA was: Short Watson Biography
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002d.html#4 IBM Mainframe at home
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#27 End of Moore's law and how it can influence job market
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003f.html#56 ECPS:VM DISPx instructions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003h.html#40 IBM system 370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003m.html#15 IEFBR14 Problems
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004l.html#65 computer industry scenairo before the invention of the PC?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#7 Whatever happened to IBM's VM PC software?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#8 Whatever happened to IBM's VM PC software?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004m.html#10 Whatever happened to IBM's VM PC software?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#14 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007g.html#76 The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#41 z/VM usability
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#38 "True" story of the birth of the IBM PC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010.html#2 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#15 Processes' memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#36 Processes' memory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#8 What was the historical price of a P/390?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#55 Favourite computer history books?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#21 Mainframe Hall of Fame (MHOF)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011c.html#6 Other early NSFNET backbone
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#27 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear in future and it still has not happened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#51 Did My Brother Invent E-Mail With Tom Van Vleck?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#64 JCL CROSS-REFERENCE Utilities (OT for Paul, Rick, and Shmuel)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#89 Auditors Don't Know Squat!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012l.html#77 zEC12, and previous generations, "why?" type question - GPU computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#8 AMC proposes 1980s computer TV series Halt & Catch Fire

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

It was 30 Years Ago Today

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: It was 30 Years Ago Today...
Date: 4 June 2013
Blog: Boyd Disciples
re:
http://lnkd.in/R34kWM

Some old email from spring of 1983 regarding John's briefings at IBM:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#email830413 .
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#email830513 .
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#email830516 .
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#email830527 .

The first briefing was just Patterns of Conflict in IBM San Jose Research auditorium. Several in the audience were computer science PHDs from institutions in the bay area like Stanford and Berkeley and came prepared to be really offended, but were surprised to find they liked the briefing. As mentioned above, John was in the process of preparing Organic Design For Command and Control and for the next briefing he wanted to try "Organic Design" and cram into the same day with Patterns of Conflict (which makes for a long day).

Disclaimer: I was blamed for online computer conferencing (early form of blogging and social media) on the internal network (larger than arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until late 85 or early 86) in the late 70s and early 80s (folklore was that when the executive committee was told about online computer conferencing and the internal network, 5of6 wanted to fire me).

from IBM Jargon:
Tandem Memos - n. Something constructive but hard to control; a fresh of breath air (sic). That's another Tandem Memos. A phrase to worry middle management. It refers to the computer-based conference (widely distributed in 1981) in which many technical personnel expressed dissatisfaction with the tools available to them at that time, and also constructively criticised the way products were are developed. The memos are required reading for anyone with a serious interest in quality products. If you have not seen the memos, try reading the November 1981 Datamation summary.

... snip ...

other from long ago and far away (gone 404, but lives on at the wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

as undergraduate in the 60s, I was making a lot of software enhancements to operating systems and the vendor would periodically suggest things that I might look at. I didn't learn about these agencies until much later ... but in retrospect some of the suggestions possibly originated from these guys.

... oh and latest followup on F35 ... so far 2 of five (intro claimed to include explanation about how both the gov and private industry cook the books)

part 1 F-35 Price Fixing; The New Era of Good F-35 Feelings
http://nation.time.com/2013/06/03/the-new-era-of-good-f-35-feelings/

part 2: F-35 Price Fixing; Alphabet Soup: PAUCs, APUCs, URFs, Cost Variances and Other Pricing Dodges
http://nation.time.com/2013/06/04/alphabet-soup-paucs-apucs-urfs-cost-variances-and-other-pricing-dodges/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken
Date: 4 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/zERnJD
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#16 How about the old mainframe error messages that actually give you a clue about what's broken

in the 80s and early 90s, we were doing IBM's high availability, cluster multiprocessor effort and doing detailed studies of vulnerabilities and countermeasures ... not only outages but security and attacks. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

Not long before the incident at World Trade Center we were visiting the institution that provided data processing for the exchanges ... which also happened to be on low-numbered floor ... but their datacenter was elsewhere.

Their datacenter was carefully chosen building in Manhatten that happened to have different major water and power mains service on different sides of the building and feeds coming in from four different central exchanges coming into four sides of the building (aka telco diverse routing and provisioning). They also had multiple front-end Tandem systems handling messages/transactions ... if the backend dataprocessing happened to have glitch, the Tandem processors would recognize the condition and redrive the transaction to a different system.

However, it was not geographically replicated. Not long afterwards they had transformer explosion in the basement that contaminated the building with PCB. Everything in the building was shutdown and the building evacuated.

Late 90s, we participated in the financial industry Critical Infrastructure Protection meetings held in the old executive bldg.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_Infrastructure_Protection

These meetings dealt with all the kinds of vulnerabilities (environmental, security, cyber, even Y2K). One of the issues is the financial industry is especially sensitive to its public image ... and a major part of CIP was the ISACs (information sharing). A major issue in the financial industry meetings was requirement that any ISAC not be subject to FOIA.
https://www.fsisac.com/about

A late 90s vulnerability was that one of the too-big-to-fail institutions had outsourced their Y2K remediation of critical financial transaction processing to the lowest bidder ... they hadn't bothered to do the necessary diligence on the company ... which they later find out to be a front for large crime family organization. Closer examination of the code they were running in production finds several kinds of procedures for performing high-value fraudulent financial transactions.

Another kind of vulnerability had been HVAC systems installed with dialup modem for remote management ... and incidents of remote attacks where datacenter HVAC is reset to overheat ... resulting in thermal shutdown of all processors (of course these days it would be internet-based remote management and internet-based remote attacks, akin to what has been in the news for public utilities; but these kinds of attacks date back to at least the early 80s).

When we were brought in to small internet client/server startup ... because they wanted to do payment transactions on their server ... we had to figure out how to map a lot of technology to payment business processes ... including they had invented this technology called "SSL" they wanted to use (result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". They were looking at replacing leased-lines with internet connections. One of the issues was leased-line point-of-sale trouble desk had 5min first level problem determination. For early internet pilots it wasn't uncommon to have no-trouble-found after 3hrs of manual investigation. I had to design a lot of new procedures and software and had to do a 40pg problem determination guide to get things back close to 5min 1st level problem determination.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Gives There a VM Discussion List?

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Gives There a VM Discussion List?
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 4 Jun 2013 13:14:17 -0700
sthompson@US.IBM.COM (Steve Thompson) writes:
I have been using google, and other search lists. The amount of false positive hits is astounding.

What I am looking for is an equivalent to IBM Main for VM/CMS.

The only link I found to such was for an entity in North Carolina that now gives a 404.


both ibm-main and ibmvm (as well as numerous others) originated on university, ibm-sponsored (vm-based) network in the 80s. It used technology that was similar to that developed for the internal, vm-based network (which was larger than the arpanet/internet from just about the beginning until sometime late '85 or early '86). some past posts mentioning internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet
some past posts mentioning ibm-sponsored univ. "bitnet" (and "earn" in europe)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

in the early 90s the bitnet groups moved to internet mailing lists .... and periodically over the years various bitnet mailing lists have been gatewayed to usenet ... which now also runs over the internet. usenet is in turned gatewayed to google. at the moment, ibm-main is gatewayed to usenet (and therefor also google, however outgoing only, posts made to usenet bit.listserv.ibm-main don't go in reverse and showup on the ibm-main mailing list) and ibmvm isn't gatewayed to usenet. Note at various times in the past various gateways have handled two-way operation between usenet and listserv mailing lists.

ibmvm mailing list currently handled by listserv@listserv.uark.edu

current listserv originated in Paris in the mid-80s on EARN (bitnet's cousin in europe)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LISTSERV

support for other platforms have been added since the original VM implementation ... from listserv wiki:
Listserv is currently available for and supported on Linux, Solaris, FreeBSD, AIX, Mac OS X, OpenVMS, HP-UX, Tru64, z/VM, and Microsoft Windows (XP, 2000, 2003, Vista, 2008, and 7)

... snip ...

originally listserv was a subset of a similar internal application called TOOLSRUN (which provided both mailing list type option as well as a usenet type option).

I had been blamed for computer conferencing on the internal network in the late 70s and early 80s ... and was doing a semi-automated process. folklore is when the corporate executive committee was told about computer conferencing (and the internal network), 5-of-6 wanted to fire me. What followed was a lot of internal task force investigations followed by the sponsorship of official sanctioned discussions (and automated TOOLSRUN that provided automated usenet-like & mailing list function)

old email from person setting up EARN ... looking for network oriented applications:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#email840320

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Check out Moto X: Motorola reveals plans for ink and even pills to replace AL

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Check out Moto X: Motorola reveals plans for ink and even pills to replace AL
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 4 Jun 2013 16:45:08 -0700
jcewing@ACM.ORG (Joel C. Ewing) writes:
If the final verdict has not yet been reached on whether or not there is any increased health risk from having a cell-phone transmitter next to your head for prolonged periods, the idea of having a permanent RF transmitter internally or attached to my body doesn't sound that appealing.

Sounds like it would also mean someone forceably detained could be impersonated easily without their need to cooperate (or even be conscious or alive?). I still see a need for authentication to require something only known by the individual, not solely based on something they possess.


static data vulnerable to replay attacks has been known for decades (if not centuries).

we had been brought in as consultants to small internet client/server startup that wanted to do payment transactions on server ... they had also invented this stuff called "SSL" they wanted to use ... the result is now frequently called "electronic commerce". somewhat as a result, in the mid-90s we were asked to participate in the x9a10 financial standards working group which had been given the requirement to preserve the integrity of financial infrastructure for all retail payments. as a result we did detailed end-to-end threat & vulnerability studies.

part of the issue is three factor authentication paradigm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#3factor

something you have
something you know
something you are

the above can also be static or non-static (dynamic); static means they are subject to replay attacks. multi-factor authentication is assumed to be more secure if they have indepedent vulnerabilities. However, two-factor authentication ATM transactions ... ATM card (something you have) with magstripe and PIN (something you know) ... have separate failure modes for lost/stolen card (if the PIN isn't written on the card ... which has found to be the case in 30% of the cards). However, both the magstripe and PIN are static data and have a common vulnerability to skimming attacks involving compromised end-points (ATM machines and/or point-of-sale terminals).

for x9a10, I semi-facetiously said I would take a $500 mil-spec chip, aggresively cost reduce it by 2-3 orders of magnitude (eventually well under dollar) while making it more secure ... including supporting dynamic data (immune to replay attacks). then the transit industry asked that the chip also be able to work on RF power within turnstyle time limits (very low power & around 100ms) ... this was at time when contact powered chips were taking several seconds for dynamic data ... and RF-powered versions would take 100 times longer (needed to be able to do dynamic data strong authentication in about 1/1000 power profile of common contact chips of the era).

basically chipcard that can work as contact and contactless ... like walking thru turnstyle. The contactless chipcard has antenna embedded in the card that picks up RF energy to power the chip when walking through transit turnstyle ... the same RF signal is also used for communication.

from security proportional to risk ... the chip dynamic data by itself is single factor (something you have) authentication for low-value operations ... but for higher value operations ... then add in something you know &/or something you are for multi-factor authentication.

another facet is whether something you know type authentication (say static data) is shared-secret or non-shared-secret. A something you know shared-secret are things like passwords ... where the password is registered at the authentication agency. For shared-secret something you know, kindergarten security requires unique shared-secret for every unique security domain ... as countermeasure to cross-domain attacks ... this results in some people being faced with needing hundreds of unique passwords.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subintegrity.html#secrets

however, it is possible design multi-factor authentication that includes pin/password something you know ... which isn't a shared-secret (not divulged or registered).

disclaimer: dozens of (assigned) patents on the subject (including covering person-centric operation as opposed to institution-centric operation where something unique is required for each different institution and/or environment)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aadssummary.htm

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Check out Moto X: Motorola reveals plans for ink and even pills to replace AL

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Check out Moto X: Motorola reveals plans for ink and even pills to replace AL
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 4 Jun 2013 17:09:15 -0700
mike.a.schwab@GMAIL.COM (Mike Schwab) writes:
There are car thieves who get a pair of transmitters. One is held near the car and sends the car's query signal to the other receiver. The other receiver is near the person leaving the car. It get's the car's query and responds. This is sent back to the car by the transmitter pair. The car thinks the owner has returned, and unlocks and starts. The guy near the car hops in, waits for the pal to get in, and leaves. After shopping for 30 seconds to 2 hours, the owner comes back to an empty parking spot (if someone else hasn't taken it).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#22 Check out Moto X: Motorola reveals plans for ink and even pills to replace AL

this is similar to vulnerability in the mid-90s that the EU identified regarding financial transactions involving compromised PCs and hardware token authentication (PC keyloggers could be leveraged to impersonate real user for hardware token use involving fraudulent financial transactions ... using the token w/o owner's knowledge) as well as displaying one transaction on the screen, asking the user to authenticate and actually executing a totally different transaction.

in the 98 time-frame the EU created the FINREAD standard as countermeasure to both vulnerabilities (use of the token w/o user's knowledge and transaction that you believe you are authenticating is really the transaction that you are authenticating).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

I/O Optimization

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: I/O Optimization
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 5 Jun 2013 06:13:13 -0700
poitras@POBOX.COM (Don Poitras) writes:
I don't know what IBM uses under the covers, but it's probably the same thing that SAS/C did. Calculate the CCHHR from the byte offset and use EXCP to read the block directly. No need to use POINT. FBS is guaranteed not to have any short blocks, so the calculation is trivial.

aka logical FBA ... one of the reasons that it would tend to also make native FBA more efficient than emulated CKD (aka there haven't been any real CKD DASD manufactured for decades ... all current CKD DASD being emulated on physical FBA disks).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
Date: 5 June 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#80 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#91 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'

How one Irish woman made $22bn for Apple in a year; A private individual who shuns publicity, Cathy Kearney is thought to be the brains behind the Cork office that has helped save Apple billions
http://m.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/may/29/apple-ireland-cork-cathy-kearney

Tax Transparency Would Take a Bite Out of Future Apples
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-05-29/tax-transparency-would-take-a-bite-out-of-future-apples.html

Companies should take the lead in take tackling tax avoidance
http://phys.org/news/2013-06-companies-tackling-tax.html

they frequently create draft language, pay the lobbyists ... and then take advantage of the loop-holes they paid to create ... and then claims of responsible corporate citizens are obfuscation and misdirection.

Claims are that selling tax loop-holes are major reason that congress is considered most corrupt institution on earth; tax-loop holes are primary reason tax code is over 72,000 pages instead of only 400-500 pages and costs 5-6% of GDP in dealing with the tax-code complexity.

Business articles claim that corporate purchase of loop-holes has the highest ROI of any business investment returning upwards of $1000 for every dollar spent (100,000%) ... with claims of multiple billions spent in the last decade that represents at least several trillion in corporate tax avoidance. It would account for corporate taxes accounted for over 30% of total taxes collected in 1950 but only 10% now (the decline sharply accelerating after 1970). ... as well as dropping from 5% of GDP to only 1% of GDP.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporate_tax_in_the_United_States
and
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/?fa=view&id=3822

Note with corporate taxes tending towards zero, opportunity ROI for purchase of additional loop-holes is also declining ... which would impact future congressional revenue ... unless congress can come up with some mechanism to change loop-holes from one-time payments to annual payments (say holding hearings every year regarding loop-hole elimination).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Getting at the original command name/line

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Getting at the original command name/line
Newsgroups: comp.lang.rexx
Date: Wed, 05 Jun 2013 13:09:57 -0400
LesK <5mre20@tampabay.rr.com> writes:
I suspect that Steve, just like me, learned BAL and we ran our class exercises on bare S/360 iron with a 3 card loader. Running (whatever) assembler was a canned operation supplied by the instructor. We got back the listing and, if there were no errors, a bunch of cards to put after the loader which, by the way, we had to design and multi-punch ourselves, using the S/360 POP for a reference.

I put notations on my Green Card to tell me how many cycles each common instruction took, as well as page references to the POP.

It wasn't until I got an opportunity to "test the water" as a programmer that I learned about macros and assemblers.

Anyway... for "old heads" like us, it will _always_ be BAL!


I have old assemble file that included "PUNCH" statements to do a 2card loader in front of the resulting TXT output ... from long ago and far away:

*********************************************************************** 00046000
•                                                                     * 00047000
•        TWO-CARD ABSOLUTE LOADER -- THE FOLLOWING ARE SELF-LOADING   * 00048000
•        IPL-ABLE CARDS THAT LOAD A CHANNEL PROGRAM WHICH FUNCTIONS   * 00049000
•        AS AN ABSOLUTE TXT CARD LOADER, EXECUTING AS A COMMAND CHAIN * 00050000
•        FROM THE INITIAL IPL READ.  IF PUNCHED BEFORE ANY ASSEMBLED  * 00051000
•        INSTRUCTIONS OR DATA, THE TEXT FILE THE ASSEMBLER PRODUCES   * 00052000
•        MAY BE CONVERTED INTO A SELF-LOADING DECK BY USING AN EDITOR * 00053000
•        TO DELETE ANY RECORDS PRECEDING THE TWO LOADER CARDS, WHICH  * 00054000
•        IMMEDIATELY PRECEDE THE FIRST TXT RECORD IN THE TEXT OUTPUT. * 00055000
•                                                                     * 00056000
•        NO CONSTANTS MAY BE ASSEMBLED IN THE ABSOLUTE ADDRESS RANGE  * 00057000
•        X'10' TO X'43', AS THEIR LOADING WOULD OVERWRITE THE LOADER  * 00058000
•        AND CAUSE IPL FAILURES.  THE LOADER OPERATION IS TERMINATED  * 00059000
•        BY LOADING AN ORDINARY NOP CCW AT LOCATION X'40'.  WHEN THE  * 00060000
•        ASSEMBLY BEGINS WITH A 'LABEL START 0' STATEMENT, THIS COULD * 00061000
•        BE ACCOMPLISHED BY INSERTING THE SEQUENCE:                   * 00062000
•                                                                     * 00063000
•                  ORG   LABEL+X'40'                                  * 00064000
•                  CCW   X'03',0,X'20',1                              * 00065000

... snip ...

internally there was some of the green card created as (CMS) IOS3270 file ... i've done a quick&dirty conversion to html here:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/gcard.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Getting at the original command name/line

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Getting at the original command name/line
Newsgroups: comp.lang.rexx
Date: Wed, 05 Jun 2013 13:35:10 -0400
LesK <5mre20@tampabay.rr.com> writes:
I've misplaced my original, but wasn't the Green Card for S/360? Did the IOS3270 file include Virtual stuff that came after 360?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#26 Getting at the original command name/line

other things were added over the years ... I also submitted stuff from the 360/67 "blue card" which included various device sense bytes ... 2540, 1403, 2400, 2301, 2250 ... I then added 3380 (and hyperchannel A220). It eventually became somewhat hodge-podge of bits&pieces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/gcard.html#greencard

note: ios3270 was by the same person that had done browse and fulist in the late 70s for cms.

IOS3270 was also used for the 3090 service processor menu screens ... aka 3090 service processor started out being a highly modified vm370 release 6 running on 4331 ... was later upgraded to a pair of 4361s each with their own 3370 ... reason the "3092" service processor description mentions requiring two 3370 FBA disks
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP3090.html

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 05 Jun 2013 17:28:22 -0400
Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> writes:
For what business does the delta in gas prices constitute 20-40% of their costs?

Maybe long-haul truckers (39% of their operating costs are fuel, about $0.54/mile). But these days, more goods are containerized, so they'll probably get to your general area by rail, before they're lifted off and dropped onto a trailer. Trucking expense is a minor fraction of the cost of most businesses, so it's probably not a major factor in the economy.


but nearly all of highway expense is 18wheeler heavy trucking ... basically design of highway is based on projected heavy trucking lifetime as well as nearly all repair wear & tear ... but road use gas tax is spread across all vehicles. heavy trucking is effectively prorated based on miles-per-gallon ... not prorated directly on highway expense specifically because of heavy trucking. in theory road use gas tax would be applied to *ONLY* heavy trucking and eliminated from all other vehicles (similar to tax doesn't apply to offroad farm equipment) ... to make up the short fall (for eliminating from all other vehicles), heavy trucking road use gas tax might have to be increased to $50/gal(?) (road use gas tax on vehicles other than heavy trucking significantly subsidizes the heavy trucking industry).

recent post in a.f.c. references several older a.f.c posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#48 What Makes a bridge Bizarre?

older a.f.c. thread
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#41 Transportation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002j.html#42 Transportation

which quotes highway design manuals ... including:
Pavement structural sections are designed to carry the projected truck traffic considering the expanded truck traffic volume, mix, and the axle loads converted to 80 kN equivalent single axle loads (ESAL's) expected to occur during the design period. The effects on pavement life of passenger cars, pickups, and two-axle trucks are considered to be negligible.

.... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 05 Jun 2013 18:06:26 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
which quotes highway design manuals ... including:

Pavement structural sections are designed to carry the projected truck traffic considering the expanded truck traffic volume, mix, and the axle loads converted to 80 kN equivalent single axle loads (ESAL's) expected to occur during the design period. The effects on pavement life of passenger cars, pickups, and two-axle trucks are considered to be negligible.

.... snip ...


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#28 "Highway Patrol" back on TV

overloaded heavy trucks significantly worsen road damage wear&tear and seems to be major problem ... given all the truck weigh scales seen on major routes. also there are periodic news reports of some trucking company or another being caught using "farm" gas (i.e. both using gas that has had no road use taxes as well as lots of overloaded trucks significantly increasing highway damage in excess of ESAL calculation ... aka not a linear relationship).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
Date: 6 June 2013
Blog: Financial Crime Risk, Fraud and Security
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#80 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#91 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#25 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'

In the congressional Madoff hearings, they had the person that had tried unsuccessfully for a decade to get SEC to do something about Madoff. During the hearings he was asked if new regulations were needed. He replied that while new regulations might be needed, much more important was to have transparency and visibility. The problem is that much of the financial culture thrives on not having transparency and visibility (uneven playing field, repeatedly exploiting opportunities that aren't generally available and operating in environment with lots of obfuscation and misdirection).

commodities trading had requirement for players to have positions in the commodity they were playing in, because speculators resulted in wild, irrational price swings. "Vampire Squid" had chapter on "19 secret letters" allowing specific speculators to play resulting in wild, irrational price swings ... including the huge spike in price of oil the summer of 2008. Later a member of congress released trading data showing speculators were responsible for huge spike in price of oil the summer of 2008 ... and there was all sorts of articles in the press criticizing him for releasing confidential data.

aka Why Didn't the SEC Catch Madoff? It Might Have Been Policy Not To
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/why-didnt-the-sec-catch-madoff-it-might-have-been-policy-not-to-20130531
and Probe of SEC Watchdog Office Could Revisit Madoff Report
http://www.businessweek.com/print/magazine/content/09_36/b4145036681619.htm
more SEC/Madoff whistle-blower reference: How Bad Can It Be for SEC Whistle-Blowers?
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-05-15/the-saga-of-one-sec-whistle-blower-william-d-cohan-correct-.html

The rhetoric in the US around the passage of Sarbanes-Oxley was that 1) it would prevent future ENRONs and WORLDCOMs and 2) auditors and executives that signed public company financial filings with incorrect numbers would go to jail (but it required SEC to do do something). Possibly because even GAO didn't think SEC was doing anything ... GAO started doing reports of fraudulent public company financial filings, even showing increase after Sarbanes-Oxley (and nobody going to jail).

As an aside. one of the people that I worked with in the mid-90s in the x9a10 financial standards working group was from NSCC. Somewhat as a result of the x9a10 standards work, I was asked in to NSCC (before it merged with DTC forming DTCC) to work on improving the integrity of exchange transactions. I did some work on transaction integrity and then was told the work was suspended. The problem was that a side-effect of the transaction integrity work would have enormously increased transparency and visibility ... which turns out to be antithetical to wallstreet culture.

past posts mentioning transparency and visibility and/or the "19 secret letters":
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#51 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#36 Architectural Diversity
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#53 Are the "brightest minds in finance" finally onto something?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#45 Artificial Intelligence to tackle rogue traders
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#67 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#29 Transparency and Visibility
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#23 Why are z/OS people reluctant to use z/OS UNIX? (Are settlements a good argument for overnight batch COBOL ?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009p.html#57 MasPar compiler and simulator
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#47 Audits VII: the future of the Audit is in your hands
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#33 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#37 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#31 In the News: SEC storms the 'Castle'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#34 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#42 "Fraud & Stupidity Look a Lot Alike"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#61 TCM's Moguls documentary series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#44 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#53 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#26 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#39 Back to architecture: Analyzing NYSE data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#82 Bank email archives thrown open in financial crash report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#86 Bank email archives thrown open in financial crash report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#52 Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011h.html#5 Home prices may drop another 25%, Shiller predicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#67 U.S. can't account for $8.7 billion of Iraq's money: audit
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#11 Innovation and iconoclasm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#38 Advice from Richard P. Feynman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#15 Is the SEC Covering Up Wall Street Crimes?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#20 Study shows powerful corporations really do control the world's finances
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#37 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#76 FIA shocked and outraged after Senator leaks oil trading data
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#1 As Pressure Grows to Cut Spending, the True Cost of Weapons Is Anyone's Guess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#21 HOLLOW STATES and a CRISIS OF CAPITALISM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#18 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#24 AMERICA IS BROKEN, WHAT NOW?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#30 Have you ever wondered why some people seem to get rich easily
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#49 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#4 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#47 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#61 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#80 How Pursuit of Profits Kills Innovation and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#29 21st Century Management approach?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#30 21st Century Management approach?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#31 21st Century Management approach?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#130 vampires in financial infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#137 The High Cost of Failing Artificial Hips
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#5 We are on the brink of a historic decision [referring to defence cuts]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012.html#87 The PC industry is heading for collapse
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#44 What's the most interesting thing you do in your non-work life?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012b.html#54 The New Age Bounty Hunger -- Showdown at the SEC Corral
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#0 New theory of moral behavior may explain recent ethical lapses in banking industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#13 Study links ultrafast machine trading with risk of crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#36 US real-estate has lost $7T in value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#71 Memory versus processor speed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#57 speculation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#74 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#80 The Failure of Central Planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#86 The Dangers of High-Frequency Trading; Wall Street's Speed Freaks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#6 Adult Supervision
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#13 Is there a connection between your strategic and tactical assertions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#20 Is there a connection between your strategic and tactical assertions?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#22 Four Signs Your Awesome Investment May Actually Be A Ponzi Scheme
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#1 STOP PRESS! An Auditor has been brought to task for a failed bank!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#77 U.S. banks on high alert against cyberattacks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#63 Is it possible to hack mainframe system??
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#38 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

I/O Optimization

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: I/O Optimization
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 6 Jun 2013 04:54:03 -0700
Gerard Schildberger <gerard46@rrt.net> writes:
CMS - Cross Memory Services --- later renamed to XMS.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#24 I/O Optimization

CMS was originally Cambridge Monitor System ... part of cp67. CMS morphed into Conversational Monitor System when CP67 morphed into VM370

as an aside TLA is not just "three-letter-acronym" but also "three-letter-agency"

CMS-based online computer conferencing was provided to SHARE for free starting in Aug1976 ... and used SHARE's (mostly) three-letter organization identifiers ... archives here:
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

CIA was CAD

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Getting at the original command name/line

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Getting at the original command name/line
Newsgroups: comp.lang.rexx
Date: Thu, 06 Jun 2013 08:25:40 -0400
LesK <5mre20@tampabay.rr.com> writes:
Theo Alkema (now deceased) was the author of IOS3270, BROWSE, FULIST and IOSMENU. Probably many others, but those are the biggies that I remember. Several IBM offerings used IOS3270 (renamed) back then.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#26 Getting at the original command name/line
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#27 Getting at the original command name/line

I had done a lot of enhancements for shared segments as part of page mapped filesystem for cp67/cms ... and then migrated to vm370/cms ... during the IBM Future System ... when lots of people were working on FS and 370 efforts were suspended and/or killed off (during the FS period, I continued to do 360/370 stuff ... even periodically criticizing what was going on in FS). some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

some old email about migration from cp67/cms to vm370/cms
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

when FS imploded, there was then a mad rush to get stuff back into the 370 product pipeline ... which contributed to decision to release a bunch of stuff that I had been doing all during the FS period. Some of it was incorporated into VM370 release 3 ... and other stuff was released as part of my "resource manager".

much of the cms & cp shared-segment stuff was picked up for vm370 release 3 as "DCSS" ... but re-organized to operate w/o the paged-mapped filesystem support. Part of the issue is paged-mapped filesystem support had gotten bad reputation because of its inclusion in FS as "single-level-store". "Single-Level-Store" was sort of picked up from tss/360 (multics, and other single-level-store implementations of the period). As undergraduate in the 60s I had lots of opportunity to see what was wrong with tss/360 and even do tss/360 benchmarks with cp67. So when I did paged-mapped filesystem for CMS ... I worked hard to avoid all the tss/360 short-comings ... being able to demonstrate three-times the throughput with paged-mapped filesystem compared to standard CMS filesystem (both CDF and EDF) on moderate filesystem intensive workload. However, it wasn't sufficient to overcome the bad rep that page-mapped filesystem had gotten. ... misc. past posts mentioning doing CMS page-mapped system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

Later I worked with Theo to rework IOS3270, BROWSE and FULIST in shared segments. some old email with theo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#email781010
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#email781011
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#email791012

Theo (and Burt Wijnen) were at the European HONE system in Uithoorn. One of my hobbies had been providing highly enhanced production operating systems for internal datacenters ... and one of my long term customers (from cp67 days) was HONE operation (started out in US, online cms-based sales & marketing support ... but clones of the HONE system then spread world-wide). misc. past posts mentioning HONE
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hone

for other topic drift, old email with the 3092 service processor engineers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#email861031
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#email861223

above mentions a replacement for IPCS that I had done mostly in REXX. For whatever reason it was never released to customers, but it was used by nearly every internal datacenter and customer support PSR ... my objective was for it to have ten times the function of IPCS and run ten times faster than (assembler) IPCS ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#dumprx

misc. past posts mentioning Theo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#8 Theo Alkema
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#9 Theo Alkema
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#21 Theo Alkema
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004q.html#63 creat
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005f.html#14 Where should the type information be: in tags and descriptors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005t.html#39 FULIST
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006.html#0 EREP , sense ... manual
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#50 TSO and more was: PDP-1
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#51 other cp/cms history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#63 An old fashioned Christmas

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 06 Jun 2013 10:13:47 -0400
Lawrence Statton <lawrence@cluon.com> writes:
All that changed when national dialing was standardized in 199x (as part of the run-up for Alabama getting assigned Area Code 334) giving everyone 7D or 1+10D dialing. A very nice time to be a consultant, because there was plenty of money to be made charging people with FG_A dialers (still popular due to a combination of economics and inertia) a hundred bucks a pop to fix their internal tables. I wrote software and built a couple of adapters for my Palm Pilot to allow me to plug into a handful of different brands of dialers and PBXes to reprogram them in minutes. Even at a hundred bucks, I probably wasn't netting that much per hour because I spent SOOO much time (delightful time, I genuinely enjoyed it) working on the tools.

when we were doing ha/cmp (high availability, cluster multiprocessor)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

we were having several joint meetings with BELLCORE about doing an ha/cmp implementation for 1-800 number (aka switch asks the 1-800 database for the "real" number that the 1-800 number overlays). The whole thing reset to zero when ruling was made that 1-800 numbers can be moved between service providers.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 06 Jun 2013 10:21:41 -0400
Lawrence Statton <lawrence@cluon.com> writes:
[footnotes]

[1] I remember the date -- I got off the plane and a couple weeks later the earth moved, a ball game was interrupted, and some bridges fell. You may have read it on the news.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loma_Prieta_earthquake


original IBM mainframe tcp/ip was implemented in vs/pascal for vm370. I've mentioned before that it had some performance issues ... getting 44kbytes/sec using nearly whole 3090 processor. I've commented before about the communication group's battle against client/server, distributed computing and tcp/ip (attempting to preserve its dumb terminal install base) may have contributed to the performance ... some past references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#terminal

I then did the enhancements for rfc1044 ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

and in some tests at cray research between a cray and 4341, got substained channel media speed using only modest amount of 4341 processing (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). was taking flt from SFO to Minneapolis to do the test ... the flt was 20mins late leaving the ground. During the flt, there was a lot of whispering by stewardesses in the galley and I got up and went back to ask them what it was all about. Turns out we had wheels up off the ground five minutes before the quake hit.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Some Things Never Die

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Some Things Never Die
Date: 5 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/D8hU-F

Jean Sammet was involved in both Cobol and PLI
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_E._Sammet

early 70s she was in the Boston Programming Group on the 3rd flr of 545 tech sq. (science center was on the 4th flr, Project MAC/Multics was on the 5th flr). The cp67 group split off from the science center and as part of morph to vm370 took over the Boston Programming Group on the 3rd flr. As it continued to expand, it outgrew the 3rd flr and moved out to the vacant SBC bldg (SBC going to CDC as part of legal settlement) in Burlington Mall.

Multics was written in PLI.
http://www.multicians.org/history.html
and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multics
Multics recently mentioned in this "Old Geeks" discussion
http://lnkd.in/zERnJD

Old thread "Thirty Years Later: Lessons from the Multics Security Evaluation"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002l.html#42
about IBM Research study from early part of the century
http://www.acsac.org/2002/papers/classic-multics.pdf
on the Air Force Multics security evaluation.
http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/history/karg74.pdf

One of the points was that Multics (PLI) had no "buffer" vulnerabilities that are epidemic in C-language based software.

Another IBM problem was that the compiler and runtime librarys were extremely heavy weight ... nobody would have ever considered doing an operating system implementation in IBM's PLI. I've periodically claimed that in the 70s, John did 801/RISC as counter to the horrible complexity of the Future System effort (before it imploded without even being announced ... but not before billions were spent on it ... it was going to completely replace 370). Part of 801/RISC was pl.8 ... which is characterized as 80% pli. pl.8 was the language used to implement the cp.r operating system for 801/risc.

for the fun ot it ... here is post today in the usenet comp.lang.rexx newsgroup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#32

it discusses some of the short-comings of FS ... including the design for single-level-store. Folklore is that some of the those from FS retreated to Rochester to do S/38 ... including the (poorly performing) single-level-store. Part of the issue was that throughput wasn't major issue for S/38. One of the nails in FS coffin was calculation that if Eastern's System/One ACP system ... which ran on 370/195 ... if it was redone on FS machine built from the fastest available technology ... it would have throughput of 370/145 (30 times slowdown).

AS/400 is then followon merger of S/38 and S/36 (with some features from S/38 dropped). AS/400 originally shipped on CISC processor ... but moved to 801/risc in the 90s.

Trivia: 1980 there was effort to move large number of IBM internal microprocessors to 801/risc base ... controllers, processors used for low-end and mid-range 370s, as well as for AS/400. For a variety of reasons, all of the efforts failed ... and you found various 801/risc engineers leaving to work on risc efforts at other vendors. However, in the as/400 case it eventually came back to RISC. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801

In the current Z mainframe case ... the claims are that much of the performance improvement in the last two generations (z196 & ec12) are because of implementing support for operations that have been part of RISC for decades.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek.
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 06 Jun 2013 14:16:05 -0400
Lawrence Statton <lawrence@cluon.com> writes:
I have a question and a nit:

The question is: What was IBM's role in that? I "know" (recall) the contract eventually went to Lockheed.

The nit is: It was the translation from the 800 number to the Carrier Identifiaction Code -- the final translation to a PTN (if there even WAS a PTN) was under the control of the RESPORG.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#33 CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#34 CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek

don't know what others in ibm may have been doing ... we were just dealing with bellcore people, primary guys were from nynex. the existing 1-800 lookup was on a hardware fault tolerant computer ... (turns out there was also group in ibm selling the same computer under ibm logo) which was expensive ... but also single "computer" ... software maintenance once a year blew a century's worth of system unavailability budget (requirement was for five-nines availability)

the switch already had hardware fault tolerant hardware and the lookup was driven down a T1 link ... and if it didn't get a response, it would drive it down a replicated T1 link (as countermeasure to communication hardware failure). HA/CMP would just put two different systems on the end of each link. Software maintenance could be done serially w/o taking out the service.

the hardware fault tolerant vendor came back and said that they could put in replicated system also to handle the software maintenance issue. However, with the switch hardware fault tolerant masking communication outages with replicated communication ... and replicated systems to handle the software maintenance issues .... it made extra expense of the lookup systems also being hardware fault tolerant, redundant and superfluous.

the whole thing was reset to zero when the regulation came down that 1-800 numbers had to be able to move with user between telco service providers.

from long ago and far away (names obscured to pretect the innocent)

Date: Mon, 13 Jan 92 08:17:35 EST
From: wheeler

I spent almost an hour on the phone with xxxxx (from Oracle) on the phone last night (Sunday). He wanted to go over several things:

1) yyyyy has called xxxxx and wanted Oracle to work with xxxxx on setting up, configuring, tuning, testing, etc. the 2000-4000 "cluster" configuration that yyyyy says that Hester asked him to put together. xxxxx basically suggested that yyyyy should coordinate the activity through us (i.e. xxxxx didn't want to step on anymore toes ... he has seen that sort of stuff from IBM already with the Whited stuff).

2) Hester/Elison meeting is schedule for Weds. during Uniform. Oracle will send a limo to pickup IBM people and take them to Oracle. During our discussion, I basically set the list of IBM'ers to be invited as Hester, zzzzz, and you. xxxxx also indicated that anything that I would like Oracle to say to Hester ... they will work into the discussion.

3) There is a conference call between Oracle, IBM Dallas testing/performance group and hopefully us scheduled for 11am (cst) this coming Thursday. The topic of the call is to verify some of the details that Oracle will be telling Hester regarding the joint Oracle/IBM activities (i.e. joint Dallas/Oracle work on tuning/testing of TPC measurements, stuff that we will be doing, etc).

4) Besides the joint IBM/Oracle conference in Sacramento on Weds. morning (for something like 50 IBM customers, including some state governments), the Wells Fargo IBM account rep. has asked xxxxx to make a call on Wells Fargo on Weds. afternoon. Wells Fargo has DB2 on IBM mainframe and has selected Oracle for their "Unix" DBMS ... and Wells Fargo is now trying to decide on the Unix hardware platform. The account rep. wants xxxxx to talk to them about HA/Oracle and the HA/CMP cluster platform. Note that Wells Fargo is at the very top of the list of customers that the people in Somers want me to call on (these are the people that want me to scuttle HA/CMP and go to work on HA/MVS-DB2 ... Wells Fargo has done some DB2 enhancements moving it along the "mode2" lines ... and would like to start work on "mode2" disaster survivability ... i.e. replicated data centers separated by geographical distances). There has actually been two meetings scheduled for me to go meet with the Wells Fargo DB2 technical developers ... however, I've not been able to make either meeting.

5) xxxxx would especially like to emphasize in the meeting with Hester the close & productive working relationship that Oracle now has with the IBM/HACMP group and how it will be very profitable to both companies. xxxxx would like to emphasize that the close working relationship could be strengthen. He would like to work towards Oracle having early engineering models of RISC/6000 & HA/CMP hardware as soon as it was available for software development ... and in return Oracle would do everything possible to implement their complete product line (from the very high-end to the low-end client applications) on the IBM RISC product line ... as well as making sure that support for the IBM product line alwas is available when any new releases &/or products first ship. They will try to emphasize their technology leadership and there past and ongoing work activities with IBM, Transarc, and OSF.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

I've referenced the Ellison meeting several times including
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/95.html#13

Date: Tue, 14 Jan 92 15:36:09 EST
From: wheeler

What Bellcore did was show that two independent RISC/6000 (i.e. a HA/CMP cluster) met their availability requirements (i.e. mean time to "system" failure is the probability that both independent RISC/6000 took a failure within the same fault window ... i.e. one failed and before it was restored to service the 2nd failed).

for the 800 number application ... the "switch" provided fault-tolerant implementation at the "single-point-of-failure" (i.e. at the switch) ... the switch then also contained logic that if any of the redundant/replicated external components failed (that were not themselves fault tolerant ... but were replicated)

For instance a copper or fiber telco line isn't fault-tolerant ... but if you have multiple independent such lines ... and a switch that can manage failures and reconfigure based on components still in service ... then the switch provides the capability for simulating fault-tolerant telco lines via multiple replicated lines and the ability to reconfigure.

The replicated HA/CMP cluster RISC/6000 processors effectively are analogous to multiple communication lines ... each individual line is not fault-tolerant ... but given sufficient replicated components and the ability to dynamically reconfigure the system to utilize components that are in service ... the it provides an approximation to "real" fault tolerance ... i.e. the probability that any single component failing is unlikely to take the system out of service.

The issue in this case isn't what the "system" mean-time to failure is ... but can the application survive and/or find acceptable in terms of the recovery taken when individual components fail (i.e. is the failure reconfiguration transparent to the application and/or is it required to be). The issue of reconfiguration transparency effectively needs to be examined on a case by case basis.

Usually the issue regarding traditional FT systems vis-a-vis HA/CMP configurations isn't an issue of system "MTBF" or mean time to failure and/or what is the individual component MTBF or mean time to failure ... but what is the application requirements regarding transparency of fault management/reconfiguration when individual components fail. Traditional FT provide some degree additional transparency in this respect compared to HA/CMP (i.e. the issue isn't REALLY mean-time-to-failure, the issue PRIMARILY is how transparent is the fault management when it does occur).

Within the context of an overall system environment ... the difference with respect to fault transparency between traditional FT systems and HA/CMP may or may not be important. As in the case of Bellcore 800 number service ... it turns out because of various operational characteristics of the overall system environment ... there is no real visable difference at the end-user service level between whether a single fault tolerant computer is attached to the pair of T1 links (connecting the switch and the "800 number database computer" or a pair of HA/CMP RISC/6000 processors are connecting to the T1 links. The operational characteristics of the switch when doing an 800 number inquiry totally masks the failure of a single HA/CMP RISC/6000 processor.

To repeat ... the issue isn't particularly mean-time to failure ... since the probability of a pair of independent RISC/6000 processors failing within the same failure window isn't the issue. The real issue is normally what is the application transparency requirement regarding what happens when an individual component (within the context of a replicated system like HA/CMP cluster) does fail.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

old email about some of the cluster scaleup stuff
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

the last email in above was end of Jan1992 ... and within hrs the cluster scaleup part had been transferred and announced as IBM supercomputer (and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors, which is major motivation in our decision to leave). News item 17Feb1992 about scientific and technical *ONLY*
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters1
news item 11May1992 about *suprised* by cluster interest
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#6000clusters2

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 06 Jun 2013 18:06:14 -0400
scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:
There's also the switch from winter blends to summer blends in some areas which requires a partial refinery shutdown. There's also seasonal refinery maintenence, often in the spring.

Then there is the supply-demand curve, spot oil price, speculation etc.


there is ongoing discussion on (closed) linkedin financial crime about lot of the mainstream press providing limited coverage of fraudulent activity of TBTF and other major institutions ... in fact, frequently just the opposite ... especially badly treating whistle-blowers.

one of the discussions was about all the press cover about how poorly people were doing dealing with the huge gas price increase the summer 2008 (because of big spike in price of oil)

rolling stones taibbi had written book "vampire squid" ... one of the chapters was about commodity trading had required players to have significant in the commodity in order to play because speculators resulted in wild, irrational price swings ... and then there were 19 "secret letters" allowing specific speculators to play ... among other things resulted in the huge spike in oil price summer of 2008 ... getting little or no coverage.

later when member of congress released the oil trading transaction details showing the speculators responsible for the huge spike in oil price summer of 2008 ... much of the press was about him being condemned for making public the "confidential" information (earlier press appeared to want somebody to blame for the gas price, but that changed once it was known who it was).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 07 Jun 2013 10:52:45 -0400
Lawrence Statton <lawrenabae@abaluon.abaom> writes:
I agree with Barb whole-heartedly here -- there is no way to prevent a person who is sufficiently dedicated to cause harm.

If they couldn't have used a cell-phone, they'd have found some other technology.

We can not prevent that some people combine high-functioning intelligence with unspeakable mallice. Ted Kaczynski. Tim McVeigh. These kids in Boston.

Life involves risk, and we cannot prevent it away through a nanny state. Freedom comes with the continuous price that sometimes people die.


the learned that in Iraq ... supposedly billions were spent on countermeasures to cellphone IEDs ... and within days/weeks the insurgents had moved to things like controllers from remote controlled cars (story about one unit getting controllers and taping all controls on ... would trigger explosion before they got to the IED ... rather than when they were over it).

however, from the annals of unintended consequences ... the decision to invade Iraq was made almost immediately ... as well as fabrication to justify the decision ... although became easier after 9/11. For the invasion, the fabrication about WMDs resulted in telling troops to not blow up enormous bunkers of weapons and ammunition ... just bypass them because they didn't have resources to deal with the WMDs. When they went back later ... the bunkers were empty (and no evidence of WMDs were ever found). Estimate that over million metric tons disappeared ... fueling the subsequent insurgency and IED activity ... FIASCO pg 145
http://www.amazon.com/Fiasco-American-Military-Adventure-ebook/dp/B004IATD6U/

Heavily reinforced trucks were eventually introduced as countermeasure to (smaller) IEDs, insurgents then started adding large artillery shells (from the bunkers) to the IEDs.

Originally, justifications included invasion would only cost $50B ... current estimates are now pushing $5T (when long term veteren benefits are included) ... a factor of 100 times increase. recent references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#3 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#51 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#52 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?

FIASCO somewhat waffles back and forth between the decision was made before 9/11 with lots of fabrication ... and disagreements between two sides about whether or not to invade Iraq. However, it does discuss that the fabrications about WMD had lots of later unintended consequences adversely affecting everything that went on.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why does IBM keep saying things like this:

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 8 Jun 2013 11:16:39 -0700
edjaffe@PHOENIXSOFTWARE.COM (Ed Jaffe) writes:
In every presentation I've seen where a statistic like this was presented, it was always qualified as "business data". In that context, it implied data bases of core customer, account, transaction, billing, and inventory data (et al) maintained by the world's largest corporations for their applications. I do not think the presenters meant to include things like, for example, the millions of copies of Microsoft Office running on business PCs as "business data".

IBM's claims used to be not just mainframe but also IMS.

trivial issue is that the "big data" movement has turned an enormous amount of stuff into "business data" (far in excess of traditional legacy business data).

in some cases the mainframe releated costs are million times that of technology being used for "big data" ... as a result, non-mainframe "big data" processing much easier to show positive ROI.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
Date: 8 June 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/TDDwnA

Part of the problem is finding published benchmarks. I found a recent IBM published peak I/O z196 benchmark that also has some related information.

2M IOPS using 104 FICON channels. FICON is technology that has legacy IBM channel protocol chatter layered ontop of FCS that significantly cuts the throughput of native FCS channel throughput (104 FICON is legacy IBM channel protocol chatter layered on top of 104 FCS). A recent FCS announced for e5-2600 claims over 1M IOPS (for single FCS) ... in theory two such FCS has higher throughput than 104 FCS running IBM channel protocol chatter (aka FICON).

Associated information with the benchmark is that z196 has maximum of 14 system assist processors ... which capable of 2.2M SSCH/sec when all are running at 100% busy ... however recommendations are SAPs are kept at 70% or less for normal workload (aka 1.5M SSCH/sec).

In financials, IBM did publish aggregate data for software & licensing. It mentioned that IBM mainframe processors account for 4% of IBM revenue ... but total IBM mainframe unit is 25% of IBM revenue ... taking into account software and services. Rough calculations is customers are paying a total of $6.25 for every dollar paid for processor ... or avg of $5.25 for software&services for every dollar spent on processor hardware. A maximum configured z196 with 80 processors goes for $28M ... from IBM financial data, on the avg., a customer is paying IBM a total of $175M for $28M z196 (total processor, software & services ... aka total of $6.25 for every dollar spent on processor).

A max. configured 80 processor z196 is rated at 50BIPS, 625MIPS/process, also translates to $560,000/BIPS in direct processor hardware cost ... but $3,500,000/BIPS when taking into account total revenue that the mainframe collects from customers .... not only processor cost but also software and services.

A 101 ec12 is rated at 50% faster or 75BIPS or 743MIPS/processor ... however, published ec12 documents claim that ec12 will have (only) 30% higher DBMS (aka i/o intensive) throughput than z196 (total processor increased 50% but DBMS throughput only increased 30%).

In approx. 40posts since the beginning of the year, I have been extensive reference to published IBM financial revenue numbers about how much the mainframe group earns from processor hardware and that the mainframe group earns 5.25 times as much from software&services than it does from processor hardware (i.e. mainframe customers are paying IBM 5.25 times for software&serves that they pay for the processor hardware). Don't have to try and do survey of customers what they are paying for hardware, software & services ... just have to look at IBM gross revenue statements about what it is taking in from hardware, software, and services.

There were nearly 60 posts since the start of the year discussing z196 in some detail ... 37 of them also discussing IBM mainframe financial details and how much customers are paying for hardware versus software. Note that this somewhat corresponds to articles about Gerstner's epiphany when he was brought in to resurrect the company (and reverse the immediate breakup; company had been re-organized into the "baby blues" in preparation for breaking the company up into numerous parts) .... i.e. redirect the company away from hardware product focus to software&services.

One of the issues is that IBM base list price for e5-2600 is $1815 ... and e5-2600 (2chip 8cores/chip, 16 processors) has rating of 527BIPS, 33,000MIPS/processor (compared to z196 625MIPS/processor) or $3.44/BIPS (a factor of million times less than the $3,500,000/BIPS for z196. The big cloud system operators for quite some time have claimed they are building blades at 1/3rd the cost of brand name server vendors ... which brings it down to about a dollar/BIPS .... making the processing cost a factor of nearly 3,500,000 times difference between z196 and e5-2600.

The big cloud megadatacenters each have several million of processors ... IBM e5-2600 @ $1815 is $113/processor, megadatacenters at 1/3rd that is $38/processor. 5million processors is $190M and aggregate computation of 165 million BIPS (165,000 TIPS). Recent press is that the x86 manufactures are shipping more chips to the big cloud operators than to the brand name server vendors (the x86 server market only takes into account the sales of brand name server vendors ... which is now less servers than are at the big cloud operators).

IBM financials has it has been selling the equivalent of approx. 180 80-processor z196 (@28M) per year ... which also translates into approx. aggregate of 9000BIPS/yr (or 9TIPS/yr) processing power. Any one of the big cloud megadatacenters then has the equivalent processing power of nearly 20,000 yrs of mainframe sales.

The enormous drop in dataprocessing cost has lots of significant implications. For instance, the big cloud operators can have excess provisioning for purely on-demand operation (lots of available idle processing power for on-demand).

There are quite a few cloud megadatacenters around the world. Hardware dataprocessing costs have plunged so far that other costs have become major factor .... as a result the cloud megatacenters have been at forefront of reducing all other operating costs, power, cooling, people, etc ... as well as processor features with power dropping to zero when idle ... but instantaneously coming up to full operation "on-demand".

IBM even has advertisements about customers upgrading their older servers to e5-2600. the dramatic increase in processing power (much fewer processors needed) and significant drop in power requirements (drop in number of servers as well as significant increases in computational power efficiency) can result in net savings (out-of-pocket cost for replacement e5-2600 servers offset by reduction in power & cooling costs).

... years ago IBM got a reputation for FUD ... part of that is obfuscation and misdirecting the discussion away from principle issues (raising issues extraneous to subject at hand). this and several other references that search engines turn up
http://changingminds.org/techniques/resisting/fud.htm

reference it really gaining hold with IBM marketing people in the 70s as countermeasure to Amdahl's clone processors. This discusses Amdahl's advanced computer project at IBM. IBM executives shut it down because they were afraid that it would advance computing too fast and they would loose control of the market (bottom of the article discusses features from ACS showing up more than 20yrs later in es/9000):
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

Amdahl leaves and starts his clone processor company. IBM then starts the Future System project that was going to completely replace 370 (and completely different and incompatible with 370). During the FS period ... 370 efforts were being suspended and/or killed off. The lack of new 370 products during the FS period is credited with giving clone processors a market foothold. That also explains marketing having to finely tune its FUD skills .... because of the lack of competitive products. posts mentioning FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

When FS implodes (after spending billions of dollars w/o even being announced), there is mad rush to get products back into the 370 product pipelines. One of these is 303x ... 3031 is 158-3 with new covers, 3032 is 168-3 with new covers, 3033 is 168-3 logic remapped to 20% faster chips ... originally being developed for FS. In parallel with 3033, 370-xa and 3081 work starts. 3081 is leveraging some other poorly performing left over FS technology. This discusses how really badly 3081 compared to competition
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

It wasn't until you get to 3090 that you have really new technology ... and it isn't until es/9000 that you get back to advanced computing. During much of this time, about the only thing that marketing had to fall back on was developing and practicing its FUD skills.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
Date: 9 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/cN9fFJ
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#13

In the 80s, John Boyd was the head of "military reform movement" ... attempting to combat some of the worse excesses of the MICC. He was the force behind this time cover 18pg article
http://nation.time.com/2013/02/28/it-was-30-years-ago-today/

one of my co-workers tracked down the person named in the article and called him up, he suggested that he call John instead. That resulted in my meeting John and sponsoring his briefings at IBM. John was responsible for lots of things, the F16, much of why the F15 and F18 are as good as they are, the battle plan for desert storm (one of the comments about the problem with the wars last decade was Boyd had died in 1997). The commandant of the Marine Corps leveraged Boyd to a make-over of the corp in the late 80s & early 90s ... and the Marine Corp sponsors regular Boyd conferences at Marine Corps Univ.

Many of Boyd's acolytes are still active attempting to counteract the worst excesses of the MICC. I've pontificated a lot how the MICC was behind significant amounts of the fabrication justifying the invasion of Iraq ... many of the participants were members of Team B responsible for other fabrications over the past decades.

One of the important things about the U2 was that Eisenhower was able to leverage the CIA U2 photo recon to debunk the MICC claims about need to close the "bomber gap" ... which would have resulted in 20% increase in DOD budget. In 1976, Ford fired Colby as head of CIA because he wouldn't go along with the Team B claims ... replacing him with Bush1; finally correcting the problem going back to (at least) U2 photo recon with CIA opposing MICC fabrications. You find members of Team B supporting both Iran and Iraq in the Iran/Iraq war (MICC weapons merchants to both sides).

The decision (& fabrication) to invade Iraq began at the start of the last administration ... becoming easier after 9/11. Part of early justification were claims that it would only cost $50B, current numbers has it pushing $5T (with long term veterans care/benefits) a 100-times increase. From the law of unintended consequences, the WMD fabrications resulted in telling invading forces to bypass huge weapon & ammo bunkers (because they didn't have facilities to deal with WMD). When they got around to going back they found them empty, a million metric tons of weapons & ammo disappearing into the insurgency ... and providing much of the material for IEDs.

... Time copy that lives free at wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20070320170523/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,953733,00.html

In "Prophets of War" ... one of the scenarios MICC had to maintain quarterly profits after the fall of Soviet Union, was expanding NATO to include former Soviet block countries ... requiring them to buy compatible arms (from US weapon merchants) underwritten by USAID. In one of the rounds of NATO expansion, candidate countries were told that it would boost their case (to join NATO) if they voted in the UN for the Invasion of Iraq

In "Fiasco: The American Military Adventure in Iraq", Ricks talks about overlap with the players between Desert Storm and the last decade ... however, he doesn't talk about the same players going back to Team B ... Colby being replaced with Bush1 in the mid-70s ... because the CIA wouldn't get in line with the MICC analysis.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_B
Eisenhower was able to debunk MICC claims with CIA U2 photo recon. The Colby firing was getting CIA inline with MICC. He also doesn't talk about Team B supporting Iraq in Iran/Iraq war
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_support_for_Iraq_during_the_Iran%E2%80%93Iraq_war
Then it turns out that US is arms merchant to both sides
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair
lots of details were to be released in 2001 under the Presidential Records Act when the new president signs executive order keeping them classified.
http://nsarchive.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/president-who-eviscerated-presidential-records-act-relying-on-his-presidential-library-to-boost-his-legacy

"Merchants of Doubt" even has chapter interacting with MICC & "Team B". Mostly it is about pubic relations firms supporting specific corporate agendas (including manipulating scientific studies) going back to tobacco industry in the 50s.

for the fun of it The Gun Seller, originally published May97 (Hugh Laurie, also actor in tv "House") loc2250-57:

If you've ever had any training in military theory, it's possible that you had to sit through a lecture on a thing called the Boyd Loop. Boyd was a chap who spent a large amount of time studying air-to-air combat during the Korean war, analysing typical "event sequences" ... or, in layman's language, sequences of events ... to see why pilot A was able to shoot down pilot B, and how pilot B felt about it afterwards, and which of them had had kedgeree for breakfast. Boyd's theory was based on the utterly facile observation that when A did something, B reacted, A did something else, B reacted again et cetera, forming a loop of action and reaction. The Boyd Loop. Nice work if you can get it, you may be thinking. But Boyd's "Eureka" moment, which to this day causes his name to be bandied about military academies the world over, came when he hit upon the notion that if B could do two things in the space of time it normally took him to do one, he would "get inside the loop", and the forces of right would thereby prevail.

loc4605-11:
The day Alexander Woolf decided to take on the military-industrial complex was the day everything changed. For him, for his family, for his business. Things changed quickly, and they changed for good. Roused from its slumber, the military-industrial complex lifted a great, lazy paw, and swatted him away, as if he were no more than a human being. They cancelled his existing contracts and withdrew possible future ones. They bankrupted his suppliers, disrupted his labour force, and investigated him for tax evasion. They bought his company's stock in a few months and sold it in a few hours, and when that didn't do the trick, they accused him of trading in narcotics. They even had him thrown out of the St Regis, for not replacing a fairway divot.

... snip ...

tribute after John's passing in proceedings of USNI
http://web.archive.org/web/20011224132049/http://www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt

recent posts mentioning Boyd Tribute:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#39 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#63 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
Date: 9 June 2013
Blog: Enterprise Systems
re:
http://lnkd.in/TDDwnA
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#xx The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"

10GbE: What the Heck Took So Long?
http://tech.slashdot.org/story/13/06/07/212207/10gbe-what-the-heck-took-so-long
10 Gig: What Took So Darn Long?
http://www.enterprisenetworkingplanet.com/nethub/10-gig-what-took-so-darn-long.html

from above:
"10GbE and PCIe 2 were a very promising combination when they appeared in 2007, but the Great Recession hit soon after and IT departments were dumping hardware rather than buying more. The final missing piece is finally arriving: 10GbE support on motherboards. 'What 10 GbE needs to become a commodity is exactly what 1 GbE got and what Fibre Channel failed to get: support on every motherboard,' writes Newman. 'The current landscape looks promising. 10 GbE is starting to appear on motherboards from every major server vendor, and I suspect that in just a few years, we'll start to see it on home PC boards, with the price dropping from the double digits to single digits, and then even down to cents.'"

... snip ...

By the time ESCON shipped with es/9000 in 1990, it was already obsolete. In 1980, IBM STL was bursting at the seams and they decided to move 300 from the IMS group to offsite building with dataprocessing service back in STL datacenter. They tried remote 3270 and found it totally unacceptable. I got roped into doing the channel extender support so they could have local, channel attached 3270 at the remote bldg. Part of the support was downloading channel program to the remote site and running it there ... with the channel extender supporting full-duplex operation between the remote site and the STL datacenter. This totally masked the latency with the remote site, and it turned out service was slightly better than with real local channel attached 3270 back in STL.

The vendor tries to talk IBM into releasing my support. The group in POK that was playing with some fiber stuff gets IBM to refuse because they were afraid it might inhibit their getting their fiber stuff out (takes another decade when it is released as ESCON with es/9000, but at 17mbytes/sec ... it is obsolete).

In 1988, I get asked to help LLNL standardize some serial technology they have which turns into fibre-channel standard (FCS). Standard operates full-duplex and downloads I/O programs (like I had done in 1980). Some POK channel engineers get involved and create definition that layers IBM's half-duplex channel protocol chatter on top of FCS that significantly reduces throughput (compared to native FCS, somewhat like they had done for ESCON) ... which eventually comes out as FICON.

1990s financial industry spent billions to move off (legacy) overnight batch settlement to straight-through processing on a large number of parallel "killer micros". The issue was that lots of real-time transactions had been added during the 70s&80s ... but were really front-ends to legacy batch-settlement from the 60s being run overnight. The problem in the 90s was both increasing workload and globalization with batch settlement no longer fitting in the declining size of the overnight batch window. Unfortunately they were using parallelization technology that had 100 times overhead of cobol batch ... and they hadn't bothered to do any speeds&feeds (even when given some numbers, they disparaged the calculations) ... so wasn't until early deployments that things went down in flames (100 times overhead increase totally swamping anticipated throughput increases from killer micros)

Later I was involved in one of the institutions that had datacenter with over 40 max. configured IBM mainframes (@$30+M each, and no machine older than 18m) ... number required for running a 450K statement cobol program for overnight batch settlement ... every night (from annual ibm financials, this datacenter and a couple other ones like it account for significant percentage of ibm mainframe sales). They had large organization that had been doing performance optimizing of the application for decades but had gotten somewhat myopically focused. With some different performance analysis approaches, I was able to identify a 14% improvement (the equivalent of 6-7 max. configured mainframe systems).

Recently I was involved in new approach for doing the straight-through processing parallelization with only 3-5 times the overhead (of cobol batch). Part of the issue was that the 90s approach required lots of RYO parallelizing programming. The latest approach leveraged the enormous amount of work that has gone into parallelization throughput by all the open-platform RDBMS vendors (including IBM). Prototype implementations easily handle the largest straight-through processing workloads with plenty of excess capacity to spare. I was involved in taking the work to financial industry standards organization ... and initially there was very positive response ... but then it turned negative. The comment was that numerous industry executives still bear the scars from the 90s effort and it will take them retiring before the industry will be ready to try again.

All the open-system vendors (including IBM) have done TPC benchmarks
http://www.tpc.org/tpcc/results/tpcc_perf_results.asp

but it is impossible to find TPC (or most other kinds of industry standard) benchmark for IBM mainframe. One of the issues is likely just raw performance ... but possibly even bigger issue is that TCO/transaction is included in the reported results.

disclaimer: I worked with Jim Gray at SJR during days of original relational/sql implementation. He then leaves and goes to tandem ... and was also one of the primary people responsible for TPC
http://www.tpc.org/information/who/gray.asp

One of the cost misdirections is conflating "server" (mainframe or non-mainframe) with personal/distributed (in the case of non-mainframe server ... possibly aided and abetted with compatible technologies ... even when the actual chips and hardware might be significantly different). A major push by Gray in the 80s for TPC was having cost/operation in addition to raw throughput included in the comparisons (starting even before client/server had became ubiquitous). There was even time when there were mainframes included in TPC benchmarks. Speculation that there are no longer industry standard benchmarks for mainframes (and has been substituted with lots of handwaving and attacks on deficiencies in industry standard benchmarks) is possibly not just simply issues with raw throughput but also requirement for actual cost/transaction. Note that it isn't a vendor issue since IBM plays active role in many industry standard benchmarks with its non-mainframe platforms (even doing both RISC-based and x86-based for same benchmarks).

other recent posts mentioning ficon:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#10 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#40 Searching for storage (DASD) alternatives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#77 OT: but hopefully interesting - Million core supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#6 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#7 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#8 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#63 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#67 relative speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#68 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#77 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#12 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#16 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#45 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#4 Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#38 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#2 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#4 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#14 Tech Time Warp of the Week: The 50-Pound Portable PC, 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#23 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#49 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#85 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?
Date: 10 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/cN9fFJ
and
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#13
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41

Boeing SST (I had left Boeing and joined IBM by the time it was canceled)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_2707
has lots of discussion of SST market, cost and noise issues
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concorde

from above:
Concorde had other considerable difficulties that led to its dismal sales performance. Costs had spiralled during development to more than six times the original projections, arriving at a unit cost of £23 million in 1977.[31] World events had also dampened Concorde sales prospects, the 1973 oil crisis had many airlines think twice about aircraft with high rates of fuel-consumption; and new wide-body aircraft, such as the Boeing 747, had recently made subsonic aircraft significantly more efficient and presented a low-risk option for airlines.[32] While carrying a full load, Concorde achieved 15.8 passenger miles per gallon of fuel, while the Boeing 707 reached 33.3 pm/g, the Boeing 747 46.4 pm/g, and the McDonnell Douglas DC-10 53.6 pm/g.[33] An emerging trend in the industry in favour of cheaper airline tickets had also caused airlines such as Qantas to question Concorde's market suitability.[34]

... snip ...

Concorde continued on after that with significant subsidies justified for image purposes. Interesting note about Virgin Atlantic attempted to buy the concorde fleet after BA stopped service.

Note that something similar has happened with JSF/F35 ... especially with long delays, development difficulties and spiraling costs. F35 was originally going to be really cheap and many thousands. Original cost savings included not have real fifth generation but strategy of relying on F22 for real fifth generation operation. However, costs have spiraled enormously ... and F35 is now being called the most expensive weapons system in history. Current public relations includes references to F35 being "real" fifth generation (facade attempting to justify enormous increase in cost) and minimal cost reduction (when comparing two sequential years ... an enormously high cost year followed by a slightly less enormously high cost year).

Also note that while Boyd had done the work that significantly improved both the F15 & F18 and design for precursor to what became F16 ... there were lots of compromises for the actual F16. The F20/tigershark then comes a lot closer to Boyd's objective ... including huge decrease in maintenance costs & skill level required along with significant increase in flying hrs per maintenance hrs. The US was so tied up with MICC ... they were going to target the F20/tigershark for export. Then the MICC got congress to pass directed appropriations foreign aid for all the F20/tigershark candidate countries that restricted the aid to only be spent for F16 (countries saying that they would really prefer F20/tigershark ... but how can you pass up free F16s).

The JSF/F35 program then comes along repeating all the claims for F20/tigershark ... but as has been well documented ... the institutionalized process for MICC weapons systems is to drastically over promise and significantly under estimate costs ... followed later by out-of-control spiraling program costs. Book on institutionalized MICC weapons program process reviewed here
http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2011/04/30/bursting-the-defense-bubble-end-the-entitlement-mentality/
lot more references at Chuck's blog (including pointer to free PDF)
http://chuckspinney.blogspot.com/p/pentagon-labyrinth.html

authors include many of Boyd's acolytes

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why does IBM keep saying things like this:

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 11 Jun 2013 08:13:31 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
I am prepared to concede that IBM evolves. Some of this evolution is admirable, some not; but it is important to remember that not corporations buy people write text. Some write English or another language well, and some do not. Merriam-Webster takes the view that usage is all, that current usage is a fortiori legitimate usage.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#39 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:

in the 70s, IBM got a wide-spread reputation for FUD ... part of that is obfuscation and misdirecting the discussion away from principle issues (raising issues extraneous to subject at hand). this and several other references that search engines turn up
http://changingminds.org/techniques/resisting/fud.htm

reference is it really gaining hold with IBM marketing people in the 70s as countermeasure to Amdahl's clone processors. This discusses Amdahl's advanced computer project at IBM. IBM executives shut it down because they were afraid that it would advance computing too fast and they would loose control of the market (bottom of the article discusses features from ACS showing up more than 20yrs later in es/9000):
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

Amdahl leaves and starts his clone processor company. IBM then starts the Future System project that was going to completely replace 370 (and completely different and incompatible with 370). During the FS period ... 370 efforts were being suspended and/or killed off. The lack of new 370 products during the FS period is credited with giving clone processors a market foothold. That also explains marketing having to finely tune its FUD skills .... because of the lack of competitive products. posts mentioning FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

When FS implodes (after spending billions of dollars w/o even being announced), there is mad rush to get products back into the 370 product pipelines. One of these is 303x ... 3031 is 158-3 with new covers, 3032 is 168-3 with new covers, 3033 is 168-3 logic remapped to 20% faster chips ... originally being developed for FS. In parallel with 3033, 370-xa and 3081 work starts. 3081 is leveraging some other poorly performing left over FS technology. This discusses how really badly 3081 compared to competition
http://www.jfsowa.com/computer/memo125.htm

It wasn't until you get to 3090 that you have really new technology ... and it isn't until es/9000 that you get back to advanced computing. During much of this time, about the only thing that marketing had to fall back on was developing and practicing its FUD skills.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 11 Jun 2013 08:40:20 -0700
shmuel+gen@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
That's not the Multics model. The Multic model is that segment numbers are dynamically assigned as needed, and that in general two processes will use different numbers for the same segment. IBM had something similar in TSS, but abandoned it.

some of the people from CTSS went to the 5th flr and did Project Mac multics. other of the people went to the science center on the 4th flr and did virtual machines, online computing, the internal network ... GML was invented at the science center in 1969, as well as lots of performance monitoring and modeling stuff ... some of which evolves into capacity planning ... misc. past posts mentioning 545 tech sq
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

supposedly 360/67 (360/65 with virtual memory) was to be ibm's candidate for project mac ... but ge won the bid instead ... and multics was done on ge645. melinda's history has lots of details ... can be found here:
http://www.leeandmelindavarian.com/Melinda/

tss/360 was then going to the official operating system ... including virtual memory and "single-level-store" (storage mapped as virtual memory ... 360/67 had both 24bit and 32bit virtual addressing modes). at one point tss/360 is claimed to have something like 1200 people at the time the science people had 12 people on cp40/cms (before being able to get 360/67, they modify 360/40 with virtual memory hardwre, later when they were able to get 360/67, cp40/cms morphs into cp67/cms ... and later into vm370/cms). old user group presentationon cp40
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt

tss/360 & 360/67 were sold to lots of univ. ... but TSS/360 never quite became product ... and so many systems ran as 360/65 as os/360 for most of the time. as undergraduate in the 60s, there was work on both tss/360 and cp67 on the weekends. we did one fortran edit, compile, and execute simulated user benchmark. tss/360 running the script with four simulated users got worse throughput and interactive response than cp67/cms with 35 simulated users (on the same hardware).

the Future System project in the early 70s was going to also be "single-level-store" based ... from tss/360, multics, etc. recent reference to future system:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#44 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:

at the same time I was at the science center and did paged-mapped filesystem for cms (somewhat in competition with multics on the floor above). Having observed a lot of the tss/360 problems ... I did an implementation that avoided many of the problems (and would periodically ridicule the FS ... claiming what I already had running was better). it never made it as part of release product ... in part because of the bad rep that single-level-store got from the FS effort ... even though I could show 3times the throughput/efficiency compared to standard CMS filesystem (both CDF & EDF) for moderate filesystem workload. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap

part of it was to have same exact shared segments at different virtual addresses in different virtual address spaces ... which also wasn't released. A small piece of the shared segment (w/o filesystem stsuff and supporting concurrent shared images at different virtual addresses) ... was released as DCSS in vm370 release 3. some old email from the period
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

one of the hardest problems was that CMS borrowed a lot of stuff from os/360 and there was enormous problem with os/360 relocatable adcons (which are swizzled to absolute address after being loaded for execution). I needed *real* relocatable adcons ... both at load time as well at execution time. This was one thing supported by tss/360. some past posts discussing constant battle that i had with os/360 relocatable adcons
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#adcon

note that folklore is that after FS failure, some of the people retreated to Rochester and did single-level-store for S/38 ... note however, the S/38 wasn't into performance throughput ... so the single-level-store performance issues weren't an issue.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2013 16:58:27 -0400
hancock4 writes:
How about at least prosecuting them? Or subject them to civil lawsuits?

So incredibly frustrating.


remember they are too-big-to-fail ... which also makes them too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-to-jail ... this came up even before robo-signing fabricated mortgage documents ... when the too-big-to-fail were caught laundering money for drug cartels and terrorists.

in the robo-signing fabricated (fraudulent) mortgage documents ... there was fine ... but was relatively trivial fine compared to the actual amounts invovled. Some of the fine was suppose to go to compensate individuals harmed by fraudulent foreclosers ... however organizations were hired to handle the compensation ... which happened to be some of the some operations involved in the fraudulent foreclosers ... and they took significant percentage of the fine in fees.

recent discussion:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#41 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#73 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#16 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#27 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#36 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#47 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#64 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#6 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#43 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#58 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#77 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#42 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#12 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence

other recent posts mentioning too-big-to-prosecute and/or being caught laundering money:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#35 Does the UK Government Really Want us to Report Fraud?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#36 JPMorgan Chase slammed by regulators for control failings after botched derivatives bet
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#50 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#0 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#1 Libor Lies Revealed in Rigging of $300 Trillion Benchmark
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#12 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#28 Neil Barofsky: Geithner Doctrine Lives on in Libor Scandal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#49 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#53 Should Bethany McLean Be Bothered by the Government Lawsuit Against S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#55 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#61 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#6 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#35 Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#42 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#43 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#76 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#81 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#86 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#9 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#28 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#46 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#79 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#83 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#86 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#90 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#0 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#2 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#4 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#6 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#8 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#11 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#34 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 11 Jun 2013 14:16:36 -0700
lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler) writes:
it never made it as part of release product ... in part because of the bad rep that single-level-store got from the FS effort ... even though I could show 3times the throughput/efficiency compared to standard CMS filesystem (both CDF & EDF) for moderate filesystem workload. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#mmap


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#44 Why does IBM keep saying things like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#45 Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]

note that there was two parts of the significant throughput increase going to paged-mapped filesystem ... one is that it is higher level abstraction that allows significant amount of optimization on service the request to be done under the covers. the other is there is a real paradigm mismatch between channel program paradigm and virtual memory ... requiring significant pathlengths to stitch together the mismatch

paradigm match/mismatch continues on down ... there is almost direct paradigm match with page mapped filesystem at the top, down through virtual memory operation to fixed-block architecture disk structure; and when there is mismatch requires a lot of extra resources and overhead ... like effort to map CKD to FBA (aka there hasn't been any real CKD disks manufactured for decades).

Virtual machines has to scan each channel program, making a copy and replacing virtual addresses for real. CMS standard filesystem used CCWs for i/o ... it was originally developed on the same 360/40 (running stand-alone) as was being used to do CP40 (with added virtual memory hardware). CMS continued to be able to run on "bare machine" all during cp67 ... but there was an artificial cripple put in in the morph from vm370/cms.

In the transition from MVT to OS/VS2 (aka virtual memory), the same problem showed up. The original implementation involved putting a little bit of code to create 16mbyte virtual address space for MVT, but the major effort was hacking CCWTRANS (from CP67) into the side of EXCP processing (EXCP had the same problem with access methods creating channel programs in the application virtual address space ... as CP67 did with virtual machine channel programs). Old reference by somebody in POK that was in the middle of the transition to OS/VS2 and virtual memory ... includes reference that OS/VS2 release 2 (MVS) was on glide path to OS/VS2 release 3 (FS)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#73 Multiple Virtual Memory

above also mentions that one of the people responsible for HASP having a group doing a TSS-style implementation of OS/360 (that had something like a page-mapped filesystem)

One of the big differences (cp67/cms and os/vs2) was that the rest of CP67 I/O processing was as little as 5% of the corresponding OS/VS2 pathlength ... so the additional pathlength for doing channel program duplication with real addresses was less noticeable in OS/VS2 (both SVS and MVS). In fact, one of the big motivations for the SSCH and other changes to I/O for 370-xa was to get some portion of the enormous I/O pathlength moved out of MVS so it could be rewritten (as well as being moved to separate dedicated processors).

Starting in the late 70s, I got to play disk engineer in the disk engineering labs and rewrite the I/O supervisor to be bullet proof and never fail ... so they could do concurrent on-demand development testing in operating system environment (they had tried MVS, but found MVS had 15min MTBF in that environment with just a single testcell ... requiring manual re-ipl). However, I also attempted to do further pathlenth reducution (while still supporting never fail) to demonstrate 370 I/O coming as close as possible to 370-xa with separate dedicated processor. past posts mentioning getting to play disk engineer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

for other topic drift ... FE had 3380 i/o error injection regression tests and even after 3380 was introduced, MVS was failing (requiring re-ipl) for all tests ... and in 2/3rds of the tests, there was no indication what had precipitated the failure. old email:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007.html#email801015

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2013 18:05:17 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#46 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

... and part of their settlement for fraudulent foreclosure practices was giving them pass on other legal actions .... which were estimated to have potential liability significantly larger than the fines they paid.

another related whistleblower discussion was by the former head of FDIC large bank examination unit ... who was catching many of the activities as they were happening ... he refused to stop raising warnings and eventually he was removed from the position ... seems to have echos of some of the things that happened during S&L debacle.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2013 19:27:30 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#46 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#48 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

here is recent news item

Mary Jo White Institutionalizes Deutsche Bank Protection Racket at the SEC
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/06/mary-jo-white-institutionalizes-deutsche-bank-protection-racket-at-the-sec.html

recent posts mentioning various things about SEC (lot of overlap with too-big-to-prosecture and money laundering list)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#0 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#1 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#60 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#68 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#9 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#18 Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story Of The Scientific Betting System That Beat The Casinos And Wall Street
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#29 Destructive Destruction? An Ecological Study of High Frequency Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#38 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#41 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#70 Implementing a Whistle-Blower Program - Detecting and Preventing Fraud at Workplace
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#19 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#26 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#42 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#54 NBC's website hacked with malware
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#31 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#40 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#69 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#71 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#73 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#76 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#19 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#29 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#42 More Whistleblower Leaks on Foreclosure Settlement Show Both Suppression of Evidence and Gross Incompetence
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#43 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#49 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#94 KPMG quits as Skechers and Herbalife auditor amid insider trading allegations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#95 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#0 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#1 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#10 'Hacking The Mainframe': What Hollywood Gets Wrong About Its Favorite Tech
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#36 Fed proposes annual assessments for large financial companies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#67 The End Of 'Orderly And Fair Markets'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#60 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#80 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#11 Become a millionaire and never work again - by being a whistleblower. Fair or perverse?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#12 Why Didn't the SEC Catch Madoff? It Might Have Been Policy Not To
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#30 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2013 20:43:39 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#46 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#48 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#49 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

some of the older stuff of foreclosure settlement (reference from one of my previous postings)

Insider Says Promontory's OCC Foreclosure Reviews for Wells are Frauds. Brought to You by HUD Sec. Donovan
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2012/02/abigail-field.html

above has lots of references that outsource operation had lots of former gov. bigshots ... but had no experience in doing what they were hired to do ... also "What the Fraudulent OCC Review Means for 'Settlement' Enforcement"

... oh ... and past reference to too-big-to-manage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

and recent references to the too-big-to-fail are badly managed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#4 HSBC's Settlement Leaves Us In A Scary Place
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#21 AIG may join bailout lawsuit against U.S. government
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#34 How Bankers Help Drug Traffickers and Terrorists
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#42 Professor Coffee Hits a Nerve at SEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#44 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#1 Libor Lies Revealed in Rigging of $300 Trillion Benchmark
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#28 Neil Barofsky: Geithner Doctrine Lives on in Libor Scandal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly

and older posts referenced too-big-to-fail are badly managed
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#24 OCC Confirms that Big Banks are Badly Managed, Lack Adequate Risk Management Controls
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#30 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#48 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#62 Search Google, 1960:s-style

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Search for first Web page takes detour into US

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Search for first Web page takes detour into US
Date: 11 June 2013
Blog: Old Geek
re:
http://lnkd.in/hY8frG
also
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/2KhwGxodAEA

Search for first Web page takes detour into US
http://phys.org/news/2013-06-1st-web-page-detour.html

first webserver in the US (on slac's vm370 system):
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/history/earlyweb/history.shtml

from long ago and far away (gone 404, but still lives at wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20090117083033/http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/list-archive/0409/8362.shtml

as undergraduate i made a lot of operating system enhancements and the vendor would periodically suggest changes. I didn't learn about these guys until later, but in retrospect some of the suggestions may have originated from this community.

some number of companies leveraged the software for online service bureau. in aug1976, one of the online service bureau started offering their online computer conferencing (early social media) free to the vendor user group, SHARE. archives are online here
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

most of the online users used their 3-letter installation identifiers ... one of the agencies (from previously mentioned community) that was quite active in the user community and had "CAD" (for cloak-and-dagger) for their installation code.

I scan'ed 1970 cp67 operator's guide and it should showup sometime today at
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cp67/

I may still have cp67 program logic manual somewhere in boxes that I can scan also

note some of the people from ctss went to the project mac on the 5th flr and did multics ... others went to the science center and did internal network, virtual machines, various online and performance work.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
GML was also invented at the science center in 1969; some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#sgml

a decade later GML morphs into ISO standard SGML and after another decade it morphs into HTML at cern ... reference here
http://infomesh.net/html/history/early/

on the 5th flr, multics also spawns unix ... recent discussion here in "Old Geeks"
http://lnkd.in/zERnJD
also archived here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#16
and this old geeks discussion
http://lnkd.in/D8hU-F
and archived here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#35
also mentioned recently in ibm-main mailing list discussion:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#45
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#47

and as for ms/dos, i've periodically referenced this geneology
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS-DOS
before ms/dos there was seattle computer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Computer_Products
and before seattle computer there was cp/m
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/M
and before cp/m, kildall worked on cp67/cms at npg school (gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine)
http://web.archive.org/web/20071011100440/http://www.khet.net/gmc/docs/museum/en_cpmName.html
npg reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Postgraduate_School

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

"Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2013 00:46:21 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
later when member of congress released the oil trading transaction details showing the speculators responsible for the huge spike in oil price summer of 2008 ... much of the press was about him being condemned for making public the "confidential" information (earlier press appeared to want somebody to blame for the gas price, but that changed once it was known who it was).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#37 "Highway Patrol" back on TV

some recent news on oil price manipulation

BP, Shell, Statoil Sued Over Claim of Price Manipulation
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-06-10/bp-shell-statoil-sued-over-claim-of-price-manipulation.html
Sanders Calls for Gas Price Probe, Emergency Action by Oil Market Regulators
http://www.sanders.senate.gov/newsroom/news/?id=da84b7b5-19d2-4948-bd3f-03bec3ef889f
Bernie Sanders Goes After Wall Street Oil Speculators
http://occupyamerica.crooksandliars.com/diane-sweet/sanders-amendments-target-wall-street-
Enron no lesson to traders as EU probes oil-price manipulation
http://business.financialpost.com/2013/05/21/enron-no-lesson-to-traders-as-eu-probes-oil-price-manipulation/
Shell CEO Says Too Early to Speculate About Oil Probe
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-05-21/shell-ceo-says-it-s-too-early-to-speculate-about-oil-price-probe.html

older

$4 Gas: Brought to You by Wall Street
http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2011/09/oil-speculators-goldman-sachs
CFTC Report Reveals Rampant Speculation in Oil Markets
http://www.sanders.senate.gov/newsroom/news/?id=e802998a-8ee2-4808-9649-0d9730b75ea4
Leaked Documents Reveal Major Speculators Behind 2008 Oil Price Shock: Hedge Funds, Koch, Big Banks, Oil Companies
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2011/09/15/317330/leaked-cftc-oil-speculation-data/
Stop Oil Speculation Now
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rep-bernie-sanders/stop-oil-speculation-now_b_877739.html

related past posts:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#61 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#64 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#1 STOP PRESS! An Auditor has been brought to task for a failed bank!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#20 General Mills computer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

NSA phone records

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: NSA phone records
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2013 11:10:22 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
I'm a bit surprised no one here has brought this up. Maybe no one wants to get the NSA after them. I know we've kidded about this before, and I'm not surprised that they have the capability. What surprised me was the scope - I would have thought they'd have had to get a hit from a known or suspected terrorist before they could start collecting data on other people's phone calls.

actually stopping something is counter strategic to the primary objective of every larger piles of money; growing Success of Failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/

objective isn't that it actually accomplishes anything ... just so that huge piles of money disappear into the infrastructure (failures contribute to justification for ever increasing piles of money). agency was then put on probation and couldn't manage its own projects for five years ... but it was more like putting the foxes/pigs in charge of the hen house

recent references to growing Success of Failure culture
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

NSA phone records

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: NSA phone records
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2013 11:51:38 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
actually stopping something is counter strategic to the primary objective of every larger piles of money; growing Success of Failure culture
http://www.govexec.com/excellence/management-matters/2007/04/the-success-of-failure/24107/


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#53 NSA phone records

aka if piles of money just getting some of the data doesn't help ... then the obvious is a mountain of money to get all of the data. the next stage will be that all of the data isn't enough ... and need for mountain ranges of money for pervasive surveillance. the primary objective is MICC increasing quarterly profits ... and so a series of never-ending increasingly larger projects ... which doesn't happen if somewhere along the line something actually works (part of Eisenhower's warning about MICC).

past reference to Success Of Failure nyc metro subway system surveillance system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#75 What Makes a substance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#76 What Makes a substance Bizarre?

some references here

Against Security: How We Go Wrong at Airports, Subways, and Other Sites of Ambiguous Danger
http://www.amazon.com/Against-Security-Airports-Subways-Ambiguous-ebook/dp/B00KAJJBTM/
National Insecurity: The Cost of American Militarism
http://www.amazon.com/National-Insecurity-American-Militarism-ebook/dp/B00ATLNI04/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2013 10:26:50 -0400
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
Nassim N. Taleb[1] again has the cure. If an institution is to big to fail the employees are to be put on a government employee pay scale. The good creative thinkers will go elsewhere and if they really are good will get basically the same compensation. But what the banksters do is accumulate small gains for a long time at the cost of gigantic loses that more than wipe out the gains which are paid for by the lower classes. In any event, you don't want fiscally creative types[2] running critical industries.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#46 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

quote just now on tv business news "privatize the profits and socialize the losses" ... aka there are no real downsizes to taking enormous bets .... because the tax payers pick up all the losses (has been periodically repeated over the past few years).

note the small gains are only relative to the enormous gains. there was over $27T in triple-a rated toxic CDOs done during the bubble ... with potentially $4T-$5T skimmed off by the banksters.

It would help explain the claim that the financial industry tripled in size (as percent of GDP) during the bubble. And since the $4T-$5T skim on the triple-A rated toxic CDOs apparently wasn't enough ... they purposefully created the CDOs to be toxic and then took out CDS gambling bets that they would fail. Current estimate is that the outstanding CDS bets at the moment are around $800T

And to further compound the sins ... the too-big-to-fail have been caught money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists ... really giving meaning to too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-to-jail (mentioned in previous post in thread).

it goes along with equivalent to (Eisenhower's warnings about) MICC and "regulatory capture" (aka the gov. agencies responsible for policing the activity are under the control of those they are suppose to regulate) ... FRCC (financial-regulatory-congressional complex), PRCC (pharmaceutical-regulatory-congressional complex), ERCC (energy-regulatory-congressional complex) ... etc.

To give an idea about regulatory capture ... a person that was head of large bank examination group at FDIC is active on some of the linkedin groups. He caught a lot of what was going ... he persisted reporting the activity even though being ignored ... and was first demoneted and then let go for his activity ... also referenced in previous post

it also goes along with enormous graft & corruption in the tax code, significant contributor to congress being considered the most corrupt institution on earth ... enormous numbers of loopholes and other mechanisms; hedge industry getting income reclassified so tax rate cut in half for ("legal") tax avoidance ... also gets around any income caps ... since it isn't considered income ... some recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#36 Bank Whistleblower Claims Retaliation And Wrongful Termination
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#89 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#93 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#95 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#69 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#91 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#25 'Big four' accountants 'use knowledge of Treasury to help rich avoid tax'

in addition to rampant ("illegal") tax evasion ... some recent posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#27 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#46 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#86 How Wall Street Defanged Dodd-Frank
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

recent posts mentioning CDS gambling:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#72 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#9 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#24 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#2 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#34 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2013 10:34:09 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
And to further compound the sins ... the too-big-to-fail have been caught money laundering for drug cartels and terrorists ... really giving meaning to too-big-to-prosecute and too-big-to-jail (mentioned in previous post in thread).

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#50 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#55 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

anybody want to take bets that the too-big-to-jail/fail/prosecute have done more to aid terriorists than the combination of all the recent leaks. other recent posts mentioning too-big-to-prosecute:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#48 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#6 Live-Blogging Senate Hearing Tomorrow, When J.P. Morgan Chase Will Be Torn a New One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#35 Ex-Bailout Watchdog: JPMorgan's Actions "Entirely Consistent With Fraud"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#76 IBM Spent A Million Dollars Renovating And Staffing Its Former CEO's Office
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#86 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#94 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#2 Too-Big-To-Fail, Too-Big-To-Prosecute, Too-Big-To-Jail, not just a problem in the USA
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#9 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#13 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#22 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#25 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#79 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#83 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#86 What Makes a thread about the European debt crisis Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#90 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#0 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#2 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#6 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#8 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#11 Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#34 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2013 11:24:22 -0400
Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com> writes:
anybody want to take bets that the too-big-to-jail/fail/prosecute have done more to aid terriorists than the combination of all the recent leaks. other recent posts mentioning too-big-to-prosecute:

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#50 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#55 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#56 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

aka leaking that gov. was tracking all call details ... supposedly gave the terriosts something they didn't know ... and therefor was aiding the enemoy ... justifying the charges. however, if you read the various accounts of tracking and finding bin laden ... one of the things repeatedly mentioned was that the terriosts went to enormous efforts to avoid being tracked by phone calls ... even predating 9/11 (of course Success Of Failure would imply they weren't actually very good at it for a long time, repeatedly spending billions on effort after effort).
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#53

a common theme running through a lot of whistleblower descriptions is the highest level classification apparently is "down right embarrasing" ... nothing to do with any adversary ... unless the american public is considered the enemy.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Traders Said to Rig Currency Rates to Profit Off Clients

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Traders Said to Rig Currency Rates to Profit Off Clients
Date: 13 June 2013
Blog: Google+
re:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102794881687002297268/posts/DLtujpH2tJT

Traders Said to Rig Currency Rates to Profit Off Clients
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-06-11/traders-said-to-rig-currency-rates-to-profit-off-clients.html

WM/Reuters Busted In Latest Market Rigging And Collusion Scandal: Foreign Exchange
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-11/wmreuters-busted-latest-market-rigging-and-collusion-scandal-foreign-exchange

from above:
But the real bottom line is if any idiot is still wondering why there will never be a great rotation out of bonds into stocks, FX, commodities, or whatever, it is because by now everyone knows that the market is one giant rigged and manipulated casino. And it is much more enjoyable to blow your money away in Vegas that alongside the E*trade baby. Period.

... snip ...

Market Fixing Scandal: World's Largest Banks Rigging Currency Rates
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/477759/20130612/libor-fixing-fx-market-manipulation-rigging-rates.htm
Dealers rigged forex spot benchmarks: report
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/dealers-rigged-forex-spot-benchmarks-report-2013-06-11
British Regulator Looking Into Currency Rates Trades
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/06/12/british-regulator-looking-into-currency-rates-trades/
Banks Rig $4.7 Trillion A Day Currency Markets To Profit Off Clients
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-12/banks-rig-47-trillion-day-currency-markets-profit-clients

Amanda Renteria To Be Nominated CFTC Chief
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/11/amanda-renteria-cftc-chief_n_3419039.html
Obama Axes Bank-Harrassing Gary Gensler at CFTC, Plans to Install Lightweight Ex-Goldmanite
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/06/obama-axes-bank-harrassing-gary-gensler-at-cftc-plans-to-install-lightweight-ex-goldmanite.html

TV business news interviewing guests on the front-running by traders ... front-running making couple hundred thousand profit from several billion dollar trade ... and there are several trillion dollar being done every day. Made big point that when front-running was being done in equities ... it was taken seriously because afraid that customers would loose confidence in the whole infrastructure. however, this reference that traders illegal manipulation in equities goes on all the time ... and traders have nothing to worry about
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

and then there is HFT
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-11/hft-stock-manipulation-action

and more drift on the HFT rigging topic: Santelli Schools Cramer & Co. On The High Freaks
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-12/santelli-schools-cramer-co-high-freaks

however as referenced in upthread ... traders had other mechanisms to game the system before HFT rigging.

more gaming the system: IT FINALLY COMES OUT: Elite Traders Are Getting Access To Data Before Everyone Else ... and as per the 2007 interview in earlier post ... they have nothing to worry about
http://www.businessinsider.com/latency-in-trading-2013-6

Everything is Rigged, Vol. 9,713: This Time, It's Currencies
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/everything-is-rigged-vol-9-713-this-time-its-currencies-20130613

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2013 16:46:41 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#38 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#46 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#48 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#49 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#50 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#55 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#56 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#57 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

latest round of too-big-to-jail ... gaming FOREX and HFT

Traders Said to Rig Currency Rates to Profit Off Clients
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-06-11/traders-said-to-rig-currency-rates-to-profit-off-clients.html

WM/Reuters Busted In Latest Market Rigging And Collusion Scandal: Foreign Exchange
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-11/wmreuters-busted-latest-market-rigging-and-collusion-scandal-foreign-exchange

from above:
But the real bottom line is if any idiot is still wondering why there will never be a great rotation out of bonds into stocks, FX, commodities, or whatever, it is because by now everyone knows that the market is one giant rigged and manipulated casino. And it is much more enjoyable to blow your money away in Vegas that alongside the E*trade baby. Period.

... snip ...

Market Fixing Scandal: World's Largest Banks Rigging Currency Rates
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/477759/20130612/libor-fixing-fx-market-manipulation-rigging-rates.htm
Dealers rigged forex spot benchmarks: report
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/dealers-rigged-forex-spot-benchmarks-report-2013-06-11
British Regulator Looking Into Currency Rates Trades
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/06/12/british-regulator-looking-into-currency-rates-trades/
Banks Rig $4.7 Trillion A Day Currency Markets To Profit Off Clients
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-12/banks-rig-47-trillion-day-currency-markets-profit-clients

Amanda Renteria To Be Nominated CFTC Chief
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/11/amanda-renteria-cftc-chief_n_3419039.html
Obama Axes Bank-Harrassing Gary Gensler at CFTC, Plans to Install Lightweight Ex-Goldmanite
http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/06/obama-axes-bank-harrassing-gary-gensler-at-cftc-plans-to-install-lightweight-ex-goldmanite.html

TV business news interviewing guests on the front-running by traders ... front-running making couple hundred thousand profit from several billion dollar trade ... and there are several trillion dollar being done every day. Made big point that when front-running was being done in equities ... it was taken seriously because afraid that customers would loose confidence in the whole infrastructure. however, this reference that traders illegal manipulation in equities goes on all the time ... and traders have nothing to worry about
http://nypost.com/2007/03/20/cramer-reveals-a-bit-too-much/

and then there is HFT
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-11/hft-stock-manipulation-action

and more drift on the HFT rigging topic: Santelli Schools Cramer & Co. On The High Freaks
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-12/santelli-schools-cramer-co-high-freaks

however as referenced ... traders had other mechanisms to game the system before HFT rigging.

more gaming the system: IT FINALLY COMES OUT: Elite Traders Are Getting Access To Data Before Everyone Else ... and as per the 2007 interview in earlier post ... they have nothing to worry about
http://www.businessinsider.com/latency-in-trading-2013-6

Everything is Rigged, Vol. 9,713: This Time, It's Currencies
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog/everything-is-rigged-vol-9-713-this-time-its-currencies-20130613

past posts mentioning gaming HFT:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#2 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#29 Destructive Destruction? An Ecological Study of High Frequency Trading
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#41 Computer Simulations Reveal Benefits of Random Investment Strategies Over Traditional Ones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#75 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#67 The End Of 'Orderly And Fair Markets'

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 08:39:16 -0400
hancock4 writes:
The Japanese mounted an extremely bloody defense against the US in 1945. They knew they lost the war, but they hoped--with very good reason--their continued fighting would get them better peace terms. The reality was that the US population was getting tired of war and if it dragged on into 1946 a tired US would've been more open to better peace terms for Japan.

However, the atomic bomb shocked the Japanense--as other weapons did not--that the war was utterly hopeless and the alternative to continued fighting (more atomic bombings) was too onerous to consider.

Thus, the atomic bomb was the weapon that finally broke Japanese resolve.


at the time, invasion of Japan was assumed to be larger than Okinawa
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/facility/okinawa-battle.htm

from above:
Okinawa was the largest amphibious invasion of the Pacific campaign and the last major campaign of the Pacific War. More ships were used, more troops put ashore, more supplies transported, more bombs dropped, more naval guns fired against shore targets than any other operation in the Pacific. More people died during the Battle of Okinawa than all those killed during the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Casualties totaled more than 38,000 Americans wounded and 12,000 killed or missing, more than 107,000 Japanese and Okinawan conscripts killed, and perhaps 100,000 Okinawan civilians who perished in the battle

... snip ...

also
http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/wwii/okinawa/default.aspx

from above:
The Battle of Okinawa is distinguished among battles, yet often unrecognized when referring to the great battles of the Second World War. Over 250,000 people lost their lives. Approximately 150,000 Okinawans, about a third of the population, perished.[1] At the battle's end, somewhere between a third and half of all surviving civilians were wounded. No battle during the Second World War, except Stalingrad, had as massive a loss of civilian life. The stakes were high. The Japanese, determined to fight to the last man, almost achieved their objective, but in defeat 100,000 Japanese combatants died rather than surrender. In the end, fewer than 10,000 of General Mitsuri Ushijimas's Thirty-Second Army were taken prisoner.

... snip ...

also from above, Okinawa larger than d-day:
The United States Navy assembled an unprecedented armada in April of 1945, with 1,300 ships laying in wait off the coast of Okinawa.[18] In fact, the effort in the spring offensive of 1945 was far greater than the previous spring offensive in Europe. During the Normandy invasion, the Allies had employed 150,000 troops, 284 ships, and 570,000 tons of supplies, all of which required a very short supply line. On Okinawa, in Japan's back yard, maintaining the supply line seemed an incomprehensible feat. In the invasion of Okinawa, there were 183,000 troops, 327 ships, and 750,000 tons of supplies.

... snip ...

past reference
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#67 Downwind from Alamogordo

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

NYT: N.S.A. Chief Says Phone Logs Halted Terror Threats

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: NYT:  N.S.A. Chief Says Phone Logs Halted Terror Threats
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 10:06:06 -0400
"Oscar Jones" <oscar@sgga.com> writes:
And the % of GDP the US spends on their military will drop significantly once they are out of Afghanistan too.

didn't happen after fall of soviet union ... old reference
http://web.archive.org/web/20011224132049/http://www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt

recent references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#39 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#48 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#12 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#63 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

claims are worst case sequestering has MICC funding dropping to 2007 levels ... but they are actively pushing for substituting other revenue streams ... including big push to have sophisticated surveillance system on the southern border. recent post that worst case sequestering returning to 2007 level
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

one of the other documented gimmicks was directed appropriations USAID to foreign countries that could only be used for purchases from US weapons merchants.

article from yesterday by Chuck
http://nation.time.com/2013/06/13/when-will-the-contractors-contract/

even if with some reduction in total budget, the "I" part of MICC has been increasing its share of the MICC ... the documented resulted is that even a level budget, overall DOS is showing less ROI (fewer ships, lower readiness level, etc) ... since so much is being skimmed off and disappearing into the industry. it is further aggravated by the spreading Success Of Failure culture ... part of general strategy for ever increasing quarterly profit. recent posts mentioning Success Of failure:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#39 NPC Luncheon with Thomas Drake, NSA Whistleblower
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#45 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#86 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#50 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#53 NSA phone records
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#54 NSA phone records
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#57 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

military effectiveness and capability per dollar spent has dropped significantly over the past couple decade. 2010 there was report that DOD budget increased by over $2T over baseline budget ... slightly over $1T for the wars and the couldn't come up with what the other $1+T went for ... forces and readiness had dropped over the decade ... even with over $2T increase in spending. recent references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#67 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#68 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#51 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?

and for other drift:

22 Nauseating Quotes From Hypocritical Establishment Politicians About The NSA Spying Scandal
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-13/22-nauseating-quotes-hypocritical-establishment-politicians-about-nsa-spying-scandal

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 11:13:12 -0400
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
Why did we allow Japan to maintain possession of Okinawa?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#60 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

also discussion here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Okinawa

in terms of wide range of estimate of civilians killed there is 1) body count ... and 2) speculation of large number died in sealed up caves based on before the invasion and after the invasion population counts.

okinawa
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okinawa_Prefecture

from above:
In 1972, the U.S. government returned the islands to Japanese administration.[6] Under the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security, the United States Forces Japan (USFJ) have maintained a large military presence. 27,000 personnel, including 15,000 Marines, contingents from the Navy, Army and Air Force, and their 22,000 family members are stationed in Okinawa.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

NYT: N.S.A. Chief Says Phone Logs Halted Terror Threats

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: NYT:  N.S.A. Chief Says Phone Logs Halted Terror Threats
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 12:48:47 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#61 NYT: N.S.A. Chief Says Phone Logs Halted Terror Threats

break down of 2012 versus 2013 total budget (includes budget items that are hidden in other categories)
http://www.phibetaiota.net/2012/02/winslow-wheeler-defense-budget-the-full-enchilada/
and
http://breakingdefense.com/2012/02/17/which-pentagon-budget-numbers-are-real-you-decide/

inflation adjusted national defense 1947-2017
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/01/07/everything-chuck-hagel-needs-to-know-about-the-defense-budget-in-charts/

above separates the Iran/Afghan blip from base budget ... the big dip is not in the base budget but no longer having occupying invasion forces in iraq and afghanistan.

also shows budget is larger than the next 13nations combined

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 13:10:26 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#60 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#62 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

American Caesar: Douglas MacArthur 1880 - 1964
http://www.amazon.com/American-Caesar-Douglas-MacArthur-ebook/dp/B000SEP9OK

loc:8779-82:
Over ten thousand kamikaze planes were readied for "Ketsu-Go," Operation Decision. Behind the beaches, enormous connecting underground caves had been stocked with caches of food and thousands of tons of ammunition. Manning the nation's ground defenses were 2,350,000 regular soldiers, 250,000 garrison troops, and 32,000,000 civilian militiamen—a total of 34,600,000, more than the combined armies of the United States, Great Britain, and Nazi Germany

loc:8789-90:
The consensus was that Japan would hold out possibly for another two years.

loc:8815-17:
He had no illusions about the savagery that lay ahead—he told Stimson that Downfall would "cost over a million casualties to American forces alone"—but he was confident that with the tanks from Europe he could outmaneuver the defenders on the great Kanto Plain before Tokyo.

... snip ...

Book mentions that in retrospect they had as grossly over-estimated Japan at the end as they had under-estimated before the beginning. Also mentions that there was lots of apprehension in early days by the allies in Tokyo (after the surrender) because there were 22 enemy divisions, 300,000 well-trained solders within a few hrs marching distance (some concern that they might continue fighting).

total drift ... from earlier posts about law of unintended consequences during the Iraq invasion ... where the myth of WMDs had resulted in invading forces bypassing huge bunkers (estimated to have million metric tons ... compared to thousands of tons prepared for defending Japan against invasion) because they were told they didn't have facilities for dealing with WMDs (even though no evidence of WMDs were ever found). When they got around to going back to the bunkers ... the contents had disappeared (providing an enormous boost to the insurgents)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#38 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 15:00:05 -0400
"Oscar Jones" <oscar@sgga.com> writes:
It isn't to the benefit of the lenders when those who take out the loan flip the property while they are still paying the sucker interest rate and when they can borrow more than the value of the property and so in effect borrow the repayments they have to make before they flip the property too. They have absolutely no skin in the game at all and if it turns out that they can not flip the property, they can just hand back the keys with no penalty what so ever under the stupid US non recourse system.

the lending business moved from profit from the loan payments to profit from fees on doing the loan origination ... they then package up the loans and pay for the triple-A rating on the toxic CDOs ... this also moved the lending business from depository institutions (using deposits for loans) to huge influx of wallstreet transactions ... where wallstreet also gets their enormous fees & transactions ... estimated over $27T done during the bubble.

The loan originators no longer have any skin in the game ... being able to immediately unload every loan they originate. They also no longer have to care about the borrowers' qualifications or loan quality since they are paying for triple-A rating on the packaged toxic CDOs.

Loan originators profits where then only limited on the number and size of the loans ... real estate speculators would increase the frequency of loan originators, their origination fees and their profit. Both the loan originators and the real-estate speculators lacked any skin in the game. In parts of the country with 20% inflation, real-estate speculators could get 2000% ROI on no-documentation, no-down, interest only, 1% loan (with speculation both driving up the inflation rate as well as the frequency and number of loans).

Securitized mortgages had been used during the S&L crisis to obfuscate fraudulent loans ... but w/o triple-A rating, there was a limited market. Discovering that they could pay for triple-A rating on all loans & mortgages enormously increased the market ... including the large retirement & other institutional funds restricted to only dealing in triple-A

In the late 90s, we had been asked to look at improving the integrity of the supporting documents in securitized mortgages (as countermeasure to the mortgage fraud in securitized mortgages done during the S&L crisis). However when loan originators discovered they could pay for triple-A rating ... there was no longer any need for supporting documents (which just slowed down the rate at which they could write loans and the rate of the corresponding fees). With triple-A rating trumping documentation ... it opened the door to no-documentation (no-down, etc) loans (loan originators only caring the size of the loan and how fast they could write them). long winded old post from jan1999
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/aepay3.htm#riskm

lots of past posts mentioning above:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#77 Apology to Cloakware (open letter)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#31 Remove the name from credit cards!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#35 Security Concerns in the Financial Services Industry
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001f.html#79 FREE X.509 Certificates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#38 distributed authentication
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#45 Article: Future Trends in Information Security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#64 Net banking, is it safe???
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#5 E-commerce security????
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#44 Does "Strong Security" Mean Anything?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#56 hammer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002c.html#35 TOPS-10 logins (Was Re: HP-2000F - want to know more about it)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002f.html#15 Mail system scalability (Was: Re: Itanium troubles)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#27 Why are Mainframe Computers really still in use at all?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#11 Serious vulnerablity in several common SSL implementations?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002m.html#20 A new e-commerce security proposal
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003k.html#41 An Understanding Database Theory
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004b.html#9 A hundred subjects: 64-bit OS2/eCs, Innotek Products,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2004e.html#19 Message To America's Students: The War, The Draft, Your Future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005j.html#63 The 8008
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005k.html#1 More on garbage
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2005o.html#37 What ever happened to Tandem and NonStop OS ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006h.html#19 The Pankian Metaphor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#24 Value of an old IBM PS/2 CL57 SX Laptop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006k.html#49 Value of an old IBM PS/2 CL57 SX Laptop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006o.html#61 Health Care
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#47 'Innovation' and other crimes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#30 How many 36-bit Unix ports in the old days?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007b.html#33 security engineering versus information security
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007c.html#11 Decoding the encryption puzzle
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007e.html#24 Securing financial transactions a high priority for 2007
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#64 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007h.html#66 sizeof() was: The Perfect Computer - 36 bits?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007i.html#12 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#0 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#46 John W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007j.html#75 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007k.html#51 IBM Unionization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007n.html#53 Windows Monitor or CUSP? [was ReJohn W. Backus, 82, Fortran developer, dies]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007o.html#0 The Unexpected Fact about the First Computer Programmer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007p.html#50 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#7 what does xp do when system is copying
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007r.html#60 Fixing our fraying Internet infrastructure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#1 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#25 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007s.html#28 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#12 Translation of IBM Basic Assembler to C?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#15 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#27 'Man in the browser' is new threat to online banking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007t.html#50 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007v.html#25 Newsweek article--baby boomers and computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#66 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#70 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#71 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008.html#78 As Expected, Ford Falls From 2nd Place in U.S. Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008b.html#14 on-demand computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#13 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008c.html#87 Toyota Sales for 2007 May Surpass GM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008d.html#38 outsourcing moving up value chain
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#42 Banks failing to manage IT risk - study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#65 Banks failing to manage IT risk - study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#66 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008e.html#69 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#11 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#15 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#51 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#57 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#75 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#76 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#77 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#79 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#86 Banks failing to manage IT risk - study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008f.html#89 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#2 Bush - place in history
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#4 CDOs subverting Boyd's OODA-loop
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#12 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#16 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#32 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#51 IBM CEO's remuneration last year ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#57 Credit crisis could cost nearly $1 trillion, IMF predicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#59 Credit crisis could cost nearly $1 trillion, IMF predicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008g.html#64 independent appraisers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#1 subprime write-down sweepstakes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#3 America's Prophet of Fiscal Doom
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#8a Using Military Philosophy to Drive High Value Sales
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#28 subprime write-down sweepstakes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#32 subprime write-down sweepstakes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008h.html#89 Credit Crisis Timeline
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#30 subprime write-down sweepstakes
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#55 Is data classification the right approach to pursue a risk based information security program?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#64 Is the credit crunch a short term aberation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#77 Do you think the change in bankrupcy laws has exacerbated the problems in the housing market leading more people into forclosure?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008i.html#104 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#23 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#29 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#38 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#46 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#48 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#68 lack of information accuracy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008j.html#69 lack of information accuracy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#10 Why do Banks lend poorly in the sub-prime market? Because they are not in Banking!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#11 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#16 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#27 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008k.html#33 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008l.html#67 dollar coins
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#12 Fraud due to stupid failure to test for negative
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#26 Fraud due to stupid failure to test for negative
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#27 Fraud due to stupid failure to test for negative
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#91 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#92 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#95 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008m.html#99 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#14 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#24 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#37 Success has many fathers, but failure has the US taxpayer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#49 VMware Chief Says the OS Is History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#56 VMware Chief Says the OS Is History
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#69 Another quiet week in finance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008n.html#94 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#14 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#15 Financial Crisis - the result of uncontrolled Innovation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#19 What's your view of current global financial / economical situation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#26 SOX (Sarbanes-Oxley Act), is this really followed and worthful considering current Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#28 Does anyone get the idea that those responsible for containing this finanical crisis are doing too much?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#42 The human plague
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#65 Can the financial meltdown be used to motivate sustainable development in order to achieve sustainable growth and desired sustainability?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#68 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#78 Who murdered the financial system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#80 Can we blame one person for the financial meltdown?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#82 Greenspan testimony and securization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#47 In Modeling Risk, the Human Factor Was Left Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#70 Is there any technology that we are severely lacking in the Financial industry?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#11 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#26 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#57 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#4 Basel Committee outlines plans to strengthen Basel II
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#35 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#67 What is securitization and why are people wary of it ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#8 Top financial firms of US are eyeing on bailout. It implies to me that their "Risk Management Department's" assessment was way below expectations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#9 Blind-sided, again. Why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#20 Five great technological revolutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#23 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#35 Is American capitalism and greed to blame for our financial troubles in the US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#55 Is this the story behind the crunchy credit stuff?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#60 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#63 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#15 What are the challenges in risk analytics post financial crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#52 The Credit Crunch: Why it happened?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#54 Business Science
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#63 CROOKS and NANNIES: what would Boyd do?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#84 what was the idea behind Citigroup's splitting up into two different divisions? what does this do for citigroup?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#1 Are Both The U.S. & UK on the brink of debt disaster?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#23 BarCampBank - informal finance rantathon in London
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#37 A great article was posted in another BI group: "To H*** with Business Intelligence: 40 Percent of Execs Trust Gut"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#53 Credit & Risk Management ... go Simple ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#56 In your opinion, which facts caused the global crise situation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#65 What can agencies such as the SEC do to insure us that something like Madoff's Ponzi scheme will never happen again?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#73 What can we learn from the meltdown?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#80 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#1 Audit II: Two more scary words: Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#40 Bernanke Says Regulators Must Protect Against Systemic Risks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#45 Bernanke Says Regulators Must Protect Against Systemic Risks
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#59 Quiz: Evaluate your level of Spreadsheet risk
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#77 Who first mentioned Credit Crunch?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#8 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#31 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#43 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#49 Is the current downturn cyclic or systemic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#65 Just posted third article about toxic assets in a series on the current financial crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#1 Future of Financial Mathematics?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#5 Do the current Banking Results in the US hide a grim truth?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#21 IBM forecasts 'new world order' for financial services
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#27 Flawed Credit Ratings Reap Profits as Regulators Fail Investors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#31 OODA-loop obfuscation
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#29 Analysing risk, especially credit risk in Banks, which was a major reason for the current crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#94 The Curly Factor -- Prologue
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#27 The Zippo Lighter theory of the financial crisis (or, who do we want to blame?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#45 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#59 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#28 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#80 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#41 On Protectionism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#87 Scientists use maths to predict 'the end of religion' - Repost
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#39 Advice from Richard P. Feynman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#89 The Grand Message in the Conceptual Spiral
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#73 computer bootlaces
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#73 Did You Hear the One About the Bankers?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#51 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#52 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#68 Building a Better America-One Wealth Quintile at a Time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#77 How Pursuit of Profits Kills Innovation and the U.S. Economy
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#44 New Citigroup Looks Too Much Like the Old One
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012d.html#5 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#71 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#68 Choice of Mary Jo White to Head SEC Puts Fox In Charge of Hen House
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#39 The Alchemy of Securitization
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#53 Should Bethany McLean Be Bothered by the Government Lawsuit Against S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#61 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 15:07:39 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#65 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

after the bubble burst, there was a fair amount of whining in the press about how hard it was going to be to go back and correctly evaluate the triple-A rated toxic CDOs ... a large part of that was because the underlying loans had been done with no supporting documentation.

in the 2008 congressional hearings into the pivotal role that the rating agencies played in the whole financial mess (selling triple-A ratings) there was reference to their business model had become mis-aligned when they switched from the purchasers paying for the ratings to the sellers paying for the ratings (i.e. the ratings were supposedly for the benefit of the purchasers ... but with the sellers paying for the ratings ... it was in the interest of the rating agencies to do what ever the sellers asked).

A little historical computer folklore ... in jan2009 when there was still facade that the TARP funds were actually going to be for purchasing toxic instruments ... one of the virtual machine online service bureaus was briefly mentioned with regard to helping evaluate those instrucments. It turns out the two first virtual machine online service bureaus had both quickly moved into higher value financial information. In turns at that one of them had bought the Pricing Services division from one of the leading rating agencies (possibly when their business model had become mis-aligned, it was no longer necessary to accurately evaluate instruments they were rating). misc. past posts mentioning the virtual machine online service bureaus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#timeshare

past posts mentioning congressional hearings into the pivotal role played by the rating agencies in the economic mess.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#78 Who murdered the financial system?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008o.html#80 Can we blame one person for the financial meltdown?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#3 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#9 Do you believe a global financial regulation is possible?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#47 In Modeling Risk, the Human Factor Was Left Out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#11 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#12 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#19 Collateralized debt obligations (CDOs)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#20 How is Subprime crisis impacting other Industries?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#49 Have not the following principles been practically disproven, once and for all, by the current global financial meltdown?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#50 Obama, ACORN, subprimes (Re: Spiders)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008q.html#69 if you are an powerful financial regulator , how would you have stopped the credit crunch?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#10 Blinkylights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#35 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#58 Blinkenlights
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008r.html#64 Is This a Different Kind of Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#8 Top financial firms of US are eyeing on bailout. It implies to me that their "Risk Management Department's" assessment was way below expectations
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#9 Blind-sided, again. Why?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#20 Five great technological revolutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#23 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#30 How reliable are the credit rating companies? Who is over seeing them?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#35 Is American capitalism and greed to blame for our financial troubles in the US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#55 Is this the story behind the crunchy credit stuff?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#59 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008s.html#60 Garbage in, garbage out trampled by Moore's law
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#14 What are the challenges in risk analytics post financial crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#32 What are the challenges in risk analytics post financial crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#42 Lets play Blame Game...?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#52 The Credit Crunch: Why it happened?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#53 CROOKS and NANNIES: what would Boyd do?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#57 CROOKS and NANNIES: what would Boyd do?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#74 CROOKS and NANNIES: what would Boyd do?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009.html#79 The Credit Crunch: Why it happened?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#1 Are Both The U.S. & UK on the brink of debt disaster?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#25 The recently revealed excesses of John Thain, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch, while the firm was receiving $25 Billion in TARP funds makes me sick
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#49 US disaster, debts and bad financial management
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#51 Will the Draft Bill floated in Congress yesterday to restrict trading of naked Credit Default Swaps help or aggravate?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#52 What has the Global Financial Crisis taught the Nations, it's Governments and Decision Makers, and how should they apply that knowledge to manage risks differently in the future?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#53 Credit & Risk Management ... go Simple ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#54 In your opinion, which facts caused the global crise situation?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#73 What can we learn from the meltdown?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#78 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009b.html#80 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#1 Audit II: Two more scary words: Sarbanes-Oxley
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#10 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#16 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#39 'WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE GLOBAL MELTDOWN'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#45 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#51 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#61 Accounting for the "greed factor"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#65 is it possible that ALL banks will be nationalized?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#0 PNC Financial to pay CEO $3 million stock bonus
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#22 Is it time to put banking executives on trial?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#37 NEW SEC (Enforcement) MANUAL, A welcome addition
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#42 Bernard Madoff Is Jailed After Pleading Guilty -- are there more "Madoff's" out there?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#62 Is Wall Street World's Largest Ponzi Scheme where Madoff is Just a Poster Child?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#73 Should Glass-Steagall be reinstated?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009d.html#77 Who first mentioned Credit Crunch?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#8 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#15 The background reasons of Credit Crunch
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#30 Timeline: 40 years of OS milestones
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#53 Are the "brightest minds in finance" finally onto something?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009e.html#70 When did "client server" become part of the language?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#31 What is the real basis for business mess we are facing today?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#41 On whom or what would you place the blame for the sub-prime crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009f.html#49 Is the current downturn cyclic or systemic?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#27 Flawed Credit Ratings Reap Profits as Regulators Fail Investors
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009g.html#29 Transparency and Visibility
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#40 Analysing risk, especially credit risk in Banks, which was a major reason for the current crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#1 IBM to Build Europe, Asia 'Smart Infrastructure'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#57 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009i.html#60 In the USA "financial regulator seeks power to curb excess speculation."
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009j.html#12 IBM identity manager goes big on role control
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#47 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009n.html#68 Opinions on the 'Unix Haters' Handbook'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009q.html#47 Is C close to the machine?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009s.html#47 Audits VII: the future of the Audit is in your hands
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010c.html#48 Happy DEC-10 Day
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010d.html#4 alphas was: search engine history, was Happy DEC
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010e.html#52 LPARs: More or Less?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#15 The Revolving Door and S.E.C. Enforcement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#31 In the News: SEC storms the 'Castle'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#58 S.E.C. Moves to Tighten Rules on Bonds Backed by Consumer Loans
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010h.html#67 The Python and the Mongoose: it helps if you know the rules of engagement
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#4 Goldman Sachs -- Post SEC complaint. What's next?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#7 The Enablers for this "Real Estate Crisis"- Willful Blindness, Greed or more?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#34 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010i.html#48 "Fraud & Stupidity Look a Lot Alike"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010j.html#12 Warren Buffett faces hearing over ratings agencies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010k.html#6 taking down the machine - z9 series
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010l.html#38 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#9 Who is Really to Blame for the Financial Crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010m.html#72 Idiotic programming style edicts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#8 PCI: Smaller Merchants Threatened
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010o.html#24 What Is MERS and What Role Does It Have in the Foreclosure Mess?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#69 Moody's hints at move that could be catastrophic for US debt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#21 Ernst & Young called to account -- should Audit firms be investigated for their role in the crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#53 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#46 What do you think about fraud prevention in the governments?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#48 What do you think about fraud prevention in the governments?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#42 Productivity And Bubbles
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011d.html#25 The first personal computer (PC)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#36 On Protectionism
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011e.html#60 In your opinon, what is the highest risk of financial fraud for a corporation ?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#35 At least two decades back, some gurus predicted that mainframes would disappear
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#43 Massive Fraud, Common Crime, No Prosecutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#66 Bank email archives thrown open in financial crash report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#55 Mobius Says Financial Crisis 'Around the Corner'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#19 Happy 100th Birthday, IBM!
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#24 rating agencies
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#38 Advice from Richard P. Feynman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#44 S&P Downgrades USA; Time to Downgrade S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#50 How Many Divisions Does Standard and Poors Have?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#2 First Website Launched 20 Years Ago Today
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#16 Feds Launch Probe Into S&P Mortgage Rates
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011k.html#56 50th anniversary of BASIC, COBOL?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#1 As Pressure Grows to Cut Spending, the True Cost of Weapons Is Anyone's Guess
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011m.html#33 Deloitte sued for $7.6 billion, accused of missing fraud
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#24 AMERICA IS BROKEN, WHAT NOW?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011n.html#49 The men who crashed the world
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#36 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011o.html#37 Civilization, doomed?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#31 21st Century Management approach?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011p.html#110 Loan Originators
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#32 US real-estate has lost $7T in value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#37 US real-estate has lost $7T in value
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#46 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012c.html#54 PC industry is heading for more change
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#23 Are mothers naturally better at OODA because they always have the Win in mind?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#40 Who Increased the Debt?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012e.html#53 GOLD STANDARD GOOD OR BAD?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#63 One maths formula and the financial crash
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#66 Predator GE: We Bring Bad Things to Life
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#74 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#75 Fed Report: Mortgage Mess NOT an Inside Job
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#80 The Failure of Central Planning
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012f.html#84 How do you feel about the fact that India has more employees than US?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#6 Adult Supervision
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#7 Adult Supervision
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#20 Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#28 REPEAL OF GLASS-STEAGALL DID NOT CAUSE THE FINANCIAL CRISIS - WHAT DO YOU THINK?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#71 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012h.html#75 Interesting News Article
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012k.html#75 What's the bigger risk, retiring too soon, or too late?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012n.html#12 Why Auditors Fail To Detect Frauds?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#7 Beyond the 10,000 Hour Rule
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012o.html#69 Can Open Source Ratings Break the Ratings Agency Oligopoly?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#45 Nate Silver is Not Just Wrong, but Maliciously Wrong
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012p.html#47 Search Google, 1960:s-style
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#0 IBM Is Changing The Terms Of Its Retirement Plan, Which Is Frustrating Some Employees
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#49 Insider Fraud: What to Monitor
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#62 Taleb On "Skin In The Game" And His Disdain For Public Intellectuals
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#35 Adair Turner: A New Debt-Free Money Advocate
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#46 Bankers Who Made Millions In Housing Boom Misled Investors: Study
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#53 Should Bethany McLean Be Bothered by the Government Lawsuit Against S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#70 Implementing a Whistle-Blower Program - Detecting and Preventing Fraud at Workplace
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#66 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#25 Senator Sherrod Brown Drops a Bombshell in Mary Jo White's Hearing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#64 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#70 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#59 What Makes bank regulation and insurance Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minicomputer Pricing

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Minicomputer Pricing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 16:43:44 -0400
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz <spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid> writes:
Reinventing history again, I see. Massachusetts General Hospital developed MUMPS, and made it publicly available..

MUMPS wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MUMPS

topic drift & misc folklore ... one of the principles at the early scientific center involved in cp40 and early cp67 ... transfers south for a number of years (during FS period, he was responsible for one of the FS components and my wife reported directly to him), he then retires from IBM and returns to Boston area. misc. past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
misc. past posts mentioning FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys
copy of paper he gave at seas 1982 on cp40
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/cp40seas1982.txt

he then is head of IT for mass general & harvard medical ... as well as co-founder of CLaM ... a small company with half-dozen people. We are starting HA/CMP project at IBM and start subcontracting major portions to CLaM in Cambridge (CLaM grows quickly with HA/CMP contract hiring lots of unix talent in the boston area). misc. past posts mentioning ha/cmp
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#hacmp

more topic drift, other old email about ha/cmp scaleup

Date: Thu, 8 Aug 91 15:52:18 EST
From: wheeler
To: distribution
Subject: High-Performance Clustering

I've just recently had discussions with NSC and Nasa/Ames regarding high speed clustering.

On the 13th ... the local NSC rep ... and the NSC corporate person that specializes in accounts with high-speed clustering requirements (national labs, cern, slac, ncar, nasa, llnl, lanl, 8x8 & 32x32, & up HiPPI & FCS type stuff) will be here in LSG for technology discussion. This will run from 10.30 thru lunch.

Also on the 13th, the local IBM rep. for Nasa/Ames and people from Nasa/Ames will be down here to visit the RFT/LCMP project for discussions regarding technology (both mss/sms type clustering and compute clustering).

In the discussions today with xxxxxx (and prior technical interchanges) we've talked about HA & clustering scale-up for applications into the 64 and beyond.


... snip ... top of post, old email index

other recent post with old ha/cmp email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#36 CLECs, Barbara, and the Phone Geek
i.e.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#email920113
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#email920114

other old email on cluster scaleup
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#medusa

very end of Jan1992 scaleup is transfered and we are told we can't work on anything with more than four processors ... and within a couple weeks cluster scaleup is announced as ibm supercomputer. this is major motivation to decide to leave. recent reference we both depart 31july1992
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#email920722
in this post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#49

all the science centers are closed the same day. in the 80s, CSC had moved out of 545 tech sq down to 101 Main Street. After CSC closes, CLaM moves into the vacated space. After we had departed, we do some consulting work for CLaM (almost directly across the river from mass general).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 18:24:50 -0400
"Oscar Jones" <oscar@sgga.com> writes:
That wasn't the reason it imploded so spectacularly when the real estate bubble inevitably burst.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#55 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#65 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

a major reason that the implosion was so spectacular was because it was fueled by over $27T-plus ... if it had only been a trillion or two bubble, the implosion would have been a lot less spectacular. the $27T-plus fueled the bubble ... the triple-A rating enabled the $27T-plus market and reduced loan originator issues to how big a loan and how many loans/day (eliminating documentation & verification ... aka "liar loans" speeding up the loans somebody could do per day). lots of players had vested interest in not stopping the meal-train with the enormous fees and commissions involved in the whole triple-A rated toxic CDO transaction stream.

the rating agency congressional hearings included testimony that they were effectively selling triple-a ratings ... regardless of how it was dressed up ... testimony included references to rate shopping ... threat that if a rating agency wouldn't give triple-a ... the sellers would go to a different rating agency that would give triple-a. testimony also included rating agency employees who had raised warnings that the dept. handling toxic CDOs were selling triple-A rating when they knew they weren't worth triple-A.

during the hearings, news commenters threw in references to the rating agencies will likely avoid any federal prosecution ... if for no other reason being able to blackmail the gov. with the threat of gov. rating downgrades.

there was a period when it started to dawn on investors that the rating agencies were selling triple-a (when the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A) and it might not be possible to trust any rating ... that was when the muni-bond market froze (since investors were worried that they couldn't trust any rating). this was when warren buffett stepped in and offered muni-bond insurance to unfreeze the market (you might not be able to trust any credit agency rating ... but you could buy bond insurance from buffett).

on the other hand, even if rating agencies didn't have opportunity to avoid federal prosecution ... it is unlike the ("captured") SEC would do anything. Sarbanes-Oxley had included a provision that SEC do something about the credit rating agencies ... in addition SEC doing something about public company fraudulent financial filings (rhetoric that top executives and auditors that signed financial filings with incorrect numbers would be guaranteed to do jail time). Even GAO apparently didn't believe SEC was doing anything and started doing reports of fraudulent public company financial filings ... even showing increase after SOX. SEC appears to have done as much about rating agencies as it did about fraudulent financial filings.

past posts mentioning muni-bond market froze-up when investors realized that the rating agencies were selling triple-A rating (when the rating agencies knew they weren't worth triple-A) and Buffett offerring muni-bond insurance
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009c.html#29 How to defeat new telemarketing tactic
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010f.html#81 The 2010 Census
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#44 S&P Downgrades USA; Time to Downgrade S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011l.html#69 computer bootlaces

past posts mentioning comments during the hearings that the rating agencies would be able to blackmail the gov and avoid federal prosecution
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2008p.html#8 Global Melt Down
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2009h.html#40 Analysing risk, especially credit risk in Banks, which was a major reason for the current crisis
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010p.html#69 Moody's hints at move that could be catastrophic for US debt
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#21 Ernst & Young called to account -- should Audit firms be investigated for their role in the crisis?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#40 Ernst & Young sued for fraud over Lehman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2010q.html#53 Programmer Charged with thieft (maybe off topic)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#46 What do you think about fraud prevention in the governments?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011.html#48 What do you think about fraud prevention in the governments?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#43 Massive Fraud, Common Crime, No Prosecutions
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011f.html#66 Bank email archives thrown open in financial crash report
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011g.html#55 Mobius Says Financial Crisis 'Around the Corner'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#38 Advice from Richard P. Feynman
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#44 S&P Downgrades USA; Time to Downgrade S&P?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2012g.html#71 Monopoly/ Cartons of Punch Cards
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#30 Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

cp67 & vm370

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: cp67 & vm370
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2013 23:46:36 -0400
I recently scan'ed cp67 operator's guide and now up
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cp67/

and vm370 script licensed material not sure about rules for getting up

I'm currently scanning cp67 & cms program logic manual. For some some reason I'm missing half dozen pages from the cp67 plm. hopefully the manuals will be up sometime soon.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 15 Jun 2013 10:37:02 -0400
greymausg <maus@mail.com> writes:
I think that the fearsome reputation that the Russian Army had aquired in Germand and later, Manchuria frightened the Japaanese as well.

claims were that 3/4ths of german military forces were tied up with russia ... and stalin put significant pressure on eisenhower to do d-day as early as possible to take some of the pressure off russia ... but russia still did 3/4ths of the fighting .... and that 2/3rds of japanese land forces had been tied up on mainland china ... as occupation forces (major difference between russian theater and china was russia was defending against an invading army ... while japanese had extensive forces on the mainland for some time as occupying army).

recent post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#60 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?

American Caesar: Douglas MacArthur 1880 - 1964
http://www.amazon.com/American-Caesar-Douglas-MacArthur-ebook/dp/B000SEP9OK

mentions loc8573-76
Later Yalta would bring out the worst in FDR's critics, but at the time it seemed that he and Churchill had won more concessions from Stalin than anyone had any right to expect. He secretly agreed to join the anti-Japanese coalition. In return, in the Far East the Soviet Union would be given certain privileges in Manchuria, the Kuril Islands, and northern Korea; and recognition of Outer Mongolia's autonomy. Except for the Kurils, the Russians were given nothing they couldn't have had for the taking.

... snip ...

"The Wars for Asia, 1911-1949"
http://www.amazon.com/Wars-Asia-1911-1949-ebook/dp/B0096R1NZ4/

talks about Japan had been in Manchuria for quite some time and turned it into major industrial producer ... massive amounts of investment and development in the area and became major industrial production. It then talks about Soviets coming in and totally stripping the country of everything of value ... and the area has still not returned to what it was under the Japanese. This has problem with the Chinese civil war was overflowing into Manchuria

loc208-12:
As the fighting moved northward in the 1920s toward the Japanese sphere of influence and focus of investments in Manchuria, Japanese leaders became increasingly concerned. In the 1930s army leaders and many other Japanese concluded that only direct military intervention could protect their national security. In other words, the long Chinese civil war precipitated a regional war between China and Japan so that by the time the conflict became global in 1941, the Chinese were fighting a civil war within a regional war within an overarching global war.

and loc219-23:
The conventional tale does not emphasize Russia's peculiar position among the Allies of World War II. Russia allied with Britain and the United States against Germany but maintained remarkably cordial relations with Japan until the last two weeks of the war, when it suddenly deployed 1.5 million men to Manchuria in its most ambitious campaign of the war. Most histories of World War II omit the Eurasian connection between the European and Pacific theaters to tell separate tales. Russians, however, saw clear connections.

... snip ...

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

cp67 & vm370

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: cp67 & vm370
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 15 Jun 2013 11:25:15 -0400
just uploaded scan of gy20-0590 cp67 program logic manual to bitsavers turns out my copy is missing:

Cover page
69-70
71-72
73-74
75-76
77-78
79-80
177-178
217-218

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minicomputer Pricing

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From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Minicomputer Pricing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sat, 15 Jun 2013 11:36:49 -0400
Jon Elson <jmelson@wustl.edu> writes:
So, IBM really knew how to make a computer CHEAP, and then sell it for an insane price!

somewhat correspond to comment about ibm management shutting down ACS-360 ... because it would advance computing too fast and they might loose control of the computer market ... features finally showing up in es/9000 more than 20yrs later
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

recent posts that during the FS period, politics was killing and/or suspending 370 development ... accounting for lack of new 370 products in the market, giving the 370 clone processors a market foothold. As a result, IBM marketing had to fall back on a lot of FUD, obfuscation and misdirection to compensate for lack of competitive products
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#44 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:

past posts mentioning future system
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

(other) recent posts mentioning shutting down ACS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#73 One reason for monocase was Re: Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#46 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#47 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#65 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#67 relative speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#19 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#22 Query for Destination z article -- mainframes back to the future
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#10 The Knowledge Economy Two Classes of Workers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#18 What in your opinion is the one defining IBM product?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#26 The Big, Bad Bit Stuffers of IBM
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#52 32760?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#1 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#10 SAS Deserting the MF?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#13 Is newer technology always better? It almost is. Exceptions?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 15 Jun 2013 12:22:11 -0700
lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler) writes:
In the transition from MVT to OS/VS2 (aka virtual memory), the same problem showed up. The original implementation involved putting a little bit of code to create 16mbyte virtual address space for MVT, but the major effort was hacking CCWTRANS (from CP67) into the side of EXCP processing (EXCP had the same problem with access methods creating channel programs in the application virtual address space ... as CP67 did with virtual machine channel programs). Old reference by somebody in POK that was in the middle of the transition to OS/VS2 and virtual memory ... includes reference that OS/VS2 release 2 (MVS) was on glide path to OS/VS2 release 3 (FS)

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#44 Why does IBM keep saying things like this
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#45 Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#47 Storage paradigm [was: RE: Data volumes]

just finished scanning my copy of cp67 PLM (although it was missing a couple pages) ... and uploading to bitsavers ... it should be showing up shortly in
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cp67

CP67 CCWTRANS (which was hacked into EXCP to perform the channel program virtual->real translation for OS/VS2) is described starting on page "35" (physical page "45" in the PDF file).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 16 Jun 2013 11:17:40 -0400
Walter Bushell <proto@panix.com> writes:
Perhaps its more like we supported the French in keeping Indochina. In both cases we gave up a large number of people to be exploited by their colonial masters.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#60 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#62 OT: "Highway Patrol" back on TV

another theme is that the objective of MICC is Perpetual Wars and "Continuous Conflict" in support of ever increasing quarterly profits. TV national affairs jus now mentioned Kennedy grew to distrust the advice of the MICC since their business is wars (trying to pull the world back from the brink after bay of pigs).

some number of accounts describe special forces on the way to winning in indochina with program of village pacification ... and then westmoreland comes in with conflict paradigm ... village pacification had significantly reduced conflict and little or no military actions ... there was no use for large scale military operations and therefor contributing nothing to MICC bottom line.

reference before ... marines small wars manual
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Wars_Manual

based on their experience dealing with small scale conflicts was written about the same time (and based on same experience) as "War Is A Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

characterizing same events done in support of MICC and wallstreet. "War Is A Racket" wiki references Perpetual war:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_war

above references some number of Boyd acolytes. I recently did web-page for Boyd's bibliography from Patterns Of Conflict, the inventory of the books in his library (now at Marine Corps Library at Quantico) and the recommended reading list from last year's Boyd conference:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

some recent posts mentioning perpetual wars
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#26 Cultural attitudes towards failure
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#57 How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#16 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#28 A Matter of Mindset: Iraq, Sequestration and the U.S. Army
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#54 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#5 Lessons Learned from the Iraq War
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#16 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#32 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#38 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#43 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#60 As an IBM'er just like the Marines only a few good men and women make the cut,
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#74 What Makes collecting sales taxes Bizarre?

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

cp67 & vm370

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: cp67 & vm370
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Sun, 16 Jun 2013 11:57:33 -0400
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#69 cp67 & vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#71 cp67 & vm370

just upload scan of gy20-0591 cms program logic manual to bitsavers ... should have all pages except for a large fold-out (about 20"x20") that occurs just before the index.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

DataPower XML Appliance and RACF

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: DataPower XML Appliance and RACF
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 16 Jun 2013 21:28:24 -0700
shmuel+gen@PATRIOT.NET (Shmuel Metz , Seymour J.) writes:
Yes, IBM used to give schools deep discounts without requiring that the systems be used only for classwork.

education/univ discounts and programs were significantly cut back with the legal actions and the unbundling announced 23jun1969. misc. posts mentioning unbundling
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#unbundle

in 60s, lots of univ. got very attractive terms for 360/67 ... basically 360/65 with virtual memory hardware ... supposedly for running tss/360. tss/360 never quite made it and lots of univ. ran it as 360/65 with os/360. however, other univ. wrote their own virtual memory operating systems ... UofMICH wrote MTS, Stanford did orvyl (also wylbur later ported to os/360), and of course the science center did (virtual machine) cp67 ... misc. past posts mentioning science center
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech
Michigan MTS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan_Terminal_System
Stanford ORVYL WYLBUR
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ORVYL_and_WYLBUR

things started up again with formation of ACIS in the early 80s ... ACIS started out with $300m fund for univ. programs; project athena at mit got $25m (joint with dec that also provided $25m; kerberos, x-windows, etc), cmu got $50m (mach, camelot, andrew file system, etc), support for ucb, ucla ... lots of others. When they used up the $300m, acis got more. part of acis discussed here:
https://calico.org/memberBrowse.php?action=article&id=396

turns out others were able to leverage a lot of the benefit ... for instance cmu mach was used by a lots of platforms as a unix work-alike. it was also used by jobs for NeXT ... and became basis of apple's operating system when he returned in the 90s.

kerberos became major authentication mechanism for windows and various other platforms.

athena
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Athena
kerberos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerberos_%28protocol%29
mach
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mach_%28kernel%29

acis was going to do mainframe version of usb BSD ... but got redirected to port for pc/rt instead ... which became aos

acis took ucla's locus (another unix work-alike) that supported distributed filesystem (including partial filesystem caching) and transparent process migration (in distributed environment) ... in some cases between machines with different architecture. this was released as aix/386 and aix/370 (for both ps2 and mainframe). ucla locus
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LOCUS_%28operating_system%29

it also provided significant support for univ. bitnet (and earn in europe) using vm370 networking support similar to that used for the internal network. bitnet (this mailing list originated on bitnet)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BITNET

a lot of that dried up when the company was going into the red in the early 90s ... the company had been re-organized into 13 "baby blues" in preparation for being break up (the board then brought in new executive to resurrect the company) ... reference to 28Dec1992 "how ibm was left behind" and the reorg to 13 "baby blues"
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

and as part of going into the red, re-org for pending breakup ... all the science centers were also shutdown 31jul1992.

early to mid-80s, we were working with NSF on interconnect for the NSF supercomputer centers ... and lots of ACIS people kept trying to be involved. We were to get $20M from NSF ... then congress cuts the budget ... several other things happen ... and finally NSF releases an RFP. Internal politics prevents us from bidding ... the director of NSF tries to help by writing letter to the company copying the CEO ... but that just makes the internal politics worse (as does comments that what we already had running was at least five years ahead of all RFP responses). reference to early nsfnet backbone
http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/401444/grid-computing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today

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From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today
Date: 17 June 2013
Blog: IBMers
IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today; Summary: Unfortunately for Big Blue and its employees, this just marks yet another round of layoffs -- one of several in the last few years.
http://www.zdnet.com/report-ibm-going-ahead-with-more-u-s-job-cuts-today-7000016758/

IBM Said to Start U.S. Job Cuts Today Amid Global Reduction
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-06-12/ibm-said-to-start-u-s-jobs-cuts-amid-1-billion-restructuring.html

from above:
Bloomberg cited analyst forecasts that the Armonk, N.Y.-headquartered corporation will be laying off anywhere between 6,000 and 8,000 employees worldwide -- close to two percent of its total workforce.

... snip ...

how do they calculate $1B savings objective ... aka per year and by head count ... say $200k/head ... need to dump 5,000 ... if its only $100k/head ... need to dump 10,000 ... the 6k to 8k estimate by bloomberg than put it between $125k/head and $167k/head to get $1B savings for dumping 6k-8k.

private equity paradigm is mostly about cutting costs to quickly meet profit objectives and drive share price and get out (top executives go along since big bonuses are tied to the share price ... and they hope to be gone before any repercussions).

there was a big transition in the corporate objectives after it went into the red in the early 90s and then new executive brought in to "resurrect" the company (it had already been re-organized into the baby blues in preparation of the breakup).

The new executive had been at AMEX in competition to be the next CEO (the loosing candidate leaves ... eventually acquiring some number of companies and eventually Citicorp and originating too-big-to-fail). AMEX was in competition with KKR for public equity take-over of RJR; KKR wins but runs into trouble and hires the executive to turn around RJR; then the IBM board hires him away to resurrect IBM (he later leaves to become head of major private equity company).

These discusses it in some detail:

The Buyout of America: How Private Equity Will Cause the Next Great Credit Crisis
http://www.amazon.com/Buyout-America-Destroying-American-ebook/dp/B002SV37FO/
& Who Stole the American Dream?
http://www.amazon.com/Who-Stole-American-Dream-ebook/dp/B007MEWAX2

"Who Stole the American Dream?" includes some number of quotes from long time former head of research and IBM VP.

disclaimer: I did stint at first data ... mentioned here (although it got some of the details of early life at ibm garbled):
http://www.ibmsystemsmag.com/mainframe/stoprun/Stop-Run/Making-History/

In 1992, AMEX spins off large part of its dataprocessing as First Data ... claimed to be the largest IPO up until that time. Late 90s, First Data merges with First Financial (first financial includes Western Union). 2005, Western Union represents half of First Data revenue and is spun off in IPO (massive increase in WU revenue during the last decade with all the foreign workers sending earnings home). All of corporate is then lop'ed off and First Data taken private in (private equity) reverse-IPO by KKR (largest reverse-IPO up until that time, 15 yrs after having AMEX spun it off in the largest IPO up until that time).

The 28Dec1992 Time magazine article (behind paywall but lives frees at wayback machine) about the fall of ibm "How IBM Was Left Behind" ... includes discussion of the re-organization into the 13 "baby blues" in preparation for breaking up the company
http://web.archive.org/web/20101120231857/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,977353,00.html

There is also the book about teaching an elephant to dance and "Strategic Intuition" where the author looks at Microsoft, Apple, Google, and the resurrection of IBM.
http://www.amazon.com/Strategic-Intuition-Creative-Achievement-Publishing-ebook/dp/B0097D773O/

Related to IBM being left behind ... in the late 80s, a senior disk engineer got a talk scheduled at annual, world-wide, internal communication group conference ... and opened with the statement that the communication group was going to be responsible for the demise of the disk division. The issue was that the communication group had strategic ownership for everything that crossed the datacenter walls (stranglehold on the datacenter) and was protecting its dumb terminal (emulation) install base, fiercely fighting off client/server and distributed computing (including all sort of FUD, obfuscation and misdirection). The disk division was seeing the effects with drop in disk sales as data was fleeing the datacenter to more distributed computing friendly platforms. The disk division had come up with a number of solutions to correct the situation, but they were constantly being vetoed by the communication group.

It was also in this period that top management was predicting that world-wide income would double ... based mostly on mainframe sales (even when it was heading in the opposite direction). There was massive internal building program to double mainframe manufacturing capacity ... and a whole lot of "fast track" MBAs ... apparently part of doubling top executive numbers

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM commitment to academia

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From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: IBM commitment to academia
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 17 Jun 2013 07:42:30 -0700
jwglists@GMAIL.COM (John Gilmore) writes:
We are in a situation much like that of the atomic-energy industry some years ago. The original Hanford, Washington, gaseous-diffusion facility for the separation of uranium isotopes was designed by Enrico Fermi, slide rule in hand. It then came uinder the control of AEC civil servants; and when decades later it was shut down, after polluting large tracts of the state of Washington all but irretrievably, there was no professional physicist on its staff.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#77 IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today

there has been a lot written about Admiral Rickover's exacting standards for nuclear plants not only for naval vessels but also land-based commercial nuclear power plants ... and that standards became more relaxed after Rickover.

one of my favorites is Col. John Boyd ... who I knew and I sponsored his briefings at IBM. He wrote jet fighter pilot training manual that came to be used by nearly country in the world. He significantly improved the design of the F15 & F18 and responsible for the design of the precursor to F16 (although lots of comments about design was significantly downgraded in becoming F16). I also credit him having big hand in F20/tigershark He is credited with the battle plan for Desert Storm in the early 90s and there have been comments that one of the problems with the conflicts the last decade was that Boyd passed in 1997. One could make a case that many of the F35/JSF problems could also be attributed to Boyd no longer being here. Lots of Boyd posts & references
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subboyd.html

for a little mainframe ... Boyd biographies mention him doing tour in command of "Spook Base" ... including reference to it being a $2.5B windfall for IBM (possibly $18+B in today's dollars) ... spook base reference ... gone 404 but lives on at wayback machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20030212092342/http://home.att.net/~c.jeppeson/igloo_white.html

Hugh Laurie (actor in TV "House") even references Boyd in "Gun Seller" fiction ... quote in this recent (open linkedin "Old Geek") discussion "Is newer technology always better?" ... also archived here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#41

as an aside, Boyd wasn't authorized to do the design for what became the F16 ... and MICC felt threaten by his activities and tried to get the Air Force to sentence him to life in Leavenworth for "stealing" millions of dollars in gov. property (i.e. the unauthorized use of supercomputer time for the F16 design) ... fortunately he had carefully covered his tracks and they couldn't find evidence of his use (somewhat analogous to part of Laurie's theme in "Gun Seller").

The issue of IBM short-term/long-term recently came up in this (closed linkedin) IBMers discussion: "IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today". part of my contribution archived here
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#77

for even more drift ... past couple months there has been lots of divers doing repair work on the seawall on the perimeter of the naval academy ... workers say that the concrete has significant erosion. Its only something like 30yrs old ... this compares to sea structures made from Roman concrete that has survived for 2000yrs "Ancient Roman Concrete Is About to Revolutionize Modern Architecture"
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-14/ancient-roman-concrete-is-about-to-revolutionize-modern-architecture

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Why does IBM keep saying things like this:

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 17 Jun 2013 08:03:18 -0700
donbwms@GMAIL.COM (Don Williams) writes:
It does not actually matter whether their systems are "open" or not; just different from IBM. Yes, the total cost is less expensive, because they are smaller. Yes, the cost per transaction is higher. However, the cost per transaction may be out weighted by other factors. Regardless, they'll work hard on making it cheaper per transaction. Will they succeed? May be, maybe not; but I think they have a good shot it. What I'm really saying is that there is more than one way to get great results. IBM is not guaranteed to be the market leader. IBM will have to fight to keep the lead and it will not be an easy battle. Of course, IBM will fight for it.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#39 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#44 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:

there are lots of industry standard benchmarks ... which require published results of transactions per time as well as total cost per transaction (and for DBMS, they have to demonstrate conformance with ACID properties). long ago and far away, there were mainframe results for these benchmarks ... but not for a long time. it isn't a vendor issue since ibm does do these benchmarks for the other platforms it sells.

example
http://www.tpc.org/

tpcc (both transaction performance and price/transaction)
http://www.tpc.org/tpcc/results/tpcc_perf_results.asp

a handle on part of mainframe total cost of ownership is IBM's mainframe revenue ... on the avg. IBM's mainframe division earns total of $6.25 for every dollar revenue from processor ... aka a customer paying $28M for a 80-processor max configured z196 ... would avg. total payments to IBM of $175M (which is just the start for running mainframe datacenter).

80-processor max configured z196 is rated at 50BIPS ($175M/50 - $3.5M/BIPS). IBM's peak I/O benchmark for z196 is 2M IOPS using 104 FICON channels ... with 14 system assist processors. Peak SAPs is 2.2M SSCH/sec running all 14 at 100% busy, but recommendation is keep SAPs to 70% or less (1.5M SSCH/sec). IBM base list price for e5-2600 blade is $1815 and e5-2600 have ratings of 527BIPS or $3.44/BIPS (factor of million times less than z196). Recent FCS (FICON is heavyweight protocol layer on top of FCS that drastically cuts the native throughput) for e5-2600 claims over million IOPS (i.e. two such FCS would have higher throughput than 104 FICON)

disclaimer: I worked with Jim Gray at IBM before he left for Tandem ... and his work to create tpc:
http://www.tpc.org/information/who/gray.asp

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minicomputer Pricing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Minicomputer Pricing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2013 12:28:03 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Yet that I/O architecture to this day inhibits a mainframes ability to effectively use a modem for async communications. Especially for full-duplex.

I'm not sure what mainframes are using for TCP/IP but they seem to handle that better.


channel programs for lots of flexibility with common architecture ... however it had all sorts of latency and serialized end-to-end throughput issues.

1980, I got con'ed into writing support for channel extender. IBM Santa Teresa Lab (now renamed silicon valley lab) was bursting at the seams and they were relocating 300 people from the IMS database group to offsite building. They had tried remote 3270 and found it totally unacceptable. One of the things for the channel extender was download the complete channel program to the remote site and execute it there ... and eliminate a whole lot of channel protocol handshaking. The remote site saw no difference in response (compared to local channel attached 3270s in the bldg) ... and the channel program offloading actually improved throughput of the datacenter mainframe by 10-15%.

the vendor attempted to get my software released ... but a group in POK that was playing with some fiber-optic stuff got it squashed ... they were afraid that it might interfer with their eventually getting their fiber-optic stuff out.

It turns out that when they did get it out ... it was a decade later in 1990 with es/9000 as ESCON ... i've mentioned that it was already obsolete ... getting only 17mbytes/sec throughput.

In 1988, I was asked to help LLNL standardize some serial stuff they had ... this comes out as fibre-channel standard ... with gigabit/sec concurrent throughput in both directions (full-duplex) ... and support for I/O programs downloaded to remote-end. Then some mainframe channel engineers get involved in FCS and define the FICON heavy weight protocol layer on top of FCS ... that simulates the legacy channel protocol chatter ... and drastically cuts the throughput of native FCS.

Recent peak I/O benchmark for z196 used 104 FICON to get 2M IOPS. This compares to recently announced (native) FCS for e5-2600 claiming over million IOPS (two such FCS would have higher throughput than the peak z196 I/O benchmark using 104 FICON ... layered on top of 104 native FCS).

The mainframe TCP/IP product was implemented in vs/pascal and (for various reasons) got 44kbytes/sec throughput using 3090 processor. I did the enhancements for RFC1044 and in some performance tests at Cray Research got sustained channel throughput between Cray and 4341 using only modest amount of 4341 processor (possibly 500 times improvement in bytes moved per instruction executed). past posts mentioning 1044 support
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#1044

recent posts mentioning FICON
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#10 From build to buy: American Airlines changes modernization course midflight
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#40 Searching for storage (DASD) alternatives
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013.html#77 OT: but hopefully interesting - Million core supercomputer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#6 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#7 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#8 mainframe "selling" points
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013b.html#55 Dualcase vs monocase. Was: Article for the boss
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#62 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#63 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#67 relative speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#68 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#77 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013c.html#84 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#12 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#16 relative mainframe speeds, was What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013d.html#45 What Makes an Architecture Bizarre?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013e.html#4 Oracle To IBM: Your 'Customers Are Being Wildly Overcharged'
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#38 Reports: IBM may sell x86 server business to Lenovo
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#57 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#70 How internet can evolve
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013f.html#73 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#2 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#4 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#14 Tech Time Warp of the Week: The 50-Pound Portable PC, 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#23 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#49 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#85 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#42 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#79 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minicomputer Pricing

Refed: **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Minicomputer Pricing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2013 13:36:04 -0400
Dan Espen <despen@verizon.net> writes:
Yet that I/O architecture to this day inhibits a mainframes ability to effectively use a modem for async communications. Especially for full-duplex.

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#80 Minicomputer Pricing

note that mainframe channel architecture was done in such a way that it could be done "integrated" ... sharing the same processor that implemented 360/370 instructions. in some cases you even find the option for controllers being integrated ... i.e. 370/145 had integrated channels and you had the option of integrated 2341 disk controller (all microcode sharing the same processor that ran 370 indstructions).

Boeblingen got their hands slapped for doing the 370/115 & 370/125. base design was 9position shared memory bus with up to 9 microprocessor. in the 370/115 case ... all the microprocessors were the same ... just added microprocessors dedicated for different purposes with different microcode loads ... m'processor that implemented 370 instructions and additional (same) m'processors that implemented controller functions. The 370/125 was same except the processor used for 370 ... the standard m'processor gave 80kips (ran avg 10 native instructions for every 370), the m'processor for 125 got 100kips (at 10:1 was around 1mip native).

I got sucked into doing architecture and design of putting five 370 m'processors on the bus as 5-way multiprocessor implementation

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Vintage IBM Manuals

From: lynn@GARLIC.COM (Anne & Lynn Wheeler)
Subject: Re: Vintage IBM Manuals
Newsgroups: bit.listserv.ibm-main
Date: 17 Jun 2013 12:42:55 -0700
starsoul@MINDSPRING.COM (Lizette Koehler) writes:

http://tk3.limewebs.com/Vintage_Manuals.html


bitsavers has lots of manuals (and software) with some mirrors around the world
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/

360
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360

and 370
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/370

also share
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/share/

I had scan'ed and uploaded (share) lsrad report ... this last weekend I uploaded several more old documents which should be appearing in various directories soon.

bitsavers also does software
http://bitsavers.org/

for the fun of it, what's new
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/Whatsnew.txt

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minicomputer Pricing

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Minicomputer Pricing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2013 16:40:59 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
What was the objection to this?

re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#80 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#81 Minicomputer Pricing

too modern a design ... much more advanced than other 370s ... even if it was only low-end ... possibly along the lines of shutting down acs360 ... not want to advance technology too fast.
http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/acs_end.html

the 9-position memory bus and modular design gave it a great deal of flexibility (large commonality between 115 & 125 implementation as well as roping me into working on 5-way smp design).

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Minicomputer Pricing

From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: Minicomputer Pricing
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2013 17:38:14 -0400
hancock4 writes:
Haven't S/360 mainframes always used a separate communications controller? Didn't that separate box worried about physicla stuff like sync or async, polling, etc.?

As I understand it, sync communication was superior due to better speeds--no more start/stop bits; plus better error correction, and better control.


re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#80 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#81 Minicomputer Pricing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#83 Minicomputer Pricing

cp67 came with 2741 & 1052 terminal support ... univerisity had 2702 telecommunications controller ... there was programmable selected line-scanner that could be specified/selected with the "SAD" ccw that handled the specific terminal type. standard os/360 software would set the association between type of line-scanner at startup ... but cp67 did dynamic terminal type identification switching the line-scanner dynamically.

univ. had some ascii/tty terminals ... and so I added tty support to cp67 ... and did it such a way that could dynamically differentiate between tty, 2741, & 1052. It worked ok for leased lines ... but I also wanted a single dial-in line for common pool of ports for all terminals ... which didn't quite work. While SAD CCW allowed dynamically switching device-type line-scanner between ports ... they had took short-cut in 2702 and hard-wired the line-speed oscillator for each port. general dynamic worked for 2741&1052 because they had same line-speed.

this was factor in motivating the university to start a clone controller project ... reversed engineered the 360/67 channel interface and built a channel interface board for an Interdata/3 programmed to emulate 2702 ... but adding support for dynamic line-speed identification (for both dynamic terminal type and dynamic line-speed identification). Four of us get written up as responsible for (some part of) clone controller business. some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#360pcm

Later it evolved into an Interdata/4 handling the mainframe channel interface with cluster of multiple Interdata/3s handling port interfaces. Interdata would replicate the channel interface board and marketed it as clone controller. This continued after Interdata was acquired under the Perkin-Elmer logo. I ran into one of the boxes a little over a decade ago in large east coast datacenter ... handling majority of dial-up point-of-sale credit card terminal traffic.

I've run into former Perkin-Elmer marketing person who said that he sold a lot of the boxes in fed. gov. market during the 80s.

cp/67 buffer overflow story (lots of code I did as undergraduate at the univ. got picked up by the science center and shipped in cp67)
http://www.multicians.org/thvv/360-67.html

In the TTY support, I had a hack with calculating line-lengths using one byte numbers. Above story has Tom changing a table so that TTY max line length was 1200(?) (I think for a tty/ascii plotter device down at harvard) ... which blew the line-length one-byte calculations.

An early "bug" in the interdata/3 testing was finding total garbage arriving in mainframe memory. It turns out that IBM controller line-scanner convention was leading bit arriving was placed in low-order bit position in byte ... so bits within byte were inverted (and reverse outgoing). IBM terminal "translate" tables were built to handle the inversion. interdata/3 implementation started with bits in conventional order (rather than inverted) ... had to do a quick hack to correspond to ibm controller convention.

One of the Future System sources claim that the major motivation for FS was countermeasure to clone controllers and major objective was to have very high level of intergration between processor and controller ... significantly raising the bar for clone controllers. After FS failure, indications are that the FS objective lived on in the SNA architecture for the PU5/PU4 (vtam/ncp) interface. misc. past posts mentioning FS
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation
Date: 17 June 2013
Blog: z/VM
re:
http://lnkd.in/kqjVZV
also archived:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#54 Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation (Cambridge skunkworks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011i.html#63 Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation (Cambridge skunkworks)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011j.html#1 Before the PC: IBM invents virtualisation

going through some boxes in storage, I found some old papers and manuals

I scanned vm370 script manual (ly20-0762), cp67 operator's guide (gh20-0856), cp67 program logic manual (gy20-0590), and cms program logic manual (gy20-0591) ... and uploaded to bitsavers. they should be appearing in the respective vm370 & cp67 directories
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/360/cp67
and
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/370/VM_370/

I had previously scanned and uploaded SHARE lsrad report (from 1979) found in
http://bitsavers.org/pdf/ibm/share/

I also found a share presentation "Why VM370" from May 13, 1975 ... hopefully I can get it onto bitsavers also (either in the vm370 directory or the share directory).

Note that a lot of things were simplified in the transition from cp67 to vm370.

some old email about moving from cp67 to vm370
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006v.html#email731212
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750102
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#email750430

one of my hobbies was producing production systems for internal datacenters. I kid the people on 5th flr of 545 tech sq doing multics (science center was on 4th flr) that at one point I had more csc/vm installations than there total number of installations that ever ran multics. some past posts mentioning 545 tech sq.
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#545tech

This was in the tail-end of the Future System period ... which was going to completely be incompatible and replace 370 (internal politics had 370 efforts being suspended and/or killed off). The lack of 370 products during the period is claimed to be the reason that the clone processors were able to gain a market foothold (and IBM developing their FUD skills as compensation for not having competitive products).

With failure of the Future System effort ... some past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/submain.html#futuresys

There was mad rush to get products back into the 370 pipeline. This contributed to decision to release a lot of stuff from csc/vm; first some bits of pieces in VM370 Release 3 ... and then other pieces as part of the separate Release Manager addon to VM370 Release 3. Some discussion in this old post
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2006w.html#8

The failure of FS also kicked off 303x (3031 - 158 with new covers, 3032 - 168 with new covers, and 3033 - 168 logic mapped to 20% faster chips) in parallel with 370-xa and 3081. The corporate favorite son operating system in POK also convinced the corporation to kill off vm370, shutdown the burlington mall development group and move all the people to POK to work on MVS/XA (or otherwise they wouldn't be able to make the MVS/XA ship schedule).

Endicott eventually managed to save the vm370 product mission, but had to reconstitute a development group from scratch ... which had steep learning curve (there are some number of comments in the vmshare archive about code quality during this period).
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

By Any Other Name

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **
From: Anne & Lynn Wheeler <lynn@garlic.com>
Subject: Re: By Any Other Name
Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2013 11:01:19 -0400
Peter Flass <Peter_Flass@Yahoo.com> writes:
It would be nice to see. They have a couple of IBM references on microcode (which I don't have ready to hand). My understanding was that each machine had a unique microinstruction set - seemed wasteful until I happened to think that the actual bare metal was so different on most machines that the microcode would have little commonality.

I would suspect that machines with microinstruction size 32 bits or less would be vertical microcode and the longer instructions would be horizontal.


i.e. that was the justification behind the "Fort Knox" and other programs around 79/80 to migrate the vast number of internal microprocessors (low/mid range 370s, controllers, followon to s/38) to 801/risc (mostly Iliad chips). For various reasons all the programs floundered and most programs returned to traditional CISC chips (and you find some number of the 801/risc engineers leaving and showing up at risc efforts at other vendors).

One of these programs would have used 801/risc for the followon to the 4341, ... I contributed to white paper that justified doing a CISC (rather than RISC) for the 4381. The 801/risc scenario for 370 was that everything was still implemented all in microcode ... the white paper showed that CISC chip technology was advancing to the point that a significant amount of 370 instructions could be directly implemented in hardware ... gaining a significant performance advantage (rather than loosing the 10:1 factor doing emulation). The Iliad 801/risc chips would still have had all 370 done in (801/risc) programming.

misc. past posts mentioning 801, risc, iliad, fort knox, romp, rios, power, etc
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#801
and some old email
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/lhwemail.html#801

the difficulty/cost of programming horizontal microcode contributed to switching from horizontal microcode for the 3830 disk controller (3330, 3340, 3350 disks) to vertical microcode for the 3880 disk controller (3380). The issue was that the 3880 disk controller was going to have significant more function than 3830. However, the cisc chip chosen for the 3880 was a really inexpensive and slow Jib-prime. Except for a special hardware data transfer path added for 3mbyte/sec transfer, all the control functions took significantly longer time on 3880 than 3830 (low level engineers in the division was predicting this all along).

legacy mainframe channel paradigm is serialized half-duplex ... during which time the channel is "busy". POK 3090 product had assumed that the 3880 channel-busy overhead was going to be capareable to the 3830 ... however, when they discovered that 3880 channel busy overhead was significantly larger ... they realized that they would have to significantly increase the number of 3090 channels in order to achieve aggregate system throughput objectives. The additional channels required an additional TCM (which was not an insignificant cost) and there were statements about charging off the increased 3090 manufacturing costs against the 3880 controller group. IBM Marketing then respins the massive number of 3090 channels as a benefit (rather than compensation for the really large channel busy overhead for 3880 operations). some past posts getting to play disk engineer in bldgs. 14&15
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subtopic.html#disk

I've pontificated that this legacy channel paradigm lingers on in the enormous overhead for mainframe FICON (layer built on industry standard that enormously cuts the throughput compared to the underlying native FCS). recent mention of FICON:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#2 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#4 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#14 Tech Time Warp of the Week: The 50-Pound Portable PC, 1977
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#23 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#49 A Complete History Of Mainframe Computing
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013g.html#85 Old data storage or data base
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#3 The cloud is killing traditional hardware and software
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#40 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#42 The Mainframe is "Alive and Kicking"
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#79 Why does IBM keep saying things like this:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#80 Minicomputer Pricing

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **
From: lynn@garlic.com
Subject: IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today
Date: 18 June 2013
Blog: IBMers
re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#77 IBM going ahead with more U.S. job cuts today

as referenced in this article ... I do a lot of pontificating about historical items including leading up to how we got where we are
http://www.ibmsystemsmag.com/mainframe/stoprun/Stop-Run/Making-History/

The top executives predicting that mainframe revenue was going to double in the late 80s (along with massive building program to double mainframe manufacturing and the huge number of fast-track MBAs) ... when the mainframe business was heading in the other direction ... and ignoring fundamental structural issues (including communication group's stranglehold on datacenters) contributing to the company going into the red a few years later (i.e. in the mid-80s there was still time to adapt to the changes rather than blindly pretending that they were going to remain the same).

In other foras ... there would be reference about those that don't study history are doomed to repeat it.

More recent in ibm-main mailing list
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2013h.html#78

references that I knew John Boyd and sponsored his briefings at IBM. This is recent reference in one of the Boyd groups:

I periodically reference marines small wars manual
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Wars_Manual
based on their experience dealing with small scale conflicts was written about the same time (and based on same experience) as "War Is A Racket"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket
characterizing same events done in support of MICC and wallstreet. "War Is A Racket" wiki references Perpetual war:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_war
above references some number of Boyd acolytes.

The Perpetual War includes reference to the role that one of the large private equity companies has played. The executive that was brought in to resurrect IBM in the early 90s ... after he left became, head of that private equity company

some historical contrasts ... 1990, the commandant of the marine corp leverages Boyd for a make-over of the corp (Boyd had been disowned by the air force, and after his passing, his effects went to marine corp library at quantico ... not to the air force; it was also the marines that were out in force at Arlington cemetery).

about that time, I would periodically drop by somers and wander around the halls. I could have detailed discussions with different people about the situation and what would be necessary to change. I would go back a couple months and nothing had changed. I've periodically characterized the situation as senior people trying to maintain the status quo until their retirement ... and have the corrections take place after they left (their 30-40 yrs of experience might be less valued after any major change).

It hadn't been exactly career enhancing to be showing that not only wasn't mainframe doubling ... but actually declining. In my executive exit interview ... the executive made the statement that they could have forgiven me for being wrong, but they were never going to forgive me for being right

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970




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